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Metformin And Hdl Cholesterol

Differential Response In Levels Of High-density Lipoprotein Cholesterol To One-year Metformin Treatment In Prediabetic Patients By Race/ethnicity

Differential Response In Levels Of High-density Lipoprotein Cholesterol To One-year Metformin Treatment In Prediabetic Patients By Race/ethnicity

Differential response in levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol to one-year metformin treatment in prediabetic patients by race/ethnicity Center for Molecular Medicine and Genetics, School of Medicine, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 USA Cardiovascular Research Institute, School of Medicine, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI USA Division of Geriatric and Palliative Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI USA Department of Physics, Tianjin University, Tianjin, China Center for Molecular Medicine and Genetics, School of Medicine, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 USA Cardiovascular Research Institute, School of Medicine, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI USA Ren Zhang, Phone: 313-577-0027, Email: [email protected] . Received 2015 Apr 22; Accepted 2015 Jun 3. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License ( ), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver ( ) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. As a first-line diabetes drug that is widely prescribed around the world, metformin has been demonstrated to be effective in reducing microvascular risk, in addition to lowering glucose levels. Specifically, metformin use has been shown to be associated with improved lipid profiles, such as increased levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). However, no study has been performed to examine the differential response in HDL-C levels to metformin treatment by race/ethnicity. Here, based on a re-analysis of the data from the Diabetes Continue reading >>

Sulfonylureas Increasing Lipids For Type 2 Diabetes Patients?

Sulfonylureas Increasing Lipids For Type 2 Diabetes Patients?

Home / Conditions / Type 2 Diabetes / Sulfonylureas Increasing Lipids for Type 2 Diabetes Patients? Sulfonylureas Increasing Lipids for Type 2 Diabetes Patients? In the study, sulfonylureas correlated with a significant increase in levels of free fatty acids. According to a meta-analysis published in the Journal of Evidence-Based Medicine, It is known that sulfonylureas may increase levels of triglycerides, free fatty acids, and lower HDL and LDL. Yue-hong Chen and her colleagues from Sichuan University in China conducted a literature review to examine sulfonylureas on lipid levels in type 2 diabetes patients. The data was included from 52 randomized controlled trials. The results indicated that sulfonylureas correlated with a significant increase in free fatty acids (standardized mean difference=0.24) and triglycerides (MD=0.06), and correlated with decreases in HDL and LDL cholesterol (MD=0.07 and 0.11, respectively). Also, the sulfonylureas had no effect on apolipoprotein AL, apolipoprotein B, and total cholesterol (MD=0.01, -0.01, 0.01). Compared to metformin, sulfonylureas increased total cholesterol and LDL. However, compared with glinides, sulfonylureas lowered HDL, LDL, and triglycerides. The researchers concluded that sulfonylureas have a small effect on lipids although they may statistically increase the level of free fatty acids and triglycerides, and decrease LDL and HDL cholesterol. Compared to other antidiabetic medications, sulfonylureas increased total cholesterol, LDL, triglycerides, and lowered HDL. From the study, the results showed that sulfonylureas correlated with a significant increase in levels of free fatty acids. Sulfonylureas may affect patients with type 2 diabetes who have hyperlipidemia. Chen, Yue-hong. Sulfonylureas May Affect Lipids in T Continue reading >>

Total Cholesterol, High Density Lipoprotein And Triglyceride For Cardiovascular Disease In Elderly Patients Treated With Metformin.

Total Cholesterol, High Density Lipoprotein And Triglyceride For Cardiovascular Disease In Elderly Patients Treated With Metformin.

Generate a file for use with external citation management software. Arch Pharm Res. 2011 Jan;34(1):99-107. doi: 10.1007/s12272-011-0112-5. Epub 2011 Apr 6. Total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein and triglyceride for cardiovascular disease in elderly patients treated with metformin. Department of Pharmacy, Gangneung Asan Hospital, Gangneung, Korea. [email protected] Metformin reduces total cholesterol level, low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) level, blood glucose level and increases high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) level associated with cardiovascular disease. We evaluated effect of metformin on lipid profile in Korean patients with type 2 diabetes aged 64 years or older. We retrospectively examined 307 outpatients treated with metformin in a hospital setting with a follow-up period of 4.7 years. Metformin was not associated with the improvement in total cholesterol level (adjusted mean difference; 30.6 mg/dl, 95% CI: 24.9 to 36.4) and HDL-C level (adjusted mean difference; 2.6 mg/dl, 95% CI: 0.09 to 4.64) but may be associated with improvement in triglyceride level (adjusted mean difference; 41.5 mg/dl, 95% CI: 24.7 to 58.3). In comparison to the placebo groups (Kooy et al., 2009), there was a 1.5-fold decrease in triglyceride level and a 2-fold decrease in HDL-C level in our study. The frequency of Scr level that increased above the defined level [Scr 1.5 mg/dl for male, 1.4 mg/dl for female] was 6.7% [mean difference of elevated Scr: -0.9 mg/dl, 95% CI: -0.41 to -1.44, p < 0.002]. To confirm the efficacy of metformin use on triglyceride level and HDL-C level associated with the risk of cardiovascular disease in patient with diabetes, further placebo-controlled investigations are required. Continue reading >>

Metformin And Aspirin Treatment Could Lead To An Improved Survival Rate For Type 2 Diabetic Patients With Stage Ii And Iii Colorectal Adenocarcinoma Relative To Non-diabetic Patients

Metformin And Aspirin Treatment Could Lead To An Improved Survival Rate For Type 2 Diabetic Patients With Stage Ii And Iii Colorectal Adenocarcinoma Relative To Non-diabetic Patients

Metformin and aspirin treatment could lead to an improved survival rate for Type 2 diabetic patients with stage II and III colorectal adenocarcinoma relative to non-diabetic patients Affiliations: Unit of Medical Clinic, University Hospital of Cattinara-ASUITS, I34149 Trieste, Italy, Department of Medical Sciences, University of Trieste, Cattinara Hospital, I34149 Trieste, Italy, Oncology Unit, University Hospital of Cattinara-ASUITS, I34149 Trieste, Italy Published online on: January 11, 2018 Metrics: HTML 0 views | PDF 0 views Cited By (CrossRef): 0 citations Metformin, the drug of choice in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2), in addition to aspirin (ASA), the drug prescribed for cardioprotection of diabetic and nondiabetic patients, have an inhibitory effect on cancer cell survival. The present populationbased study conducted in the province of Trieste (Italy), aimed to investigate the prevalence of DM2 in patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma (CRC) and survival for CRC in diabetic and nondiabetic patients. All permanent residents diagnosed with a CRC between 2004 and 2007 were ascertained through the regional health information system. CRCspecific and relative survival probabilities were computed for each group of patients defined by CRC stage, presence or absence of DM2 treated with metformin, and presence or absence of daily ASA therapy. A total of 515CRC patients without DM2 and 156 with DM2 treated with metformin were enrolled in the study. At the time of CRC diagnosis, 71 (14%) nondiabetic and 39 (25%) diabetic patients were taking ASA daily. The fiveyear relative survival for stageIII CRC was 101% [95% confidence interval (CI)=76126] in the 18patients with DM2 treated with metformin and ASA, 55% (95% CI=3178) in the 23 without DM2 treated with Continue reading >>

Influence Of Lh And High-density Lipoprotein Cholesterol (hdl-c) On Metformin Response In Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Influence Of Lh And High-density Lipoprotein Cholesterol (hdl-c) On Metformin Response In Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Volume 157, Issue 2 , August 2011, Pages 180-184 Influence of LH and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) on metformin response in women with polycystic ovary syndrome To search for predictors of metformin response in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) through a detailed analysis of clinical and laboratory parameters. We designed a prospective study to investigate clinical and laboratory parameters to search for predictors of metformin response in women with PCOS. A total of 53 PCOS patients were given metformin 850mg twice a day for 6 months, after which patients were classified as responders or non-responders. Parameters analyzed for comparison between the two groups were: plasma fasting insulin glucose/insulin ratio; oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) with insulin (120min); HOMA and QUICKI tests; total cholesterol and fractions, triglycerides; LH, FSH, estradiol, progesterone, testosterone, androstenedione, 17-OH progesterone, and DHEAS. From all patients, 30 (56.6%) were responders and 23 (43.3%) were non-responders. Multinomial analysis showed that the positive response to metformin was associated with higher levels of basal LH (p=0.038) and lower levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) (p=0.015). In weight-matched PCOS subjects, laboratory markers might predict the metformin response. Higher levels of basal LH and lower levels of HDL-C are correlated with a positive response to metformin treatment in PCOS subjects. Continue reading >>

Metformin Improves Hdl-mediated Cholesterol Efflux Through The Inhibition Of Hdl Glycation

Metformin Improves Hdl-mediated Cholesterol Efflux Through The Inhibition Of Hdl Glycation

Metformin Improves HDL-mediated Cholesterol Efflux Through The Inhibition of HDL Glycation [Study Aim]HDL makes an import [Study Aim]HDL makes an important athero-protective role in reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). We hypothesized that non-specific glycation would disturb the function of plasma lipoproteins in diabetes. We made glycated HDL and determined its ability of cholesterol efflux. [Method]1) Production of glycated HDL: Human HDL (CALBIOCHEM, 5mg/ml) was glycated under the incubation with 3-deoxyglucosone (3-DG, 0 - 100mM) in 37 degree for 3, 7 and 14 days. Glycated products were confirmed by measuring the concentration of carboxymethyl-lysine (CML). Finally, we determined the glycation condition as the incubation with 100 mM 3-DG for 7 days. 2) Comparison of glycated HDL-mediated of cholesterol efflux with non-glycated HDL: Human monocyte derived THP-1 cells were developed to macrophages and labeled with 3H-cholesterol (0.6[micro]Ci/ml). After the macrophage incubation adding glycated HDL (50 [micro]g/ml) into the medium for 24 hours, the rate of labeled cholesterol pulled out from the macrophages was measured as cholesterol efflux. The result was compared with that of non-glycated HDL. 3) Effect of metformin for glycation of HDL and for HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux: We investigated the role of glycation-inhibitors; metformin and aminoguanidine(AGD) on HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux. THP-1 derived macrophages were glycated with 3-DG adding metformin or AGD (0 - 100 mM). Then, glycated HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux was determined and compared. [Result] 1) It was confirmed that human HDL was glycated with 3-DG by dose and time dependently by measuring CML (CML 2.361[rarr]3.845[micro]g/ml). 2) Glycated HDL revealed significantly reduced cholesterol effl Continue reading >>

Metformin Diabetes Drug Could Extend Lifespan

Metformin Diabetes Drug Could Extend Lifespan

Metformin is approved in the US as a treatment for type 2 diabetes. A new study by Cardiff University, UK, involving over 180,000 people, reveals that the drug could also increase the lifespan of those individuals who are non-diabetics. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), there are around 29.1 million people in the US with diabetes, equating to 9.3% of the population. Type 2 diabetes accounts for 90-95% of diabetes cases and is usually associated with older age, obesity and physical inactivity, family history of type 2 diabetes or a personal history of gestational diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is preventable through healthful eating, regular physical activity and weight loss. It can be controlled with these same activities, but insulin or oral medication also may be necessary. Metformin (metformin hydrochloride) is an oral biguanide antidiabetic medicine to treat type 2 diabetes, a condition in which the body does not use insulin normally and, therefore, cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood. Metformin helps to control the amount of glucose (sugar) in your blood, it decreases the amount of glucose you absorb from your food and the amount of glucose made by your liver. Metformin also increases your body's response to insulin, a natural substance that controls the amount of glucose in the blood. The objective of the study, published in leading diabetes journal Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism, was to compare all-cause mortality in diabetic patients treated with either sulphonylurea or metformin with matched individuals without diabetes including age, gender, same general practice, smoking status and clinical status criteria. The data is from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD), which encompasses clinically rich, pseudonymize Continue reading >>

Hdl: Nine Ways To Raise Your Good Cholesterol

Hdl: Nine Ways To Raise Your Good Cholesterol

HDL: Nine Ways to Raise Your Good Cholesterol They call HDL good cholesterol. But its better than that. HDL keeps arteries young. The more HDL you have, the better. But how do you get your HDL level up? HDL is especially important when you have diabetes. A new Italian study followed more than 47,000 people with Type 2 for four years. Those with low levels of HDL had a 44% increased chance of developing signs of diabetic kidney disease. Low HDL levels were more dangerous than high levels of triglycerides, which were thought to be a greater risk. HDL stands for high-density lipoprotein. Our bodies have two main types of cholesterol carriers. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) takes cholesterol from the liver to the rest of the body. LDL leaves a lot of extra cholesterol lying around, where it can form hard stuff called plaque in arteries. HDL goes the other way. It brings extra cholesterol from other parts of the body back to the liver. It keeps plaque from forming and helps keep arteries open. It undoes damage that life, food, and time do to arteries. Your HDL level means a lot for your risk of stroke, heart disease, kidney disease, and other kinds of blood vessel damage. Since diabetes complications result from blood vessel damage, you really want your HDL level up. A level over 60 mg/dl (milligrams per deciliter, the same measurement used for blood sugar) is considered excellent. From 40 to 60 is OK. Below 40 is considered low. 1. Exercise. Aerobic exercise for 120180 minutes a week raises HDL. Some studies have found that lower-extremity exercise such as bicycling and strength training is good for HDL. 2. Stop smoking . Many studies show HDL goes up in people who stop smoking, even though their weight tends to increase. 3. Have 12 drinks a day. Red wine may be the best dr Continue reading >>

Metformin For Triglycerides

Metformin For Triglycerides

Carrie Cross has been writing for profit and pleasure for more than 35 years. Her background includes business, real estate, entrepreneurship, management, health and nutrition. A registered nurse, she has published various pieces, including web content, numerous newspaper and magazine articles and columns and six books. A pharmacist is listening to a man.Photo Credit: monkeybusinessimages/iStock/Getty Images Metformin, also known as glucophage, is a prescription drug normally used to help lower blood glucose levels in type 2 diabetics, by decreasing glucose absorption in the intestines and improving your cells' insulin sensitivity, DrugLib.com explains. It is also used as a weight loss aid in diabetic and non-diabetic individuals. Studies show that metformin may help lower high triglycerides, a part of your cholesterol profile. Cholesterol is a fat found only in meat, including shellfish, and dairy products, and is produced naturally in your liver. There is no cholesterol in plant-based foods. Cholesterol is a waxy substance and is needed for cell building and hormone production. It is carried through your blood in fats, or lipids, by proteins called lipoproteins. When you have your cholesterol tested, it shows the levels of two types of lipoproteins -- LDL or low-density, and HDL or high-density. LDL, or "bad" cholesterol, carries the fat through your body, and HDL, "good" cholesterol, clears it out of your body. A total cholesterol reading of over 240 mg/dL is considered high. Your triglyceride level refers to a second type of fat, or lipid, also measured during a cholesterol, or lipid, panel. Triglyceride levels measure the circulating fat in your blood. After a meal, your triglyceride level is high prior to being used by your cells for energy or being stored as fat Continue reading >>

Total Cholesterol, High Density Lipoprotein And Triglyceride For Cardiovascular Disease In Elderly Patients Treated With Metformin

Total Cholesterol, High Density Lipoprotein And Triglyceride For Cardiovascular Disease In Elderly Patients Treated With Metformin

, Volume 34, Issue1 , pp 99107 | Cite as Total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein and triglyceride for cardiovascular disease in elderly patients treated with metformin Metformin reduces total cholesterol level, low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) level, blood glucose level and increases high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) level associated with cardiovascular disease. We evaluated effect of metformin on lipid profile in Korean patients with type 2 diabetes aged 64 yeras or older. We retrospectively examined 307 outpatients treated with metformin in a hospital setting with a follow-up period of 4.7 years. Metformin was not associated with the improvement in total cholesterol level (adjusted mean difference; 30.6 mg/dl, 95% CI: 24.9 to 36.4) and HDL-C level (adjusted mean difference; 2.6 mg/dl, 95% CI: 0.09 to 4.64) but may be associated with improvement in triglyceride level (adjusted mean difference; 41.5 mg/dl, 95% CI: 24.7 to 58.3). In comparison to the placebo groups (Kooy et al., 2009), there was a 1.5-fold decrease in triglyceride level and a 2-fold decrease in HDL-C level in our study. The frequency of Scr level that increased above the defined level [Scr 1.5 mg/dl for male, 1.4 mg/dl for female] was 6.7% [mean difference of elevated Scr: 0.9 mg/dl, 95% CI: 0.41 to 1.44, p < 0.002]. To confirm the efficacy of metformin use on triglyceride level and HDL-C level associated with the risk of cardiovascular disease in patient with diabetes, further placebo-controlled investigations are required. Cardiovascular diseaseHigh density lipoprotein cholesterolTriglyceride This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access. Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF. Bailey, C. J., Metformin: effect on micro and macrovascular complicati Continue reading >>

The Effect Of Metformin On Blood Pressure, Plasma Cholesterol And Triglycerides In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review

The Effect Of Metformin On Blood Pressure, Plasma Cholesterol And Triglycerides In Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review

The effect of metformin on blood pressure, plasma cholesterol and triglycerides in type 2 diabetes mellitus: a systematic review Wulffele M G, Kooy A, De Zeeuw D, Stehouwer C D, Gansevoort R T This review examined the effects of metformin on blood-pressure and lipid profile in type 2 diabetes. The authors concluded that metformin reduces total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol slightly more than control treatments but has no effect on other outcomes. The review included a large number of trials and was reasonably well-conducted, and the authors' conclusions are likely to be reliable. To assess the efficacy of metformin in lowering the blood-pressure (BP) and lipid profile in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched up to 2002; some search terms were listed. In addition, the manufacturer of metformin was contacted and the references of publications retrieved by the search were checked. Study designs of evaluations included in the review Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) were included in the review. Trials with crossover or parallel designs and blinded or open-label trials were all eligible for inclusion. Specific interventions included in the review Studies that employed metformin for a treatment period of at least 6 weeks were eligible for inclusion. The comparison groups in the included trials used sulphonylurea derivatives, diet, placebo, insulin, thiazolidinediones, arcabose and guar. Studies of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus were eligible for inclusion. The authors' definitions of type 2 diabetes mellitus were accepted. The primary outcomes included in the review were systolic and diastolic BP and lipid profile. The lipid profile comprised levels of plasma triglycerides, plasma total, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cho Continue reading >>

More Exercise, Metformin Alter Lipid Particles

More Exercise, Metformin Alter Lipid Particles

More Exercise, Metformin Alter Lipid Particles by Kristina Fiore Kristina Fiore, Staff Writer, MedPage Today This article is a collaboration between MedPage Today and: In patients with impaired glucose tolerance, randomization to intensive lifestyle change or metformin versus placebo had favorable effects on lipoprotein subfractions, a study found. There were also significant changes in adiponectin as well as body mass index. Both metformin and changes in diet and exercise made significant changes to the size and types of lipid particles in patients with impaired glucose tolerance, researchers found. In a subgroup analysis of the Diabetes Prevention Program, patients who were randomized to either metformin or to an intense lifestyle intervention had lower levels of various particles of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, and increases in high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles (P<0.01), Ronald Goldberg, MD, of the University of Miami, and colleagues reported online in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. "Our findings demonstrate that the same therapies used to slow the onset of diabetes also may help allay the risk of heart disease," Goldberg said in a statement. Earlier research from the Diabetes Prevention Program has shown that intensive lifestyle changes and metformin both reduce diabetes incidence in patients with impaired glucose tolerance. Both treatments have also been shown to modify lipid profiles in this group of patients. However, their effects on lipoprotein subfractions -- the size and types of particles that carry various types of cholesterol -- have not been studied. For their analysis, Goldberg and colleagues looked at data on 1,645 patients in the study who had been randomized to one of three groups: placebo, metformin 850 mg t Continue reading >>

Effect Of Metformin Treatment On Lipoprotein Subfractions In Non-diabetic Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction: A Glycometabolic Intervention As Adjunct To Primary Coronary Intervention In St Elevation Myocardial Infarction (gips-iii) Trial

Effect Of Metformin Treatment On Lipoprotein Subfractions In Non-diabetic Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction: A Glycometabolic Intervention As Adjunct To Primary Coronary Intervention In St Elevation Myocardial Infarction (gips-iii) Trial

Click through the PLOS taxonomy to find articles in your field. For more information about PLOS Subject Areas, click here . Effect of Metformin Treatment on Lipoprotein Subfractions in Non-Diabetic Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction: A Glycometabolic Intervention as Adjunct to Primary Coronary Intervention in ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction (GIPS-III) Trial Affiliation University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, the Department of Cardiology, Groningen, the Netherlands Affiliation University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, the Department of Cardiology, Groningen, the Netherlands Affiliation University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, the Department of Cardiology, Groningen, the Netherlands Affiliation University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, the Department of Cardiology, Groningen, the Netherlands Affiliation LabCorp, Raleigh, North Carolina, United States of America Affiliation University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, the Department of Cardiology, Groningen, the Netherlands Affiliation University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, the Department of Critical Care, Groningen, the Netherlands Continue reading >>

The Multiple Benefits Of Metformin

The Multiple Benefits Of Metformin

Metformin (brand name "Glucophage") has been used in the treatment of type II diabetes for the past 40 years.1 This drug counteracts many of the underlying factors that result in the manifestation of this insidious disease. Metformin also produces helpful side benefits that can protect against the lethal complications of type II diabetes. Frequently prescribed anti-diabetic drugs fail to address the fundamental causes of type II diabetes and can induce serious side effects. Type II diabetes affects between 16 to 19 million Americans. About 75% of type II diabetics will die from a cardiovascular-related disease. Conventional doctors often prescribe drugs for the purpose of lowering blood sugar levels. These drugs do not adequately address the multiple underlying pathologies associated with the type II diabetic state. Type II diabetes is characterized by cellular insulin resistence. The result is excess accumulation of glucose in the bloodstream as cells become resistant to the effects of insulin. Type II diabetes is characterized by cellular insulin resistence. The result is excess accumulation of glucose in the bloodstream because cells become resistant to the effects of insulin and fail to take up glucose As the type II diabetic condition progresses, many people gain weight and develop more fat cells.2 Treating type II diabetes with insulin-enhancing therapy increases the risk of cardiovascular complications, induces weight gain, and fails to correct the underlying cause of the disease. Many type II diabetics produce too much insulin in a futile attempt to drive glucose into insulin-resistant cells. When doctors prescribe insulin-enhancing drugs to these type II diabetics, a temporarily reduction of serum glucose may occur, but the long-term effects of this excess insu Continue reading >>

Metformin And Hdl - Type 2 Diabetes - Diabetes Forums

Metformin And Hdl - Type 2 Diabetes - Diabetes Forums

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Thought i'd come to my information source. The total cholesterol was within normal limits. The doc said to get aerobic exercise to help raise it and he would recheck it in 6 months. I've been doing stationery bike and treadmill very diligently, but am still concerned that it won't be enough. I'd like to avoid taking any statins because of all the side effects i've read about. I'm overweight, but losing, and eat a low-carb diet. Can too much protein affect this? I've heard that fish oil tablets are good for this as well. Any one have a good result with the fish oil tablets? Cy mentioned the Mediterranain (?sp) diet was good to follow to help with this..has this worked for anyone. I've never been on any medications before my diagnosis 4 months ago, and don't want to be on any more than I have to. Could my low-carb diet contribute to the low HDL? I use the South Beach Diet as it's easy for me to follow and it has helped with my weight loss and blood sugar control. Lastly, someone I work with said that metformin can lower HDL..anyone heard of this? I'm only on 500 mg 2 x daily. Wish I had a pre-diabetes/diagnosis level to go by. Thanks for your help. I had my first blood drawn today for lipid profiles since dx'd with D so I'll find out soon how the numbers look compared to before. It's gonna be difficult to determine my Actoplus met effect on my lipids because I changed my diet and exercise at the same time I started the met. I've not heard of metformin lowering HDL, do you have a CDE you can ask? As far as statins go, I take 20mg Lipitor (used to take 40) daily and I never had any noticable side Continue reading >>

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