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Metformin And Eye Pressure

Metformin May Lower Risk Of Glaucoma In People With Diabetes

Metformin May Lower Risk Of Glaucoma In People With Diabetes

Q: I just read that the drug metformin might help prevent glaucoma. I have pre-diabetes and am working on lowering my blood sugar. My last eye exam indicated my eye pressures were in the high normal range. Should I start metformin now? A: Metformin is the best medicine to use first for people with type 2 diabetes. And some experts suggest people with pre-diabetes should consider taking it, in addition to diet and exercise. You have a higher than average risk of developing open-angle glaucoma, so your question is very timely. A study published last week in the journal JAMA Ophthalmology suggested metformin might decrease the risk of glaucoma in people with diabetes. Glaucoma is a group of eye diseases that can lead to irreversible vision loss through damage to the optic nerve, a collection of specialized nerve fibers that connect the back of the eye (the retina) to the brain. Glaucoma is caused by a problem with the circulation of fluid in the eye. Normally, a clear liquid called aqueous humor circulates continuously inside the front part of the eye. To keep a healthy pressure within the eye, an equal amount of this fluid flows out of the eye. In open-angle glaucoma, this drainage system becomes less efficient. The outflow of fluid slows. The fluid then backs up in the eye, like water in a clogged sink. Internal pressure in the eye rises. This, in turn, puts stress on the optic nerve. If the pressure continues, nerve fibers that carry the vision messages to the brain begin to die. Vision starts to fade. If left untreated, glaucoma can lead to blindness. Results of this study showed a 25 percent lower risk of open-angle glaucoma in people who took the highest amount of metformin compared with those who didn't take the drug. The higher the dose of metformin, the lower the Continue reading >>

Metformin Use Linked With Decreased Risk Of Glaucoma

Metformin Use Linked With Decreased Risk Of Glaucoma

Metformin is the most commonly prescribed diabetes medicine in the world, with more than 61 million prescriptions filled in 2012 in the United States alone. In addition to its blood-sugar-lowering ability, the drug has been linked with a variety of other potential health benefits, including decreasing the risk of death in people with Type 2 diabetes, lowering cancer risk, and increasing life span. Now, new research suggests that it may also reduce the risk of the eye disease open-angle glaucoma in people with diabetes. Glaucoma is the leading cause of blindness in the United States and the world, affecting more than 3 million Americans. The most common form, open-angle glaucoma, affects 2.7 million Americans over age 40 and occurs when the eye’s drainage canals become blocked, leading to an increase in eye pressure and damage to the optic nerve. Drugs that mimic the effects of calorie restriction such as metformin are known to decrease the risk for a variety of age-related conditions. To determine whether the medicine is also beneficial for reducing the risk of open-angle glaucoma, for which age is a major factor, researchers looked at data spanning 2001 through 2010 from a U.S. managed care network. Of the 150,016 study participants with diabetes, 5,893 (3.9%), developed open-angle glaucoma. Over the study period, 60,124 people (40.1%) filled at least one prescription for metformin, 46,505 (31%) filled at least one prescription for a sulfonylurea, 35,707 (23.8%) filled at least one prescription for a thiazolidinedioine, 33,948 (22.6%) filled at least one prescription for insulin, and 3,663 (2.4%) filled at least one prescription for a meglitinide. The researchers found that people prescribed the highest amount of metformin (more than 1,110 grams in two years) had a 2 Continue reading >>

Can Janumet Cause Vision Probs & Should You Take Metformin If You Can Control Blood Sugar W/out It?

Can Janumet Cause Vision Probs & Should You Take Metformin If You Can Control Blood Sugar W/out It?

Home Q & A Questions Can Janumet cause vision... Can Janumet cause vision probs & should you take Metformin if you can control Blood Sugar w/out it? I was diagnosed with type 2 3.5 moths ago. My A1C was 10.8. Lost some weight, changed diet, exercise more and take Janumet. My A1C yesterday was 5.5.so it is clearly effective. But, the side effects: lethargic, abdomen pain, flu like feeling, and the worst - blurred vision and sensitivity to light. I have checked my blood sugar when I have the vision problems and sometimes it may be in the 80's - low 100's. I took myself off Janumet and a blood pressure medicine. My dr knew about stopping the Janumet temporarily but my blood pressure went up. I have two questions... 1. Could the Janumet be the cause of the side effects and vision issues? 2. I have read it is good to take metformin continuously even if you can control your blood sugars without medicine. is that true? You bring up some excelent points! First, I want to commend you on your excelent numbers and loosing all that wegiht. Good work, keep it up! Since Janumet is combination of both Januvia and Metformin, I will adress both seperatly. 1) Januvia has not been reported to cause vision problems, neither has metformin. There are a couple of possibilities that I see. First, even though it is less likely with these two meds, you could still get hypoglycemic. If you are hypoglycemic you could have vision problems. However, it doesn't sound like you are that low when this happens. The second possibility is the natural course of diabetes. Have you hade your eyes checked? That is a need-to check for all diabetics to look for diabetic retinopathy. 2) There is a lot of evidence that shows metformin is good to prevent further complications from diabetes. So yes you could still Continue reading >>

Association Of Geroprotective Effects Of Metformin And Risk Of Open-angle Glaucoma In Persons With Diabetes Mellitus

Association Of Geroprotective Effects Of Metformin And Risk Of Open-angle Glaucoma In Persons With Diabetes Mellitus

Association of Geroprotective Effects of Metformin and Risk of Open-Angle Glaucoma in Persons With Diabetes Mellitus Hsien-Chang Lin , PhD, Joshua D. Stein , MD, MS, Bin Nan , PhD, David Childers , MA, Paula Anne Newman-Casey , MD, MS, Debra A. Thompson , PhD, and Julia E. Richards , PhD Department of Applied Health Science, Indiana University, Bloomington (Lin); Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (Stein, Childers, Newman-Casey, Thompson); Institute for Health Care Policy and Innovation, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (Stein, Newman-Casey); Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (Nan); Center for Statistical Consultation and Research, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (Childers); Department of Biological Chemistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (Thompson); Department of Epidemiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (Richards) Corresponding Author: Julia E. Richards, PhD, 229 W. K. Kellogg Eye Center, 1000 Wall St, Ann Arbor, MI 48105 ( [email protected] ) The publisher's final edited version of this article is available at JAMA Ophthalmol See other articles in PMC that cite the published article. Caloric restriction mimetic drugs have geroprotective effects that delay or reduce risks for a variety of age-associated systemic diseases, suggesting that such drugs might also have the potential to reduce risks of blinding ophthalmologic conditions for which age is a major risk factor. To determine whether the caloric restriction mimetic drug metformin hydrochloride is associated with reduced risk of open-angle glaucoma (OAG) in persons with diabetes mellitus. Retrospective cohort study of patients aged 40 years or older with diabetes mellitus and no preexisting record of OAG in a large US managed Continue reading >>

Diabetes Pill May Lower Risk Of Eye Disease In Elderly

Diabetes Pill May Lower Risk Of Eye Disease In Elderly

Diabetes pill may lower risk of eye disease in elderly (Reuters Health) - Metformin, a pill that lowers blood sugar in people with diabetes, might also reduce their risk of developing glaucoma, an eye disease that can lead to vision loss and blindness, a new study suggests. While the results cant prove the drug prevents glaucoma, researchers found that diabetics taking higher doses of metformin were less likely to develop the eye disease than those who used smaller doses or didnt take the pill at all. Because metformin has worse side effects at higher doses, more research is needed to better understand whether patients might benefit from taking more medicine just to ward off glaucoma, said senior study author Julia Richards, director of the glaucoma research center at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor Our hope is that if we can confirm the findings in diabetics, who clearly benefit from metformin for their diabetes, additional studies can be performed among persons without diabetes. Globally, about one in 10 adults have diabetes, according to the World Health Organization. Most of these people have type 2 diabetes, which is associated with obesity and aging and occurs when the body cant make or use enough of the hormone insulin to convert blood sugar into energy. Metformin lowers blood sugar by preventing the liver from making excess glucose and by making muscle and fat cells better at using available insulin. Glaucoma is group of eye conditions that can damage the optic nerve, typically because pressure builds up inside the eye. The current study focused on the most common variation, known as open-angle glaucoma, which starts with gradual loss of peripheral vision. Richards and colleagues reviewed a database with a decade of health claims and prescription data f Continue reading >>

Does Oral Acetaminophen Lower Intraocular Pressure?

Does Oral Acetaminophen Lower Intraocular Pressure?

You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Does Oral Acetaminophen Lower Intraocular Pressure? The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02366065 Information provided by (Responsible Party): Henry D. Jampel, M.D., M.H.S., Johns Hopkins University Study Description Study Design Arms and Interventions Outcome Measures Eligibility Criteria Contacts and Locations More Information - Lowering intraocular pressure is the only proven treatment for glaucoma. Medications, almost always in the form of eye drops, are a mainstay for lowering intraocular pressure. Eye drops have the disadvantage of being difficult to administer and can have adverse effects on the surface of the eye and the surrounding tissues. Lowering intraocular pressure can be accomplished with oral carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, but the many systemic side effects of these agents relegates them to drugs of last resort. Therefore, an effective, well-tolerated, oral agent would be an important addition to the treatment of glaucoma. The hypothesis is that oral acetaminophen can lower intraocular pressure to a clinically significant degree in a dosing regimen that is both safe and convenient. The research is important because acetaminophen is inexpensive, available over-the-counter, and has a well known safety and side effect profile. The study design is prospective case series. Before treatment, study subjects will have their intraocular pressure measured at 8 am, 10 am, 12 pm and 4 pm. They will then take acetaminophen 650 mg qid Continue reading >>

Metformin (oral Route)

Metformin (oral Route)

Precautions Drug information provided by: Micromedex It is very important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits, especially during the first few weeks that you take this medicine. Blood and urine tests may be needed to check for unwanted effects. This medicine may interact with the dye used for an X-ray or CT scan. Your doctor should advise you to stop taking it before you have any medical exams or diagnostic tests that might cause less urine output than usual. You may be advised to start taking the medicine again 48 hours after the exams or tests if your kidney function is tested and found to be normal. Make sure any doctor or dentist who treats you knows that you are using this medicine. You may need to stop using this medicine several days before having surgery or medical tests. It is very important to carefully follow any instructions from your health care team about: Alcohol—Drinking alcohol may cause severe low blood sugar. Discuss this with your health care team. Other medicines—Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor. This especially includes nonprescription medicines such as aspirin, and medicines for appetite control, asthma, colds, cough, hay fever, or sinus problems. Counseling—Other family members need to learn how to prevent side effects or help with side effects if they occur. Also, patients with diabetes may need special counseling about diabetes medicine dosing changes that might occur with lifestyle changes, such as changes in exercise or diet. Counseling on birth control and pregnancy may be needed because of the problems that can occur in pregnancy for patients with diabetes. Travel—Keep a recent prescription and your medical history with you. Be prepared for an emergency as you would norm Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drug Metformin May Lower Glaucoma Risk

Diabetes Drug Metformin May Lower Glaucoma Risk

THURSDAY, May 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The diabetes drug metformin was linked to a lower risk of developing the eye condition glaucoma in a new study. People who took the most metformin during the 10-year study period had a 25 percent reduced risk of glaucoma compared with people not taking the drug, researchers found. "Glaucoma is a leading cause of blindness worldwide and classic open-angle glaucoma develops in late middle age or late age. So we hypothesized that a drug that mimics caloric restriction, such as metformin, might reduce the risk of glaucoma," said lead researcher Julia Richards, a professor of ophthalmology and visual sciences at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. Exactly how metformin might reduce the risk of glaucoma isn't known, the researchers said. And, while this study found an association between metformin use and lower glaucoma risk, it wasn't designed to prove a cause-and-effect relationship. Dr. Mark Fromer, an ophthalmologist at Lenox Hill Hospital in New York City, explained that glaucoma is caused by too much fluid in the eye, when fluid doesn't drain adequately, or when the blood vessels in the optic nerve are damaged. "Somehow metformin is affecting one of those conditions," he said. Fromer pointed out that although the results of this study are impressive, using metformin to prevent or treat glaucoma in non-diabetic patients is problematic. Metformin could drop blood sugar too low in people without diabetes, he said. "People without diabetes should not be taking metformin," he said. "If not monitored carefully by a doctor, it can have significant consequences," said Fromer, who was not involved with the study. Richards, however, said that it might be possible to use metformin as a treatment for glaucoma even in people without d Continue reading >>

Metformin - Oral, Glucophage

Metformin - Oral, Glucophage

are allergic to dapagliflozin or any of the ingredients in FARXIGA. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction may include skin rash, raised red patches on your skin (hives), swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty in breathing or swallowing. If you have any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and contact your healthcare provider or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away have severe kidney problems or are on dialysis. Your healthcare provider should do blood tests to check how well your kidneys are working before and during your treatment with FARXIGA Dehydration (the loss of body water and salt), which may cause you to feel dizzy, faint, lightheaded, or weak, especially when you stand up (orthostatic hypotension). You may be at a higher risk of dehydration if you have low blood pressure; take medicines to lower your blood pressure, including water pills (diuretics); are 65 years of age or older; are on a low salt diet, or have kidney problems Ketoacidosis occurred in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes during treatment with FARXIGA. Ketoacidosis is a serious condition which may require hospitalization and may lead to death. Symptoms may include nausea, tiredness, vomiting, trouble breathing, and abdominal pain. If you get any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and call your healthcare provider right away. If possible, check for ketones in your urine or blood, even if your blood sugar is less than 250 mg/dL Kidney problems. Sudden kidney injury occurred in people taking FARXIGA. Talk to your doctor right away if you reduce the amount you eat or drink, or if you lose liquids; for example, from vomiting, diarrhea, or excessive heat exposure Serious urinary tract infections (UTI), some that lead to hospitalization, occu Continue reading >>

Metformin Reduces The Incidence Of Open Angle Glaucoma

Metformin Reduces The Incidence Of Open Angle Glaucoma

Metformin Reduces the Incidence of Open Angle Glaucoma By Jessica G. Shantha, MD and T. R. Shantha, MD, PhD, FACA Glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness in the world.1 A medical group submitted a report to Life Extension Magazine that provides persuasive data that the AMPK-activating drug metformin may be of significant benefit in protecting the eyes against the threat of blindness from open angle glaucoma. This report is written with some technical language that may make it challenging for some of our readers to understand. We choose to publish it with the caveat that a succinct practical suggestion on how to use metformin to potentially reduce glaucoma risk be made in the introduction. So here is what the medical group that authored this report recommends: Those with elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) and/or glaucoma should ask their doctor about prescribing a modest 250 mg-500 mg dose of metformin twice a day after meals as it may have unique beneficial mechanisms in protecting against this blinding disorder. We welcome you to read the report beginning on the next page that describes underlying pathologies of open angle glaucoma and how metformin can help to counteract them. Metformin is a decades-old antidiabetic drug used by millions of type II diabetics all over the world. It is inexpensive, quite commonly prescribed, and its effectiveness in reducing elevated blood glucose is well established. In addition to its antidiabetic properties, metformin has also been shown to provide a number of other health benefits, including weight reduction, promoting longevity, and reducing cancer incidence, as well as reducing or eliminating chronic pain.2-7 It hascalorie restriction mimetic cellular effects such as activating the energy enzyme adenosine monophosphate Continue reading >>

Metformin Linked To Reduced Risk For Glaucoma

Metformin Linked To Reduced Risk For Glaucoma

Metformin Linked to Reduced Risk for Glaucoma ORLANDO, Florida Metformin, the popular diabetes drug, is associated with a dose-dependent reduction in risk for open-angle glaucoma, according to new research. "Should these findings be confirmed in prospective clinical trials, this could lead to novel treatments for this sight-threatening disease and new opportunities to reduce other risks," said lead investigator Julia Richards, MD, from the University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center in Ann Arbor. She presented study results here at the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology 2014 Annual Meeting. Dr. Richards and her colleagues analyzed longitudinal data for 2001 to 2009 from the Clinformatics Data Mart Database, a large health claims database of insured patients in the United States. They identified 150,016 people 40 years and older with diabetes and no pre-existing open-angle glaucoma, of whom 5893 (3.9%) developed incident open-angle glaucoma. The risk for open-angle glaucoma was 25% lower in patients with documented cumulative metformin use of more than 1110g over 2 years (average dose, 2g/day) than in those with no metformin use (hazard ratio, 0.75; 95% confidence interval, 0.59- 0.95; P= .017). The association was dose-dependent, with a 0.01% reduced hazard for open-angle glaucoma with every 1g increase in metformin (P= .001). The greatest risk reduction was associated with the highest baseline risk and the highest glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels. "As we looked at the higher-risk populations with higher HbA1c levels, we found a greater reduction in risk. The people who benefited the least from this were people who were already at low risk and had well-controlled diabetes," Dr. Richards reported. The findings support the concept that metformin and som Continue reading >>

Will You Have Intraocular Pressure Increased With Metformin - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

Will You Have Intraocular Pressure Increased With Metformin - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

More posts for: Metformin , Intraocular pressure increased NOTE: The study is based on active ingredients and brand name. Other drugs that have the same active ingredients (e.g. generic drugs) are NOT considered. WARNING: Please DO NOT STOP MEDICATIONS without first consulting a physician since doing so could be hazardous to your health. DISCLAIMER: All material available on eHealthMe.com is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment provided by a qualified healthcare provider. All information is observation-only, and has not been supported by scientific studies or clinical trials unless otherwise stated. Different individuals may respond to medication in different ways. Every effort has been made to ensure that all information is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. The use of the eHealthMe site and its content is at your own risk. You may report adverse side effects to the FDA at or 1-800-FDA-1088 (1-800-332-1088). If you use this eHealthMe study on publication, please acknowledge it with a citation: study title, URL, accessed date. Continue reading >>

Can Metformin Cause Problems With Vision? Is It Permanent?

Can Metformin Cause Problems With Vision? Is It Permanent?

I’m afraid there is no simple answer to this one. But there is a clear way ahead. Let me explain. If you get blurry vision as soon as you start the metformin, there are some experts who say that this is could be a good sign. How come? Well, diabetes affects vision and you could have been losing your eyesight gradually, as your sugar levels went up over months and years. You are not even aware of this change in vision, because the loss is so gradual. RELATED: If You Take Metformin, You Need These Nutritional Supplements As soon as you start the metformin, your sugar suddenly comes under control and your eyes suddenly cannot adjust to the new, lower blood sugar, causing the blurry vision. The answer therefore could be to lower your starting metformin dose and then slowly, increase it over a few weeks/months, giving your body and your eyes a chance to adjust. The blurry vision could disappear with this. However, if you have started to experience blurry vision after using metformin for a few years, the answer could be very different. This form of vision loss happens due to loss of Vitamin B12 from the body, because Metformin interferes with our ability to absorb this vitamin from food. Vitamin B12 forms the protective sheath or insulation of all nerves in the body, including the one that is critical for vision, the optic nerve. When the optic nerve is damaged due to prolonged metformin use, the right solution is to immediately supplement with Vitamin B12. You should also know that with long term use, metformin also interferes with our ability to use two other vital nutrients, Vitamin B9 and Co Enzyme Q10 in the human body. This can cause a range of side effects – from hair loss and insomnia and heart palpitations to unexplained muscle pains. The real answer – to both Continue reading >>

Eye Complications :: Diabetes Education Online

Eye Complications :: Diabetes Education Online

Eye problems range from minor changes to significant visual loss. People with diabetes are at risk of eye problems, ranging from minor changes with no effect on vision to significant visual loss. With regular screening and eye exams by an eye doctor (ophthalmologist), and with stable and near normal blood glucose control, most of the serious complications can be avoided or successfully treated. Putting off an eye exam is very risky. Usually there are few or no symptoms at the time the damage is occurring. Exams will reveal the problem and allow your eye doctor to treat it. Treatment can slow down the progression and maintain vision even in those who have developed significant eye complications. See your ophthalmologist regularly and get retinal exams and eye pressure checked If you have symptoms of any of the eye emergencies, seek medical care or contact your eye doctor immediately. Self assessment quizzes are available for topics covered in this website. To find out how much you have learned about Diabetes Complications, take our self assessment quiz when you have completed this section. The quiz is multiple choice. Please choose the single best answer to each question. At the end of the quiz, your score will display. If your score is over 70% correct, you are doing very well. If your score is less than 70%, you can return to this section and review the information. Continue reading >>

Is Intraocular Pressure Increased A Side Effect Of Metformin ? ( Factmed.com )

Is Intraocular Pressure Increased A Side Effect Of Metformin ? ( Factmed.com )

Introduction This page is designed to help you determine the relationship, if any, between METFORMIN and INTRAOCULAR PRESSURE INCREASED. In doing so, we compare METFORMIN with other drugs that cause INTRAOCULAR PRESSURE INCREASED, to help you evaluate whether or not METFORMIN causes INTRAOCULAR PRESSURE INCREASED. Likewise, this page shows the most highly-reported side effects of METFORMIN, so you can see if INTRAOCULAR PRESSURE INCREASED ranks among METFORMIN's most well-known side effects. Reports of METFORMIN causing INTRAOCULAR PRESSURE INCREASED: 28 Reports of any side effect of METFORMIN : 22852 Percentage of METFORMIN patients where INTRAOCULAR PRESSURE INCREASED is a reported side effect: 0.1225% FDA reports of any drug causing INTRAOCULAR PRESSURE INCREASED : 4114 Average percentage for all medicated patients where INTRAOCULAR PRESSURE INCREASED is reported as a complication: 0.0258% Physician opinion on METFORMIN as adverse event culprit: Overall opinion for all reports of this drug: Most frequent diagnoses/indications for prescribing METFORMIN: TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS ( 1542 patients ) PRODUCT USED FOR UNKNOWN INDICATION ( 1149 patients ) DRUG USE FOR UNKNOWN INDICATION ( 736 patients ) DIABETES MELLITUS NON-INSULIN-DEPENDENT ( 264 patients ) GLUCOSE TOLERANCE IMPAIRED ( 90 patients ) Is Metformin safe if you already have Macular Degeneration? I definately think Metformin (after about 6 years of use -2 500 mg tabs in AM/PM) have started to cause problems with my connective tissues. First it was Achilles tendonitis and now what seems like Tennis or Golfers elbow. Even my wrist have been hurting. I have done nothing to injure these areas. Also after running, I can tell I have muscle tears in my calves. I don't think people realize how Metformin really affects Continue reading >>

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