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Metformin And Dehydration

Common Brand Name(s): Fortamet, Glucophage Xr, Glumetza

Common Brand Name(s): Fortamet, Glucophage Xr, Glumetza

IMPORTANT: HOW TO USE THIS INFORMATION: This is a summary and does NOT have all possible information about this product. This information does not assure that this product is safe, effective, or appropriate for you. This information is not individual medical advice and does not substitute for the advice of your health care professional. Always ask your health care professional for complete information about this product and your specific health needs. METFORMIN SUSTAINED-ACTION TABLET - ORAL (met-FOR-min) WARNING: Metformin can rarely cause a serious (sometimes fatal) condition called lactic acidosis. Stop taking metformin and get medical help right away if you develop any of the following symptoms of lactic acidosis: unusual tiredness, dizziness, severe drowsiness, chills, blue/cold skin, muscle pain, fast/difficult breathing, slow/irregular heartbeat, stomach pain with nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea. Lactic acidosis is more likely to occur in patients who have certain medical conditions, including kidney or liver disease, recent surgery, a serious infection, conditions that may cause a low level of oxygen in the blood or poor circulation (such as congestive heart failure, recent heart attack, recent stroke), heavy alcohol use, a severe loss of body fluids (dehydration), or X-ray or scanning procedures that require an injectable iodinated contrast drug. Tell your doctor immediately if any of these conditions occur or if you notice a big change in your overall health. You may need to stop taking this medication temporarily. The elderly are also at higher risk, especially those older than 80 years who have not had kidney tests. (See also Side Effects and Precautions sections.) USES: Metformin is used with a proper diet and exercise program and possibly with other medicati Continue reading >>

What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Metformin?

What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Metformin?

Medicines and their possible side effects can affect individual people in different ways. The following are some of the side effects that are known to be associated with metformin. Just because a side effect is stated here does not mean that all people using this medicine will experience that or any side effect. Very common (affect more than 1 in 10 people) Disturbances of the gut such as nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea or abdominal pain. Loss of appetite. The above side effects are most likely to occur when you first start taking metformin and tend to improve over time. They can be prevented or minimised by taking the medicine during or after meals, and by increasing the dose gradually when treatment is started. Follow the instructions given by your doctor. Common (affect between 1 in 10 and 1 in 100 people) Taste disturbance, usually a metallic taste. Very rare (affect fewer than 1 in 10,000 people) Lactic acidosis - a potentially serious condition where there is too much acid in the blood. Symptoms may include breathing difficulties and non-specific symptoms such as feeling weak, sick or generally unwell, vomiting, abdominal pain, or unusual muscle pains or discomfort. It's important to consult your doctor straight away if you experience these symptoms. Kidney problems, dehydration, prolonged fasting and drinking excessive amounts of alcohol increase the risk. Skin reactions such as rash, itching or flushing. If you want any more information about the possible side effects of metformin you should talk to your doctor or pharmacist, or read the leaflet that comes with the medicine. If you think you have experienced a side effect, did you know you can report this using the yellow card website? Last updated: 16/06/2016 Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms - Don’t Ignore This Warning Sign Of Condition

Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms - Don’t Ignore This Warning Sign Of Condition

Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin or the insulin produced does not work properly and can be linked to lifestyle factors such as being overweight. The condition can cause long-term complications - and increase the risk of heart disease, stroke and kidney damage. However it can alter the way the body works in the short-term. People with diabetes have an increase risk of dehydration as high blood glucose levels can lead to decreased hydration in the body. Symptoms of dehydration can include thirst, headache, dry mouth and eyes, dizziness, tiredness and dark coloured urine. Often, feeling thirsty is the last symptom of dehydration and irritability and tiredess can come first. People are also considered to be dehydrated if they urinate less than four times a day. Symptoms of severe dehydration can include low blood pressure, a weak pulse or rapid heart rate and feeling confused. Diabetes.co.uk said: “If you feel thirsty all the time or your thirst is stronger than usual and continues even after you drink, it can be a sign that not all is well inside your body.” Fri, August 19, 2016 Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition. If you feel thirsty all the time it can be a sign that not all is well inside your body If our blood glucose levels are higher than they should be for prolonged periods of time, the kidneys will work to get rid some of the excess glucose from the blood and excrete this as urine. While the kidneys filter the blood in this way, water will also be removed from the blood and will need replenishing and this is why we tend to have increase thirst when blood sugar levels are too high. Continue reading >>

Glyburide And Metformin (oral Route)

Glyburide And Metformin (oral Route)

Precautions Drug information provided by: Micromedex It is very important that your doctor check your progress at regular visits to make sure this medicine is working properly. Blood tests may be needed to check for unwanted effects. Under certain conditions, too much metformin can cause lactic acidosis. The symptoms of lactic acidosis are severe and quick to appear. They usually occur when other health problems not related to the medicine are present and very severe, such as a heart attack or kidney failure. The symptoms of lactic acidosis include abdominal or stomach discomfort; decreased appetite; diarrhea; fast, shallow breathing; a general feeling of discomfort; muscle pain or cramping; and unusual sleepiness, tiredness, or weakness. If you have any symptoms of lactic acidosis, get emergency medical help right away. It is very important to carefully follow any instructions from your health care team about: Alcohol—Drinking alcohol may cause severe low blood sugar. Discuss this with your health care team. Other medicines—Do not take other medicines unless they have been discussed with your doctor. This especially includes nonprescription medicines such as aspirin, and medicines for appetite control, asthma, colds, cough, hay fever, or sinus problems. Counseling—Other family members need to learn how to prevent side effects or help with side effects if they occur. Also, patients with diabetes may need special counseling about diabetes medicine dosing changes that might occur because of lifestyle changes, such as changes in exercise and diet. Furthermore, counseling on contraception and pregnancy may be needed because of the problems that can occur in patients with diabetes during pregnancy. Travel—Keep your recent prescription and your medical history with yo Continue reading >>

Review Metformin-associated Lactic Acidosis: Current Perspectives On Causes And Risk

Review Metformin-associated Lactic Acidosis: Current Perspectives On Causes And Risk

Abstract Although metformin has become a drug of choice for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus, some patients may not receive it owing to the risk of lactic acidosis. Metformin, along with other drugs in the biguanide class, increases plasma lactate levels in a plasma concentration-dependent manner by inhibiting mitochondrial respiration predominantly in the liver. Elevated plasma metformin concentrations (as occur in individuals with renal impairment) and a secondary event or condition that further disrupts lactate production or clearance (e.g., cirrhosis, sepsis, or hypoperfusion), are typically necessary to cause metformin-associated lactic acidosis (MALA). As these secondary events may be unpredictable and the mortality rate for MALA approaches 50%, metformin has been contraindicated in moderate and severe renal impairment since its FDA approval in patients with normal renal function or mild renal insufficiency to minimize the potential for toxic metformin levels and MALA. However, the reported incidence of lactic acidosis in clinical practice has proved to be very low (< 10 cases per 100,000 patient-years). Several groups have suggested that current renal function cutoffs for metformin are too conservative, thus depriving a substantial number of type 2 diabetes patients from the potential benefit of metformin therapy. On the other hand, the success of metformin as the first-line diabetes therapy may be a direct consequence of conservative labeling, the absence of which could have led to excess patient risk and eventual withdrawal from the market, as happened with earlier biguanide therapies. An investigational delayed-release metformin currently under development could potentially provide a treatment option for patients with renal impairment pending the resu Continue reading >>

Metformin =rapid Drop In Fbg, But Also New Dehydration, Thirst. Any Ideas?

Metformin =rapid Drop In Fbg, But Also New Dehydration, Thirst. Any Ideas?

Metformin =rapid drop in FBG, but also new dehydration, thirst. Any ideas? Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Metformin =rapid drop in FBG, but also new dehydration, thirst. Any ideas? I went on Metformin about three and a half weeks ago. Within 7 days my FBG went from 163 to 131. During that week, and for the following week, I felt awful. Exhausted, scarily depressed, headachey. Finally, it passed and I was able to start getting some mild exercise. This has further dropped my fasting number to 120s. And rest of day is fine. Just last week I was able to start going to the gym, and do what is for me a mildly strenuous cardio/strength routine. Yesterday, I did a did a nice solid hour,( most aggressive yet), drank some water, ate dinner and a snack and went to sleep five hours later. I awoke in three hours and peed a larger volume than I ever have in my life. Like a frightening amount. And I was so dehydrated, I drank at least a gallon of water, unable to get my saliva going, and completely unable to sleep. My reading this morning was 121, which is good for me so far. (I'm really fat.) Oh, I should that my numbers had risen to 132-133 for two days before, so 121 was a drop. I should add that last's night's experience also happened, with less severity, ten nights earlier, when my FBG dropped from 131 to 118. Now I made it a habit years ago to make water my primary beverage. I've never felt dehydration unless I simply didnt drink anything. I have never been someone who needed to pee often--in fact it's kind of a joke with my friends that I've never seen anyone's bathroom--and that hadn't changed--- until the metformin. So now that Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Metformin Faqs

Diabetes And Metformin Faqs

Tweet Although one of the most common drugs for type 2 diabetics, Metformin can still confuse diabetic patients. This set of FAQs are intended for information purposes, and should not replace or supersede the advice of a doctor or qualified medical professional. If you have a question about diabetes and Metformin that is not covered here, please ask the community in the Diabetes forum. Should all type 2 diabetics take Meformin? One side effect of taking Metformin is lactic acidosis, and for this reason some diabetics should not take Metformin unless specifically advised to do so by their GP or diabetes healthcare team. For this reason, diabetics with kidney problems, liver problems, and heart problems are often advised to avoid Metformin. Similarly, diabetics that are dehydrated, drink alcohol a lot, or are going to have an x-ray or surgery. For some pregnant diabetics, Metformin may not be the best choice, but in all instances this should be discussed with your doctor. Can young diabetics take Metformin? Metformin has been proven in clinical trials to lower glucose levels amongst children between 10-16 years of age suffering from type 2 diabetes. Research is less conclusive about children under 10 and children taking Metformin alongside other treatments, but your diabetes health care team should be able to elaborate on this. How much Metformin should I take? This will depend entirely on your condition, and your doctor will be able to tell you how much Metformin to take, when you should take it, and how you should take it. Usually, diabetics start out on a low dose of Metformin, and this is slowly increased until blood sugar responds. Doctors often put diabetics on combination courses with other medication, including insulin. If I take Metformin, can I stop my diet and Continue reading >>

Pcos: Insulin And Metformin

Pcos: Insulin And Metformin

Young women with PCOS often have elevated insulin levels and are more likely to develop diabetes. Metformin is a medication often prescribed for women with PCOS to help prevent diabetes. A lifestyle that includes healthy nutrition and daily exercise is the most important part of a PCOS treatment plan. What is insulin? Insulin is a hormone made by an organ in the body called the pancreas. The food you eat is broken down into simple sugar (glucose) during digestion. Glucose is absorbed into the blood after you eat. Insulin helps glucose enter the cells of the body to be used as energy. If there’s not enough insulin in the body, or if the body can’t use the insulin, sugar levels in the blood become higher. What is insulin resistance? If your body is resistant to insulin, it means you need high levels of insulin to keep your blood sugar normal. Certain medical conditions such as being overweight or having PCOS can cause insulin resistance. Insulin resistance tends to run in families. What can insulin resistance do to me? High insulin levels can cause thickening and darkening of the skin (acanthosis nigricans) on the back of the neck, axilla (under the arms), and groin area. In young women with PCOS, high insulin levels can cause the ovaries to make more androgen hormones such as testosterone. This can cause increased body hair, acne, and irregular or few periods. Having insulin resistance can increase your risk of developing diabetes. How can I lower my insulin levels? You can help lower your insulin levels naturally by eating fewer starches and sugars, and more foods that are high in fiber and low in refined carbohydrates. Low glycemic foods, on the other hand, don’t raise your blood sugar or insulin levels as much as foods that are high in sugar or refined carbohydr Continue reading >>

Metformin Associated Lactic Acidosis

Metformin Associated Lactic Acidosis

Emma Fitzgerald, specialist trainee year 2 in anaesthetics 1, Stephen Mathieu, specialist registrar in anaesthetics and intensive care medicine1, Andrew Ball, consultant in anaesthesia and intensive care medicine1 1Dorset County Hospital, Dorchester, Dorset DT1 2JY Correspondence to: E Fitzgerald zcharm6{at}hotmail.com Dehydration in patients taking metformin can lead to metformin associated lactic acidosis, a potentially fatal condition Metformin, a dimethylbiguanide, is a widely used oral antihyperglycaemic drug used in the long term treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. More recently it has also been used to improve fertility and weight reduction in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome. Many large studies have shown that intensive glucose control with metformin in overweight patients with type 2 diabetes is associated with risk reductions of 32% (P=0.002) for any diabetes related end point, 42% (P=0.017) for diabetes related death, and 36% (P=0.011) for all cause mortality compared with diet alone.1 Furthermore, metformin reduces microvascular end points, and its degree of glycaemic control is similar to that sulphonylureas and insulin. Metformin is considered to be first line treatment in overweight patients with type 2 diabetes whose blood glucose is inadequately controlled by lifestyle interventions alone and should be considered as a first line glucose lowering treatment in non-overweight patients with type 2 diabetes because of its other beneficial effects.2 It may also be useful in overweight patients with type 1 diabetes. A potential complication of metformin is the development of type B (non-hypoxic) lactic acidosis. Although metformin associated lactic acidosis is a rare condition, with an estimated prevalence of one to five cases per 100 000 population Continue reading >>

Metformin And Fatal Lactic Acidosis

Metformin And Fatal Lactic Acidosis

Publications Published: July 1998 Information on this subject has been updated. Read the most recent information. Dr P Pillans,former Medical Assessor, Centre for Adverse Reactions Monitoring (CARM), Dunedin Metformin is a useful anti-hyperglycaemic agent but significant mortality is associated with drug-induced lactic acidosis. Significant renal and hepatic disease, alcoholism and conditions associated with hypoxia (eg. cardiac and pulmonary disease, surgery) are contraindications to the use of metformin. Other risk factors for metformin-induced lactic acidosis are sepsis, dehydration, high dosages and increasing age. Metformin remains a major reported cause of drug-associated mortality in New Zealand. Of the 12 cases of lactic acidosis associated with metformin reported to CARM since 1977, 2 occurred in the last year and 8 cases had a fatal outcome. Metformin useful but small risk of potentially fatal lactic acidosis Metformin is a useful therapeutic agent for obese non-insulin dependent diabetics and those whose glycaemia cannot be controlled by sulphonylurea monotherapy. Lactic acidosis is an uncommon but potentially fatal adverse effect. The reported frequency of lactic acidosis is 0.06 per 1000 patient-years, mostly in patients with predisposing factors.1 Examples of metformin-induced lactic acidosis cases reported to CARM include: A 69-year-old man, with renal and cardiac disease, was prescribed metformin due to failing glycaemic control on glibenclamide monotherapy. He was well for six weeks, then developed lactic acidosis and died within 3 days. Post-surgical lactic acidosis caused the death of a 70-year-old man whose metformin was not withdrawn at the time of surgery. A 56-year-old woman, with no predisposing disease, died from lactic acidosis following major Continue reading >>

What Is The Most Important Information I Should Know About Synjardy Or Synjardy Xr?

What Is The Most Important Information I Should Know About Synjardy Or Synjardy Xr?

SYNJARDY and SYNJARDY XR are prescription medicines that contain 2 diabetes medicines, empagliflozin (JARDIANCE) and metformin. SYNJARDY and SYNJARDY XR can be used along with diet and exercise to improve blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes, and can be used in adults with type 2 diabetes who have known cardiovascular disease when both empagliflozin and metformin are appropriate and empagliflozin is needed to reduce the risk of cardiovascular death. SYNJARDY and SYNJARDY XR are not for people with type 1 diabetes, or for people with diabetic ketoacidosis (increased ketones in the blood or urine). IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION SYNJARDY or SYNJARDY XR can cause serious side effects, including Lactic Acidosis (a build-up of lactic acid in the blood). Metformin, one of the medicines in SYNJARDY and SYNJARDY XR, can cause lactic acidosis, a rare but serious condition that can cause death. Lactic acidosis is a medical emergency and must be treated in a hospital. Call your doctor right away if you get any of the following symptoms of lactic acidosis: cold in your hands or feet; feel dizzy or lightheaded; slow or irregular heartbeat; feel very weak or tired; have unusual muscle pain; have trouble breathing; feel sleepy or drowsy; have stomach pains, nausea, or vomiting. You have a higher chance of getting lactic acidosis with SYNJARDY or SYNJARDY XR if you: have moderate to severe kidney problems or your kidneys are affected by certain x-ray tests that use injectable dye; have liver problems; drink alcohol very often, or drink a lot of alcohol in the short term (“binge” drinking); get dehydrated (lose a large amount of body fluids); have surgery; have a heart attack, severe infection, or stroke. Who should not take SYNJARDY or SYNJARDY XR? Do not take SYNJARDY or SYNJA Continue reading >>

Metformin Tablets

Metformin Tablets

Generic Name: Metformin Tablets (met FOR min) Brand Name: Glucophage Warning Rarely, metformin may cause an acid health problem in the blood (lactic acidosis). The risk of lactic acidosis is higher in people with kidney problems and in people who take certain other drugs like topiramate. The risk is also higher in people with liver problems or heart failure, in older people (65 or older), or with alcohol use. If lactic acidosis happens, it can lead to other health problems and can be deadly. Lab tests to check the kidneys may be done while taking this medicine (metformin tablets). Talk with the doctor. Call your doctor right away if you have signs of too much lactic acid in the blood (lactic acidosis) like fast breathing, fast or slow heartbeat, a heartbeat that does not feel normal, very bad upset stomach or throwing up, feeling very sleepy, shortness of breath, feeling very tired or weak, very bad dizziness, feeling cold, or muscle pain or cramps. Do not take this medicine if you have a very bad infection, low oxygen, or a lot of fluid loss (dehydration). Talk with your doctor before you drink alcohol. If you are having an exam or test with contrast or have had one within the past 48 hours, talk with your doctor. Tell all of your health care providers that you take this medicine (metformin tablets). This includes your doctors, nurses, pharmacists, and dentists. Uses of Metformin Tablets: It is used to lower blood sugar in patients with high blood sugar (diabetes). What do I need to tell my doctor BEFORE I take Metformin Tablets? If you have an allergy to metformin or any other part of this medicine. If you are allergic to any drugs like this one, any other drugs, foods, or other substances. Tell your doctor about the allergy and what signs you had, like rash; hives; i Continue reading >>

Metformin. What Do You Need To Know?

Metformin. What Do You Need To Know?

What is type 2 diabetes? People with diabetes are not able to make enough insulin and/or respond normally to the insulin their body does make. When this happens, sugar (glucose) builds up in the blood. This can lead to serious medical problems including kidney damage, amputations and blindness. Diabetes is also closely linked to heart disease. The main goal of treating diabetes is to lower the level of your blood sugar as close to normal as possible. How is type 2 diabetes usually controlled? High blood sugar can be lowered by diet and exercise, by a number of oral medications and by insulin injections. Before taking biguanidas (metformin hydrochloride tablets) you should first try to control your diabetes by exercise and weight loss. Even if you are taking biguanidas, you should still exercise and follow the diet recommended for your diabetes. Does Metformin work differently from other glucose-control medications? Yes it does. Until Metformin was introduced, al¡ the available oral glucose-control medications were from the same chemical group called sulfonylureas. These drugs lower blood sugar primarily by causing more of the body's own insulin to be released. Metformin lowers the amount of sugar in your blood by helping your body respond better to its own insulin. Metformin (metformin hydrochloride tablets) does not cause your body to produce more insulin. Therefore, Metformin rarely causes hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) and it doesn't usually cause weight gain. What happens if my blood sugar is still too high? When blood sugar cannot be lowered enough by either Metformin or a sulfonylurea, the two medications may be effective taken together. However, if you are unable to maintain your blood sugar with diet, exercise and glucose-control medication taken orally, then y Continue reading >>

6 Pearls About Metformin And Lactic Acidosis

6 Pearls About Metformin And Lactic Acidosis

Metformin accumulation: Lactic acidosis and high plasmatic metformin levels in a retrospective case series of 66 patients on chronic therapy. Vecchio S et al. Clin Toxicol 2014 Feb;52:129-135. Metformin is frequently used alone or in combination to treat type 2 diabetes. It lowers blood glucose by decreasing hepatic gluconeogenesis, predominantly by inhibiting mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I. The drug is eliminated mainly by the kidneys, and acute or chronic renal insufficiency may allow accumulation of the drug with increasing levels. A small percentage of patients on metformin develop severe lactic acidosis. There has been an ongoing controversy as whether this acidosis is metformin-associated or metformin-induced. This paper, from the Pavia Poison Control Centre in Northern Italy, helps shed light on this question. The authors retrospectively reviewed patients admitted to their toxicology unit over a 5-year period. Eligible patients were on chronic metformin therapy at the time of admission, had lactic acidosis (pH < 7.35, arterial lactate > 5 mmol/L), and elevated metformin levels (plasma metformin > 4 mcg/ml). Cases of acute overdose were excluded. The study objective was to correlate the metformin levels with measured pH, lactate levels, renal function, and mortality rate. Sixty-six eligible patients were identified. All patients presented with acute renal failure and severe lactic acidosis (mean pH 6.91, mean lactate 14.36 mmol/L). About half the patients had a pre-existing contraindication to metformin therapy, predominantly renal failure and/or heart disease. Approximately 75% presented after several days of a mild gastrointestinal prodrome with nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea; this may either have represented the initial manifestations of metformin po Continue reading >>

Metformin - Oral, Glucophage

Metformin - Oral, Glucophage

are allergic to dapagliflozin or any of the ingredients in FARXIGA. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction may include skin rash, raised red patches on your skin (hives), swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty in breathing or swallowing. If you have any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and contact your healthcare provider or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away have severe kidney problems or are on dialysis. Your healthcare provider should do blood tests to check how well your kidneys are working before and during your treatment with FARXIGA Dehydration (the loss of body water and salt), which may cause you to feel dizzy, faint, lightheaded, or weak, especially when you stand up (orthostatic hypotension). You may be at a higher risk of dehydration if you have low blood pressure; take medicines to lower your blood pressure, including water pills (diuretics); are 65 years of age or older; are on a low salt diet, or have kidney problems Ketoacidosis occurred in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes during treatment with FARXIGA. Ketoacidosis is a serious condition which may require hospitalization and may lead to death. Symptoms may include nausea, tiredness, vomiting, trouble breathing, and abdominal pain. If you get any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and call your healthcare provider right away. If possible, check for ketones in your urine or blood, even if your blood sugar is less than 250 mg/dL Kidney problems. Sudden kidney injury occurred in people taking FARXIGA. Talk to your doctor right away if you reduce the amount you eat or drink, or if you lose liquids; for example, from vomiting, diarrhea, or excessive heat exposure Serious urinary tract infections (UTI), some that lead to hospitalization, occu Continue reading >>

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