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Metformin And Cholesterol

Effect Of Metformin Treatment On Lipoprotein Subfractions In Non-diabetic Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction: A Glycometabolic Intervention As Adjunct To Primary Coronary Intervention In St Elevation Myocardial Infarction (gips-iii) Trial

Effect Of Metformin Treatment On Lipoprotein Subfractions In Non-diabetic Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction: A Glycometabolic Intervention As Adjunct To Primary Coronary Intervention In St Elevation Myocardial Infarction (gips-iii) Trial

Click through the PLOS taxonomy to find articles in your field. For more information about PLOS Subject Areas, click here . Effect of Metformin Treatment on Lipoprotein Subfractions in Non-Diabetic Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction: A Glycometabolic Intervention as Adjunct to Primary Coronary Intervention in ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction (GIPS-III) Trial Affiliation University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, the Department of Cardiology, Groningen, the Netherlands Affiliation University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, the Department of Cardiology, Groningen, the Netherlands Affiliation University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, the Department of Cardiology, Groningen, the Netherlands Affiliation University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, the Department of Cardiology, Groningen, the Netherlands Affiliation LabCorp, Raleigh, North Carolina, United States of America Affiliation University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, the Department of Cardiology, Groningen, the Netherlands Affiliation University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, the Department of Critical Care, Groningen, the Netherlands Continue reading >>

Metformin Could Reduce Cholesterol Levels, Research Suggests

Metformin Could Reduce Cholesterol Levels, Research Suggests

Metformin could reduce cholesterol levels, research suggests Metformin could reduce cholesterol levels, research suggests The type 2 diabetes drug metformin could be used to lower cholesterol levels , according to new research. The study, conducted by researchers at the German Diabetes Centre in Dsseldorf, analysed the blood samples of more than 1,800 participants. The researchers looked for metabolites that would provide evidence of blood lipid profiles. They split the participants into several groups: one group was given metformin , and the four control groups were not. The researchers found significantly lower concentrations of three metabolites in the metformin group. The metabolites were all associated with lower levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. It was hypothesised that the lower levels of LDL cholesterol could be explained by genes associated with AMPK, a molecular mechanism activated by metformin. By activating AMPK, metformin controls the genes associated with LDL cholesterol levels. "Our study suggests that metformin might indeed have an additional beneficial effect with regards to cardiovascular diseases among the diabetes patients," said first author Dr. Tao Xu. Dr. Stefan Brandmaier, co-first author, added: "Until now the exact mechanism is unclear. Thus, we want to continue our contribution to its decryption." The study is one of several that have examined metformin's potential for use in treating conditions other than type 2 diabetes. Other studies have suggested that metformin could treat Alzheimer's disease , or at least have a positive effect on the brain. Continue reading >>

The Multiple Benefits Of Metformin

The Multiple Benefits Of Metformin

Metformin (brand name "Glucophage") has been used in the treatment of type II diabetes for the past 40 years.1 This drug counteracts many of the underlying factors that result in the manifestation of this insidious disease. Metformin also produces helpful side benefits that can protect against the lethal complications of type II diabetes. Frequently prescribed anti-diabetic drugs fail to address the fundamental causes of type II diabetes and can induce serious side effects. Type II diabetes affects between 16 to 19 million Americans. About 75% of type II diabetics will die from a cardiovascular-related disease. Conventional doctors often prescribe drugs for the purpose of lowering blood sugar levels. These drugs do not adequately address the multiple underlying pathologies associated with the type II diabetic state. Type II diabetes is characterized by cellular insulin resistence. The result is excess accumulation of glucose in the bloodstream as cells become resistant to the effects of insulin. Type II diabetes is characterized by cellular insulin resistence. The result is excess accumulation of glucose in the bloodstream because cells become resistant to the effects of insulin and fail to take up glucose As the type II diabetic condition progresses, many people gain weight and develop more fat cells.2 Treating type II diabetes with insulin-enhancing therapy increases the risk of cardiovascular complications, induces weight gain, and fails to correct the underlying cause of the disease. Many type II diabetics produce too much insulin in a futile attempt to drive glucose into insulin-resistant cells. When doctors prescribe insulin-enhancing drugs to these type II diabetics, a temporarily reduction of serum glucose may occur, but the long-term effects of this excess insu Continue reading >>

A New Perspective On Metformin Therapy In Type 1 Diabetes

A New Perspective On Metformin Therapy In Type 1 Diabetes

, Volume 60, Issue9 , pp 15941600 | Cite as A new perspective on metformin therapy in type 1 diabetes Metformin is quite frequently used off-label in type 1 diabetes to limit insulin dose requirement. Guidelines recommend that it can improve glucose control in those who are overweight and obese but evidence in support of this is limited. Recently-published findings from the REducing with MetfOrmin Vascular Adverse Lesions (REMOVAL) trial suggest that metformin therapy in type 1 diabetes can reduce atherosclerosis progression, weight and LDL-cholesterol levels. This provides a new perspective on metformin therapy in type 1 diabetes and suggests a potential role for reducing the long-term risk of cardiovascular disease. AtherosclerosisCardiovascularCarotid intima-media thicknessCholesterolMetforminReviewType 1 diabetes Carotid Atherosclerosis: MEtformin for insulin ResistAnce Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications National Institute for Health and Care Excellence REducing with MetfOrmin Vascular Adverse Lesions The complete member list for The REMOVAL Study Team is provided in the electronic supplementary material ( ESM ). The online version of this article (doi: 10.1007/s00125-017-4364-6 ) contains peer-reviewed but unedited supplementary material, which is available to authorised users. Over the last three decades, the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) and its Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (EDIC) post-randomisation follow-up have confirmed that the risk of microvascular and cardiovascular complications in type 1 diabetes can be reduced with intensive glucose control [ 1 , 2 ]. However, despite modern insulin formulations administered by increasingly user-friendly and efficient modes of delivery, achieving and m Continue reading >>

Metformin May Reduce Risk Of Heart Disease In Adults With T1d

Metformin May Reduce Risk Of Heart Disease In Adults With T1d

Metformin May Reduce Risk of Heart Disease in Adults with T1D Treatment with metformin may help to reduce long-termheart disease risk in middle-aged adults with type 1 diabetes who are at increased risk forcardiovascular disease(CVD), according to a study presented simultaneously this week at the American Diabetes Associations 77th Scientific Sessionsat the San Diego Convention Center and inT A multicenter, international clinical trial, the REMOVAL trial,enrolled patients at 23 centers across the United Kingdom, Australia, Canada, Denmark and the Netherlands and usedultrasoundto measure atherosclerosisin the carotid arteries as a surrogate marker of heart disease.Atherosclerosisis a form of hardening of the arteries that is the leading cause of heart attacks, strokes and peripheral vascular disease. REMOVAL studied 428 middle-aged adults with longstanding type 1 diabetes--on average for 33 years. The patients had 3 or more risk factors for cardiovascular disease, including BMI over 27;A1Cgreater than 8.0; known CVD/peripheral vascular disease; current smoker; highblood pressure; highcholesterolor triglycerides; strong family history of CVD; or duration of diabetes more than 20 years. Trial participants were assigned interventions of 3 years duration of either oral metformin treatmentor matching placebos. Patients who received metformin lost weight, and their insulin doses were able to be reduced during the study. However, A1C levels showed reduction only during the first 3 months of metformin treatment. Cholesterol was also reduced, even though more than 80% of trial participants were already taking statins. Weight reduction and lowering of cholesterol may therefore have played a role in reducing atherosclerosis. EstimatedGlomerular Filtration Rate(eGFR) by the Modific Continue reading >>

Has Anyone Tried Metformin?

Has Anyone Tried Metformin?

HealthBoards > Heart & Vascular > High Cholesterol > Has Anyone Tried Metformin? Has anyone tried metformin and what kind of results did you obtain on your cholesterol numbers. The research I found on the web seems incouraging. I think I would have a better chance talking my doctor in to a script for that instead of a Statin. Just trying to know all my options before ai go to the dr. metformin is for diabetes not cholesteral To live my life to its fullest and to put all my trust in God. As Delrae said, glucophage is for Diabetes. I doubt that you'll have trouble talking your doctor into a statin. If anything, most of them are MORE than ready and willing to prescribe them. metformin is for diabetes not cholesteral ...Yes, you are both correct. I was researching the other day and ran across a report on the effects of metformin in a study. Besides the glucose benefits, there was significant improvement in the test subjects cholesterol levels. I suspect it works the same way that the Low gi diet works. I was just curious if anyone here had tried it. ...The more and more I research the subject on the web, the more I'm beginning to think that carbohydrate metabolism has a big influence on cholesterol. Right now I'm trying to find the relationship between the adrenal gland and cholesterol. I read one report that stated the adrenal gland uses LDL to make the adrenal hormones. It seems logical to me that if our adrenal system was overtaxed or exhausted, that the liver would produce extra LDL for the adrenal to use to make more hormones. The adrenal gland also regulates the glucose levels of our metabolism when glycogen stores are depleted or inhibited by excess insulin. ...All these things can be carbohydrate metabolism related by conditions like insulin resistance, which is my Continue reading >>

Metformin May Reduce High Cholesterol In Patients Taking Antipsychotics

Metformin May Reduce High Cholesterol In Patients Taking Antipsychotics

Metformin May Reduce High Cholesterol in Patients Taking Antipsychotics Antipsychotics can cause numerous side effects, including weight gain and metabolic abnormalities. The off-label use of the type 2 diabetes medication metformin may be able to help patients who are unable to switch to a lower-risk antipsychotic. Despite the great benefit that second-generation antipsychotics can offer patients with schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders, taking them can lead to serious side effects for some patients, including a high risk of weight gain and metabolic abnormalities. To help minimize this risk, experts advise that clinicians discuss the importance of healthy eating and regular exercise with patients before prescribing antipsychotics; monitor any changes in weight, blood pressure, or fasting plasma glucose and lipid levels after initiating therapy; and, if significant changes are detected, consider switching patients to a lower-risk antipsychotic. If switching antipsychotics is not an option, a growing body of literature suggests that the off-label use of metforminapproved for the treatment of type 2 diabetesmay be able to reduce antipsychotic-induced weight gain and insulin resistance. A study published last month in Molecular Psychiatry also suggests that the medication may reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), which is a primary target of cardiovascular disease reduction. Christoph Correll, M.D., says that before prescribing metformin, clinicians treating patients with antipsychotic-induced weight gain should consider healthy lifestyle interventions and switching patients to lower-risk antipsychotics. Hofstra North Shore LIJ School of Medicine People dont die of weight gain; they die of insulin resistance and lipid abnormalities, said Christoph Continue reading >>

Cholesterol Lowering Effect Of Metformin In Combined Hyperlipidemia: Placebo Controlled Double Blind Trial.

Cholesterol Lowering Effect Of Metformin In Combined Hyperlipidemia: Placebo Controlled Double Blind Trial.

Cholesterol lowering effect of metformin in combined hyperlipidemia: placebo controlled double blind trial. Third Department of Medicine, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Finland. Metformin, an antidiabetic biguanide derivative, prevents experimental atherosclerosis and induces structural changes in lipoproteins in experimental animals. In the present study we investigated the effect of metformin on serum lipoproteins and platelet function in 24 non-diabetic patients with type II B hyperlipidemia. The patients were randomly given metformin in two dosage levels (1.0 g/day and 2.0 g/day) and placebo for periods of nine weeks in a crossover trial. Metformin caused a dose dependent fall in the concentrations of total serum cholesterol and of LDL-cholesterol. The average concentration of total cholesterol was 8.54 +/- 0.22 (SE) mmol/l, 8.12 +/- 0.19 mmol/l and 7.79 +/- 0.15 mmol/l during placebo, metformin 1.0 g/day and 2.0 g/day treatments, respectively. Both metformin values differed significantly (P less than 0.05) from the placebo value. Thus there was an average fall of 8.1% in total cholesterol after the higher metformin dose. LDL-cholesterol was 5.25 +/- 0.23 mmol/l after placebo, falling by 3.1% and 9.6% after metformin doses of 1.0 g/day and 2.0 g/day, respectively. The concentrations of HDL-cholesterol and total serum triglycerides showed no significant changes. Body weight, blood glucose, plasma insulin, blood lactate, platelet function and urinary excretion of prostanoids remained unchanged during the study. The reduction of total- and LDL-cholesterol levels may be a welcome additional consequence of metformin during treatment of diabetic patients with hypercholesterolemia. Continue reading >>

Metformin Modulates Insulin Receptor Signaling In Normal And Cholesterol-treated Human Hepatoma Cells (hepg2)

Metformin Modulates Insulin Receptor Signaling In Normal And Cholesterol-treated Human Hepatoma Cells (hepg2)

Volume 377, Issues 23 , 21 July 1999, Pages 241-252 Metformin modulates insulin receptor signaling in normal and cholesterol-treated human hepatoma cells (HepG2) Author links open overlay panel Emmanuelle JMeuilleta Get rights and content The effects of the biguanide anti-hyperglycemic agent, metformin (N,N-dimethyl-biguanide), on insulin signaling was studied in a human hepatoma cell line (HepG2). Cells were cultured in the absence (control cells) or in the presence of 100 M of a cholesterol derivative, hemisuccinate of cholesterol. Cholesterol hemisuccinate-treatment alters cholesterol and lipid content of HepG2 and modulates membrane fluidity. Cholesterol hemisuccinate-treatment induces a decrease in insulin responsiveness and creates an "insulin-resistant" state in these cells. Exposure to 100 M of metformin resulted in a significant enhancement of insulin-stimulated lipogenesis in control and cholesterol hemisuccinate-treated cells. In control cells, metformin altered glycogenesis in a biphasic manner. In cholesterol hemisuccinate-treated cells, metformin inhibited basal glycogenesis but restored insulin-stimulated glycogenesis. Hence, to understand the mechanism of metformin action, we analyzed early steps in the insulin signaling pathway, including insulin receptor autophosphorylation, mitogen-activated-protein kinase and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activities, in both control and cholesterol hemisuccinate-treated cells. Overall, the results suggest that metformin may interact with the insulin receptor and/or a component involved in the early steps of insulin signal transduction. Continue reading >>

Metformin: Is This Diabetes Treatment A Wonder Drug?

Metformin: Is This Diabetes Treatment A Wonder Drug?

Metformin: Is This Diabetes Treatment a Wonder Drug? New research is showing that the first-line diabetes drug can improve ovarian cancer survival only boosting metformin's status as an emerging "magic drug." Sign Up for Our Living with Diabetes Newsletter Thanks for signing up! You might also like these other newsletters: Sign up for more FREE Everyday Health newsletters . MONDAY, Dec. 3, 2012 Metformin , the generic first-line diabetes drug oftenused to control blood sugar, may also improve ovarian cancer survival , researchers at the Mayo Clinic reported online in the journal Cancer. In a retrospective study, women who were taking metformin during treatment for ovarian cancer, typically to control type 2 diabetes, had significantly better survival rates than cancer patients not on the drug. This is not the first time metformin has been linked to anti-cancer effects in ovarian cancer, as well as prostate, colon, pancreatic, and brain cancer. Earlier this year, a large systematic review also found that metformin reduces overall cancer risk in people with type 2 diabetes because it regulates activity of an enzyme that suppresses cell growth, endocrinologists with Mexico's National Institute of Medical Sciences and Nutrition in Mexico City reported. Metformin's hormone-inhibiting abilities might help more than cancer and type 2 diabetes, according to a slew of recent studies, prompting researchers at theDow University of Health Sciences in Karachi, Pakistan, to go so far as to call it a "magic drug" and many others to herald it as an affordable wonder with few serious side effects. Here's a look at more recent research exploring the many positive effects of metformin: Treats type 2 diabetes.Because of its low cost and lack of serious side effects, it is the preferred dr Continue reading >>

Metformin

Metformin

A popular oral drug for treating Type 2 diabetes. Metformin (brand name Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glumetza, Riomet) is a member of a class of drugs called biguanides that helps lower blood glucose levels by improving the way the body handles insulin — namely, by preventing the liver from making excess glucose and by making muscle and fat cells more sensitive to available insulin. Metformin not only lowers blood glucose levels, which in the long term reduces the risk of diabetic complications, but it also lowers blood cholesterol and triglyceride levels and does not cause weight gain the way insulin and some other oral blood-glucose-lowering drugs do. Overweight, high cholesterol, and high triglyceride levels all increase the risk of developing heart disease, the leading cause of death in people with Type 2 diabetes. Another advantage of metformin is that it does not cause hypoglycemia (low blood glucose) when it is the only diabetes medicine taken. Metformin is typically taken two to three times a day, with meals. The extended-release formula (Glucophage XR) is taken once a day, with the evening meal. The most common side effects of metformin are nausea and diarrhea, which usually go away over time. A more serious side effect is a rare but potentially fatal condition called lactic acidosis, in which dangerously high levels of lactic acid build up in the bloodstream. Lactic acidosis is most likely to occur in people with kidney disease, liver disease, or congestive heart failure, or in those who drink alcohol regularly. (If you have more than four alcoholic drinks a week, metformin may not be the best medicine for you.) Unfortunately, many doctors ignore these contraindications (conditions that make a particular treatment inadvisable) and prescribe metformin to people Continue reading >>

Metformin Promotes Cholesterol Efflux In Macrophages By Up-regulating Fgf21 Expression: A Novel Anti-atherosclerotic Mechanism

Metformin Promotes Cholesterol Efflux In Macrophages By Up-regulating Fgf21 Expression: A Novel Anti-atherosclerotic Mechanism

MetforminFGF21MacrophageABCA1ABCG1Cholesterol efflux Metformin is widely used as a glucose-lowering agent in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Recently, several studies have confirmed that metformin possessed multiple cardiovascular protective effects such as decreasing cardiovascular mortality, attenuating adverse cardiac and vascular remodeling and ameliorating atherosclerosis [ 1 3 ]. Hong et al. [ 4 ] in a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial found treatment with metformin for 3years substantially reduced major cardiovascular events in a median follow-up of 5.0years compared with glipizide in type 2 diabetes patients who had a history of coronary artery disease. Forouzandeh et al. [ 5 ] demonstrated metformin treatment significantly attenuated high-fat diet-induced atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E-knockout (ApoE /) mice. These studies suggest metformin could ameliorate atherosclerosis, but the anti-atherosclerotic mechanism of metformin remains to be fully clarified. Previous studies reported that metformin could decrease plasma cholesterol levels in diabetic and non-diabetic patients beyond its glucose-lowering effect [ 6 9 ], and the lipid-lowering effect of metformin was also confirmed in a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) [ 10 ]. Besides, it was found that metformin treatment could lower inflammation markers levels in patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease and restore impaired HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux from macrophages due to glycation [ 11 , 12 ]. These effects may contribute to the anti-atherosclerotic properties of metformin. The deposition of excessive cholesterol in macrophages plays a key role in atherosclerotic plaque formation, thus removal of excess cholesterol from macrophage Continue reading >>

Metformin - Oral, Glucophage

Metformin - Oral, Glucophage

are allergic to dapagliflozin or any of the ingredients in FARXIGA. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction may include skin rash, raised red patches on your skin (hives), swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty in breathing or swallowing. If you have any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and contact your healthcare provider or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away have severe kidney problems or are on dialysis. Your healthcare provider should do blood tests to check how well your kidneys are working before and during your treatment with FARXIGA Dehydration (the loss of body water and salt), which may cause you to feel dizzy, faint, lightheaded, or weak, especially when you stand up (orthostatic hypotension). You may be at a higher risk of dehydration if you have low blood pressure; take medicines to lower your blood pressure, including water pills (diuretics); are 65 years of age or older; are on a low salt diet, or have kidney problems Ketoacidosis occurred in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes during treatment with FARXIGA. Ketoacidosis is a serious condition which may require hospitalization and may lead to death. Symptoms may include nausea, tiredness, vomiting, trouble breathing, and abdominal pain. If you get any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and call your healthcare provider right away. If possible, check for ketones in your urine or blood, even if your blood sugar is less than 250 mg/dL Kidney problems. Sudden kidney injury occurred in people taking FARXIGA. Talk to your doctor right away if you reduce the amount you eat or drink, or if you lose liquids; for example, from vomiting, diarrhea, or excessive heat exposure Serious urinary tract infections (UTI), some that lead to hospitalization, occu Continue reading >>

Avoid The Metformin Bandwagon

Avoid The Metformin Bandwagon

From diabetes to cancer, berberine matches - or beats - this patent medicine every time! As many know, metformin is the number one prescription medication for type-2 diabetes. The patent for the name-brand of this patent medicine, Glucophage®, expired years ago and as a result generic-brand competition (metformin) brought this patent medicine’s price down so that it’s relatively inexpensive, especially when compared with nearly any other medication still covered by a patent. Mainstream medical research has found other uses for this un-natural molecule, including (but not limited to) lipid, blood pressure, and insulin resistance lowering effects, anti-cancer effects, improvement of polycystic ovarian syndrome, combatting Alzheimer’s disease, and extending life span in mice. Surprising guests on the metformin bandwagon Some proponents of natural therapies – including, surprisingly, two nationally and internationally circulated health magazines – have climbed on the metformin bandwagon, writing articles about the “health benefits” of metformin, and even advocating that otherwise healthy people take this patent medicine every day as a preventive. They admit that there are known side effects, but write that these are few, and that the benefits outweigh the risks. If there aren’t any natural treatment alternatives that are as effective, or more effective, than a patent medicine or other un-natural molecule – especially in serious or life-threatening situations – then the use of a patent medication of course makes sense. But when there are natural alternatives that work just as well or better, the rule is – and always should be – to “Copy Nature.” Human bodies are formed from the molecules of planet Earth, and powered by the energies of this planet Continue reading >>

Combined Use Of Metformin And Atorvastatin Attenuates Atherosclerosis In Rabbits Fed A High-cholesterol Diet

Combined Use Of Metformin And Atorvastatin Attenuates Atherosclerosis In Rabbits Fed A High-cholesterol Diet

Combined use of metformin and atorvastatin attenuates atherosclerosis in rabbits fed a high-cholesterol diet Scientific Reportsvolume7, Articlenumber:2169 (2017) Statins are widely used to reduce cardiovascular risk. Unfortunately, some patients still experience cardiovascular events though prescribed with high-intensity statins. Metformin, an anti-diabetic drug, was reported to possess anti-atherosclerotic effects. Therefore, the experiments were designed to evaluate whether combined use of metformin and atorvastatin can achieve additional benefits. In rabbits fed a high-cholesterol diet, we evaluated the effects of the combination therapy on atherosclerotic plaques, lipid profiles, blood glucose levels, liver and kidney functions. Effects of combination therapy on cholesterol efflux and the expression of related transporters were studied in vitro. Our results showed that the combination therapy induced a more significant decrease in atherosclerotic lesion area than atorvastatin without additional lipid-lowering effect. The combination therapy significantly increased the percentage of large high-density lipoprotein subfraction. The intravenous glucose tolerance test showed that atorvastatin-treated rabbits had an increased area under the curve for time-dependent glucose levels after a bolus injection of glucose, which was completely reversed by metformin treatment. In cultured macrophages, co-treatment with metformin and atorvastatin promoted cholesterol efflux and up-regulated expression of ATP-binding cassette transporters A1 and G1. Taken together, our results suggest that atorvastatin/metformin combination therapy may achieve additional anti-atherosclerotic benefits likely through increasing cholesterol efflux in macrophages. Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease Continue reading >>

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