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Metformin And Caffeine

Caffeine Effectiveness, Safety, And Drug Interactions On Rxlist

Caffeine Effectiveness, Safety, And Drug Interactions On Rxlist

1,3,7-Trimethyl-1H- purine - 2,6(3H,7H)-dione, 1,3,7-trimethylxanthine, 1,3,7-trimthylxanthine, 3,7-Dihydro-1,3,7-trimethyl-1H-purine-2,6-dione, Anhydrous Caffeine , Cafeina, Cafine, Cafine Anhydre, Cafine Benzodate de Sodium , Caffeine Sodium Benzoate, Caffeine Anhydrous, Caffeine Citrate, Caffeinum, Citrate de Cafine, Citrated Caffeine, Methylxanthine, Mthylxanthine, Trimethylxanthine, Trimthylxanthine. Caffeine is a chemical found in coffee, tea, cola, guarana , mate, and other products. Caffeine is most commonly used to improve mental alertness, but it has many other uses. Caffeine is used by mouth or rectally in combination with painkillers (such as aspirin and acetaminophen ) and a chemical called ergotamine for treating migraine headaches. It is also used with painkillers for simple headaches and preventing and treating headaches after epidural anesthesia . Some people use caffeine by mouth for asthma , gallbladder disease , attention deficit- hyperactivity disorder ( ADHD ), obsessive-compulsive disorder ( OCD ), low oxygen levels in the blood due to exercise, Parkinson's disease , memory , cramping, liver cirrhosis , Hepatitis C , stroke , recovery after surgery , decreasing pain , muscle soreness from exercise, age-related mental impairment, shortness of breath in newborns, and low blood pressure . Caffeine is also used for weight loss and type 2 diabetes . Very high doses are used, often in combination with ephedrine , as an alternative to illegal stimulants. Caffeine is one of the most commonly used stimulants among athletes. Taking caffeine, within limits, is allowed by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). Urine concentrations over 15 mcg/mL are prohibited. It takes most people about 8 cups of coffee providing 100 mg /cup to reach this urin Continue reading >>

Caffeine Effectiveness, How It Works, And Drug Interactions On Emedicinehealth

Caffeine Effectiveness, How It Works, And Drug Interactions On Emedicinehealth

Are there any interactions with medications? Interaction Rating: Major Do not take this combination. Stimulant drugs speed up the nervous system . Caffeine and ephedrine are both stimulant drugs. Taking caffeine along with ephedrine might cause too much stimulation and sometimes serious side effects and heart problems. Do not take caffeine-containing products and ephedrine at the same time. Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination. Caffeine might block the effects of adenosine (Adenocard). Adenosine (Adenocard) is often used by doctors to do a test on the heart. This test is called a cardiac stress test. Stop consuming caffeine-containing products at least 24 hours before a cardiac stress test. Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination. The body breaks down caffeine to get rid of it. Some antibiotics might decrease how quickly the body breaks down caffeine. Taking these antibiotics along with caffeine can increase the risk of side effects including jitteriness, headache, increased heart rate, and other side effects. Some antibiotics that decrease how quickly the body breaks down caffeine include ciprofloxacin ( Cipro ), enoxacin (Penetrex), norfloxacin ( Chibroxin , Noroxin ), sparfloxacin (Zagam), trovafloxacin (Trovan), and grepafloxacin (Raxar). Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination. Carbamazepine is used to treat some seizures . Caffeine may lower the effects of carbamazepine or increase how susceptible a person is to seizures . In theory, taking caffeine with carbamazepine can reduce its effects and increase the risk of seizures in some people. Interaction Rating: Moderate Be cautious with this combination. The body breaks down caffeine to get rid of it. Cimetidine (Tagamet) can decrease how quick Continue reading >>

Does Caffeine Interact With The Metformin? My Husband Is Taking Metformin, And His Sugar Goes Sky?

Does Caffeine Interact With The Metformin? My Husband Is Taking Metformin, And His Sugar Goes Sky?

Home Q & A Questions Does caffeine interact with... Does caffeine interact with the metformin? My husband is taking metformin, and his sugar goes sky? I have never heard of an interaction with caffeine and metformin, but I have read recently that there are some reports of coffee making blood sugar go up. The studies showed that the coffee drinkers were only drinking the coffee black and were adding no sugar. It is an interesting topic. About the Metformin with coffee question! Well I drink my coffee black with honey, and it seems as long as I'm not over stressed, depressed or feeling bummed out, it did little to my blood sugar, since taking metformin for 3months, this week is the first time I have felt stressed and depressed (existing condition) and my morning glucose went from 5.4 to 7.2 - 8.8 for the past 5 days. Can anyone else say the same. Another query please, can anyone tell me if they have stopped metformin cold turkey... any side effects noticed. I have quit Metformin before cold turkey and I would not wish the result on anyone. I had severe abdominal cramping and nausea. It was comparable to the pain I felt when I had to have my galbladder removed. Metfromin is a medication you have to ramp up to taking the full dose, the same care should be taken to stop taking it as well. Continue reading >>

Side Effects Of Metformin Are More Serious Than You Think

Side Effects Of Metformin Are More Serious Than You Think

The Side Effects of Metformin can range from not so serious, to deadly, are the risks of Metformin and Glucophage side effects worth it? This page will give you information that might be able to help you decide that for yourself. Also known as Glucophage, this is an antidiabetic medicine most often used in those with Type 2 Diabetes who are also overweight. It’s also used extensively in women with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome, a condition known as PCOS, which is often accompanied by higher blood sugar readings which often benefit from the blood sugar lowering effects of Metformin. While at first glance it seems that Side Effects of Metformin are rare, a closer look and a little math show that there are some serious problems that can occur when taking this drug, and others that can and should be prevented easily, but are usually not due to a medical community that simply does not use nutritional supplements in the prevention of even well-known, easily preventable Glucophage side effects. Vitamin B12 Deficiency Vitamin B12 and Folic Acid Deficiency are well-known and well-studied side effects of Metformin. Despite the fact that there have been many studies confirming this problem over and over again in the medical literature, just like the Side Effects of Nitrous Oxide, few doctors warn their patients of this or recommend that they take simple, cheap over the counter Vitamin B12 Supplements in order to avoid this potentially devastating nutritional deficiency. In addition, the long term use of the ‘antacid’ drugs known as H2 receptor antagonist or proton pump inhibitors like Famotidine or Omeprazole, some of the most widely prescribed drugs, can increase this risk, as is mentioned in the Omeprazole Side Effects page. The Vitamin B12 Deficiency Symptoms range anywhere Continue reading >>

Does Caffeine Interact With Metformin? Complete Overview | Treato

Does Caffeine Interact With Metformin? Complete Overview | Treato

Caffeine and Headaches Metformin and PCOS Caffeine and Tiredness Metformin and Diabetes Caffeine and Pain Metformin and Clomid Caffeine and Addiction Metformin and Weight Loss Caffeine and Coffee Metformin and Pregnancy Treato does not review third-party posts for accuracy of any kind, including for medical diagnosis or treatments, or events in general. Treato does not provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Usage of the website does not substitute professional medical advice. The side effects featured here are based on those most frequently appearing in user posts on the Internet. The manufacturer's product labeling should always be consulted for a list of side effects most frequently appearing in patients during clinical studies. Talk to your doctor about which medications may be most appropriate for you. The information reflected here is dependent upon the correct functioning of our algorithm. From time-to-time, our system might experience bugs or glitches that affect the accuracy or correct application of mathematical algorithms. We will do our best to update the site if we are made aware of any malfunctioning or misapplication of these algorithms. We cannot guarantee results and occasional interruptions in updating may occur. Please continue to check the site for updated information. Continue reading >>

Caffeine Induces Metformin Anticancer Effect On Fibrosarcoma In Hamsters.

Caffeine Induces Metformin Anticancer Effect On Fibrosarcoma In Hamsters.

Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci. 2018 Apr;22(8):2461-2467. doi: 10.26355/eurrev_201804_14840. Caffeine induces metformin anticancer effect on fibrosarcoma in hamsters. Department of Histology and Embryology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Novi Sad, Novi Sad, Republic of Serbia. [email protected] We investigated the effect of metformin and caffeine on fibrosarcoma in hamsters. 32 Syrian golden hamsters of both sexes, weighing approximately 100 g, were randomly allocated to 3 experimental and 2 control groups, with a minimum of 6 animals per group. 2 x 106 BHK-21/C13 cells in 1 ml were injected subcutaneously into the animals' back in 4 groups. The first experimental group started peroral treatment with metformin 500 mg/kg daily, the second with caffeine 100 mg/kg daily and the third with a combination of metformin 500 mg/kg and caffeine 100 mg/kg daily, via a gastric probe 3 days before tumor inoculation. After 2 weeks, when the tumors were approximately 2 cm in the control group, all animals were sacrificed. The blood was collected for glucose and other analyses. The tumors were excised and weighed and their diameters were measured. The tumor samples were pathohistologically (HE) and immunohistochemically (Ki-67, CD 31, COX IV, GLUT-1, iNOS) assessed and the main organs toxicologically analyzed, including the control animals that had received metformin and caffeine. Tumor volume was determined using the formula LxS2/2, where L was the longest and S the shortest diameter. Ki-67-positive cells in the tumor samples were quantified. Images were taken and processed by software UTHSCSA Image Tools for Windows Version 3.00. Statistical significances were determined by the Student's t-test. The combination of metformin and caffeine inhibited fibrosarcoma growth in hams Continue reading >>

Coffee Interferes With Metformin?

Coffee Interferes With Metformin?

I love coffee.I am newly dx'd on 9/7/09 with Type 2.It's been 5 years in the making.My question is does anyone have experience that yes indeed, caffeine(coffee, diet soda, etc) have an adverse effect on the BGS when using metformin? Moderator T2 insulin resistant Using Basal/Bolus Therapy To my knowledge it is not the metformin, it is the caffeine itself. Although I have other issues, have not been able to handle caffeine in years. If I get some regular coffee, my blood glucose levels will go up. Glad you joined DD and enjoy the site, you will meet some great people here. I have caffiene every day and I use it to take my met and haven't had a problem. Everyones body is different. MEDS... 1000 mg ER met, 2000IU vitamin D3, multi vitamins, allegra, If you are not free to choose wrongly and irresponsibly, you are not free at all~~Jacob Hornberger "I have heard it said that you can leave camp, but camp never really leaves you." Paul Newmann We have had this discussion before and I think it is an idiividual thing. Metformin works in the liver to prevent spikes, so I don't think that has anything to do with it. What I find is my metformin wears off after about 7 hours. Originally took my metformin at dinner, but would have higher numbers in the mornings and late morning, even if I didn't eat. Now I take it 3 times a day, when I first get up (7 am, noon and right before bed 12 am) That seems to work best for me. Also DP, dawn phenomenom causes bg rise in a lot of diabetics. This is caused by hormones that are naturally produced in the morning. Some people who produce too much cortisol ( stress hormone) may have difficulties with caffeine. Only been about a month with time out due to due MRI about 3 or 4 days.Wow what a change to my sweet tooth carbohydrate eating plan.Am on 7 Continue reading >>

How Does Coffee Affect Diabetes?

How Does Coffee Affect Diabetes?

With diabetes, diet is of the utmost concern. What people with diabetes eat and drink directly affects their blood glucose levels. We often concentrate on food, but what people drink is just as important. For many people, the only way to get the day started is with a cup of coffee. Thankfully, recent studies have shown that drinking coffee may actually reduce the risk of getting diabetes. But what about for those who already have diabetes? Is coffee, or the caffeine in coffee, a problem for those with diabetes? Two 8-ounce cups of coffee contain about 280 milligrams of caffeine. For most young healthy adults, caffeine does not seem to make blood sugar levels higher. Even consuming up to 400 milligrams per day appears to be safe for most people. This article will take a closer look at caffeine and some of the research that has been done in this area. Diabetes and caffeine According to the American Diabetes Association in 2012, 29.1 million Americans or 9.3 percent of the population had diabetes. About 8.1 million of the 29.1 million were undiagnosed. The World Health Organization reported that the number of people with diabetes worldwide in 2014 was 422 million. Diabetes affects how the body uses sugar (glucose). The body needs glucose because it is an important energy source for certain cells and is the brain's main source of fuel. Glucose in the body comes from food and drink as well as being made by the liver. Insulin is a naturally occurring hormone in the body and helps the body to absorb glucose. People who have diabetes have too much glucose in their blood, which can cause serious health problems. Diabetes can occur due to either the pancreas not producing no or not enough insulin or the body being unable to use insulin effectively. Type 2 is the most common type Continue reading >>

The Mystery Of Coffee And Diabetes

The Mystery Of Coffee And Diabetes

Is coffee good or bad for diabetes? Some studies show that coffee is protective, while others say it’s harmful. Some say decaf is better; others say it’s worse. Let’s try to sort this out. For years, various studies have reported that coffee drinkers are less likely to develop Type 2 diabetes. A recent UCLA study found that “women who drink at least four cups of coffee a day are less than half as likely to develop diabetes as non-coffee drinkers.” Lead scientist Simin Liu said that coffee may improve the body’s tolerance to glucose by increasing metabolism or lowering insulin resistance. In 2008, Diabetes Self-Management blogger Amy Campbell reported on several other studies showing benefits for coffee. A study published in Diabetes Care in 2006 followed about 900 adults, roughly 300 of whom had prediabetes, for eight years. The people who drank caffeinated coffee had a 60% lower risk of getting diabetes than those who didn’t drink coffee. Another Diabetes Care study published the same year looked at more than 88,000 women in the Nurses’ Health Study II. It found that women who drank two or more cups of coffee daily had a lower risk (slightly more than half the risk) of getting diabetes than those who drank just one cup of coffee daily, or no coffee at all. And it didn’t matter whether the coffee was regular or decaf. So right there you have a disagreement about caffeine. Meanwhile, other studies have shown that coffee, or the caffeine in coffee, raises after-meal (postprandial) blood glucose levels up to 20% in people with diabetes. These studies have not been large but have received a lot of attention. In the most-reported study, from Duke University, ten subjects, all with diabetes, were tested — given either caffeine capsules or a placebo (inacti Continue reading >>

Caffeine And Diabetes; 6 Important Facts

Caffeine And Diabetes; 6 Important Facts

Share: Morning coffee-it is the only way to get the day started for many people all over the world. Recently many articles about coffee have been released in the news. Many people are asking, what’s the story-is coffee a good choice for people trying to prevent diabetes? Is there information about the effects of caffeine and coffee if one has diabetes? We’ll discuss six interesting studies and facts about coffee and caffeine. Fact 1: Caffeine and memory - A recent small study carried and published in 2014 at Johns Hopkins University with 73 subjects concluded that as little as 200 milligrams of caffeine enhances a special type of memory called pattern separation for up to 24 hours. When a person distinguishes the differences between two similar items that are not identical, they are exercising pattern discrimination. (1,2,3) The Mayo Clinic has an interesting graph depicting the amounts of caffeine in many popular drinks. Fact 2: Preventing type 2 diabetes - In both men and women, increased caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee consumption is strongly associated with a reduced risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Researchers at The Harvard School of Public Health just released an evaluation (in 2014) of twenty-eight studies from around the world. The risk of developing diabetes with drinking no coffee or coffee at different amounts was reviewed. Studies took place with a total of 1,109,272 subjects with outcome risk for diabetes type 2 of which there were 45,335 cases of diabetes. The studies followed the participants from 10 months to 20 years. There was a 33 percent drop in associated risk of developing type 2 diabetes when six cups of coffee (caffeinated or decaffeinated) was consumed per day. The researchers did not find significance between the relative risks of Continue reading >>

Interactions Between Metformin-caffein-aa7-hrb125-chol Oral And Theophylline-derivatives-lithium

Interactions Between Metformin-caffein-aa7-hrb125-chol Oral And Theophylline-derivatives-lithium

A decrease in the beneficial effects of lithium may occur. What you should do about this interaction: If you experience restlessness, tremors, loss of appetite, or other symptoms, contact your doctor. If you change the amount of caffeine you consume, contact your doctor. Your doctor may want to check the amount of lithium in your blood.Your healthcare professionals (e.g. doctor or pharmacist) may already be aware of this interaction and may be monitoring you for it. Do not start, stop, or change the dosage of any medicine before checking with them first. 1.Perry PJ, Calloway RA, Cook BL, Smith RE. Theophylline precipitated alterations of lithium clearance. Acta Psychiatr Scand 1984 Jun; 69(6):528-37. 2.Holstad SG, Perry PJ, Kathol RG, Carson RW, Krummel SJ. The effects of intravenous theophylline infusion versus intravenous sodium bicarbonate infusion on lithium clearance in normal subjects. Psychiatry Res 1988 Aug; 25(2):203-11. 3.Sierles FS, Ossowski MG. Concurrent use of theophylline and lithium in a patient with chronic obstructive lung disease and bipolar disorder. Am J Psychiatry 1982 Jan;139(1):117-8. 4.Thomsen K, Schou M. Renal lithium excretion in man. Am J Physiol 1968 Oct; 215(4):823-7. 5.Tondo L, Rudas N. The course of a seasonal bipolar disorder influenced by caffeine. J Affect Disord 1991 Aug;22(4):249-51. 6.Jefferson JW. Lithium tremor and caffeine intake: two cases of drinking less and shaking more. J Clin Psychiatry 1988 Feb;49(2):72-3. 7.Mester R, Toren P, Mizrachi I, Wolmer L, Karni N, Weizman A. Caffeine withdrawal increases lithium blood levels. Biol Psychiatry 1995 Mar 1; 37(5):348-50. Continue reading >>

Glucophage

Glucophage

How does this medication work? What will it do for me? Metformin belongs to the class of medications called oral hypoglycemics, which are medications that lower blood sugar. It is used to control blood glucose (blood sugar) for people with type 2 diabetes. It is used when diet, exercise, and weight reduction have not been found to lower blood glucose well enough on their own. Metformin works by reducing the amount of glucose made by the liver and by making it easier for glucose to enter into the tissues of the body. Metformin has been found to be especially useful in delaying problems associated with diabetes for overweight people with diabetes. This medication may be available under multiple brand names and/or in several different forms. Any specific brand name of this medication may not be available in all of the forms or approved for all of the conditions discussed here. As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here. Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than those listed in these drug information articles. If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are taking this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop taking this medication without consulting your doctor. Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms as you do. It can be harmful for people to take this medication if their doctor has not prescribed it. What form(s) does this medication come in? 500 mg Each white, round, biconvex tablet, scored on one side and debossed with "HMR" on the other, contains metformin HCl 500 mg. Nonmedicinal ingredients: magnesium stearate and povidone. 850 mg Each white, oblong tablet, debossed with "HMR" on one side and "850" on the other, Continue reading >>

Brand Name Act Metformin Common Name Metformin

Brand Name Act Metformin Common Name Metformin

The content of this page: How does this medication work? What will it do for me? Metformin belongs to the class of medications called oral hypoglycemics, which are medications that lower blood sugar. It is used to control blood glucose (blood sugar) for people with type 2 diabetes. It is used when diet, exercise, and weight reduction have not been found to lower blood glucose well enough on their own. Metformin works by reducing the amount of glucose made by the liver and by making it easier for glucose to enter into the tissues of the body. Metformin has been found to be especially useful in delaying problems associated with diabetes for overweight people with diabetes. This medication may be available under multiple brand names and/or in several different forms. Any specific brand name of this medication may not be available in all of the forms or approved for all of the conditions discussed here. As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here. Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than those listed in these drug information articles. If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are taking this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop taking this medication without consulting your doctor. Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms as you do. It can be harmful for people to take this medication if their doctor has not prescribed it. How should I use this medication? The recommended adult dose of metformin ranges from 500 mg 3 or 4 times a day to 850 mg 2 or 3 times a day or 1000 mg 2 times a day. The maximum daily dose should not exceed 2,550 mg daily. Tablets should be taken with food whenever possible to reduce the risk o Continue reading >>

Does Caffeine Affect Blood Sugar?

Does Caffeine Affect Blood Sugar?

The average U.S. adult consumes about two 8-ounce cups (474 milliliters) of coffee a day, which can contain around 280 milligrams of caffeine. For most young, healthy adults, caffeine doesn't appear to noticeably affect blood sugar (glucose) levels, and consumption up to 400 milligrams a day appears to be safe. Some studies suggest that drinking coffee, caffeinated and decaffeinated, may actually reduce your risk of developing diabetes. If you already have diabetes, however, the impact of caffeine on insulin action may be associated with higher or lower blood sugar levels. For some people with diabetes, about 200 milligrams of caffeine — or the equivalent of one to two 8-ounce cups (237 to 474 milliliters) of plain, brewed coffee — may cause this effect. Caffeine affects every person differently. If you have diabetes or you're struggling to control your blood sugar levels, limiting the amount of caffeine in your diet may provide a benefit. Continue reading >>

Caffeine Can Decrease Insulin Sensitivity In Humans

Caffeine Can Decrease Insulin Sensitivity In Humans

Abstract OBJECTIVE—Caffeine is a central stimulant that increases the release of catecholamines. As a component of popular beverages, caffeine is widely used around the world. Its pharmacological effects are predominantly due to adenosine receptor antagonism and include release of catecholamines. We hypothesized that caffeine reduces insulin sensitivity, either due to catecholamines and/or as a result of blocking adenosine-mediated stimulation of peripheral glucose uptake. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic glucose clamps were used to assess insulin sensitivity. Caffeine or placebo was administered intravenously to 12 healthy volunteers in a randomized, double-blind, crossover design. Measurements included plasma levels of insulin, catecholamines, free fatty acids (FFAs), and hemodynamic parameters. Insulin sensitivity was calculated as whole-body glucose uptake corrected for the insulin concentration. In a second study, the adenosine reuptake inhibitor dipyridamole was tested using an identical protocol in 10 healthy subjects. RESULTS—Caffeine decreased insulin sensitivity by 15% (P < 0.05 vs. placebo). After caffeine administration, plasma FFAs increased (P < 0.05) and remained higher than during placebo. Plasma epinephrine increased fivefold (P < 0.0005), and smaller increases were recorded in plasma norepinephrine (P < 0.02) and blood pressure (P < 0.001). Dipyridamole did not alter insulin sensitivity and only increased plasma norepinephrine (P < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS—Caffeine can decrease insulin sensitivity in healthy humans, possibly as a result of elevated plasma epinephrine levels. Because dipyridamole did not affect glucose uptake, peripheral adenosine receptor antagonism does not appear to contribute to this effect. Caffeine is one Continue reading >>

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