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Metformin And Breast Cancer Recurrence

Metformin As An Adjuvant Treatment For Cancer: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis

Metformin As An Adjuvant Treatment For Cancer: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis

Metformin as an adjuvant treatment for cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis MRC Clinical Trials Unit at University College London, London, UK Correspondence to: Dr Christopher Coyle, MRC Clinical Trials Unit at UCL, Aviation House, 125 Kingsway, London WC2B 6NH, UK. Tel: +44-207-670-4692; E-mail: [email protected] Search for other works by this author on: MRC Clinical Trials Unit at University College London, London, UK Search for other works by this author on: MRC Clinical Trials Unit at University College London, London, UK Search for other works by this author on: MRC Clinical Trials Unit at University College London, London, UK Search for other works by this author on: Annals of Oncology, Volume 27, Issue 12, 1 December 2016, Pages 21842195, C. Coyle, F. H. Cafferty, C. Vale, R. E. Langley; Metformin as an adjuvant treatment for cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis, Annals of Oncology, Volume 27, Issue 12, 1 December 2016, Pages 21842195, Metformin use has been associated with a reduced risk of developing cancer and an improvement in overall cancer survival rates in meta-analyses, but, to date, evidence to support the use of metformin as an adjuvant therapy in individual cancer types has not been presented. We systematically searched research databases, conference abstracts and trial registries for any studies reporting cancer outcomes for individual tumour types in metformin users compared with non-users, and extracted data on patients with early-stage cancer. Studies were assessed for design and quality, and a meta-analysis was conducted to quantify the adjuvant effect of metformin on recurrence-free survival (RFS), overall survival (OS) and cancer-specific survival (CSS), to inform future trial design. Of 7670 articles screened, 27 eligible stu Continue reading >>

Use Of Metformin For Type 2 Diabetes Linked To Lower Recurrence Among Older Breast Cancer Survivors | Food For Breast Cancer

Use Of Metformin For Type 2 Diabetes Linked To Lower Recurrence Among Older Breast Cancer Survivors | Food For Breast Cancer

Use of metformin for type 2 diabetes linked to lower recurrence among older breast cancer survivors Diabetes treatments and risks of adverse breast cancer outcomes among early stage breast cancer patients: A SEER-Medicare analysis Type 2 diabetes ("diabetes"), a disease characterized by insulin resistance and abnormally high levels of glucose in the blood, is associated with poorer survival among women with breast cancer. One study reported that breast cancer patients with high fasting blood sugar levels at diagnosis were almost twice as likely to experience a recurrence as patients with normal levels. Metformin has long been safely used to increase insulin sensitivity in people with type 2 diabetes and has also been shown to reduce the risks of cancer and cancer-related death. Generally speaking, diabetics who use metformin have better outcomes than those who do not. On the other hand, there is some evidence that the use of insulin (especially long-acting types such as Lantus ), or sulfonylurea derivatives such as Glipizide, could reduce breast cancer-specific survival, although these findings are controversial. Now a new study has reported that the risks of breast cancer recurrence and death among women enrolled in Medicare are lowest in those using metformin. Metformin reduces the production of glucose in the liver, enhances the uptake of glucose in muscles, and reduces the level of circulating glucose. Metformin also reduces circulating insulin levels and insulin like growth factor-1 ( IGF-1 ), increases insulin sensitivity, and reduces insulin resistance-associated excess levels of circulating insulin in the blood. High fasting insulin appears to be an independent risk factor for poor outcomes in women with breast cancer. Most studies that have examined the associ Continue reading >>

Metformin Supplementation And Cancer Treatment

Metformin Supplementation And Cancer Treatment

Home > Articles > Supplements and Botanicals > Metformin Supplementation and Cancer Treatment Metformin Supplementation and Cancer Treatment The Oncology Association of Naturopathic Physicians (OncANP) annual conference was chock-full of excellent talks on the use of a variety of supplements that may be useful in helping to reduce the risk of cancer development, progression and recurrence. I wrote a blog post, yesterday, on Dr Dugald Seelys talk on the use of melatonin supplementation in cancer treatment . Today, I will update you on the latest information on Metformin. Metformin is a medication derived from the herbGalega officinalis, also known asFrench lilac. (Also check out my previous blog article on Metformin .) The talk on metformin was given by Dr Davis Lamson, MS, ND ( Tahoma Clinic and Bastyr University .) He made a compelling case for why this commonly prescribed, inexpensive (and safe) diabetes medication might want to be added to the care plan for patients with any one of a variety of cancer types. First of all, metformin has been used for over 50 years in the management of diabetes. So, we have lots of safety information on it. It is also available as a generic prescription, so its relatively cheap. The challenge for many patients who might want to use it is that most physicians will not write a prescription for it unless you have diabetes (as metformin is only approved by the FDA for this indication.) You might ask your physician to read this article to help convince them to prescribe it to you. Metformin is such a promising anti-cancer medication that there are approximately 150 clinical trials (see ClinicalTrials.Gov ) investigating its use in cancer treatment and prevention. Cancer loves sugar ( see our blog post on this here .) So, if you reduce the Continue reading >>

Hypertension And Diabetes Treatments And Risk Of Adverse Outcomes Among Breast Cancer Patients

Hypertension And Diabetes Treatments And Risk Of Adverse Outcomes Among Breast Cancer Patients

JavaScript is disabled for your browser. Some features of this site may not work without it. Hypertension and diabetes treatments and risk of adverse outcomes among breast cancer patients Background: Management of comorbidities is a critical issue among 2.9 million breast cancer survivors in the U.S. Hypertension and diabetes are two common chronic conditions affecting this patient population. Despite the generally good safety profile of widely used antihypertensive medications and diabetes treatments, few studies have examined their relationships with adverse breast cancer outcomes. In particular, metformin, a first line diabetes treatment, is hypothesized to lower the risk of incident breast cancer, but it is unclear whether metformin influences breast cancer progression. The purpose of this dissertation was to characterize how commonly prescribed classes of antihypertensive medications and diabetes treatments relate to adverse breast cancer outcomes. Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of women between ages 66 and 80 years newly diagnosed with stage I or II breast cancer during 2007-2011. A total of 14,766 eligible women were identified in the linked Surveillance, Epidemiology and End-Results (SEER)-Medicare database. Medicare Part D Prescription Drug Event data were obtained to characterize womens use of commonly used antihypertensive medications (angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs), angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs), -blockers, calcium channel blockers and diuretics) and diabetes treatments (metformin, sulfonylureas, insulin therapy and other diabetes treatments) after their breast cancer diagnosis. Primary outcomes were any second breast cancer events (SBCEs, recurrence or second primary breast cancer, n=791), recurrence per se ( Continue reading >>

Recent Advances In The Use Of Metformin: Can Treating Diabetes Prevent Breast Cancer?

Recent Advances In The Use Of Metformin: Can Treating Diabetes Prevent Breast Cancer?

Copyright © 2015 Diana Hatoum and Eileen M. McGowan. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Abstract There is substantial epidemiological evidence pointing to an increased incidence of breast cancer and morbidity in obese, prediabetic, and diabetic patients. In vitro studies strongly support metformin, a diabetic medication, in breast cancer therapy. Although metformin has been heralded as an exciting new breast cancer treatment, the principal consideration is whether metformin can be used as a generic treatment for all breast cancer types. Importantly, will metformin be useful as an inexpensive therapy for patients with comorbidity of diabetes and breast cancer? In general, meta-analyses of clinical trial data from retrospective studies in which metformin treatment has been used for patients with diabetes and breast cancer have a positive trend; nevertheless, the supporting clinical data outcomes remain inconclusive. The heterogeneity of breast cancer, confounded by comorbidity of disease in the elderly population, makes it difficult to determine the actual benefits of metformin therapy. Despite the questionable evidence available from observational clinical studies and meta-analyses, randomized phases I–III clinical trials are ongoing to test the efficacy of metformin for breast cancer. This special issue review will focus on recent research, highlighting in vitro research and retrospective observational clinical studies and current clinical trials on metformin action in breast cancer. 1. Introduction Cancer and diabetes are two of the most common chronic diseases worldwide [1] with a strong Continue reading >>

Relationship Between Metformin Use And Recurrence And Survival In Patients With Resected Stage Iii Colon Cancer Receiving Adjuvant Chemotherapy: Results From North Central Cancer Treatment Group N0147 (alliance)

Relationship Between Metformin Use And Recurrence And Survival In Patients With Resected Stage Iii Colon Cancer Receiving Adjuvant Chemotherapy: Results From North Central Cancer Treatment Group N0147 (alliance)

Preclinical and epidemiological data suggest that metformin might have antineoplastic properties against colon cancer (CC). However, the effect of metformin use on patient survival in stage III CC after curative resection is unknown. The survival outcomes were comparable regardless of the duration of metformin use. Before randomization to FOLFOX (folinic acid, 5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin) with or without cetuximab, 1,958 patients with stage III CC enrolled in the N0147 study completed a questionnaire with information on diabetes mellitus (DM) and metformin use. Cox models were used to assess the association between metformin use and disease-free survival (DFS), overall survival (OS), and the time to recurrence (TTR), adjusting for clinical and/or pathological factors. Of the 1,958 patients, 1,691 (86%) reported no history of DM, 115 reported DM with metformin use (6%), and 152 reported DM without metformin use (8%). The adjuvant treatment arms were pooled, because metformin use showed homogeneous effects on outcomes across the two arms. Among the patients with DM (n = 267), DFS (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 0.90; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.591.35; p = .60), OS (aHR, 0.99; 95% CI, 0.651.49; p = .95), and TTR (aHR, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.561.35; p = .53) were not different for the metformin users compared with the nonusers after adjusting for tumor and patient factors. The survival outcomes were comparable regardless of the duration of metformin use (<1, 15, 610, 11 years) before randomization (ptrend = .64 for DFS, ptrend = .84 for OS, and ptrend = .87 for TTR). No interaction effects were observed between metformin use and KRAS, BRAF mutation status, tumor site, T/N stage, gender, or age. Patients with stage III CC undergoing adjuvant chemotherapy who used metformin befo Continue reading >>

More Support For Metformin Benefit In Breast Cancer

More Support For Metformin Benefit In Breast Cancer

More Support for Metformin Benefit in Breast Cancer Better outcomes but only in hormone receptor-positive disease by Pam Harrison, Contributing Writer, MedPage Today This article is a collaboration between MedPage Today and: In patients with diabetes and HER2-positive breast cancer, metformin improved outcomes, but benefits were limited to patients who also had hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. Note that treatment with insulin had a detrimental effect on the same endpoints of disease-free and overall survival. Metformin has again been found to improve outcomes in breast cancer, in this case early HER2-positive breast cancer but the benefits observed in disease-free and overall survival were limited to patients who also had hormone receptor-positive breast cancer, researchers said. At a median follow-up of 4.5 years, risk of progression or death was 40% higher among diabetic participants in a large clinical trial not receiving metformin compared with those who had been treated with the drug (HR 1.40; 95% CI 1.01-1.94; P=0.043), while risk of distant metastasis, progression or death was 56% higher (HR 1.56; 95% CI 1.10-2.22; P=0.013). Risk of death among those who had not received metformin was also 87% higher compared to those who had received metformin at the same point of follow-up (HR 1.87; 95% CI 1.23-1.85; P=0.004), as reported by Amir Sonnenblick, MD, Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel, and colleagues in the Journal of Clinical Oncology . In contrast, treatment with insulin had a detrimental effect on the same endpoints. "This is the first analysis from a prospective trial that demonstrates the benefit from metformin treatment in patients with diabetes and HER2-positive breast cancer," Sonnenblick and colleagues emphasized. "Our an Continue reading >>

Metformin In Breast Cancer - An Evolving Mystery

Metformin In Breast Cancer - An Evolving Mystery

Metformin in breast cancer - an evolving mystery Metformin, a diabetes drug with well-established side effect and safety profiles, has been widely studied for its anti-tumor activities in a number of cancers, including breast cancer. But its mechanism of action in the clinical arena remains elusive. In a window of opportunity trial of metformin in non-diabetic breast cancer patients, Dowling and colleagues examined both the direct actions of the drug on cancer cells (as mediated by AMP kinase), as well as its indirect actions (as mediated by circulating insulin). The data suggest that short-term administration of metformin in this setting has anti-tumor effects significantly involving the indirect, insulin-dependent pathway. The role of the direct pathway remains to be determined. This study represents an important step forward in establishing one of several possible mechanisms for metformin, information that will be useful in determining candidate biomarkers to evaluate in large clinical trials of metformin, such as the ongoing NCIC CTG MA.32 trial of adjuvant metformin. The potential significance of these data for metformin in the treatment of breast cancer is discussed here. Metformin has been studied in breast cancer, but its mechanism of action in the clinical arena remains unclear. Several trials have attempted to address this knowledge gap (Table 1 ) [ 1 10 ]. In a recent issue of Breast Cancer Research, Dowling and colleagues [ 10 ] present their mechanistic studies from a previously reported single arm, neoadjuvant, window of opportunity trial of metformin in non-diabetic breast cancer patients. Thirty-nine operable breast cancer patients were given metformin 500 mg three times daily for a median of 18 days (range 13 to 40). Their results demonstrate that shor Continue reading >>

Israeli Researchers Find Diabetes Drug May Ward Off Breast Cancer

Israeli Researchers Find Diabetes Drug May Ward Off Breast Cancer

Israeli researchers find diabetes drug may ward off breast cancer Can medicine that helps diabetes also benefit breast cancer? Hadassah Medical Center.(photo credit: WWW.HADASSAH.ORG.IL) A drug commonly used to treat type-2 diabetes can prevent or delay the recurrence of some types of breast cancer, researchers at Hadassah-University Medical Center have found. Metformin (Glucophage and other brand names) was found in a study of 8,000 patients around the world to reduce the risk of repeated HER-2 positive breast cancers. Be the first to know - Join our Facebook page. HER2-positive breast cancers tend to grow faster and are more likely to spread and come back compared to HER2-negative breast cancers. The research appeared in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. The study, led by Hadassah oncologist Dr. Amir Sonnenblick, offers encouraging results for women with HER2-positive (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2) breast cancer, as metformin was found beneficial to women with type-2 diabetes as well as this aggressive type of malignancy. Until now there have been preclinical studies in the field using lab cultures and mice. They showed that administering metformin and related diabetes drugs to mice may prevent or delay recurrence of breast cancer, while not giving the drug can raise the risk for the return of the malignancy, said Sonnenblick. But this was the first significant study using women as subjects. The researchers also found that giving insulin to HER2+ patients more than doubled the risk of a breast cancer recurrence, while metformin had the opposite result. Thus, the international team concluded that careful dosage of such patients could have a dramatic effect in protecting women with this highrisk type of breast cancer. A graduate of the Hebrew-University Med Continue reading >>

Breast Cancer Topic: Anyone Taking Metformin To Prevent Reoccurrance?

Breast Cancer Topic: Anyone Taking Metformin To Prevent Reoccurrance?

I am reading up on the topic. I asked my oncologist if she would prescribe it for me when I finished treatment and she declined. I plan on going back to my primary care doc and asking her. An oncology pharmacist friend told me the drug is very benign but oncologists won't start prescribing it until the results of a Phase III study are published. Anyone taking it to ward off reoccurance? Anyone struggling to get a prescription? Dx 11/9/2015, IDC, Left, 2cm, Stage IIA, Grade 3, 0/4 nodes, ER-/PR-, HER2- Chemotherapy 12/6/2015 Adriamycin (doxorubicin), Carboplatin (Paraplatin), Cytoxan (cyclophosphamide), Taxol (paclitaxel) Surgery 5/11/2016 Mastectomy: Left, Right; Reconstruction (left): Tissue expander placement; Reconstruction (right): Tissue expander placement I take it for Triple Positive...I talked myprimary care docinto prescribing it for me and my Onc said fine. I believe I am in my third year now of taking it. I've had no side effects. Because of all the studies going on about it, I wanted to give it a shot! www.denise4health.info my BC Blog with over 200 informative posts - stop by and say hello! Myself, my mom, and sister were all diagnosed with BC within 3 years. What a ride! Dx 10/10/2011, IDC, Left, 6cm+, Stage IIIA, Grade 2, 9/14 nodes, ER+/PR+, HER2+ (FISH) Surgery 11/23/2011 Lymph node removal: Left, Underarm/Axillary; Mastectomy: Left Chemotherapy 12/27/2011 AC + T (Taxol) Targeted Therapy 2/28/2012 Herceptin (trastuzumab) Hormonal Therapy 10/11/2012 Arimidex (anastrozole) avmom Alberta Joined: Dec 2014 Posts: 304 Im taking the clinical trial dose (850 mg bid) on a prescription from my primary care physician, with the approval of my oncologist. I've been taking it for just over a year, with no significant side effects. I do have a history of PCOS, and th Continue reading >>

Metformin Increases Survival In Hormone Receptor-positive, Her2-positive Breast Cancer Patients With Diabetes

Metformin Increases Survival In Hormone Receptor-positive, Her2-positive Breast Cancer Patients With Diabetes

Metformin increases survival in hormone receptor-positive, HER2-positive breast cancer patients with diabetes Hee Jeong Kim , Hyunwook Kwon , Jong Won Lee , Hwa Jung Kim , Sae Byul Lee , Hee Sung Park , Guiyun Sohn , Yura Lee , Beom Seok Koh , Jong Han Yu , Byung Ho Son , and Sei Hyun Ahn Division of Breast and Endocrine Surgery, Department of Surgery, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea Division of Vascular Surgery, Department of Surgery, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea Division of Breast and Endocrine Surgery, Department of Surgery, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatics, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea Division of Breast and Endocrine Surgery, Department of Surgery, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea Division of Breast and Endocrine Surgery, Department of Surgery, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea Division of Breast and Endocrine Surgery, Department of Surgery, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea Division of Breast and Endocrine Surgery, Department of Surgery, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea Division of Breast and Endocrine Surgery, Department of Surgery, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea Division of Breast and Endocrine Surgery, Department of Surgery, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea Division of Breast and Endocrine Surgery, Department of Surgery, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Continue reading >>

Metformin Suppresses Triple-negative Breast Cancer Stem Cells By Targeting Klf5 For Degradation

Metformin Suppresses Triple-negative Breast Cancer Stem Cells By Targeting Klf5 For Degradation

Metformin suppresses triple-negative breast cancer stem cells by targeting KLF5 for degradation Cell Discovery volume 3, Articlenumber:17010 (2017) Out of the breast cancer subtypes, triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) has the poorest prognosis without effective targeted therapies. Metformin, a first-line drug for type 2 diabetes mellitus, was demonstrated to target breast cancer stem cells selectively. However, the efficiency and the mechanism of action of metformin in TNBC are unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that metformin decreased the percentage of TNBC stem cells partially through the downregulation of the expression of the stem cell transcription factor Krppel-like factor 5 (KLF5) and its downstream target genes, such as Nanog and FGF-BP1, in TNBC cell lines. Metformin induced glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3)-mediated KLF5 protein phosphorylation and degradation through the inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA) activity in TNBC cells. Consistently, PKA activators increased the expression levels of KLF5. We observed a positive correlation between p-CREB, p-GSK3, KLF5 and FGF-BP1 protein levels in human TNBC samples. These findings suggest that metformin suppresses TNBC stem cells partially through the PKA-GSK3-KLF5 signaling pathway. Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women in China and the United States. China was estimated to have 268 600 new cases in 2015, and the United States was estimated to have 246 660 new cases in 2016 [ 1 , 2 ]. Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC; estrogen receptor -, progesterone receptor and HER2-negative) is the subtype of breast cancer with the poorest prognosis due to a lack of targeted therapies [ 3 ]. TNBC can further be divided into different subtypes, including the basal-like and claudin-low subtypes [ 4 ]. Bas Continue reading >>

Metformin: Can A Diabetes Drug Help Prevent Cancer?

Metformin: Can A Diabetes Drug Help Prevent Cancer?

In 1957, the first results from a clinical trial of the diabetes drug metformin in patients were published. Yet, it would take nearly 40 years for the drug to be approved in the United States as a treatment for type 2 diabetes. Now researchers want to know whether this decades-old drug may have additional uses in another disease—cancer. Based on findings from a number of large epidemiologic studies and extensive laboratory research, metformin is being tested in clinical trials not only as a treatment for cancer, but as a way to prevent it in people at increased risk, including cancer survivors who have a higher risk of a second primary cancer. Numerous early-stage clinical trials are currently under way to investigate metformin’s potential to prevent an array of cancers, including colorectal, prostate, endometrial, and breast cancer. Several of these trials are being funded by NCI’s Consortia for Early Phase Prevention Trials. And NCI is collaborating with the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) to study participants from the landmark clinical trial, the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), to investigate metformin’s impact on cancer incidence. Some of the early-phase prevention trials of metformin are enrolling participants who are at increased risk for cancer and who are obese, have elevated glucose or insulin levels, or have other conditions that put them at risk for diabetes. “With the obesity epidemic, these studies are applicable to a substantial portion of the U.S. population and, increasingly, of the world population,” said Brandy Heckman-Stoddard, PhD, MPH, of NCI’s Division of Cancer Prevention. Expanding the Data Pool Much of the human data on metformin and cancer has come from epidemiologic studies of people w Continue reading >>

A Phase Iii Randomized Trial Of Metformin Vs Placebo In Early Stage Breast Cancer

A Phase Iii Randomized Trial Of Metformin Vs Placebo In Early Stage Breast Cancer

You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. A Phase III Randomized Trial of Metformin vs Placebo in Early Stage Breast Cancer The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01101438 Recruitment Status : Active, not recruiting Information provided by (Responsible Party): Study Description Study Design Arms and Interventions Outcome Measures Eligibility Criteria Contacts and Locations More Information This study is looking at whether Metformin, an agent that is commonly used to treat diabetes, can decrease or affect the ability of breast cancer cells to grow and whether Metformin will work with other therapies to keep cancer from recurring. Health Canada has not approved the sale or use of Metformin to treat breast cancer, although they have approved its use in this clinical trial. Although Metformin is approved by the FDA for the treatment of diabetes, its use in breast cancer is considered investigational. Drug: metformin hydrochloride Other: placebo To compare invasive disease-free survival of patients with hormone receptor positive early-stage breast cancer treated with metformin vs placebo in addition to standard adjuvant therapy. To compare overall survival of these patients. To compare distant disease-free survival of these patients. To compare breast cancer-free interval in these patients. To compare changes in body mass index in these patients. To compare adverse events in these patients. To compare other medical endpoints, including a new diagnosis of diabetes mellitus or cardiovas Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drug Metformin Holds Promise For Cancer Treatment And Prevention, Penn Studies Find

Diabetes Drug Metformin Holds Promise For Cancer Treatment And Prevention, Penn Studies Find

Diabetes Drug Metformin Holds Promise for Cancer Treatment and Prevention, Penn Studies Find Results Show Survival Benefit for Some Breast Cancer Patients and Potential Treatment Option for Patients with Endometrial Hyperplasia CHICAGO Use of Metformin commonly used as the front-line treatment for type 2 diabetes improves survival for some breast cancer patients, and shows promise as a treatment for patients diagnosed with endometrial hyperplasia, according to the results of two new studies presented by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting . In one study ( abstract 1569 ), the first to examine the effect of metformin on survival rates for breast cancer patients, researchers examined clinical outcomes for 1,215 patients who were diagnosed and underwent surgical treatment for breast cancer between 1997 and 2013. Ninety-seven patients examined reported using metformin before their diagnosis, and 97 reported use of the drug after diagnosis. Results of the study showed that patients who used metformin before being diagnosed with breast cancer were more than twice as likely to die than patients who never used the drug, while patients who began using metformin after their cancer diagnosis were almost 50 percent more likely to survive than non-users. Using metformin as a cancer prevention strategy has been controversial and results have been inconsistent, but our analysis reveals that use of the drug is time-dependent, which may explain the disparity. While use of the drug may have a survival benefit for some breast cancer patients, those who developed breast cancer while already using Metformin may have more aggressive cancer subtypes, said lead author Yun Rose Li, Continue reading >>

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