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Metformin And Bladder Pain

Actoplus Met, Actoplus Met Xr (metformin And Pioglitazone) Drug Side Effects, Interactions, And Medication Information On Emedicinehealth.

Actoplus Met, Actoplus Met Xr (metformin And Pioglitazone) Drug Side Effects, Interactions, And Medication Information On Emedicinehealth.

oval, white, imprinted with 4833M, 15/850 What are the possible side effects of metformin and pioglitazone (Actoplus Met, Actoplus Met XR)? This medication may cause lactic acidosis (a build-up of lactic acid in the body, which can be fatal). Lactic acidosis can start slowly and get worse over time. Get emergency medical help if you have even mild symptoms of lactic acidosis, such as: muscle pain or weakness, numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs, trouble breathing, stomach pain, nausea with vomiting, slow or irregular heart rate, dizziness , or feeling very weak or tired. Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have any other serious side effects, such as: stomach pain, blood in your urine, painful urination; feeling short of breath, especially when lying down; pale skin, feeling light-headed, rapid heart rate, trouble concentrating; sudden unusual pain in your hand, arm, or foot; or nausea, stomach pain, low fever , loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes). sneezing, runny nose, cough or other signs of a cold. This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. What is the most important information I should know about metformin and pioglitazone (Actoplus Met, Actoplus Met XR)? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to metformin (Glucophage) or pioglitazone (Actos), or if you have kidney problems, severe heart failure, active bladder cancer , or metabolic acidosis. Do not use metformin and pioglitazone if you are in a state o Continue reading >>

Metformin / Pioglitazone Side Effects

Metformin / Pioglitazone Side Effects

For the Consumer Applies to metformin / pioglitazone: oral tablet, oral tablet extended release Along with its needed effects, metformin / pioglitazone may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention. Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur while taking metformin / pioglitazone: More common Bladder pain bloody or cloudy urine difficult, burning, or painful urination frequent urge to urinate lower back or side pain swelling of the face, fingers, feet, or lower legs weight gain Less common Pain or swelling in the arms or legs without any injury pale skin troubled breathing with exertion unusual bleeding or bruising unusual tiredness or weakness Rare Abdominal or stomach discomfort anxiety blurred vision chills cold sweats coma confusion cool, pale skin decreased appetite depression diarrhea dizziness fast heartbeat fast, shallow breathing general feeling of discomfort headache increased hunger muscle pain or cramping nausea nightmares seizures shakiness sleepiness slurred speech Some side effects of metformin / pioglitazone may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them: More common Body aches or pain cough ear congestion fever, sneezing, or sore throat loss of voice runny nose stuffy nose For Healthcare Professionals Applies to metformin / pioglitazone: oral tablet, oral tablet extended release Cardi Continue reading >>

Metformin (glucophage) Side Effects & Complications

Metformin (glucophage) Side Effects & Complications

The fascinating compound called metformin was discovered nearly a century ago. Scientists realized that it could lower blood sugar in an animal model (rabbits) as early as 1929, but it wasn’t until the late 1950s that a French researcher came up with the name Glucophage (roughly translated as glucose eater). The FDA gave metformin (Glucophage) the green light for the treatment of type 2 diabetes in 1994, 36 years after it had been approved for this use in Britain. Uses of Generic Metformin: Glucophage lost its patent protection in the U.S. in 2002 and now most prescriptions are filled with generic metformin. This drug is recognized as a first line treatment to control blood sugar by improving the cells’ response to insulin and reducing the amount of sugar that the liver makes. Unlike some other oral diabetes drugs, it doesn’t lead to weight gain and may even help people get their weight under control. Starting early in 2000, sales of metformin (Glucophage) were challenged by a new class of diabetes drugs. First Avandia and then Actos challenged metformin for leadership in diabetes treatment. Avandia later lost its luster because it was linked to heart attacks and strokes. Sales of this drug are now miniscule because of tight FDA regulations. Actos is coming under increasing scrutiny as well. The drug has been banned in France and Germany because of a link to bladder cancer. The FDA has also required Actos to carry its strictest black box warning about an increased risk of congestive heart failure brought on by the drug. Newer diabetes drugs like liraglutide (Victoza), saxagliptin (Onglyza) and sitagliptin (Januvia) have become very successful. But metformin remains a mainstay of diabetes treatment. It is prescribed on its own or sometimes combined with the newer d Continue reading >>

Dapagliflozin And Metformin

Dapagliflozin And Metformin

Pronunciation: DAP a gli FLOE zin and met FOR min What is the most important information I should know about dapagliflozin and metformin? You should not use this medicine if you have moderate to severe kidney disease, if you are on dialysis, or if you have metabolic acidosis. Dapagliflozin and metformin is not for treating type 1 diabetes. If you need to have any type of x-ray or CT scan using a dye that is injected into your veins, you will need to temporarily stop taking dapagliflozin and metformin. This medicine may cause a serious condition called lactic acidosis. Get emergency medical help if you have even mild symptoms such as: muscle pain or weakness, numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs, trouble breathing, stomach pain, nausea with vomiting, slow or uneven heart rate, dizziness, or feeling very weak or tired. Dapagliflozin and metformin are oral diabetes medicines that help control blood sugar levels. Dapagliflozin works by helping the kidneys get rid of glucose from your bloodstream. Metformin lowers glucose production in the liver and also causes your intestines to absorb less glucose. Dapagliflozin and metformin is a combination medicine used together with diet and exercise to improve blood sugar control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. This medicine is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Dapagliflozin and metformin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking dapagliflozin and metformin? You should not use this medicine if you are allergic to dapagliflozin (Farxiga) or metformin (Glucophage, Actoplus Met, Avandamet, Glucovance, Jentadueto, Kombiglyze, Metaglip, and others), or if you have: moderate to severe kidney disease (or if you are on dialysis); or metabo Continue reading >>

Will You Have Bladder Pain With Metformin - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

Will You Have Bladder Pain With Metformin - From Fda Reports - Ehealthme

A study for a 50 year old man who takes Lithane NOTE: The study is based on active ingredients and brand name. Other drugs that have the same active ingredients (e.g. generic drugs) are NOT considered. WARNING: Please DO NOT STOP MEDICATIONS without first consulting a physician since doing so could be hazardous to your health. DISCLAIMER: All material available on eHealthMe.com is for informational purposes only, and is not a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment provided by a qualified healthcare provider. All information is observation-only, and has not been supported by scientific studies or clinical trials unless otherwise stated. Different individuals may respond to medication in different ways. Every effort has been made to ensure that all information is accurate, up-to-date, and complete, but no guarantee is made to that effect. The use of the eHealthMe site and its content is at your own risk. You may report adverse side effects to the FDA at or 1-800-FDA-1088 (1-800-332-1088). If you use this eHealthMe study on publication, please acknowledge it with a citation: study title, URL, accessed date. Continue reading >>

Invokamet - Side Effects, Dosage, Interactions - Drugs - Everyday Health

Invokamet - Side Effects, Dosage, Interactions - Drugs - Everyday Health

Canagliflozin and metformin are oral diabetes medicines that help control blood sugar levels. Canagliflozin and metformin is a combination medicine used with diet and exercise to improve blood sugar control in adults with type 2 diabetes. Canagliflozin and metformin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. You should not use this medicine if you have moderate to severe kidney disease, diabetic ketoacidosis, or if you are on dialysis. This medicine may cause a serious condition called lactic acidosis. Get emergency medical help if you have: muscle pain or weakness, numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs, trouble breathing, stomach pain, nausea with vomiting, slow or uneven heart rate, dizziness, or feeling very weak or tired. You should not use this medicine if you are allergic to canagliflozin (Invokana) or metformin (Glucophage, Avandamet, and others), or if you have: moderate to severe kidney disease (or if you are on dialysis); or diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment with insulin). If you need to have any type of x-ray or CT scan using a dye that is injected into your veins, you will need to temporarily stop taking this medicine. Some people taking metformin develop a serious condition called lactic acidosis. This may be more likely if you have liver or kidney disease, a severe infection, surgery, a heart attack or stroke, if you are dehydrated, or if you drink large amounts of alcohol. Talk with your doctor about your risk. To make sure canagliflozin and metformin is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have ever had: bladder infections or other urination problems; an electrolyte imbalance (such as high levels of potassium in your blood); or Using canagliflozin and metformin during pregnancy could harm the unborn baby Continue reading >>

What Are The Symptoms Of Interstitial Cystitis? - Pcos Nutrition Center

What Are The Symptoms Of Interstitial Cystitis? - Pcos Nutrition Center

What Are The Symptoms Of Interstitial Cystitis? By Angela on September 20, 2015 under Related Conditions Do you feel like you have the most sensitive bladder on the planet? Maybe you have frequent urges to urinate (even during the night) or experience pain when you do? You may have a condition known as Interstitial Cystitis. A study published in the Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics found that women with PCOS who had higher serum testosterone levels reported to have more bladder symptoms such as pain with intercourse, urgency to urinate, waking up several times to urinate during the night, and bladder or pelvic pain. Many of these reported symptoms are also symptoms seen in those suffering with interstitial cystitis. In this informative article, guest post IC expert, author, and dietitian Julie Beyer helps us understand IC and how a few diet changes can make a big difference. Interstitial cystitis, or IC, is a chronic pelvic pain syndrome originating in the bladder. Other names for IC include painful bladder syndrome (PBS), bladder pain syndrome (BPS, used primarily in Europe), and hypersensitive bladder syndrome (HBS, used primarily in Asia). Patients with IC experience urinary pain, frequency, urgency, and nighttime urination that cannot be attributed to other causes. Although symptoms of interstitial cystitis can be confused with a urinary tract infection, urine from an IC patient does not show any bacteria when cultured. Sometimes I describe IC to people as the difference between a cold and allergies. A person may sneeze with both, but a cold is caused by a germ and allergies are not. Patients with IC have a damaged bladder lining. Both the glycosaminoglycans (GAG) layer (the protective mucous coating on the surface of the bladder), and the urothelial layer (th Continue reading >>

Can Glimperide And Metformin Cause Interstitial Cystitis Of The Bladder?

Can Glimperide And Metformin Cause Interstitial Cystitis Of The Bladder?

Home / Type 2 Diabetes Questions / Can Glimperide and Metformin cause interstitial cystitis of the bladder? Can Glimperide and Metformin cause interstitial cystitis of the bladder? We could not find cases of people taking metformin and that being associated with Cystitis. However, of the12,540 consumers reporting to the FDA on side effects while taking Glimepiride 302 also had Cystitis. The association of Glimepiride andCystitis is greater if : have been taking the drug for 5 10 years and/or have also been taking the medication Lisinopril for kidney issues We recommend you speak to your doctor about this. Our team does extensive research on every topic published on the website. The team has several decades of experience in health care and uses this to sift through the available research and bring you the most authentic, usable information. Latest posts by Sepalika Editorial ( see all ) 7 Easy to Make Healthy Vegetable Juice Recipes - February 12, 2018 Medical And General Disclaimer for sepalika.com This article is intended for informational purposes only. The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Sepalika.com strongly recommends that you consult a medical practitioner for implementing any of the above. Results may vary from person to person. Use of this web site constitutes acceptance of the sepalika.com Terms of Use , Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy . The material appearing on sepalika.com is for educational use only. It should not be used as a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Our 5-Petal PCOD Treatment Program batch is full and participants are seeing wonderful results. Sign up to be the first one to know when we begin our new batch! Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Urinary Tract Infections – Things You Need To Know

Diabetes And Urinary Tract Infections – Things You Need To Know

In this article we will cover everything you need to know about diabetes and your risk for Urinary Tract Infections. Do you have an increased risk of Urinary Tract Infections now that you have diabetes? We will cover what a Urinary Tract Infection is, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment guidelines, as well as why they are more common in people with diabetes. More importantly, we will discuss steps you can take to prevent them! What Is a Urinary Tract Infection (UTI)? A urinary tract infection or UTI is an infection anywhere in your bladder, kidneys or in the urinary system. An infection of the upper urinary tract or the bladder is called a bladder infection or cystitis. An infection in the urethra is called urethritis. Women tend to be more at risk of these types of infections due to their anatomy; they have a much shorter area between the urethra and the opening to the urethra to the bladder. Urinary tract infections are rare in men under 50 due to their anatomy. A more serious infection of the lower urinary tract is an infection of the kidney and the ureters and is called pyelonephritis. This is a complication and occurs when the bladder infection progresses to the kidneys. I highly advise reading the following articles: According to the Stanford Medicine’s Michael Hsieh Lab, half of women and men will have experienced a urinary tract infection (UTI) during our lifetime at least once. They are the most common infection, and can lead to death in patients who are experiencing it severely. Antibiotics are the most effective therapy.The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases account 8.1 million visits to the clinic, hospitals for UTI purposes. For women, the risk of getting a UTI is 50 percent greater than a man. What Are The Symptoms of a UTI? L Continue reading >>

Sex, Urinary, And Bladder Problems Of Diabetes

Sex, Urinary, And Bladder Problems Of Diabetes

What sexual problems can occur in men with diabetes? Erectile Dysfunction Erectile dysfunction is a consistent inability to have an erection firm enough for sexual intercourse. The condition includes the total inability to have an erection and the inability to sustain an erection. Estimates of the prevalence of erectile dysfunction in men with diabetes vary widely, ranging from 20 to 75 percent. Men who have diabetes are two to three times more likely to have erectile dysfunction than men who do not have diabetes. Among men with erectile dysfunction, those with diabetes may experience the problem as much as 10 to 15 years earlier than men without diabetes. Research suggests that erectile dysfunction may be an early marker of diabetes, particularly in men ages 45 and younger. In addition to diabetes, other major causes of erectile dysfunction include high blood pressure, kidney disease, alcohol abuse, and blood vessel disease. Erectile dysfunction may also occur because of the side effects of medications, psychological factors, smoking, and hormonal deficiencies. Men who experience erectile dysfunction should consider talking with a health care provider. The health care provider may ask about the patient's medical history, the type and frequency of sexual problems, medications, smoking and drinking habits, and other health conditions. A physical exam and laboratory tests may help pinpoint causes of sexual problems. The health care provider will check blood glucose control and hormone levels and may ask the patient to do a test at home that checks for erections that occur during sleep. The health care provider may also ask whether the patient is depressed or has recently experienced upsetting changes in his life. Treatments for erectile dysfunction caused by nerve damage, Continue reading >>

Alogliptin / Metformin Side Effects

Alogliptin / Metformin Side Effects

Visit your doctor or health care professional for regular checks on your progress. A test called the HbA1C (A1C) will be monitored. This is a simple blood test. It measures your blood sugar control over the last 2 to 3 months. You will receive this test every 3 to 6 months. Learn how to check your blood sugar. Learn the symptoms of low and high blood sugar and how to manage them. Always carry a quick-source of sugar with you in case you have symptoms of low blood sugar . Examples include hard sugar candy or glucose tablets. Make sure others know that you can choke if you eat or drink when you develop serious symptoms of low blood sugar , such as seizures or unconsciousness. They must get medical help at once. Tell your doctor or health care professional if you have high blood sugar. You might need to change the dose of your medicine. If you are sick or exercising more than usual, you might need to change the dose of your medicine. Do not skip meals. Ask your doctor or health care professional if you should avoid alcohol. Many nonprescription cough and cold products contain sugar or alcohol. These can affect blood sugar. This medicine may cause ovulation in premenopausal women who do not have regular monthly periods. This may increase your chances of becoming pregnant. You should not take this medicine if you become pregnant or think you may be pregnant. Talk with your doctor or health care professional about your birth control options while taking this medicine. Contact your doctor or health care professional right away if think you are pregnant. If you are going to need surgery, a MRI, CT scan, or other procedure, tell your doctor that you are taking this medicine. You may need to stop taking this medicine before the procedure. Wear a medical ID bracelet or chain, and Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Recurring Uti

Type 2 Diabetes And Recurring Uti

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Im a 55 year old male who was diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes two years ago. Since then I have been on Metformin 500mg tablets which I take twice a day. Since the beginning of May, I have had a recurring Urinary Tract Infection (burning sensation when I urinate), a high temperature and a general feeling of being unwell. I wake up two or three times during the night, soaked with sweat. I went to see my GP and traces of blood and protein were found in my urine. The doctor prescribed a 7-day course of Amoxicillin 250mg and although these seemed to help bring my temperature down, I was still experiencing discomfort when passing water. My doctor prescribed a further 5-day course of Amoxicillin 250mg. By the end of the second course of antibiotics the burning sensation seemed to have subsided. The practice nurse tested my urine on and confirmed that my infection had gone. However I wasnt convinced that it had completely gone away because my urine still seemed to be very strong and smelly at certain times of the day. My blood pressure has also been high since the onset of these infections. My GP has put me on Ramipril 2.5mg. Another urine test two weeks later showed that my UTI had returned. This time, my GP prescribed a 7-day course of Trimethoprim 200mg. Initially these seemed to clear the infection but within three weeks of finishing the course, my UTI was back. The practice nurse suggested I ask my doctor to refer me to a Urologist. This I did but unfortunately had to wait two months for an appointment. In the meantime I was prescribed another 7-day course of Trimethoprim 200mg. When I eventually saw the Urologist, he examined my prostate, which he said s Continue reading >>

Resolving Diabetes-related Bladder Problems

Resolving Diabetes-related Bladder Problems

Diabetes can cause a host of medical complications, some well-known and others less so. Bladder and voiding (bladder emptying) problems are quite common in people with diabetes, both in those who have had trouble maintaining good blood glucose control and in those who have been able to keep a tight rein on their levels. The bad news is that bladder problems, like so many complications of diabetes, are at first “silent” ones — they can go unsuspected for months or even years before suddenly manifesting themselves. The good news is that by looking out for certain warning signs, you can catch bladder problems early and treat them before permanent injury is done. Why bladder problems? The reason people with diabetes develop bladder problems is complex and involves the bladder muscles and the nerves that control them. The picture is further complicated by the fact that people with diabetes can develop all of the same bladder and voiding problems as people who don’t have diabetes. For instance, women with diabetes can develop the same overactive bladder problems (including feeling sudden urges to void and needing to void more frequently) that women without diabetes often have. Likewise, men with and without diabetes tend to develop enlarged prostates as they get older, causing both obstruction of the flow of urine and irritability of the bladder (a condition that has symptoms similar to overactive bladder, but different treatments). A stroke or a herniated disk compressing a spinal nerve, among other non-diabetes-related conditions, can also cause bladder problems. Sometimes a person with diabetes may have bladder and voiding problems with multiple causes, only one of which is diabetes. Seeing a physician who is familiar with the many possible causes of bladder dysfun Continue reading >>

Does Anyone Take Metformin?

Does Anyone Take Metformin?

2 years 11 months ago - 2 years 11 months ago #48685 by sweetheart238 Dear yoksgrl, i'm too but after 4 months taking Metformin bladder tumor was developed . Agree with you that cancer is the emperor of all maladies Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation. 2 years 11 months ago #48666 by rocksteady This just may be a coincidence but I had symptom of burning upon urination. I saw my doctor and a urologist.I felt it was caused by something in my diet or meds. I also happened to have started metformin approx 6 months earlier. Before my cystoscope, I stopped metformin because of stomach/ digestive problems. Of course, the burning stopped almost immediately. I told the urologist about it and he just said 'that's good'. The burning came back when I had BCG,so much that I could barely hold it in for 15 minutes but eventually stopped after about the 4th installation. They still haven't told what caused the burning...enlarged prostate, CIS or something else ( like metformin). So I don't know if the metformin played a role, but seeing all these complaints and questions really makes me wonder. btw, it really lowered my A1C Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation. 2 years 11 months ago #48604 by Harrymack I have been taking metformin for more than 12 years now and January of 2014 I was diagnosed with bladder cancer (5 tumors) after passing blood in urine along with frequent and painful urination for quite some time prior to being diagnosed. I went through 6 treatments of BCG and was clear of cancer for 9 months. Now at 12 months, 2 tumors have recurred that were more aggressive than the previous ones. I recently had the two removed surgically. I am convinced that, after extensive research on the Web, there's a link between metformin and blad Continue reading >>

Very Common Diabetes Drug Raises Risk Of Bladder Cancer

Very Common Diabetes Drug Raises Risk Of Bladder Cancer

Very Common Diabetes Drug Raises Risk Of Bladder Cancer New research published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute has found that a popular class of diabetes drug increases people's risk of developing bladder cancer. According to researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, the drug that accounts for up to 20% of the medication prescribed to diabetics in the U.S., thiazolidinedione (TZDs), gives patients a 2 to 3 times greater likelihood of developing bladder cancer than those taking a sulfonylurea drug, another common class of medication for diabetics. Diabetes patients are already known to have a slightly greater chance of developing this cancer as compared to the general population, which the authors suggest makes this finding especially important. About 40 out of 100,00 diabetics typically eventually develop cancer of the bladder, versus 30 in 100,000 out of the general population. Sixty thousand type 2 diabetics from the Health Improvement Network (THIN) database in the United Kingdom were observed in the study. Authors found that people treated with the TZD drugs, pioglitazone (Actos) or rosiglitzaone (Avandia), had a 2 to 3 fold increase in the risk of bladder cancer after 5 or more years taking the drug, as opposed to those who took sulfonylurea drugs, like glipizide (Glucotrol). The experts' analysis showed that 170 patients per 100,000 taking TZDs, for 5 or more years, were expected to develop this disease. For those taking sulfonylurea drugs, about 60 in 100,000 would develop bladder cancer. Ronac Mamtani, MD, the study's lead author, an instructor in the division of Hematology-Oncology in Penn's Abramson Cancer Center, explained: "Diabetes is one the most common chronic diseases worldwide, affecting 285 mil Continue reading >>

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