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Metformin And Back Pain

Metformin And Kidney Pain - Medhelp

Metformin And Kidney Pain - Medhelp

Common Questions and Answers about Metformin and kidney pain Now, I have to deal with this sort of kidney pain and back pain everyday. Does anyone out there just like me? I am also hypothyroid. I am on Synthoid, Metformin and Lovaza (basic Omega-3 acid to help lower triglycerides.) If the medication does not lower my level, should I ask the doctor to look at other underlining causes? I just have to be really careful. So far so good. I have read that the metformin can cause liver and kidney damage so was worried about it, especially since my liver is damaged.Then when I got so sick had so many side effects I got scared that I might be doing damage to my already damaged liver. I have been taking metformin for a week and have lost 19 pounds i am taking it for pcos and it has worked wonders i also have a normal cycle now i dont know if you have one or not but if you dont hopefully it will help I have been taking Metformn for over 3 years for my PCOS and never had an issue with kidney pain . I actually have had no problems at all taking it, I lost 50 lbs on it and stopped making cysts.my question to you is how much were you taking a day? I have taken Metformin 500 Mg x 2 times /day for nearly 3 years, but a year ago until now my feet are swollen, and I have bone spur on the left heel of my foot that is more growing bigger. This foot is in pain when I walk. Everyday when I take Metformin I usually have constipation and the top of my feet are swollen up. My fingers are so numb, and my urine is dark yellow and opaque. They thought it was a sinus infection, but the antibiotics are done, and I wasn't really congested as it was, and the headaches and such are only getting worse. I started getting EXCRUCIATING stomach aches, which i have IBS, but it hasn't acted up in over 10 year Continue reading >>

Metformin And Sitagliptin

Metformin And Sitagliptin

Pronunciation: met FOR min and SI ta glip tin Brand: Janumet, Janumet XR Janumet 100 mg-50 mg What is the most important information I should know about metformin and sitagliptin? You should not use this medicine if you have severe kidney disease, or if you are in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment with insulin). This medicine may cause a serious condition called lactic acidosis. Get emergency medical help if you have even mild symptoms such as: muscle pain or weakness, numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs, trouble breathing, stomach pain, nausea with vomiting, fast or uneven heart rate, dizziness, or feeling very weak or tired. What is metformin and sitagliptin? Metformin and sitagliptin are oral diabetes medicines that help control blood sugar levels. Metformin works by decreasing glucose (sugar) production in the liver and decreasing absorption of glucose by the intestines. Sitagliptin works by regulating the levels of insulin your body produces after eating. Metformin and sitagliptin is a combination medicine used to treat type 2 diabetes. This medication is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Metformin and sitagliptin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. What should I discuss with my health care provider before taking metformin and sitagliptin? You should not use this medicine if you are allergic to metformin (Actoplus Met, Avandamet, Fortamet, Glucophage, Riomet) or sitagliptin (Januvia), if you have severe kidney disease, or if you are in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment with insulin). Some people taking metformin develop a serious condition called lactic acidosis. This may be more likely if you have liver or kidney disease, congestive heart failure, a severe infection Continue reading >>

Metformin (glucophage) Side Effects & Complications

Metformin (glucophage) Side Effects & Complications

The fascinating compound called metformin was discovered nearly a century ago. Scientists realized that it could lower blood sugar in an animal model (rabbits) as early as 1929, but it wasn’t until the late 1950s that a French researcher came up with the name Glucophage (roughly translated as glucose eater). The FDA gave metformin (Glucophage) the green light for the treatment of type 2 diabetes in 1994, 36 years after it had been approved for this use in Britain. Uses of Generic Metformin: Glucophage lost its patent protection in the U.S. in 2002 and now most prescriptions are filled with generic metformin. This drug is recognized as a first line treatment to control blood sugar by improving the cells’ response to insulin and reducing the amount of sugar that the liver makes. Unlike some other oral diabetes drugs, it doesn’t lead to weight gain and may even help people get their weight under control. Starting early in 2000, sales of metformin (Glucophage) were challenged by a new class of diabetes drugs. First Avandia and then Actos challenged metformin for leadership in diabetes treatment. Avandia later lost its luster because it was linked to heart attacks and strokes. Sales of this drug are now miniscule because of tight FDA regulations. Actos is coming under increasing scrutiny as well. The drug has been banned in France and Germany because of a link to bladder cancer. The FDA has also required Actos to carry its strictest black box warning about an increased risk of congestive heart failure brought on by the drug. Newer diabetes drugs like liraglutide (Victoza), saxagliptin (Onglyza) and sitagliptin (Januvia) have become very successful. But metformin remains a mainstay of diabetes treatment. It is prescribed on its own or sometimes combined with the newer d Continue reading >>

What You Should Know About: Metformin

What You Should Know About: Metformin

If you've been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes or you're prediabetic, there's a good chance you've been placed on at least one medication to control your blood glucose levels. Glucose is a sugar that provides energy to the body's cells. Physicians have several diabetes medications at their disposal (see chart). Some drugs help stimulate the pancreas to make more insulin, a hormone that moves glucose from the blood and into cells, where it's needed for energy. These include meglitinides and sulfonylureas, some of the oldest diabetes drugs. Subscribe to Harvard Health Online for immediate access to health news and information from Harvard Medical School. Continue reading >>

Side Effects

Side Effects

Drug information provided by: Micromedex Along with its needed effects, a medicine may cause some unwanted effects. Although not all of these side effects may occur, if they do occur they may need medical attention. Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur: More common Abdominal or stomach discomfort cough or hoarseness decreased appetite diarrhea fast or shallow breathing fever or chills general feeling of discomfort lower back or side pain muscle pain or cramping painful or difficult urination sleepiness Less common Anxiety blurred vision chest discomfort cold sweats coma confusion cool, pale skin depression difficult or labored breathing dizziness fast, irregular, pounding, or racing heartbeat or pulse feeling of warmth headache increased hunger increased sweating nausea nervousness nightmares redness of the face, neck, arms, and occasionally, upper chest seizures shakiness shortness of breath slurred speech tightness in the chest unusual tiredness or weakness wheezing Rare Behavior change similar to being drunk difficulty with concentrating drowsiness lack or loss of strength restless sleep unusual sleepiness Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. These side effects may go away during treatment as your body adjusts to the medicine. Also, your health care professional may be able to tell you about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects. Check with your health care professional if any of the following side effects continue or are bothersome or if you have any questions about them: More common Acid or sour stomach belching bloated excess air or gas in the stomach or intestines full feeling heartburn indigestion loss of appetite metallic taste in the mouth passing of gas stomachache stom Continue reading >>

Metformin 101: Blood Sugar Levels, Weight, Side Effects

Metformin 101: Blood Sugar Levels, Weight, Side Effects

As a type 2 diabetic, you've probably heard of Metformin, or you might even be taking it yourself. Metformin (brand name “Glucophage” aka “glucose-eater”) is the most commonly prescribed medication for type 2 diabetes worldwide…and for good reason. It is one of the safest, most effective, least costly medication available with minimal, if any, side effects. There are always lots of questions around Metformin – how does metformin lower blood sugar, does metformin promote weight loss or weight gain, will it give me side effects – and lots more. Today we'll hopefully answer some of those questions. How Metformin Works Metformin belongs to a class of medications known as “Biguanides,” which lower blood glucose by decreasing the amount of sugar put out by the liver. The liver normally produces glucose throughout the day in conjunction with the pancreas’ production of insulin to maintain stable blood sugar. In many people with diabetes, both mechanisms are altered in that the pancreas puts out less insulin while the liver is unable to shut down production of excess glucose. This means your body is putting out as much as 3 times as much sugar than that of nondiabetic individuals, resulting in high levels of glucose in the bloodstream. Metformin effectively shuts down this excess production resulting in less insulin required. As a result, less sugar is available for absorption by the muscles and conversion to fat. Additionally, a lower need for insulin slows the progression of insulin resistance and keeps cells sensitive to endogenous insulin (that made by the body). Since metformin doesn’t cause the body to generate more insulin, it does not cause hypoglycemia unless combined with a sulfonylurea or insulin injection. Metformin is one of the few oral diabe Continue reading >>

Bad Reaction To Metformin Er?

Bad Reaction To Metformin Er?

A bit off topic, but no one in PCOS group is answering me.... if you read my other post detailing my diagnosis journey you'll know that I just started metformin. If you haven't read it and are bored its called first appointment with new endo. Two days in metformin and its not going so well. I feel fatigued (your laughing right now because that's not a new symptom)... have muscle weakness... and aching pain by kidneys (just under ribcage)... in particular the right side. So I check the warning sheet the pharmacy gave me and have scared myself sideways. It warns against use with people with pituitary, Adrenal, and thyroid issues... a danger of developing Lactic Acidosis. Grrrreat. Lol. I'm on a low dose of 500 mg (some take 2000mg). I'm going to call the endo tomorrow if the symptoms persist... but was curious for your opinion. The meds lower your blood glucose... which somehow makes a PCOS person's ovaries stop producing the extra testosterone. My back has been aching... keeping me awake... sometimes Sharp pains on right side.... and I've been on a sugar bender all weekend.... insatiable appetite for sweets! I have not had any of the common digestive side effects at all. Senior Member | 8 years on site | 1141 posts I WISH I could help...but to me, it DOES sound like AI symptoms...make sure you're drinking enough water....I woke up w/HUGE AI symptoms, and "something" told me to drink water. I went through a pint in 1/2 hour, and am feeling much better. chocolate....don't have a clue why that is. I empathize w/you....it's difficult to differentiate between AI symptoms and meds reactions...been there....done that.... As far as not calling the doc right away....I understand where you're coming from...you don't want to appear as overreacting....PLUS....it was the weekend. W/ Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects And How To Deal With Them

Metformin Side Effects And How To Deal With Them

Metformin side effects include diabetic neuropathy, brain fog, and digestive issues. You can address them through diet, Vitamin B12, CoQ10, and exercise. Let us understand the drug Metformin in detail and study different forms of metformin, its uses and common metformin side effects along with how to deal with them. Metformin: What Is It Used For? Metformin is an old warhorse in the pharma battle against diabetes. It has been the mainstay in the treatment of Type 2 Diabetes for more than fifty years, often matching or outperforming newer drugs. In fact, many new combination drugs are often created with metformin as one of the main ingredients. Thanks to its long run in the pharmaceutical world, the side effects of Metformin are also well known. The Metformin-PCOS connection has been studied extensively since a majority of health complications associated with PCOS (polycystic ovarian syndrome) are due to hyperinsulinemia (high amounts of insulin in the blood stream). Metformin is known to reduce circulating insulin levels. The use of this drug in women with PCOS has shown highly encouraging results. RELATED: 10 Easy Breakfast Ideas For Diabetics Most Prescribed Names in Metformin Category Include: Fortamet: It is an extended-release formulation that contains metformin hydrochloride. The tablets are designed for once-a-day administration. They deliver either 500 mg or 1000 mg of metformin. The tablet is made using a patented technology called SCOTTM that delivers the active compound slowly and at a constant rate. Glucophage: Glucophage tablets contain metformin hydrochoride. They contain either 500 mg, 850 mg or 1000 mg of the active compound. Glucophage tablets do not contain any special covering and need to be taken multiple times a day until the prescribed dosage is me Continue reading >>

Why Am I Taking Metformin?

Why Am I Taking Metformin?

I was controlling my blood sugar with regular insulin injections, so why did my doctor add metformin during my last visit? Conditions Expert Chief Medical Officer, American Cancer Society Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a disease that can initially show no symptoms. Eventually very high blood sugars cause symptoms of blurred vision, increased urination, and increased thirst. The long-term effects of diabetes, especially uncontrolled diabetes, can include cardiovascular disease, heart attack and stroke, peripheral vascular disease, and kidney disease. In type 2 diabetes, the cells of the muscles and organs of the body have difficulty bringing blood sugar, which is also called blood glucose, inside to use as fuel for metabolism. Insulin's normal function is to help bring sugar into the cell, and the problem is these cells have what is called insulin resistance. The body's response to insulin resistance is to increase the amount of insulin secreted by the pancreas. Over time, higher and higher amounts of insulin are secreted to overcome insulin resistance. Eventually the blood sugar levels rise higher than normal despite the high levels of circulating insulin. Type 1 diabetes differs from type 2 diabetes in that type 1 is a disease in which the pancreas stops producing insulin. The initial treatment of mild type 2 diabetes mellitus is lifestyle intervention. This usually consists of diet modification, exercise and weight loss. If this does not control blood sugars, metformin is usually the first drug prescribed. Metformin is an oral medication that is taken once or twice a day. It decreases sugar production in the liver and decreases blood sugar levels by increasing muscle and organ sensitivity to insulin. The dose of metformin can be increased over a period of weeks to months Continue reading >>

Pcos And Metformin – Is This Treatment Right For You?

Pcos And Metformin – Is This Treatment Right For You?

Here at Flo Living headquarters I speak with many women suffering with PCOS who have either been offered Metformin and decided against it or have tried Metformin and it’s not worked for them. If you have a diagnosis of PCOS it’s very likely that at some point your doctor has suggested Metformin. I personally was what would be considered the “perfect” candidate for this treatment when I was in my 20s and suffering with PCOS – overweight, struggling with acne and a complete lack of periods. However, I never tried it myself – instead I created a protocol for myself that became Flo Living. I’ve since helped many women manage their PCOS successfully with this protocol, just as I did my own diagnosis. That said, I speak with women so often about the Metformin option that I want to share my perspective with you. Although I do not dismiss the option completely, I do have some caveats and concerns. What is Metformin? Metformin is a first-line medication for those suffering with type 2 diabetes. It is also presented as a treatment for PCOS sufferers who are also overweight or obese. Not all PCOS sufferers have weight gain as a symptom, it depends on the kind of PCOS. Women with the kind of PCOS that causes weight gain are usually insulin resistant. Metformin reduces overall insulin levels. Insulin resistance is when the cells of your body become resistant to the hormone insulin, preventing glucose from entering your cells to be used for energy, and instead causing soaring levels of sugar blood stream bringing about diabetes, pre-diabetes or insulin-resistant PCOS. The connection between insulin and PCOS is blood sugar regulation. We hear about this most commonly with diabetes, but it’s also very important with PCOS. An unstable, constantly spiking and crashing, bl Continue reading >>

What Patients Say About Janumet 50 1000

What Patients Say About Janumet 50 1000

Janumet 50 1000 is the brand name (and dosage level) of sitagliptin-metformin, a combination prescription drug used in the management of type 2 diabetes. (50 refers to 50 mg of sitagliptin while 1000 refers to 1000 mg of metformin.) In addition to diet and exercise, Janumet 50 1000 is prescribed when the use of metformin or sitagliptin alone does not adequately control the condition. At PatientsLikeMe, where more than 130,000 patients are sharing their experiences with conditions, symptoms, treatments and more, 21 patients report using Janumet 50 1000 or a lower daily dosage (50 mg sitagliptin / 500 mg metformin). What can we learn from these patients’ experiences? Quite a bit, actually, thanks to PatientsLikeMe’s unique data-sharing platform. Looking at the three treatment evaluations submitted for Janumet, all three patients rate the effectiveness as “Moderate,” while side effects were marked as “Mild,” “Moderate” and “Severe,” respectively. The chief complaint from the patient who reported “Severe” side effects was diarrhea. However, she writes, “Blood sugars are going down.” JOIN PATIENTSLIKEME TODAY What about you? Have you taken Janumet 50 1000 or a different dosage of this combination diabetes medication? Join PatientsLikeMe and add your experiences to our growing body of knowledge. Then, stay to exchange advice and support, research common treatments and learn from other patients like you. Continue reading >>

Metformin (glucophage) For Pcos

Metformin (glucophage) For Pcos

Metformin (or Glucophage) for polycystic ovararian symdrome (PCOS) by Kelly Why would you be taking metformin or glucophage (metformin is the generic for glucophage) Metformin is a diabetes medicine used for lowering insulin and blood sugar levels in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). This helps regulate menstrual cycles, start ovulation, and lower the risk of miscarriage in women with PCOS. It is generally used in conjuction with clomid. The most common side effects of metformin Nausea. Loss of appetite. Diarrhea. Increased abdominal gas. A metallic taste. Tiredness. Problems that might arise and ways to troubleshoot I have always had pretty strong side effects (lots of nausea and always very tired) while taking metformin. It does get better as time goes on but working myself up to the maximum dosage has always been hard. I’ve been to a number of different doctors who have all suggested different ways to work up to my maximum dosage (1500 mg). It is generally suggested that you start with the lowest dose and keep increasing it as you get used to it (or as the side effects start to go away). The first time I took it, I took 500 mg for about three weeks (1 pill in the morning). Then added a second pill at lunch time (so I took 1000 mg for 3 weeks). And, then I added a third pill at dinner time. The second time that I took metformin, I increased the dosage from 500 mg to 1500 mg over the course of three weeks. I was sick a lot but I feel like I got the worst part over with faster. My personal experience has been that it usually takes me about 1 month for the side effects to start to lessen. I will still have bouts of nausea, but after about 2 months that starts to happen less often. My personal tips Always take with food or a glass of milk – I always take my Continue reading >>

Metformin May Prevent Multidrug-resistant Breast Cancer

Metformin May Prevent Multidrug-resistant Breast Cancer

Metformin may prevent multidrug-resistant breast cancer Research led by the University of Saskatchewan in Canada has discovered that the diabetes drug metformin might reduce the development of multidrug resistance in vitro in breast cancer cells and may reverse resistance once it has occurred. MDR could be delayed, prevented, or reversed using metformin. Terra Arnason, Ph.D. an associate professor and clinician scientist in the Department and College of Medicine and colleagues led the study. Their findings were published in the journal PLOS ONE. Multidrug resistance (MDR) occurs when several cancers develop resistance to chemotherapy drugs. MDR is a significant factor in the failure of many types of chemotherapy, and it is often a terminal event. It affects individuals with blood cancers and solid tumors, including those with breast cancer . How and why cancer cells become resistant to drugs has remained an important question in cancer research. The answer would provide potential targets to prevent and reverse resistance to treatment. People who develop resistance to one agent frequently develop resistance to many, hence being known as "multiple drug resistance." Arnason and team aimed to investigate the effect of metformin on MDR when used together with the primary treatment. Metformin is a drug used to treat type 2 diabetes when diet and exercise alone have not helped to control blood sugar levels. Metformin helps to lower blood sugar by improving the way the body manages insulin . In previous research, metformin has been shown to have an antiproliferative effect on tumor cells, meaning that the drug inhibits the growth and spread of cancer cells. In fact, people with type 2 diabetes and cancer who take metformin have been reported to have a 31 percent reduction in t Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects

Metformin Side Effects

Summary Common metformin side effects include gastrointestinal problems such as nausea, vomiting, cramps and diarrhea. Hypoglycemia and lactic acid build-up are other more serious—but more rare—side effects of metformin. Some women may also experience vitamin B12 deficiency, and children specifically may possibly experience abnormal taste bud function and appetite loss. Common Metformin Side Effects The most common side effects of metformin are gastrointestinal, and include the following: Nausea Vomiting Diarrhea Cramps Other common side effects are represented by abnormal stools, muscle pain, changes in taste sensations and occasionally difficulties in breathing. Some patients may experience side effects in the shape of dizziness, light-headedness or flu-like symptoms, while others may have nail problems, palpitations, flushing of the face or an increase in thirst and/ or sweating. Serious Metformin Side Effects Occasionally, patients may experience side effects of a more serious nature. These side effects include allergic reactions, which may be manifested through unexplained swellings hives rashes itching wheezing and / or severe breathing difficulties. In some cases, the Metformin may cause a disturbance in electrolytes, causing the body to function within an acidic environment, a condition known as lactic acidosis. Often occurring severely and suddenly, lactic acidosis is the result of increased levels of lactic acid, in particular when Metformin is used to inhibit the process of glucose production, hepatic gluconeogenesis. This condition is sometimes the result of a metformin overdose and can cause severe muscle soreness. Another more serious side effect of metformin is hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar. This occurs in individuals whose bodies are particularly Continue reading >>

Possible Side Effects Of Kombiglyze Xr

Possible Side Effects Of Kombiglyze Xr

KOMBIGLYZE XR can cause serious side effects, including: Common side effects of KOMBIGLYZE XR include: Upper respiratory tract infection Stuffy or runny nose and sore throat Urinary tract infection Headache Diarrhea Nausea and vomiting Taking KOMBIGLYZE XR with meals can help lessen the common stomach side effects of metformin. If you have stomach pains, nausea, or vomiting, tell your doctor. Stomach problems that start later during treatment may be a sign of something more serious. Tell your doctor if you have any side effects that bother you or that do not go away. These are not all of the possible side effects of KOMBIGLYZE XR. For more information, ask your doctor or pharmacist. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088 or www.FDA.gov/medwatch. Allergic (hypersensitivity) reactions, such as: Swelling of your face, lips, throat, and other areas on your skin Difficulty with swallowing or breathing Raised, red areas on your skin (hives) Skin rash, itching, flaking, or peeling If you have any of these symptoms, stop taking KOMBIGLYZE XR and contact your healthcare provider or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away. Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) If you take KOMBIGLYZE XR with another medicine that can cause low blood sugar, such as sulfonylureas or insulin, you have a higher chance of having low blood sugar. Tell your doctor if you take other diabetes medicines. If you have symptoms of low blood sugar, you should check your blood sugar and treat if low, then call your doctor. Follow your doctor’s instructions for treating low blood sugar. Symptoms of low blood sugar include: Shaking Sweating Rapid heartbeat Change in vision Hunger Headache Change in mood Continue reading >>

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