diabetestalk.net

Metformin And Apples

Supplements That Help Alleviate Diabetes

Supplements That Help Alleviate Diabetes

Low-carb diets can provide you with powerful health benefits, including lowering your blood sugar and insulin levels, helping you lose weight and reducing disease risk. A growing number of studies suggest that these effects may be enhanced by taking certain supplements. At this point there aren’t a lot of high-quality studies looking at the effects of spices and other plant compounds on health markers in people with diabetes and prediabetes. However, the research that currently exists is pretty impressive. Although the supplements discussed in this chapter are considered safe if taken in the recommended dosages, individual adverse reactions cannot be ruled out. Therefore, starting with a small dosage and assessing your personal tolerance is highly recommended. In addition, if you are taking any medications, be sure to discuss potential interactions between these supplements and your medicines with your pharmacist to make sure it is safe to take them together. Berberine Berberine may provide a number of beneficial effects on metabolic health. This orange-colored compound is found in several plants, including goldenseal, barberry and Oregon grape root. It has been prized in ancient Chinese medicine for centuries due to its strong anti-inflammatory properties. A number of studies have shown that it can also help lower blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes (187, 188, 189, 190). Indeed, a large analysis of 14 studies totalling more than 1000 people revealed that berberine is as effective at lowering blood sugar levels as metformin, one of the oldest and safest diabetes medications (190). Like metformin, berberine works by reducing the amount of sugar released by your liver and making your cells more sensitive to insulin. This insulin-sensitizing effect also see Continue reading >>

Apples, Tomatoes, Ginger And Garlic And Type Ii Diabetes

Apples, Tomatoes, Ginger And Garlic And Type Ii Diabetes

Apples, Tomatoes, Ginger and Garlic and Type II Diabetes Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Apples, Tomatoes, Ginger and Garlic and Type II Diabetes I am a new Member of South East Asia origin, 84 years old, and for purposes physically and mentally active. I was diagnosed with Type II Diabetes around 2 or 3 years ago. Initial reading was around 600 and I was put on Metformin. The number dropped to 115-125 over a period of about 3 month. Can any Member please tell me if Apples, Tomatoes, Garlic and Ginger - combined or individually - increase glucose levels. For about 2 months the glucose level has risen to 180 to 215 and remains constant. Apples and/or tomatoes can certainly have an effect on blood sugars. Are you testing 2 hrs after your first bite of food to find out which foods give you problems? We're all different, so testing and seeing what works for you is the only way to go. Personally, I can tolerate about 1/2 of an apple (the granny smith variety works best for me). I don't eat tomatoes, but have to be careful of tomato-based sauces portion-wise or my blood sugar will elevate. I am a new Member of South East Asia origin, 84 years old, and for purposes physically and mentally active. I was diagnosed with Type II Diabetes around 2 or 3 years ago. Initial reading was around 600 and I was put on Metformin. The number dropped to 115-125 over a period of about 3 month. Can any Member please tell me if Apples, Tomatoes, Garlic and Ginger - combined or individually - increase glucose levels. For about 2 months the glucose level has risen to 180 to 215 and remains constant. Welcome. That is an excellent improvement over the f Continue reading >>

New Low Glycemic Sweetener Is Higher In Calories Than Indicated

New Low Glycemic Sweetener Is Higher In Calories Than Indicated

New low glycemic sweetener is higher in calories than indicated I recently received a sample for review of a new sweetener from Italy called Dolcedi, made from organic apples. According to the manufacturers website : Dolced can be used any way you would use traditional table sugar or honey and in the same proportions; one teaspoon of sugar equals one teaspoon of Dolced. Its promoted as having a lower glycemic index than sugarwhich it does. But the manufacturer also claims that its 25% lower in calories than sugarwhich it is not. When used as directed, Dolcedi actually provides31% MORE calories than sugar. The mislabeling appears to be an innocentalthoughextremely carelesserror. As you can see, the label says that 1 teaspoon (4g) of Dolcedi provides 12 calories. But something didnt seem right to me. And when I got out my digital scale, I discovered that 1teaspoon of Dolcedi does not weigh 4 grams. It actually weighs 7 grams, which suggeststhat it contains 21 calories per teaspoon, or 75% more than what the label says. When I contacted the company (through their US based public relations firm), they confirmed that the label is incorrect. Heres their explanation: The fact that Rigoni di Asiago is a European brand and Europes measuring practices are all metric system seems to be at the root of this miscommunication. When their team determined the caloric differences between regular sugar and Dolced, they were comparing these ingredients in grams. (Understandable since this is the standard unit of measuring ingredients for them!) By weight, Dolced does in fact have 25% fewer calories than sugar. While I get that Europeans may not be accustomed to English units, its a little hard to excuse the confusion over units of weight and volume. The metric system does include both. (( Continue reading >>

Grapefruit, Orange Juices Can Affect Your Medication

Grapefruit, Orange Juices Can Affect Your Medication

Q. I have understood that grapefruit juice generally should not be used to take medicine. My wife believes that orange juice also is dangerous. She is urging me not to take my pills with orange juice. I understand that grapefruit juice contains an ingredient that orange juice does not and that is what interacts adversely with medicine. This is now becoming a major issue for us. Can you resolve it? A. As with most marital disputes, the answer to your question is complicated. Scientists have known for 25 years that grapefruit juice has a special ability to increase blood levels of certain medications, including the hypertension drug felodipine, cholesterol-lowering meds such as atorvastatin and simvastatin and the anti-anxiety agent buspirone. This can make side effects more severe. The only other fruits that act like grapefruit are Seville (sour) oranges and pomelos. Ordinary orange juice and apple juice can affect other medications in a completely different way (Journal of Clinical Pharmacology online, June 10, 2015). Instead of inhibiting the intestinal enzyme (CYP3A) that metabolizes many medicines, these fruit juices inhibit the compounds that help move certain medications into tissues and cells. The affected drugs include aliskiren (Tekturna), fexofenadine (Allegra) and atenolol (Tenormin), most notably. The impact is to lower tissue levels and effectiveness. The grapefruit effect can last for a few days, while orange juice activity disappears within a few hours. Whether or not you need to avoid taking your medication with grapefruit or orange juice depends on which drug you are taking. Q. I have been on metformin since I was diagnosed with diabetes several years ago. About a year ago, I developed debilitating neuropathy. Just going to the store for an hour kept me Continue reading >>

Can Drinking Apple Cider Vinegar Help With Diabetes?

Can Drinking Apple Cider Vinegar Help With Diabetes?

Part 1 of 4 Overview Type 2 diabetes is a preventable and chronic disease that affects how your body controls sugar (glucose) in your blood. Medications, diet, and exercise are the standard treatments. But recent studies vouch for something you can find in most kitchen cabinets too: apple cider vinegar. Over 9 percent of Americans have type 2 diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). If apple cider vinegar has potential as a natural treatment, that would be good news indeed. Part 2 of 4 While a number of studies have looked at the link between apple cider vinegar and blood sugar management, they are usually small, with varying results. “There have been several small studies evaluating the effects of apple cider vinegar, and the results are mixed,” said Dr. Maria Pena, an endocrinologist in New York. “For example, there was one small study done in rats showing that apple cider vinegar helped lower LDL and A1C levels. But the limitation to this study is that it was only done in rats, not humans.” One study from researchers at Arizona State University found that taking 20 grams of apple cider vinegar diluted in 40 grams of water, with 1 teaspoon of saccharine, could lower blood sugar after meals. Another study found that taking apple cider vinegar before bed helped moderate blood sugar upon waking up. But both studies were small, looking only at 19 and 11 participants, respectively. Another study that looked at apple cider vinegar’s impact on type 1 diabetes found that it could actually worsen glycemic control, according to Pena. “The take-home message is that until a large, randomized control trial is done, it is difficult to ascertain the true benefits of taking apple cider vinegar,” she said. Part 3 of 4 Dilute apple cide Continue reading >>

Apple Cider Vinegar And Diabetes

Apple Cider Vinegar And Diabetes

OK, y’all. I wrote about this several years ago, but now I’m serious. If you want to control any type of diabetes better, consume vinegar before meals and at bedtime. Start today! It lowers post-meal and fasting glucose levels. In a study from Arizona State University, subjects took a drink of 20 grams of apple cider vinegar, 40 grams of water, and 1 teaspoon of saccharin with each meal. (I think stevia might be better than saccharin.) Those with insulin resistance who drank the vinegar had 34% lower postprandial (after-meal) glucose compared to controls. These postprandial benefits had been found before. It was thought that vinegar might slow the absorption of carbohydrate into the blood, or slow the breakdown of starches into sugars. This effect would mimic the effect of drugs like acarbose (brand name Precose). But the 2004 study cited above reported that vinegar reduced postprandial glucose more in subjects who were highly insulin resistant. The authors say this result shows that vinegar increases insulin sensitivity, perhaps acting similarly to metformin. Now studies have found that vinegar at bedtime reduces fasting blood glucose in the morning, indicating that vinegar might promote insulin production, like nateglinide (Starlix). Pretty amazing that a simple chemical like vinegar (acetic acid) could have the benefits of three different classes of diabetes drugs, and all for a few cents a dose! It’s likely good for both Type 2 and Type 1, especially for lowering postprandial glucose. And postprandial glucose levels account for 30% to 70% of A1C values. Vinegar has got to be the most cost-effective medicine in history, but most people with diabetes still aren’t taking it. And doctors aren’t prescribing it. Why not? Is it because there are no “vinegar rep Continue reading >>

Weight Loss: How To Take Apple Cider Vinegar In Order To Shed Pounds Fast

Weight Loss: How To Take Apple Cider Vinegar In Order To Shed Pounds Fast

Apple cider vinegar is a type of vinegar made from apples, which has a deep amber colour. Unpasturised versions of the vinegar have a cloudy appearacnce, and are thought to have a number of health benefits. The ingredient was originally used to make salad dressing and chutney, but recently other properties have been dscovered. Apple cider vinegar is made by squeezing the liquid from apples, which is then infused with yeast to ferment and created an alcohol. It then goes through a second fermenting stage, which madesacetic acid and forms the liquid into a vinegar. Can apple cider vinegar help you lose weight? Weight loss can be aided by apple cider vinegar, various scientific studies have shown. It has been proven to make dieters feel fuller, effectively helping them to shed the pounds. A number of studies involving human subjects have resulted in real weight loss on the scales, showing just how potent the vinegar can be. Scientists at the Department of Nutrition at Arizona State University found that after taking vinegar the dieters at 200 to 275 calories less per day. More researchers at Lund University, in Sweden, found very similar results. The nutrition experts claimed: The results indicate an interesting potential of fermented and pickled products containing acetic acid. Continue reading >>

Foods To Avoid When On Metformin

Foods To Avoid When On Metformin

Metformin is often one of the first medications prescribed to people with diabetes, according to the Canadian Diabetes Association (see reference 2 under Highlights of Revisions). It helps lower your blood sugar levels by decreasing the amount of glucose, or sugar, produced by your liver. It also helps your insulin, the hormone that gets the sugar out of your blood and into your cell, work better. (see reference 1 pg 1 under Clinical Pharmacology under Mechanism of Action para 1). While you do not need to avoid any foods when taking metformin, you may need to limit or avoid alcohol (see reference 1 pg 8 under alcohol intake.). Metformin and Alcohol If your doctor has prescribed metformin to help you get better control over your blood sugar, you should not drink an excessive amount of alcohol, including beer, wine or hard liquor (see reference 1 pg 8 under Alcohol Intake). Too much alcohol causes metformin to breakdown too much lactate, which is a by-product of glucose and amino acids, and may lead to lactic acidosis (see reference 1 pg 8 under Alcohol Intake). If you drink alcohol, it's OK to have moderate amounts while on metformin, which means up to 1 drink a day for women and 2 drinks a day for men (see reference 3 pg x). But everyone is different, so be sure to talk to your doctor first to a safe amount of alcohol for you. Lactic acidosis is actually not very common when taking metformin, but it can be dangerous, and even deadly, according to the Food and Drug Administration (see reference 1 pg 15). Symptoms that warrant an immediate call to your doctor include difficulty breathing, stomach pain, diarrhea, muscle cramps, unusual sleepiness or weakness or an all-around achiness. Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects

Metformin Side Effects

I am a 68 year old male caucasian with type 2 diabetes diagnosed in 2011. I have been taking Metformin 1000 twice per day, along with Glyburide 2.5 (once) and Losartan 100 (once) for hypertension. My numbers are still more or less ok with medication, last A1c was 5.9, daily fasting glucose about 100. Struggling to lose weight.... the story of my life. My question is regarding Metformin and diarrhea. About 4 or 5 days per week I have an explosive bathroom emergency, perhaps 3 or 4 incidents usually during the afternoon. I am looking for ways to mitigate this. Though I have not kept careful records, it *seems* that if I eat roughage on one day, then the next day I have the problem. Most of my adult life I have eaten fruits and veggies, dark greens, salads, etc. It *seems* that on days when I eat a blander, more digestible diet.... i.e. no salads, no apples etc.... then the next day I may not have the problem. Has anyone found foods that make this problem better or worse? Are there perhaps specific foods that can be eaten along with the meds that have helped somebody? Alternatively, might there be an advantage to splitting the 1000 mg tablets in half and taking 4 times per day? Metformin has been around a long time and is no longer experimental. Also it's not expensive. I like the idea of sticking with it. Some of the more modern drugs have turned out to have serious side effects. What is the general feedback on extended release Metformin? Does this help with the problem? Is it a lot more expensive? What is some feedback on alternative drugs like those advertised ad nauseum (pun intended) on tv? Thanks for whatever feedback y'all can give. I did try searching this forum for this question, but did not find accurate results. I'm a bit surprised that a search did not yield u Continue reading >>

Grapefruit & Metformin

Grapefruit & Metformin

Metformin is a drug used to treat Type 2 diabetes, a condition in which the body does not properly process insulin, leading to high blood sugar levels or hyperglycemia. This drug works by decreasing the amount of glucose your body makes and absorbs from food. Additionally, metformin bolsters your body's reaction to insulin, which helps to lower blood sugar. When you take a medication like metformin, it interacts with enzymes and chemicals in your body through a process called metabolism. Other medications or foods such as grapefruit may influence the way your body metabolizes drugs. Metformin Metformin comes in liquid and tablet form and is taken with meals throughout the day. Typically, diabetics begin on a low dose of metformin and monitor their blood sugar to determine how well the medication is working. Your physician will increase your dose as needed. In some rare cases, metformin may cause a life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis. You should call emergency medical services immediately if you experience extreme lethargy, weakness, nausea, vomiting, stomach pain, irregular heartbeat, shortness of breath, flushed skin, rapid or labored breathing, muscle pain, chills or dizziness. Grapefruit and Drug Metabolism Grapefruit and other citrus fruits and juices contain chemicals that impair your body's ability to metabolize some drugs. With metabolism slowed, medications build up in your body and have the potential to reach lethal levels. Unfortunately, it doesn't matter if you eat grapefruit with your medication or consume it at a different time of day. If a drug interacts with grapefruit or other citrus products, you'll need to eliminate them from your diet. Potentially Harmful Interaction Grapefruit juice is rich naringin, an antioxidant compound with blood s Continue reading >>

Diabetes And The Apple Juice Coup

Diabetes And The Apple Juice Coup

When I was a teenager, about 16 years old, I went away to a summer camp for kids with diabetes. Before I went, I had a picture in my head right out of a Charles Dickens novel: a bleak, depressing camp full of children with grey circles under their eyes, crutches, and persistent coughs from “the diabetes.” Basically, I pictured a whole camp full of Tiny Tims, and a whole team of doctors and nurses taking 24-hour care of us wretchedly sick “diabetics.” What I discovered when I got there was a camp full of normal kids, who looked, acted, and felt just like me. It was, in two words, life-changing. Far from making me feel MORE different because of my condition, it made me realize that we were, in fact, all just normal kids with a serious condition we had to live with. We still hiked, did the ropes courses, canoed, snuck away from our counselors, had our teenage-angst filled summer romances; in other words, we still had a regular camp experience. The only difference was that on each hike, we’d ALL stop to test our blood sugar. Every night, the counselors in our cabins would wake us up briefly for our “overnight” blood sugar check. That was it. Beyond that, we were just a group of teenagers enjoying a week in the woods. Except we weren’t just like everyone else — not completely. On one afternoon, I broke away with a group of fellow campers who I had become friends with — this was actually during my SECOND year of attending this camp, and we were all returning campers. In any event, I followed them through the woods to a spot where they had stashed something illicit. I wondered what it could be — was it alcohol? Did someone swipe the keys to a counselors golf cart? Maybe someone had a dirty magazine! It was none of the above. It was juice. Apple juice. It Continue reading >>

Patty Bonsignore Has Been A Nurse For 25 Years, Focusing On Diabetes For The Past 15 Years.

Patty Bonsignore Has Been A Nurse For 25 Years, Focusing On Diabetes For The Past 15 Years.

A: Vinegar may indeed lower blood glucose levels, according to some studies. The acetic acid in vinegar (which is what gives vinegar its tanginess) is thought to block the action of certain enzymes that break down carbohydrate. As a result, some carbohydrate goes undigested and, therefore, has less effect on blood glucose levels. Different studies have had success with different amounts of vinegar, ranging from 2 teaspoons to 2 tablespoons per day. In one study, people who took 2 tablespoons of apple cider vinegar along with some cheese before bedtime had a 4 to 6 percent reduction in their fasting blood glucose readings. Of course, taking vinegar may not lead to the same reductions in blood glucose levels in everyone. Also, taking too much vinegar can lead to acid reflux, indigestion and even damage to the esophagus. If you have low potassium levels or osteoporosis, you should talk with your provider before taking vinegar. Your husband certainly could try taking 2 teaspoons of vinegar with a meal, perhaps as salad dressing or drizzled on some vegetables. However, a bigger question might be whether your husband’s diabetes treatment plan and his metformin dose is still the right dose, and what his overall meal and physical activity plan look like. I suggest that your husband meet with a dietitian to discuss his food intake and activity level, and if his blood glucose and A1C levels are not within his target, I suggest he talk with his healthcare provider about his medication and what, if any, changes might be needed. Also, your husband should let his provider know if he does start taking vinegar regularly. Continue reading >>

An Old Idea, Revived: Starve Cancer To Death

An Old Idea, Revived: Starve Cancer To Death

The story of modern cancer research begins, somewhat improbably, with the sea urchin. In the first decade of the 20th century, the German biologist Theodor Boveri discovered that if he fertilized sea-urchin eggs with two sperm rather than one, some of the cells would end up with the wrong number of chromosomes and fail to develop properly. It was the era before modern genetics, but Boveri was aware that cancer cells, like the deformed sea urchin cells, had abnormal chromosomes; whatever caused cancer, he surmised, had something to do with chromosomes. Today Boveri is celebrated for discovering the origins of cancer, but another German scientist, Otto Warburg, was studying sea-urchin eggs around the same time as Boveri. His research, too, was hailed as a major breakthrough in our understanding of cancer. But in the following decades, Warburg’s discovery would largely disappear from the cancer narrative, his contributions considered so negligible that they were left out of textbooks altogether. Unlike Boveri, Warburg wasn’t interested in the chromosomes of sea-urchin eggs. Rather, Warburg was focused on energy, specifically on how the eggs fueled their growth. By the time Warburg turned his attention from sea-urchin cells to the cells of a rat tumor, in 1923, he knew that sea-urchin eggs increased their oxygen consumption significantly as they grew, so he expected to see a similar need for extra oxygen in the rat tumor. Instead, the cancer cells fueled their growth by swallowing up enormous amounts of glucose (blood sugar) and breaking it down without oxygen. The result made no sense. Oxygen-fueled reactions are a much more efficient way of turning food into energy, and there was plenty of oxygen available for the cancer cells to use. But when Warburg tested additiona Continue reading >>

Can Metformin Cut Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes?

Can Metformin Cut Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes?

Can Metformin Cut Risk of Type 2 Diabetes? Researchers in India find the drug might help when combined with lifestyle intervention. The study has some limitations, however. In a way, the best, and most cost-effective, way to treat diabetes is to prevent it. A new study suggests metformin might help people with prediabetes avoid a Type 2 diabetes diagnosis, but only when the drug treatment is combined with lifestyle intervention. Researchers in India tracked just under 600 overweight people with prediabetes divided into two groups: those in an intensive lifestyle intervention program that included the option of taking metformin and those given standard care without metformin. Over the course of four months, patients in the metformin-plus-intervention program attended weekly educational classes on diet and exercise, followed by an additional two months of weekly education meetings; metformin was prescribed as needed. Those in the control group had one-time visits with a physician, a dietician, and a fitness trainer, and attended a group class on diabetes prevention through diet and exercise; this group did not receive metformin. It is not clear from the report on this study how many weeks this class lasted for the control group. Both groups were tracked for three years, according to a report in Diabetes in Control. Researchers found those in the intervention-plus-metformin group had a 3.3 percent lower risk of developing Type 2 diabetes each year than the control group. However, the intervention-plus-metformin program cut the risk more for those who had both impaired fasting glucose and impaired glucose tolerance; this group had a 36 percent lower risk of developing diabetes compared with the control group. Metformin works by decreasing glucose production by the liver an Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drugs: Metformin

Diabetes Drugs: Metformin

Editor’s Note: This is the second post in our miniseries about diabetes drugs. Tune in on August 21 for the next installment. Metformin (brand names Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Riomet, Fortamet, Glumetza) is a member of a class of medicines known as biguanides. This type of medicine was first introduced into clinical practice in the 1950’s with a drug called phenformin. Unfortunately, phenformin was found to be associated with lactic acidosis, a serious and often fatal condition, and was removed from the U.S. market in 1977. This situation most likely slowed the approval of metformin, which was not used in the U.S. until 1995. (By comparison, metformin has been used in Europe since the 1960’s.) The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) required large safety studies of metformin, the results of which demonstrated that the development of lactic acidosis as a result of metformin therapy is very rare. (A finding that has been confirmed in many other clinical trials to date.) Of note, the FDA officer involved in removing phenformin from the market recently wrote an article highlighting the safety of metformin. Metformin works primarily by decreasing the amount of glucose made by the liver. It does this by activating a protein known as AMP-activated protein kinase, or AMPK. This protein acts much like an “energy sensor,” setting off cellular activities that result in glucose storage, enhanced entry of glucose into cells, and decreased creation of fatty acids and cholesterol. A secondary effect of the enhanced entry of glucose into cells is improved glucose uptake and increased storage of glycogen (a form of glucose) by the muscles. Additionally, the decrease in fatty acid levels brought about by metformin may indirectly improve insulin resistance and beta cell func Continue reading >>

More in diabetes