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Metformin 2000

A Comprehensive Guide To Metformin

A Comprehensive Guide To Metformin

Metformin is the top of the line medication option for Pre-Diabetes and Type 2 Diabetes. If you must start taking medication for your newly diagnosed condition, it is then likely that your healthcare provider will prescribe this medication. Taking care of beta cells is an important thing. If you help to shield them from demise, they will keep your blood sugar down. This medication is important for your beta cell safety if you have Type 2 Diabetes. Not only does Metformin lower blood sugar and decrease resistance of insulin at the cellular level, it improves cell functioning, lipids, and how fat is distributed in our bodies. Increasing evidence in research points to Metformin’s effects on decreasing the replication of cancer cells, and providing a protective action for the neurological system. Let’s find out why Lori didn’t want to take Metformin. After learning about the benefits of going on Metformin, she changed her mind. Lori’s Story Lori came in worrying. Her doctor had placed her on Metformin, but she didn’t want to get the prescription filled. “I don’t want to go on diabetes medicine,” said Lori. “If I go on pills, next it will be shots. I don’t want to end up like my dad who took four shots a day.” “The doctor wants you on Metformin now to protect cells in your pancreas, so they can make more insulin. With diet and exercise, at your age, you can reverse the diagnosis. Would you like to talk about how we can work together to accomplish that?” “Reverse?” she asked. “What do you mean reverse? Will I not have Type 2 Diabetes anymore?” “You will always have it, but if you want to put it in remission, you are certainly young enough to do so. Your doctor wants to protect your beta cells in the pancreas. If you take the new medication, Continue reading >>

Metformin ? - March 2015 Babies | Forums | What To Expect

Metformin ? - March 2015 Babies | Forums | What To Expect

See active discussions on March 2015 Babies Is anyone on metformin because of pcos pregnancy? How much dose? What did your doctor say about whether to continue or stop midway? I am on 850 mg and have a history of high testosterone and DHT because of pcos. I want to continue it throughout my pregnancy. Is it safe? This is my second pregnancy on Metformin for PCOS. I took it my entire pregnancy last time & will this time. I take 2000mgs a day. Last time it was fine until the last 3 weeks when I needed to switch to glyburide do to increasing blood sugar. I've always been told it's safer to take it throughout pregnancy than it is not to. I actually conceived via fertility treatments and I have PCOS. My last pregnancy I was on 850mg until I hit 12 weeks and then my doctor told me to stop. This pregnancy I'm doing the same thing. So far everything is fine. Just ask your doctor and see what he thinks. I've read a lot of PCOS women stay on it. Talk to your doctor about it. With my first pregnancy, I was told to stop at 12w (was on 1500mg). And I weaned myself off until 14w when I stopped completely. Everything was fine after that. I did get gestational diabetes but I think I would've gotten that anyway. This time, my doctor didn't mention anything at my 12w appointment so I've continued taking it. I think she may have just overlooked it though *shrugs* I'm currently on 2000mg a day. I'm sure I'll be told to stop it at my next appointment though next week. My dr stops metformin at 12 weeks. I was on 2000 mg a day and dr said it was fine to stop, there was no need to wean off of it. Both my reproductive endocrinologist and ob/gyn agreed with stopping it at 12 weeks after I conceived through ivf My doctor wants me to continue taking 1500mg throughout my pregnancy which is fine by Continue reading >>

Metformin, Oral Tablet

Metformin, Oral Tablet

Metformin oral tablet is available as both a generic and brand-name drug. Brand names: Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and Glumetza. Metformin is also available as an oral solution but only in the brand-name drug Riomet. Metformin is used to treat high blood sugar levels caused by type 2 diabetes. FDA warning: Lactic acidosis warning This drug has a Black Box Warning. This is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A black box warning alerts doctors and patients to potentially dangerous effects. Lactic acidosis is a rare but serious side effect of this drug. In this condition, lactic acid builds up in your blood. This is a medical emergency that requires treatment in the hospital. Lactic acidosis is fatal in about half of people who develop it. You should stop taking this drug and call your doctor right away or go to the emergency room if you have signs of lactic acidosis. Symptoms include tiredness, weakness, unusual muscle pain, trouble breathing, unusual sleepiness, stomach pains, nausea (or vomiting), dizziness (or lightheadedness), and slow or irregular heart rate. Alcohol use warning: You shouldn’t drink alcohol while taking this drug. Alcohol can affect your blood sugar levels unpredictably and increase your risk of lactic acidosis. Kidney problems warning: If you have moderate to severe kidney problems, you have a higher risk of lactic acidosis. You shouldn’t take this drug. Liver problems warning: Liver disease is a risk factor for lactic acidosis. You shouldn’t take this drug if you have liver problems. Metformin oral tablet is a prescription drug that’s available as the brand name drugs Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and Glumetza. Glucophage is an immediate-release tablet. All of the other brands are extended-r Continue reading >>

Metformin Vs Metformin Er

Metformin Vs Metformin Er

I'm seeing quite a few posts on BBSes from people who are having problems with metformin because of side effects that could be eliminated if they were taking the extended release form of this drug. For some reason, many family doctors don't seem to be aware that there is a ER version of this drug that has such benefits. This is probably because metformin is a cheap generic and isn't promoted by herds of beautiful ex-cheerleaders turned drug company salespushers who "educate" doctors about far more expensive--and less effective--newer drugs. Here are the facts: Metformin (also sold under the brand name Glucophage) comes in a regular version which is taken at meal time, three times a day, and an extended release form (marketed as ER or XR) which is taken once a day. Almost always, when people report diarrhea or intense heartburn with metformin, they are taking regular version. I experienced the heartburn on the regular drug. It was very disturbing because the pain was localized over my heart and felt just like the description of a heart attack you read in articles. My doctor assured me it was coming from the metformin, but that didn't make it any easier to live with because I kept wondering how, if I were having a real heart attack, I'd know it wasn't a pain from the drug? The ER version releases the drug more slowly and this usually eliminates the gastrointestinal problems. The trade off with taking the ER form is that the amount of blood sugar lowering you see might be a bit less than with the regular form as the drug acts in a slower smoother fashion rather than hitting all at once. But if you can't take the regular at all drug because of the side effects, the slight weakening in effect is a reasonable trade off. Plus, you only have to remember to take one dose rather Continue reading >>

Efficacy, Dose-response Relationship And Safety Of Once-daily Extended-releasemetformin (glucophage Xr) In Type 2 Diabetic Patients With Inadequate Glycaemiccontrol Despite Prior Treatment With Diet And Exercise: Results From Twodouble-blind, Placebo-controlled Studies.

Efficacy, Dose-response Relationship And Safety Of Once-daily Extended-releasemetformin (glucophage Xr) In Type 2 Diabetic Patients With Inadequate Glycaemiccontrol Despite Prior Treatment With Diet And Exercise: Results From Twodouble-blind, Placebo-controlled Studies.

1. Diabetes Obes Metab. 2005 Jan;7(1):28-39. Efficacy, dose-response relationship and safety of once-daily extended-releasemetformin (Glucophage XR) in type 2 diabetic patients with inadequate glycaemiccontrol despite prior treatment with diet and exercise: results from twodouble-blind, placebo-controlled studies. Fujioka K(1), Brazg RL, Raz I, Bruce S, Joyal S, Swanink R, Pans M. (1)Department of Endocrinology, Scripps Clinic, La Jolla, San Diego, CA 92130, USA. [email protected] AIM: The efficacy, dose-response relationships and safety of an extended-release formulation of metformin (Glucophage) XR) were evaluated in two double-blind,randomized, placebo-controlled studies of 24 and 16 weeks' duration, in patients with inadequate glycaemic control despite diet and exercise. Protocol 1 provided an evaluation of metformin XR at a commonly used dosage. Protocol 2 evaluateddifferent dosages of metformin XR.METHODS: In Protocol 1, 240 patients were randomized to receive metformin XR 1000mg once daily. or placebo in a 2:1 ratio for 12 weeks (patients could receivemetformin XR 1500 mg during weeks 12-24 if required). In Protocol 2, 742 patientswere randomized to receive metformin XR 500 mg once daily, 1000 mg once daily,1500 mg once daily, 2000 mg once daily, 1000 mg twice daily or placebo for 16weeks. The primary endpoint in each study was the change from baseline in HbA(1C)at 12 weeks (Protocol 1) or 16 weeks (Protocol 2).RESULTS: Metformin XR reduced HbA(1C) in Protocol 1, with mean treatmentdifferences for 1000 mg once daily vs. placebo of -0.7% at 12 weeks and -0.8% at 24 weeks (p < 0.001 for each). In Protocol 2, a clear dose-response relationship was evident at doses up to 1500 mg, with treatment differences vs. placebo of-0.6% (500 mg once daily), -0.7% (100 Continue reading >>

Metformin Wonder Drug

Metformin Wonder Drug

A while back I wrote about why metformin is the number one treatment for Type 2 diabetes. Now new research finds metformin prevents cancer and heart disease and may actually slow aging! Where can I get this stuff? A study from Scotland found that people on metformin had only roughly half the cancer rate of people with diabetes who weren’t on the drug. This is important, because diabetes is associated with higher risks of liver, pancreas, endometrial, colon and rectum, breast, and bladder cancer. Nobody could explain how metformin helped, but then Canadian researchers showed that metformin reduces cell mutations and DNA damage. Since mutations and DNA damage promote both cancer and aging, this is striking news. No one thought we could limit mutations before, but perhaps metformin can do it. A study on mice exposed to cigarette smoke showed that those given metformin had 70% less tumor growth. A small study of humans in Japan showed similar improvements in colorectal cancer outcomes. Metformin is now being studied in clinical trials for breast cancer. The researchers write, “Women with early-stage breast cancer taking metformin for diabetes have higher response rates to [presurgical cancer therapies] than diabetic patients not taking metformin.” They also had better results than people without diabetes. How Does It Work? According to Michael Pollak, MD, professor in McGill’s Medicine and Oncology Departments, metformin is a powerful antioxidant. It slows DNA damage by reducing levels of “reactive oxygen species” (ROS). ROS are produced as byproducts when cells burn glucose. Just as oxygen helps fires burn or metals rust, ROS will oxidize (“burn” or “rust”) the nuclei or other parts of cells. ROS are what the antioxidant vitamins are supposed to block. Continue reading >>

Metformin Dosage

Metformin Dosage

Usual Adult Dose for Diabetes Type 2 Immediate-release: Initial dose: 500 mg orally twice a day or 850 mg orally once a day Dose titration: Increase in 500 mg weekly increments or 850 mg every 2 weeks as tolerated Maintenance dose: 2000 mg daily in divided doses Maximum dose: 2550 mg/day Extended-release: Initial dose: 500 to 1000 mg orally once a day Dose titration: Increase in 500 mg weekly increments as tolerated Maintenance dose: 2000 mg daily Maximum dose: 2500 mg daily Comments: -Metformin, if not contraindicated, is the preferred initial pharmacologic agent for treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. -Immediate-release: Take in divided doses 2 to 3 times a day with meals; titrate slowly to minimize gastrointestinal side effects. In general, significant responses are not observed with doses less than 1500 mg/day. -Extended-release: Take with the evening meal; if glycemic control is not achieved with 2000 mg once a day, may consider 1000 mg of extended-release product twice a day; if glycemic control is still not achieve, may switch to immediate-release product. Use: To improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus as an adjunct to diet and exercise. Usual Pediatric Dose for Diabetes Type 2 10 years or older: Immediate-release: Initial dose: 500 mg orally twice a day Dose titration: Increase in 500 mg weekly increments as tolerated Maintenance dose: 2000 mg daily Maximum dose: 2000 mg daily Comments: Take in divided doses 2 to 3 times a day with meals. Titrate slowly to minimize gastrointestinal side effects. Safety and effectiveness of metformin extended-release has not been established in pediatric patients less than 18 years of age. Use: To improve glycemic control in children with type 2 diabetes mellitus as an adjunct to diet and exercise. Le Continue reading >>

2000mg Of Metformin???

2000mg Of Metformin???

Well I went to see the new endocrinologist today. This is what he had to say. He upped my dosage from 500mg to 2000mg a day! I will start the increase of 1000 this week, 1500 next week and 2000 the third week. He said I will have GI issues, but after a month my body should get used to it? He also told me its great that I walk 2 mi a day on treadmill, but that will not help me lose weight. He said calorie intake is the only way to lose weight. He said to stay at my current weight, I need 1800 calories a day, if I cut that to 1000-1200 a day, I WILL lose weight. He suggested I do a low gi diet (which I just started) and he suggests to all PCOS patients to either buy shakes for those meals, and then a low gi dinner. He said when you control your calorie intake, you see major difference! So I left there somewhat upset about the 2000 mg of metformin. I have a weak GI to begin with, I dont like using any restroom but my own when I have GI Issues, so it looks like I will be HOUSEBOUND for the next month and half until my body adjusts....lets hope it adjusts sooner rather than later. Anyone else on 2000mg of metformin? Have you lost weight? I am just so discouraged, I feel this PCOS has taken over my life. 10 more lbs and I will weigh as much as I did when I delivered my TWINS!!! Thats nuts. Since my check up at my 6 week appt after giving birth in 2004, I have gained 35 lbs! It is so depressing! I took 2000 mg of Metformin.... I love Metformin!!!! I was on 1000 mg and nothing was happening. My RE switched me to 2000 mg and in two months my cycle started and came both months on the same date and that hasn't happened in over 10 years. I lost 23 lbs in those two months and I wasn't even trying to loose weight and I also FINALLY ovulated and got pregnant with my daughter. While I Continue reading >>

Metformin And The Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Metformin And The Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

To the editor: Moghetti et al. (1) are to be congratulated for their marvelous study assessing the effects of long-term metformin treatment in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). The investigators used a metformin dose of 500 mg t.i.d. (1500 mg daily). It is possible that women who did not respond to metformin at this dose might have responded had the dose been increased to 1000 mg b.i.d. (2000 mg daily). A dose-response study in type 2 diabetic patients has shown that a daily metformin dose of 1500 mg was less effective than 2000 mg, and that 2000 mg daily is the optimal dose (2). Presumably, 2000 mg daily is the dose that maximally improves hepatic and muscle insulin sensitivity. We have used a metformin dose of 500 mg t.i.d. in all our published studies in PCOS by historical accident (3–5). Metformin was not available in the United States at the time of our first study (3), and in Europe it was being dosed in this fashion. We maintained this dose in subsequent studies for consistency and to do comparative analyses in the future. In my own clinical practice, however, I treat women with PCOS with metformin at a dose of 2000 mg daily. Also, it has been my anecdotal experience that some PCOS women who did not respond to metformin at a dose of 1500 mg daily, responded favorably when the dose was subsequently increased to 2000 mg daily. Continue reading >>

About Metformin

About Metformin

Metformin is a medicine used to treat type 2 diabetes and sometimes polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Type 2 diabetes is an illness where the body doesn't make enough insulin, or the insulin that it makes doesn't work properly. This can cause high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia). PCOS is a condition that affects how the ovaries work. Metformin lowers your blood sugar levels by improving the way your body handles insulin. It's usually prescribed for diabetes when diet and exercise alone have not been enough to control your blood sugar levels. For women with PCOS, metformin stimulates ovulation even if they don't have diabetes. It does this by lowering insulin and blood sugar levels. Metformin is available on prescription as tablets and as a liquid that you drink. Key facts Metformin works by reducing the amount of sugar your liver releases into your blood. It also makes your body respond better to insulin. Insulin is the hormone that controls the level of sugar in your blood. It's best to take metformin with a meal to reduce the side effects. The most common side effects are feeling sick, vomiting, diarrhoea, stomach ache and going off your food. Metformin does not cause weight gain (unlike some other diabetes medicines). Metformin may also be called by the brand names Bolamyn, Diagemet, Glucient, Glucophage, and Metabet. Who can and can't take metformin Metformin can be taken by adults. It can also be taken by children from 10 years of age on the advice of a doctor. Metformin isn't suitable for some people. Tell your doctor before starting the medicine if you: have had an allergic reaction to metformin or other medicines in the past have uncontrolled diabetes have liver or kidney problems have a severe infection are being treated for heart failure or you have recentl Continue reading >>

Efficacy, Tolerability, And Safety Of A Novel Once-daily Extended-release Metformin In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Efficacy, Tolerability, And Safety Of A Novel Once-daily Extended-release Metformin In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

OBJECTIVE—The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy and safety of a novel extended-release metformin in patients with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—Adults with type 2 diabetes (newly diagnosed, treated with diet and exercise only, or previously treated with oral diabetic medications) were randomly assigned to receive one of three extended-release metformin treatment regimens (1,500 mg/day q.d., 1,500 mg/day twice daily, or 2,000 mg/day q.d.) or immediate-release metformin (1,500 mg/day twice daily) in a double-blind 24-week trial. RESULTS—Significant decreases (P < 0.001) in mean HbA1c (A1C) levels were observed by week 12 in all treatment groups. The mean changes from baseline to end point in the two groups given 1,500 mg extended-release metformin (−0.73 and −0.74%) were not significantly different from the change in the immediate-release metformin group (−0.70%), whereas the 2,000-mg extended-release metformin group showed a greater decrease in A1C levels (−1.06%; mean difference [2,000 mg extended-release metformin − immediate-release metformin]: −0.36 [98.4% CI −0.65 to −0.06]). Rapid decreases in fasting plasma glucose levels were observed by week 1, which continued until week 8, and were maintained for the duration of the study. The overall incidence of adverse events was similar for all treatment groups, but fewer patients in the extended-release metformin groups discontinued treatment due to nausea during the initial dosing period than in the immediate-release metformin group. CONCLUSIONS—Once- or twice-daily extended-release metformin was as safe and effective as twice-daily immediate-release metformin and provided continued glycemic control for up to 24 weeks of treatment. Metformin hydrochloride has been w Continue reading >>

The Slower The Better

The Slower The Better

Endocrine Unit, Careggi University Hospital, Florence, Italy Department of Biomedical Experimental and Clinical Sciences, University of Florence, Obesity Agency, Careggi University Hospital, Viale Pieraccini 6, 50134 Florence, Italy C. M. Rotella, Email: [email protected] . Received 2014 Jan 20; Accepted 2014 Feb 27. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. A new formulation of metformin: metformin extended-release (ER) is now available, with different formulations in each country and it appears relevant to discuss the management of this drug in clinical practice. Metformin, an oral biguanide hypoglycemic agent, is an efficacious tool in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Metformin’s efficacy, security profile, benefic cardiovascular and metabolic effects make this drug as the first agent of choice in the treatment of type 2 diabetes, together with lifestyle modifications [ 1 ]. Type 2 diabetes is characterized by impaired insulin secretion and insulin resistance. Insulin resistance in the fasting state induces an increase in hepatic gluconeogenesis and induces hyperglycemia in the early morning. Metformin, as its major effect, decreases hepatic glucose output lowering fasting glycaemia and, secondarily, it increases glucose uptake in peripheral tissues. It is generally well tolerated, despite the fact that the most common adverse effects are gastrointestinal ones, which may be tampered by dose titration. In monotherapy metformin decreases HbA1c levels by 0.6–1.0 % and this is not accompanied by hypoglycemia in the large majority of patients. Metformin is neutral with respect to weight or, possibly, induces a modest weight loss. The UKPDS has demonstrated a beneficial effect of metformin therapy on CVD outcomes [ 2 ]. Severe renal dysfunc Continue reading >>

Metformin, Weight Loss & Pcos – Does It Actually Work?

Metformin, Weight Loss & Pcos – Does It Actually Work?

Did you know that one of the main reasons you can't lose weight with PCOS is because of your hormones? It's true, and that's why many women (and physicians) turn to using Metformin to try and help with weight loss. But just because it works for some people doesn't mean it will necessarily work for YOU. Find out why metformin helps with weight loss, but more important what works better and how to finally lose weight if you have PCOS. ​ Insulin & PCOS: Why It's so Important One of the most common medications prescribed for PCOS is metformin. But, PCOS is a hormonal condition which results in weight gain, hair growth on the face, infertility, acne and estrogen/progesterone imbalances. So why is metformin, a medication used to lower blood sugar and treat insulin resistance, used to treat estrogen/progesterone imbalances in women? The logic is quite simple: Most of the symptoms of PCOS (all those listed above) stem from insulin resistanc e! In fact many physicians recommend that ALL women with PCOS should be treated for insulin resistance regardless of what their fasting insulin and fasting blood sugar levels are. This means that the root cause of PCOS (at least the majority of it) is insulin resistance, and this is why metformin is so commonly used to treat. Insulin resistance causes a block of glucose uptake in your skeletal muscles which results in a lower metabolism (and weight gain), insulin also directly acts on your ovaries and adrenals increasing androgens like testosterone and DHEA. It's also the action of insulin on your pituitary that results in increased LH production which over stimulates your ovaries resulting in the characteristic "cysts" of PCOS. ​ High levels of DHEA and testosterone lead to acne and hair growth (hirsutism). ​ But one simple question r Continue reading >>

When Do I Take Metformin For My Diet: Morning Or Night?

When Do I Take Metformin For My Diet: Morning Or Night?

Metformin helps control blood sugar and increase your body's sensitivity to insulin. The drug is available only by prescription and sold under several different brand names, including Fortamet, Glumetza, Riomet, Glucophage and Glucophage XR. Your dosage will depend on your normal diet and exercise habits -- too much metformin can lead to low blood sugar and hypoglycemia. Always follow your doctor's directions for taking your medication. Video of the Day Metformin works by limiting your liver's production of glucose and stopping your body from absorbing some of the glucose in your bloodstream. Additionally, metformin increases your body's sensitivity to insulin, allowing your pancreas to produce less insulin. Keeping blood sugar levels stable can decrease hunger and food cravings, leading to weight loss. Metformin is not an appetite suppressant, nor does it boost metabolism; to lose weight, you'll still need to pay close attention to your diet and increase your physical activity. Standard vs. Extended Release Options The amount of metformin you'll take depends on why you are using the medication, how often you take the medicine, other medications you might be taking and the time between doses. The National Institutes of Health explains that metformin is available as a tablet or a liquid solution. Tablets come in an extended release dose -- Glucophage XR -- or in a standard release option. Extended release pills are designed to be taken once daily, with your evening meal. Standard tablet and liquid solutions may be taken once or multiple times daily -- with meals. Metformin should be taken with food. Always follow your doctor's orders. It's typical to start with a 500 milligram dose once daily, then increase both the amount of medication and the frequency. If you're using Continue reading >>

Proper Use

Proper Use

Drug information provided by: Micromedex This medicine usually comes with a patient information insert. Read the information carefully and make sure you understand it before taking this medicine. If you have any questions, ask your doctor. Carefully follow the special meal plan your doctor gave you. This is a very important part of controlling your condition, and is necessary if the medicine is to work properly. Also, exercise regularly and test for sugar in your blood or urine as directed. Metformin should be taken with meals to help reduce stomach or bowel side effects that may occur during the first few weeks of treatment. Swallow the extended-release tablet whole with a full glass of water. Do not crush, break, or chew it. While taking the extended-release tablet, part of the tablet may pass into your stool after your body has absorbed the medicine. This is normal and nothing to worry about. Measure the oral liquid with a marked measuring spoon, oral syringe, or medicine cup. The average household teaspoon may not hold the right amount of liquid. Use only the brand of this medicine that your doctor prescribed. Different brands may not work the same way. You may notice improvement in your blood glucose control in 1 to 2 weeks, but the full effect of blood glucose control may take up to 2 to 3 months. Ask your doctor if you have any questions about this. Dosing The dose of this medicine will be different for different patients. Follow your doctor's orders or the directions on the label. The following information includes only the average doses of this medicine. If your dose is different, do not change it unless your doctor tells you to do so. The amount of medicine that you take depends on the strength of the medicine. Also, the number of doses you take each day, the Continue reading >>

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