diabetestalk.net

Metamucil And Blood Glucose

Metamucil & Diabetes

Metamucil & Diabetes

Metamucil is a fiber supplement brand that contains psyllium, a source of both soluble and insoluble fiber. Diabetes is a chronic disorder characterized by high blood sugar and cardiovascular complications. Increasing dietary fiber can help you manage diabetes and reduce your risk of complications. Consult your doctor about the benefits of Metamucil and diabetes. Video of the Day Psyllium, also called isapgol and ispaghula, comes from the seed of the Plantago ovata plant that grows annually in silty and sandy soils in North Africa, the Mediterranean region and Asia, especially India and Pakistan. India exports over 85 percent of psyllium available on the global market and the United States is the world’s largest importer of the product. Psyllium is promoted as a bulk-fiber laxative that can be used to treat constipation. The soluble fiber content in psyllium may also reduce the amount of cholesterol you absorb from foods. The Food and Drug Administration approves a health claim that states, “Soluble fiber from foods such as psyllium, as part of a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol, may reduce the risk of heart disease.” Metamucil psyllium is sold in powder, capsule, wafer and liquid forms. Soluble fiber can help you manage your blood sugar. Soluble fiber slows down the absorption of sugars in food into your bloodstream, preventing spikes and enabling you to control your blood sugar. Research published in the "Annals of Pharmacotherapy" in November 2010, reports psyllium supplementation may be a therapeutic option for people with Type 2 diabetes who take medication, but experience elevated concentrations of blood sugar after meals. The results of the research showed 10.2 grams of psyllium daily effectively reduces blood sugar. High blood cholesterol is a ris Continue reading >>

Metamucil

Metamucil

This is kind of indelicate. I have had a problems with constipation since I have began controlling my D. I have been taking colace to soften things. I have wondered about a fiber supplement but was worried it might spike my bg levels. All advice welcomed. D.D. Family T1 on insulin pump since 1997 This is kind of indelicate. I have had a problems with constipation since I have began controlling my D. I have been taking colace to soften things. I have wondered about a fiber supplement but was worried it might spike my bg levels. All advice welcomed. My husband uses sugar-free Citrucel. I'm sure Metamucil has a sugar-free variety, also. Moderator Type1 - Minimed 640G - Enlite CGM Yes, you can get sugar free Metamucil. There is also a reasonably new Metamucil product called Fibresure. It is 100% tasteless mixed into any food or drink, and yet strangely enough tastes sweet if you eat if right off the spoon. Kind of tastes like fairy-floss (cotton candy). It contains zero carbs and does absolutely nothing to my blood glucose. Drinking plenty of water & exercising also helps get things moving too. D.D. Family T2 dx 3/07, tx w/very lo carb D&E Met, bolus R The sugar-free Metamucil now contains maltodextrin, which is a food starch. Walmart carries a product called Konsyl that is just plain psyllium husks (the "active" ingredient in Metamucil). Look for that or a store that carries plain psyllium husks. Another thing that works well for me is ground up flax seed. Flax (linseed) has a very high fiber and oil content so it doesn't spike my blood sugar. 'Veni, Vidi, Velcro' - I came, I saw, I stuck around. Continue reading >>

Metamucil And Cholesterol: Is There A Connection?

Metamucil And Cholesterol: Is There A Connection?

Psyllium has been used as a natural remedy for ages. Metamucil didnt come on the scene until 1934. According to Metamucils website , the product contains 100 percent natural psyllium husk fiber. In addition to lowering cholesterol and promoting regularity, Metamucil is thought to help you feel fuller between meals and help maintain blood sugar levels. Psyllium is a natural product. It may reduce total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein (LDL). LDL, also known as bad cholesterol, contributes to clogged arteries and may lead to stroke and heart attack. Psyllium is believed to help absorb waste, bile acids, and cholesterol, which are removed from the body during bowel movements. This may be due to its ability to swell and form a thick gel. A 1990 study concluded that psyllium could help lower cholesterol. This led to additional research into the effects of psyllium on cholesterol. In 2000, a meta-analysis was published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition (AJCN) . It looked at eight studies on the cholesterol-lowering benefits of psyllium. Researchers determined psyllium significantly lowered LDL cholesterol in participants who were already consuming a low-fat diet. No significant differences were noted between men and women, but older age groups had the largest decrease in LDL cholesterol. According to a more recent study published in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition (EJCN) , psyllium may help reduce triglycerides in people with type 2 diabetes. The study followed 40 people with type 2 diabetes. They were treated with sulfonylureas, or antidiabetes drugs, and a prescribed, controlled diet. Study participants were either given psyllium three times per day or assigned to a control group. The control group was only given the controlled diet. Those tre Continue reading >>

Does This Lower Blood Sugar?

Does This Lower Blood Sugar?

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I read recently that having a glass of water mixed with 1 packet of metamucil a day lowers blood sugar, blood pressure and cholesterol. Has anyone heard or tried this? I took a chug of the big M every night for a while. I didn't notice any improvement, in fact it would raise my BG even though it was sugar free. Metamucil is good for only one thing in my opinion and unless you "need the fiber" I wouldn't take it. Negative....I have not heard that, nor find it credible. However, I don't see any reason not to give it it a try. If you do try it....let us know how it works. Actually there's multiple studies showing various sources of soluble fiber such as chia seeds, psyllium, nopales, flax, aloe gel, etc. can keep bgs a bit lower if taken prior to the carby foods. The more of a 'gel' it forms the better. Metamucil is psyllium if I recall correctly. The studies I read didn't say 'why' but I'm guessing they do something similar to oil in slowing absorption. Whether soluble fiber or oil they seem to be effective taken immediately before the carby foods. Hours before or later doesn't make much difference. Although I will say getting irregular raises my bgs considerably so Metamucil might help there too if that's a problem. Actually there's multiple studies showing various sources of soluble fiber such as chia seeds, psyllium, nopales, flax, aloe gel, etc. can keep bgs a bit lower if taken prior to the carby foods. The more of a 'gel' it forms the better. Metamucil is psyllium if I recall correctly. The studies I read didn't say 'why' but I'm guessing they do something similar to oil in slowing absorp Continue reading >>

Metamucil And Lower Bg And Cholesterol | Diabetic Connect

Metamucil And Lower Bg And Cholesterol | Diabetic Connect

By diabeticdummy Latest Reply2014-03-29 12:28:56 -0500 Ok so my mom sent me a video today by dr. Oz saying using Metamucil with meals will help lower and regulate bg and cholesterol because in your stomach it collects in the drink and carries it away only letting a little into blood stream so is this true or false and does it work anyone tried it or using it Know that Oz is being paid to promote Metamucil. Oz can be such a shill and seems to promote any and everything which pays him. I see what he promotes and a lot of times shake my head in disbelief. Like Steve noted below there is often a grain of truth in what Oz says, but often the result of taking what is suggested by him is often so minisule as to be negligable. Ok yeah first time I even heard of him but seeing some of his videos he is just an infomercial I take anything Dr. Oz may say with a grain of salt however it is believed that a diet high in fiber and low in saturated fats and cholesterol will help lower your cholesterol. I believe this absolutely works but rather than taking a laxative I have been eating a diet high in fiber. Besides getting the benefit of the fiber you will also get the nutritional benefits of eating healthier. And a high fiber diet does not mean high carbs here is some info to get you started: And some info on the affect of fiber on your blood glucose levels: Continue reading >>

The Power Of Psyllium Fiber

The Power Of Psyllium Fiber

The Power of Psyllium Fiber by Berkeley Wellness Many people take psyllium as a fiber supplement for its laxative effect or as a way to help lower blood cholesterol. Made from the husks of seeds from the Plantago ovata plant, it is sold as a powder or capsules. Another potential benefit of psyllium is its ability to help control blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. This was examined in an analysis of 10 studies, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Psyllium was taken before meals at standard doses. The greatest reductions in blood sugar and hemoglobin A1c (a longer-term measure of blood sugar control) occurred in people with the worst blood sugar control initially and were “comparable to the effect of many drugs that are used to treat diabetes,” the researchers wrote. The analysis also looked at 14 studies involving people with prediabetes and found that psyllium modestly reduced blood sugar in them. If you have diabetes and take medication for it, consult your health care provider before trying psyllium, since the combination may result in excessive lowering of blood sugar; your dose of medication or psyllium may need to be adjusted. And make sure the psyllium doesn’t contain added sugar (it often does). The authors of the study were employed or funded by Procter & Gamble, the maker of a brand of psyllium (Metamucil). How psyllium works The fiber in psyllium absorbs water in the colon, resulting in bulkier stool (thus it’s called a “bulk-forming” laxative); it also forms emollient gels that facilitate the passage of stool. Psyllium is gentle and usually takes 12 to 24 hours to affect bowel movements. Its cholesterol-lowering effect was perhaps best seen in a 2005 study in the Archives of Internal Medicine, which found that people Continue reading >>

Why Psyllium Husk Works

Why Psyllium Husk Works

Among recommendations in a Symphony Health Solutions survey 2017 (OTC therapeutic fiber category). Diets low in saturated fat and cholesterol that include 7 grams of soluble fiber per day from psyllium husk, as in Metamucil and Meta Daily Heart Health, may reduce the risk of heart disease by lowering cholesterol. One serving of Metamucil has 2.4 grams of this soluble fiber. One serving of Meta Daily Heart Health has 3.6 grams of this soluble fiber. One serving of Metamucil capsules has at least 1.8 grams of this soluble fiber. *These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease. Continue reading >>

Does Metamucil Sugar Free Up My Bg?

Does Metamucil Sugar Free Up My Bg?

Along with other things, I looked up Metamucil in calorie king. There are carbs in that. Not a lot, but they all add up, especially when you're not paying attention to them. Sugar-free Metamucil doesn't appear to contain any digestible carbs at all. Some sites specifically list all the "carbohydrate" as dietary fiber (equal numbers of grams). Others show a smaller number for "fiber" than for "total carbohydrate" but show 0 for sugars and starch. Hmm. What else is there? One site specifically broke it down as containing both insoluble and soluble fiber. The latter can be metabolized into SCFAs, hence the "calories" attributed to it. I highly doubt if anyone can actually make glucose out of this stuff. Even a cow couldn't do that I don't think. They would only get SCFAs by fermenting it in their multiple stomachs. << Nothing I say or express is medical or DIETARY advice so please do not take it as such. >> Although I may show my enthusiasm about my own success with a ketogenic diet (and no meds), I am NOT under any circumstances advising anyone else what to do, only sharing my personal experiences and often some of the science/research that led me to it. I would try doubling the dose and test the Metamucil all by itself. That's the only way to know if it is actually an independent source of blood sugar - which is extremely unlikely by the way. Something more plausible is that the presence of the Metamucil modified the timing of digestion and absorption and the like of OTHER things. Since we only do spot checks and usually only a few of those, changes in timing can look like changes in absolute blood sugar even when they aren't. Well I doubt it's the metamucil, it is good to test this out but you might not want to go with double this dose which is already a lot of metamuc Continue reading >>

Pros & Cons Of Metamucil

Pros & Cons Of Metamucil

Leigh Good has been writing for magazines and newspapers for more than 10 years. Her work has been published in numerous print and online publications. Good has a bachelor's degree in print journalism from Georgia State University. A spoon containing ground psyllium husks sits on a wooden table.Photo Credit: konok1a/iStock/Getty Images Metamucil is a brand name for a fiber supplement containing psyllium seed husks, according to Drugs.com. Psyllium is created from the crushed seeds of Plantago ovata plants. Native to Asia, the Mediterranean and north Africa, Plantago ovata is now commonly grown in the U.S. as well as India and Pakistan. Psyllium is used to treat occasional or chronic constipation, according to the American Cancer Society. Psyllium husk seeds absorb water and expand as they travel through your digestive system, where the psyllium acts as a bulk-forming laxative. Taking psyllium supplements can also improve stomach pain and diarrhea, according to MedlinePlus. Psyllium supplements must be taken with ample amounts of water to prevent choking, according to Drugs.com. Take your psyllium with at least 8 oz. of water to help the fiber pass through your esophagus safely. Psyllium can swell in your throat without ample water, causing you to choke. If you experience choking every time you take psyllium, discontinue use and talk to your doctor. Taking psyllium supplements may help you lower your cholesterol levels, according to MedlinePlus. If you have cholesterol levels that are mildly or moderately high, adding 10 to 12 g of psyllium seed husks to your diet daily for seven weeks can help reduce your cholesterol levels by five to 10 percent. Talk to your doctor about using psyllium to help reduce your cholesterol levels. Drugs.com warns that laxatives, such as psy Continue reading >>

Which Supplements Can Help Lower Or Control My Blood Sugar?

Which Supplements Can Help Lower Or Control My Blood Sugar?

Question: Answer: Many different supplements may help lower or control blood sugar in people with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes who experience hyperglycemia (when blood glucose rises higher than normal). These supplements are discussed below. More details about each, including dosage, drug interactions, potential side effects, and ConsumerLab.com's reviews of products on the market, can be found by clicking on the links. Due to the seriousness of hyperglycemia, it is important to consult with your physician regarding use of these supplements. Cinnamon supplements may modestly improve blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes whose blood sugar is not well controlled with medication. In addition, one small study found that a branded cinnamon extract reduced fasting blood sugar by an average of about 10 mg/dL in prediabetic men and women with metabolic syndrome. Keep in mind, however, that only certain varieties of cinnamon have been shown to have this effect, and long-term safety studies have not been conducted. Curcumin (from turmeric) may improve blood sugar levels, according to preliminary studies, and one study found curcumin to dramatically lower the chances of prediabetes in middle-aged, slightly overweight men and women with somewhat higher than normal blood sugar levels. Alpha lipoic acid may improve insulin sensitivity and blood sugar control in people with type 2 diabetes, although it may only slightly reduce levels of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c). Chromium picolinate may help some people with type 2 diabetes decrease fasting blood glucose levels as well as levels of insulin and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c). However, be aware that high doses may worsen insulin sensitivity in healthy people who are not obese or diabetic. Having adequate blood levels of vi Continue reading >>

Does Metamucil Sugar Free Up My Bg?

Does Metamucil Sugar Free Up My Bg?

my last a1c was 6.0. lately my daily bg's are rising. I take lantus. 15 units am and 8 units pm. and metforming 1000 mg twice a day. is it normal to have to keep increasing my insulin. now I seem to have take humalog twice a day as well. I eat pretty carefully. 2 tablespoons of metamucil at 4p, today. had salad for lunch. ham and cheese roll up for snack at 4pm, 160bg. aat 630 265bg. guess I am going to have to increase my insuling even more.? any thoughts on this. I also have 2 daily drinks at 530. 2 ounce vodka and crystal light..... eggs for breakfast, roll ups and peanut butter and apple for snacks and salads for lunch. tonight fish and yellow squash. D.D. Family Getting much harder to control Apples raise blood sugar most all other foods you mentioned seem ok. How many units of humalog per day are you taking. How long have you been taking insulin, this is a trial and error with dosing its been 32 yrs for me and I have to adjust its the way it is. Moderator T2 insulin resistant Using Basal/Bolus Therapy For me my bolus changes all the time. Much depends on where I was prior to a meal and to how much insulin I need to take. D.D. Family Getting much harder to control thanks.4 years now lantus 2 1/2 humilog. it sure is tricky How nsny units of novalog per meal are you taking. my last a1c was 6.0. lately my daily bg's are rising. I take lantus. 15 units am and 8 units pm. and metforming 1000 mg twice a day. is it normal to have to keep increasing my insulin. now I seem to have take humalog twice a day as well. I eat pretty carefully. 2 tablespoons of metamucil at 4p, today. had salad for lunch. ham and cheese roll up for snack at 4pm, 160bg. aat 630 265bg. guess I am going to have to increase my insuling even more.? any thoughts on this. I also have 2 daily drinks at 5 Continue reading >>

Study Of Metamucil On Blood Glucose And Hba1c In Type Ii Niddm Subjects

Study Of Metamucil On Blood Glucose And Hba1c In Type Ii Niddm Subjects

You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. Study of Metamucil on Blood Glucose and HbA1c in Type II NIDDM Subjects The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01582282 Recruitment Status : Terminated (due to slow enrollment) Information provided by (Responsible Party): Study Description Study Design Arms and Interventions Outcome Measures Eligibility Criteria Contacts and Locations More Information A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, multi-dose clinical study consisting of 2 phases; 1) an 8-week lead-in period during which patients followed a diet judged to be within the acceptable guidelines of the ADA, and 2) a 12-week treatment period, at the beginning of which, Subjects are randomly assigned to 1 of the 3 treatment groups: placebo, 3.4 g psyllium BID for a total of 6.8 g/day (10.4g Metamucil) or 6.8g psyllium BID for a total of 13.6 g/day (20.8g Metamucil). For 12 weeks, Subjects took Metamucil or the fiber-free placebo BID, just prior to breakfast and dinner. Patients visited the clinic 10 times during the 20-week period at Screening, Weeks -8, -6, -4, 0, Day 3, and Weeks 2, 4, 8 and 12, fasting at least 12 hours prior to each visit where a blood sample was taken (all visits except Week -6 and Day 3) for analysis of fasting serum glucose and lipid levels, and HbA1c. Clinical chemistry, hematology and urinalysis were done at Weeks -8, 0 and 12. The completed 7-day food diaries were reviewed by the study dietician at each visit and discussed with the patient to ensure co Continue reading >>

How To Stabilize Your Blood Sugar

How To Stabilize Your Blood Sugar

Life with type 2 diabetes can sometimes seem like an hourly or even minute-by-minute effort to stabilize your blood sugar. All of the recommendations and drugs you’ve been given as part of your type 2 diabetes treatment plan are intended to help you reach — and keep — healthy blood sugar levels most of the time. But doctors are learning that to control type 2 diabetes well, better information about why blood sugar matters and how to manage it is essential. The Facts About Diabetes and Blood Sugar As the American Diabetes Association (ADA) explains, your body needs sugar (glucose) for fuel, and there’s a fairly complicated process that makes it possible for your body to use that sugar. Insulin, which is made by the pancreas, is the hormone that enables the cells in your body to take advantage of sugar. Type 2 diabetes occurs when your body isn’t able to remove sugar from your blood. This can happen if your body stops being sensitive to insulin or if it starts to respond in a delayed or exaggerated way to changes in your blood sugar. Diabetes is signaled by an elevated blood sugar level of more than 126 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) for a fasting blood test, or more than 200 mg/dL at any time during the day. It can also be indicated by a hemoglobin A1C level of 6.5 percent or higher, a measure of the percentage of blood sugar attached to hemoglobin in the blood during the past two to three months. (Hemoglobin is a protein in red blood cells that transports oxygen throughout the body. So an A1C of 6.5 means that 6.5 percent of your red blood cells have sugar attached to them.) Unchecked high blood sugar gradually damages the blood vessels in your body. Over the long term, this slow, progressive harm can lead to a dangerous loss of sensation in your legs and fe Continue reading >>

Getting To Know Fiber: Supplements

Getting To Know Fiber: Supplements

How are you feeling about fiber these days? Do you have a better understanding of what insoluble, soluble, and functional fibers are? And most importantly, do you think you’re getting enough fiber in your diet? That’s really the question, isn’t it? Remember that the average person gets about 13 grams of fiber each day. Yet we all need more than that (14 grams per 1,000 calories) and only 10% of Americans get the amount of fiber that’s recommended. Dietitians will tell you that it’s best to get your fiber from food sources. Why? Because high-fiber foods offer other health and nutrition benefits, of course! So, your diet should include whole grains, beans, fruits, vegetables, nuts, and seeds. Yet, as is the case with many nutrients, sometimes we fall short. It’s during these times when it seems so much easier to be able to pop a pill or gulp down a drink that gives us what we need. And just as there are pills and supplements for vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients, there are supplements that contain fiber. Are these any good? Do they actually contain fiber? Are they harmful in any way? Let’s look. Fiber Supplements Stroll down one of the aisles of any drugstore and you’ll see fiber supplements. They’re often in powder, pill, or even wafer form. They seem appealing, especially to the person who dislikes whole wheat bread, bran flakes, or the skin of an apple. And why not take one if you can’t get enough from food? Here’s a rundown of some of the more popular types of supplements. Psyllium. Psyllium is a natural (as opposed to synthetic) type of soluble fiber that offers the following benefits: Promotes regularity Relieves constipation Lowers blood cholesterol May lower blood glucose Metamucil. Metamucil is a psyllium-based supplement that has been Continue reading >>

How To Get More Fiber If You Have Diabetes

How To Get More Fiber If You Have Diabetes

Even dressed up, 50 grams of daily fiber is a lot to pack away.(ISTOCKPHOTO)If youve got type 2 diabetes, the quality of food is as important as the quantity. And fiber is the best stuff around. Fiber itself doesnt raise blood sugar because it can't be digested, and that's good. But even better, it can blunt the impact that carbohydrates have on blood sugar. The reason? The intestines take a bit more time to digest fiber-rich foods, and that slows the release of glucose into your bloodstream. You need to check labels and add more fiber A 2000 study of 13 patients showed that patients with diabetes who consumed 50 grams of fiber each day lowered their glucose levels 10% and insulin levels 12% more than those who consumed 24 grams of fiber a day. The problem is that 50 grams of fiber per day is a lot of fiber. Most Americans consume only 15 grams every day, according to the American Heart Association, and the American Diabetes Association recommends that people with diabetes eat 25 to 50 grams daily. While its tough to consume that much, its not impossible. "Check nutrition labels to see how much fiber there is in the foods you eat," says LuAnn Berry, RD, a certified diabetes educator and diabetes specialist at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. "Then go back to the ones with the most grams of fiber per serving." Good sources of fiber include: Whole grain products, such as whole wheat bread Dried beans, including kidney, black and garbanzos, lentils Oats, which are found in oatmeal Apples and pears with their skins on Berry says you can eat the fiber-high foods alone or add them to recipesfor example, put beans in a salad. However, dont forget to calculate how much carbohydrate you are adding. A half-cup of beans, for example, has the same carbohydrate count as Continue reading >>

More in diabetes