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Medtronic Rewards

Medtronic Jobs With Remote, Part-time Or Freelance Work

Medtronic Jobs With Remote, Part-time Or Freelance Work

Manage patients via tele-monitoring, assess symptoms, provide education, and work with case managers and providers to provide the best care. Full-time, telecommute role requires a bachelors degree and 5 years of experience. Part-time, weekend role. Full-Time Telecommute Job Eindhoven Netherlands Dutch/English bilingual candidate sought for a full-time, remote option position requiring a BA/BS, computer proficiency, current driver's license, and exceptional communication skills. Will support teams and clinical needs, make sales. Full-Time Telecommute Job Fridley, MN, Minneapolis, MN Negotiate/draft contracts, provide legal support with business activities, and mitigate legal risks in this full-time role. Must have a JD degree, 5+ years' complex health care agreement drafting experience, and healthcare knowledge. Remote options. Full-Time Telecommute Job New Haven, CT, Boulder, CO, Miami, FL Oversee the development of curricula and deployment projects and support training activities in this full-time position. Must have a bachelor's degree, project management expertise, PMP certificate, and 10+ years' experience. Option of telecommuting. Full-Time Telecommute Job San Antonio, TX Sales representative needed for a full-time, partially remote position responsible for building relationships, making sales, promoting products/services, meeting revenue goals. BA/BS, three+ years' similarly focused experience required. Inside Sales Representative - Finnish and Danish Full-Time Telecommute Job Copenhagen Denmark Inside sales representative needed. Translate market insights results. Build account plan and conduct business reviews regularly. Must close sales deals easily. Strong presentation abilities required. Full-time and mostly work from home. Senior Program Manager, Neurovascu Continue reading >>

Employee Rewards Program Transforms Medtronic - Towers Watson - Willis Towers Watson

Employee Rewards Program Transforms Medtronic - Towers Watson - Willis Towers Watson

Ken Fairchild, director of U.S. compensation, Medtronic, Inc. In 1949, in a 600-square-foot garage in northeast Minneapolis, an electrical engineering graduate student and his brother-in-law established a medical equipment repair shop. Their goal: To transform the lives of patients. Today, Medtronic, Inc., has grown into the world's largest independent medical technology company, serving patients and physicians in 120 countries. This success is due in large part to the company's simple mission: to research, design, manufacture and sell products that alleviate pain, restore health and extend life. However, with 41% of the company's revenues outside of the U.S., it recently became time to focus on Medtronic's evolving global culture. The company needed to expand on its 60-year mission. Medtronic had multiple reward philosophies worldwide, and it needed one clear, consistent reward philosophy that would be flexible for all of its local offices. It had been 15 years since the company had last evaluated its philosophy, and the working world had changed dramatically. "It was imperative for us to develop a truly 'glocal' globally applicable and locally relevant reward philosophy that was compelling, appropriate and easy to understand," says Dawn Galas, Medtronic's total rewards philosophy project manager. "It had to motivate employees to fulfill our mission to serve patients." At the same time, Medtronic wanted to revise its compensation structure to make it less U.S.-centric and create a governance framework to allow managers to make good decisions and implement them more efficiently. Medtronic turned to Towers Watson (Watson Wyatt at that time) for assistance. "Towers Watson had the tools, as well as the best process to meet our specific needs," says Galas. (Left to right) Continue reading >>

Press Release| Investors | Medtronic

Press Release| Investors | Medtronic

Medtronic to Expand Minimally Invasive Therapy Portfolio with Acquisition of Gynecology Business from Smith & Nephew DUBLIN - May 18, 2016 - Medtronic plc ( NYSE: MDT ) today announced it has signed a definitive agreement to acquire Smith & Nephew's (NYSE: SNN; LSE: SN) gynecology (GYN) business for approximately $350 million. This agreement reinforces Medtronic's dedication to expanding the use of less invasive treatments and demonstrates a commitment to improving options for women with abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB). The addition of the GYN portfolio will expand and strengthen Medtronic's minimally invasive surgical offerings and will further complement its existing global GYN business. The acquisition is expected to close this summer. Smith & Nephew's key GYN solution is the TRUCLEAR System, which is a medical technology platform used to remove abnormal uterine tissue such as polyps and fibroids. The TRUCLEAR System, currently available throughout the U.S. and parts of Europe, is a less invasivetreatment option to surgical procedures such as a hysterectomy. The TRUCLEAR procedure is a minimally invasive surgical option that can be performed as an outpatient procedure. For more than 10 years, Smith & Nephew has developed medical devices in the GYN space. "We believe gynecology is one of the most underserved specialty procedure areas. Smith & Nephew has developed a rapidly growing business that expands minimally invasive treatment options for gynecology patients," said Chris Barry, senior vice president and president of the Surgical Innovations business, Minimally Invasive Therapies Group at Medtronic. "This acquisition expands our existing GYN portfolio and we believe creates opportunities to further explore and develop global therapies and solutions that improve GY Continue reading >>

Medtronic, Triple S Invest $500k To Open 1st In-house Salus Clinic In P.r.

Medtronic, Triple S Invest $500k To Open 1st In-house Salus Clinic In P.r.

Medtronic, Triple S invest $500K to open 1st in-house Salus clinic in P.R. Written by Contributor // March 7, 2018 // Manufacturing // No comments Flix Negrn, vice president of operations for Medtronic in Puerto Rico. Medical device manufacturer Medtronic, in partnership with health insurance provider Triple-S and Salus, inaugurated the first non-occupational health clinic at the plants Juncos campus, to serve employees and their families. The clinic represents a combined investment of $500,000 and has the capacity to serve a population of 5,000, combining Medtronics population in Juncos and Humacao, company officials said. [email protected] is a pilot program that provides access to laboratory services, specialists and telemedicine to employees and their dependents who are covered by Medtronics health plan. For Medtronic, the well-being of our employees is the top priority, and with this pilot project, we not only innovate beyond traditional occupational medicine services in a manufacturing environment, but also provide easy and direct access to health services, said Flix Negrn, vice president of operations for Medtronic in Puerto Rico. [email protected] allows us to be pioneers by offering our employees and their dependents comprehensive health services focused on prevention and management of chronic conditions, he said, adding the services will be free to employees covered by Medtronics health plan. Denise King, vice president of Medtronics Americas Benefits Center of Expertise and Total Rewards Operations, was on hand for the clinics inauguration last week, and said,our work at Medtronic focuses on improving lives every day. We continue to fulfill our mission by investing in the growth, development and well-being of our employees and by offering them the best work experience. Th Continue reading >>

Medtronic Takes Another Step Toward Value-based Care

Medtronic Takes Another Step Toward Value-based Care

Medtronic takes another step toward value-based care Medtronic has signed a 5-year partnership with Lehigh Valley Health Network to try to create and demonstrate value. Medtronic and Lehigh Valley Health Network aim to reach 500,000 patients and cut costs of care by $100 million. Omar Ishrak, Medtronic CEO, has championed value-based care, a system where suppliers are paid based on outcomes. A Medtronic worker assembles a device that is inserted into a heart pacemaker. Medtronic has inked a partnership with a hospital network to try to create and demonstrate value. The five-year initiative will couple Medtronic's medical device expertise with Lehigh Valley Health Network's clinical expertise. They'll work together to create processes to treat more than 70 medical conditions using Medtronic equipment and improve patient outcomes and cut costs. LVHN will compare results with existing patient data from its eight Pennsylvania hospitals to measure health outcomes and quantify savings. For some treatments, Medtronic will get paid based on those results, a system known as value-based care. "This is a big step, and what we bring to this and what Lehigh brings to this are complementary capabilities with the desire to improve outcomes," said Medtronic CEO Omar Ishrak. He has been a vocal supporter of moving toward this idea that medical device and pharmaceutical companies get paid if their products work. His company has been experimenting with reimbursement models, including signing nearly 1,000 deals requiring it to reimburse hospitals for some costs if its Tyrx antibacterial envelope doesn't prevent infection like it's supposed to in patients who receive cardiac devices. The phrase value-based care has become a buzzword in the health-care industry, with experts preaching it as Continue reading >>

Unitedhealthcare's Medtronic Deal Sparks Furor, But A Year Later, Innovation Continues

Unitedhealthcare's Medtronic Deal Sparks Furor, But A Year Later, Innovation Continues

UnitedHealthcare has not released numbers on how many patients are affected by its exclusivity deal with Medtronic. While the initial press stories criticizing the transaction have died down, a JDRF initiative calls on insurers to preserve patient choice. When UnitedHealthcare (UHC) announced in May 2016 that it would only cover insulin pumps made by Medtronic for most adults, patient advocates decried the news as both a major loss for those affected and, quite possibly, a harbinger of a world where exclusivity pacts stifled competitive innovation. Investors, it seemed, were in full agreement. Shares of smaller pump maker Tandem Diabetes Care immediately dropped 20% when news of the deal became public.1 Such predictions, however, may prove overly dramatic. The past 16 months have seen Medtronic sign an outcomes-based payment agreement with another insurer, but no insurer has followed UHC’s lead and signed exclusivity pacts with Medtronic or any other pump maker. If UHC patients are protesting the policy, they have been less visible in recent months. The exclusivity deal helped inspire a campaign by JDRF (formerly the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation),2 but the early media coverage has waned. As for the deal’s impact on UHC patients, outsiders are forced to guess. UHC has declined to disclose any figures related to the policy: how many of its policyholders use insulin pumps, what pumps they chose before the transition, or how many have switched to Medtronic after preferred pumps broke or were out of warranty. An estimated 1.25 million3 (0.4%) of the nation’s 325 million people4 have type 1 diabetes (T1D). Estimates of the percentage of American patients with T1D who use a pump vary, but the JDRF currently reports the figure at 40%.5 Roughly 75% of all pump use Continue reading >>

Organizer Of Medtronic Charitable Events Finds Special Reward In Donating Her Time

Organizer Of Medtronic Charitable Events Finds Special Reward In Donating Her Time

Organizer of Medtronic charitable events finds special reward in donating her time Donielle Johnson plays many roles as Medtronic's Sonoma County volunteer coordinator. One of them is "Happy Heart," a heart-shaped foam figure who teaches children about the importance of exercise and healthy eating habits. "I dress up as Happy Heart and dance around," she said. "The kids are a little nervous at first. Then they all want to hug the heart." Johnson, 31, is a regulatory affairs specialist at Medtronic, Sonoma County's largest medical technology employer. She works with Medtronic scientists and government regulators to help secure marketing approval for the company's vascular products. She's also the force behind Medtronic's local volunteer programs, which involve hundreds of employees each year. In addition to organizing the company's charitable events, she's an active volunteer herself. "Donielle is a lightning rod for volunteerism," said Joe McGrath, a Medtronic spokesman in Santa Rosa. Earlier this month, she was pitching in at Sonoma County YWCA's A Special Place preschool, a program for abused and dependent children aged 3 to 5. Kids flocked to her side when she entered the room. "I remember your name!" she told a beaming 4-year-old who grabbed her hand. At the Santa Rosa preschool, Johnson and other Medtronic volunteers read to the children, help serve lunch, lead exercises, work in the garden and do maintenance chores. Volunteers are vital to the YWCA program, said Briah Gere, the preschool's director. "We wouldn't be able to operate without volunteer help," she said. "We just don't have the staff." Medtronic volunteers also work with Redwood Empire Food Bank, the American Heart Association's Jump Rope for Heart, Sonoma County Children's Village, student leadership Continue reading >>

Empowered Employees Keep Medtronic's Heart Beating

Empowered Employees Keep Medtronic's Heart Beating

Empowered Employees Keep Medtronic's Heart Beating A key component in the mission statement of this Minneapolis-based manufacturer of medical device technology is to recognize the personal worth of each of its 38,000 employees. At Medtronic, a strong tie exists between the company's EHS vision and its mission. The company strives to maintain good citizenship in each of its 45 manufacturing and distribution facilities around the world. The company-wide code of conduct includes specific health and safety requirements: Medtronic is committed to a safe, healthy work environment that is in compliance with all applicable laws and regulations. All employees are expected to develop a pro-active, cooperative attitude toward issues of health and safety throughout the company. We believe that empowered managers and employees can significantly influence our safety culture and we've seen dramatic results to prove it, says John Ficklin, director, health and safety. He cites Medronic's Humacao, Puerto Rico, site as an example of management's dedication to safe production. The site rapidly was expanding and as a result, was experiencing higher injury rates and compliance issues. The site manager made safety and health a priority by including it in all of his manager's performance evaluations and he measured their progress with regular status meetings. The result was no recordable injuries for five quarters. According to Ficklin, the company's Santa Rosa site had a laissez-faire attitude toward safety. It had one EHS representative and large workers' compensation payments. New site management shook things up, says Ficklin, adding four additional EHS personnel who implemented management systems and performance scorecards. After 6 years, the site has experienced a 90 percent reduction in Continue reading >>

Medtronic To Recall Defective Diabetes Infusion Sets

Medtronic To Recall Defective Diabetes Infusion Sets

Medical device maker Medtronic Plc said on Monday it would recall certain infusion sets used with its insulin pumps by diabetes patients due to a component that could cause death in extreme cases. Infusion sets help connect an insulin pump device to the body. Medtronic said the vent membrane in some of its infusion sets could be blocked by fluid during the process of priming, or removal of air bubbles, potentially leading to insulin being over-delivered. Over-delivery of insulin can cause hypoglycemia or low blood sugar and in extreme cases, death. Medtronic said it had discontinued the affected vent membranes in the infusion sets. The Dublin-based company received reports of hypoglycemia requiring medical intervention, potentially linked to the issue, Medtronic said. Medtronic did not provide the number of infusion sets being recalled. The company in April recalled devices used to manage build-up of the cerebrospinal fluid that surrounds the brain due to increased complaints. Continue reading >>

Access Recognize.medtronic.com.

Access Recognize.medtronic.com.

HTML content can be minified and compressed by a websites server. The most efficient way is to compress content using GZIP which reduces data amount travelling through the network between server and browser. HTML code on this page is well minified. It is highly recommended that content of this web page should be compressed using GZIP, as it can save up to 30 B or 20% of the original size. Our browser made a total of 1 request to load all elements on the main page. We found that all of those requests were addressed to Recognize.medtronic.com and no external sources were called. The less responsive or slowest element that took the longest time to load (232 ms) belongs to the original domain Recognize.medtronic.com. Additional info on recognize.medtronic.com Besides the initial HTML request, no CSS, Javascripts, AJAX or image files were requested in the course of web page rendering. Recognize.medtronic.com uses IP address which is currently shared with 4 other domains. The more sites share the same IP address, the higher the host servers workload is. It is strongly recommended that the host server should be changed or the hosting provider should be requested to give a different (separate) IP address for this domain. Continue reading >>

Medtronic-covidien Deal Rewards Just 2 Advisory Firms

Medtronic-covidien Deal Rewards Just 2 Advisory Firms

DealBook | Medtronic-Covidien Deal Rewards Just 2 Advisory Firms Medtronic-Covidien Deal Rewards Just 2 Advisory Firms Investment bankers had a rude awakening over the weekend. A megamerger like the $43 billion cash and stock deal Medtronic and Covidien announced on Sunday often provides a feast for a raft of advisory firms. Not this time. The two medical devices companies are only using one each. Piling on advisers may sometimes cover executives backs in case a deal goes bad or incurs the wrath of shareholders. On occasion, extra banks provide separate advice for directors worried that a chief executive may have his own agenda, for example, as a big shareholder. Other times, companies hand out merger roles to keep banks sweet. They may want, for example, to repay support in less lucrative lines of business not least, lending. This trade-off is one method universal banks like Citigroup and JPMorgan Chase have used over the last decade or more to muscle in on the M.&A. business. In Comcasts $45 billion all-stock deal to buy Time Warner Cable, announced in February, Comcast used three advisers, including JPMorgan. Its target had four, one of them Citigroup. Omar Ishrak, the chief executive, said Medtronic expected to invest $10 billion in the United States over the next 10 years.Credit Brendan McDermid/Reuters The Medtronic-Covidien deal, though, is a blast from the advisory past. Goldman Sachs, a traditional leader in merger advisory, assisted Covidien, while the specialist advisory firm Perella Weinberg was hired by Medtronic. Bank of America is providing finance for the deal, but based on the wording in the deal announcement, thats all it is doing, so its mergers department ought not to get any league-table credit. Granted, the two merging companies have each used the Continue reading >>

Medtronic Records Reveal Royal Rewards

Medtronic Records Reveal Royal Rewards

by John Fauber John Fauber, Reporter, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel/MedPage Today Since it won FDA approval in 2002 for use in spinal fusions, recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2, or BMP-2, has generated annual sales of $800 million. Many of those sales represented off-label use, a trend that has lately stirred the interest of Congress and the media. MedPage Today and the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel revealed many aspects of this marketing approach in an earlier special report ; here, we report information gathered in our follow-up investigation. A key factor in the BMP-2 success story is a cadre of prominent surgeons whose members have been enlisted by medical device-maker Medtronic to conduct clinical research or author articles about InFuse, the brand name for BMP-2. This year alone, many of those doctors received payments of hundreds of thousands to millions of dollars each in royalties for a variety of other Medtronic spinal devices, according to a MedPage Today/Journal Sentinel analysis of newly released company payments. Medtronic began disclosing the payments this year, in advance of a federal requirement set to take effect in 2013. Surgeons with no financial ties to Medtronic say the product's success is due largely to positive findings made by the surgeons affiliated with the company. Doctors involved with two of the many research articles on BMP-2 published since it was approved -- one in 2002, the other in 2004 -- received a combined $6 million in royalties this year for other Medtronic spinal products, the newspaper found. The payments went directly to the doctors or business entities designated by them. "There is no question, if you have a product, you want it to be published," said Dan Spengler, MD, former editor of a spinal medical journal and pro Continue reading >>

Medtronic, Now Based In Ireland, Still Reaps U.s. Benefits

Medtronic, Now Based In Ireland, Still Reaps U.s. Benefits

Medtronic, now based in Ireland, still reaps U.S. benefits Since its "inversion," the company has been awarded more than $40 million in federal contracts and its executives still work at its Fridley campus. By Renae Merle Washington Post DAVID PAUL MORRIS • Bloomberg News Medtronic CEO Omar Ishrak at the 2016 Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., on Jan. 6, 2016. Medical device maker Medtronic PLC found itself in an enviable position in March when one of its executives joined a U.S. trade mission to Peru, where there is a booming health-care market. The trip included matchmaking meetings with Peruvian businesses and networking luncheons with the Lima Chamber of Commerce. The delegation of more than a dozen health-care companies also visited a new $75 million hospital serving 600,000 people in Villa El Salvador, a sprawling shantytown on the outskirts of Lima. There, Medtronic received an influential shout-out. Toured new state of the art hospital Mission member @Medtronic provided their tech, Bruce Andrews, the deputy secretary of Commerce leading the trip, said in a Twitter post. In promoting the three-day trip, the Commerce Department had promised opportunities for U.S. companies to expand their footprint in the country, and Medtronic was now a featured player. Except by the time the trip took place, Medtronic, a behemoth that started humbly in a Minnesota garage in 1949, had claimed Ireland as its corporate home and given up its U.S. citizenship. In doing so, Medtronic joined a parade of prominent U.S. companies that have set up operations overseas to lower their tax bills. The migration has grown so large it is attracting scrutiny from tax collectors on both sides of the Atlantic. In late August, the European Union ruled that Apple must Continue reading >>

Cardinal Health Buys Three Units From Medtronic For $6.1 Billion

Cardinal Health Buys Three Units From Medtronic For $6.1 Billion

Cardinal Health buys three units from Medtronic for $6.1 billion Marla Matzer Rose The Columbus Dispatch @MarlaMRose Cardinal Health has made an anticipated deal to buy three medical-supply units from Medtronic for $6.1 billion. It is one of Cardinal's biggest medical-products acquisitions. Medtronic has its global headquarters in Ireland but has an operational headquarters in Minneapolis. The units being acquired have a presence that includes operations in about a dozen states. Under the deal, 10,000 Medtronic employees will be absorbed into Dublin-based Cardinal's worldwide workforce of 40,000. The three units are focused on patient care, deep-vein thrombosis and nutritional insufficiency and make products as varied as hypodermic needles, surgery kitsand feeding pumps. It's not clear whether the acquisition will bring more employees to central Ohio, where Cardinal has more than 5,000 workers, Cardinal spokeswoman Ellen Barry said. Cardinal had been the rumored frontrunner for the Medtronics units for weeks but declined to comment on earlier reports. Medtronic had been looking to sell the businesses, which it acquired in the purchase of Covidien in 2014. Although analysts have expressed support for the acquisition, Cardinal's shares fell sharply Tuesday, closed down 11.5 percent as the company issued new earnings guidance for fiscal 2017. The forecast came in at the low end of its previously predicted range of $5.35 to $5.50 per sharebecausethe company expects lower prices for its generic drugs. Charles Rhyee, an analyst for Cowen and Co., maintained a neutral "market perform" rating on Cardinal shares in a research note issued after the announcement of the acquisition of the Medtronic units. They had revenue of $2.3 billion in the most recent fiscal year, compared wi Continue reading >>

Medtronic Bolsters Paid Family Leave Benefits

Medtronic Bolsters Paid Family Leave Benefits

Medtronic bolsters paid family leave benefits Medtronic bolsters paid family leave benefits Medical device company Medtronic implemented a new family care leave policy to better attract and retain its workforce. The companys 40,000 part-time and full-time employees, who are dispersed across the country, will have access to six weeks of paid leave for a range of family care leave needs. Employees can take leave to bond with a new child or care for a sick family member, for example. The benefit is in addition to maternity benefits for birth mothers, such as a two week healthy pregnancy program. The program, which is offered through Medtronics health plan, awards birth moms with two weeks of paid time off. Birth mothers can receive up to 18 weeks of fully-paid leave with all the available benefits. We want to support employees who had other life events [and] need to exit the workforce for a period of time, says Denise King, vice president of benefits COE and total rewards operations at Medtronic. We wanted to make sure that they had the company support to exit the workforce for six weeks. Previously, Medtronic offered five to seven weeks of paid leave for birth parents, one week for non-birth parents, and four weeks for compassionate leave to care for or support a terminally ill family member. The company says it wanted to make the policy inclusive, rather than focused on baby bonding. See also: Bristol-Myers Squibb boosts parental leave, expands caregiver benefits However, the updated policy stemmed from the Medtronic Womens Network, an employee resource group of women who wanted just that. The female employees had asked for a better policy to improve the baby bonding experience, and the company took the needs of the workforce and benchmarked them against what other empl Continue reading >>

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