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Medtronic Reservoir Paradigm Price

Minimed Paradigm Revel Insulin Pump, Clear, 300 Unit Pump

Minimed Paradigm Revel Insulin Pump, Clear, 300 Unit Pump

Do not base your order on the picture presented. MiniMed Paradigm Revel Insulin Pump, Clear, 300 Unit Pump Features of the MiniMed Paradigm Revel Insulin Pumps: Can hold up to 300 units of insulin in the reservoir. REAL-Time Trend Graphs at 3-, 6-, 12- and 24-hour intervals give you a clear picture of your glucose levels over time. Bolus Wizard Calculator does the math for you and simplifies insulin doses, reduces math errors. Uses an "active insulin curve" to factor in the amount of active insulin left in your body to help prevent "insulin stacking". Delivers multiple basal rates as low as 0.025 units per hour, and sets up insulin-to-carbohydrate ratios as low as 1 to 1 to match your insulin needs. Responds to changes in activity levels, stress, illness, or other events. Missed Meal Bolus Reminder for those who tend to forget to take insulin for your meal to help avoid hyperglycemia after meals. Programmable Predictive Alerts that can be set to warn you up to 30 minutes before your low or high glucose limits are reached, up to 8 different thresholds. Very discreet, may be easily worn under clothing. Watertight design, may be worn while swimming. Medtronic MiniMed Paradigm Insulin Pump Manufacturer's Warranty: With one of the largest catalogs of medical, surgical and diagnostic supplies available online, Medex Supply can accommodate your facility's needs for Diabetic . Blood Glucose Meters and Infusion Pumps can be found in our extensive online collection of products from globally recognized and trusted brands, including Minimed Medtronic. An excellent option to consider is the Paradigm Revel Insulin Pump, Clear, 300 Unit Pump. Eligible for FREE or discounted ground shipping. Continue reading >>

Medtronic Other | New Sealed Medtronic Reservoir Paradigm | Poshmark

Medtronic Other | New Sealed Medtronic Reservoir Paradigm | Poshmark

Medtronic Reservoirs MMT-332A 1 box. 10 per box . All are unexpired. I have lots of other supplies. Please ask trodgerssushi  trodgerssushi@jenjen83. Yes still available. I have additional pump supplies available. Are you looking for quick sets or bandage covers. trodgerssushi @tinasmommy0903 . sorry no test steips jenjen83 @trodgerssushi do you still have the quick sets? tinasmommy0903 @trodgerssushi I'm interested in 5 quik set and 5 resivoir, can you make listing for me please trodgerssushi @tinasmommy0903 . I made a listing with 4 of each. trodgerssushi  Trodgerssushi@jenjen83. Yes, I have plenty left. Are you interested hayhallemom  Do you have Quick-sets MMT-399 or 397? Or the equivalent? I just need a box or two. Let me know what kind of deal you can make! Thanks! trodgerssushi  trodgerssushi@hayhallemom. I did use MMT-399. I may have some but they are expired (2010-12). Still in the wrapper and protected. I may have some at home, I kept some at work for emergencies. trodgerssushi  trodgerssushi@hayhallemom. Posted picture in this listing to show some of what I have. hayhallemom @trodgerssushi how many of the MMT-399 do you have? Price? Do you need to make me a separate listing? Thank you! trodgerssushi @hayhallemom . Found nine so fat. I probably do have to do s separate listing. Do you have anything to trade hayhallemom  I don't have anything for trade. Sorry. If you will, just make me another listing please. Thanks! trodgerssushi @hayhallemom . I thought I had more. I need to check at work and I will list everything I have on Monday I also have the bandage covers and the insertor. Do you need anything else Have some resovuiors in 326A hayhallemom @trodgerssushi I only need the quick sets. Monday is fine. Thank you! trodgerssushi @hayha Continue reading >>

U.k.'s Nice Recommends Medtronic Minimed Auto-insulin Shutoff For Hypoglycemic Type 1 Diabetics

U.k.'s Nice Recommends Medtronic Minimed Auto-insulin Shutoff For Hypoglycemic Type 1 Diabetics

U.K.'s NICE recommends Medtronic MiniMed auto-insulin shutoff for hypoglycemic Type 1 diabetics MiniMed 640G continuous glucose monitor--Courtesy of Medtronic The notoriously tight-fisted National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE), which makes healthcare product payment decisions for the U.K. on what can be used in the country's National Health Service (NHS), has come out with a recommendation in support of the use of the MiniMed Paradigm Veo system from Medtronic ($MDT). It's specifically for adults and children with Type 1 diabetes who have had disabling episodes of hypoglycemia even with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion. The MiniMed Paradigm Veo sensor system includes an automatic insulin shut-off feature as part of the MiniMed 640G CGM and insulin pump system, which was CE-marked more than a year ago in January 2015. Still, NICE cautioned that all of its physician commentators involved in compiling the report that the recommendation was based on had "difficulties in adopting and using the MiniMed 640G system." The system isn't yet approved in the U.S. Specifically, the report noted concerns that the continuous glucose sensors used in the MiniMed 640G are not as accurate at those in a combination, competitive system made of a CGM from Dexcom ($DXCM) when used with an Animas Vibe insulin pump from Johnson & Johnson ($JNJ). But that Dexcom/J&J combo system lacks the insulin autoshutoff feature that Medtronic's MiniMed Paradigm Veo system offers. As part of its recommendation, NICE specifically required that Medtronic collect, analyze and publish data on the use of the MiniMed Paradigm Veo including demonstrating that it improves patient outcomes, raises quality of life for patients and caregivers, reduces the number of hypoglycemic episodes, offe Continue reading >>

Medtronic Paradigm Insulin Pump

Medtronic Paradigm Insulin Pump

Australian Government Department of Health Health professionals and consumers are advised that Medtronic, in consultation with the TGA, has issued information regarding three potential but rare issues with its Medtronic Paradigm Insulin Pump. Medtronic Paradigm Insulin Pumps are small, portable devices used for the control of insulin-dependent diabetes. They maintain a patient's blood glucose targets in two ways: by delivering a continuous, minimal dose of insulin (basal) by delivering a larger dose of insulin when required (bolus). If you have a Medtronic Paradigm Insulin Pump, you should receive a letter from Medtronic with further information about the three potential issues and instructions for what you should do if you experience them. A summary of those issues and instructions are provided below. Please note that these issues are rare and it is unlikely that you will need to replace your Medtronic Paradigm Insulin Pump. If you have any questions or concerns, contact Medtronic's 24-hour helpline on 1800777808 (option 1). The drive support cap holds the device's pump motor in place and allows the motor's piston to press against the reservoir to deliver insulin. There have been reports of loose drive support caps and, in rare cases, the cap may stick out from the bottom of the reservoir compartment. This can happen if the device hits a hard surface, for example, if it is dropped. In one report, the user tried to push the drive support cap back into place while they were still attached to it, which resulted in unintentional delivery of insulin and, consequently, severe hypoglycaemia. Users are advised to regularly examine their Medtronic Paradigm Insulin Pumps. The device is designed to withstand occasional drops and bumps, but should be checked for any signs of dama Continue reading >>

My Boobs Are Costing Me $7000 (a.k.a. Time For A New Insulin Pump)

My Boobs Are Costing Me $7000 (a.k.a. Time For A New Insulin Pump)

Opening Note: If the title of this post seems like a shameless grab for attention, that’s because it is. I’m really interested in some opinions/feedback from other pumpers on this post. However, being largely absent from the blogosphere since having Baby B (I’m spending lots of time with the kids instead of at the keyboard, and also dealing with some wicked carpal tunnel) makes me feel the need to put a little extra effort into getting this post noticed. So if you’re here just to read about boobs, you’ll likely be disappointed. If you’re here as a pumper – please read on and leave a comment! Back in April, I had a baby. You may already know this. You may also already know that I had a c-section. Normally I wear my pump (a Medtronic Paradigm) clipped to the waist of my pants/shorts/skirt/pyjamas, but after my c-section I found it a bit uncomfortable to wear it near my belly while sleeping, so I decided to keep it between my boobs at night. It’s probably also no surprise to anyone that boobs tend to expand significantly when you’re breastfeeding a baby. So that pump was in there nice and snug. What may be news to some, though, is that hormones take a while to settle down after having a baby, and these wacky hormones can cause night sweats. I don’t mean seems-a bit-warm-in-here sweating. No, I mean doing-cardio-outside-in-summer sweating. Does anyone see yet where this story is headed? It is important to note that Medtronic pumps are not advertised as being waterproof. I was quite well versed in the dangers of exposing a Medtronic Pump to water after I accidentally took my pump swimming with me last year. But I’ve always sort of assumed that they would be somewhat water resistant. And definitely sweat resistant. I mean, athletes wear them, right? I re Continue reading >>

U.k.'s Nice Recommends Medtronic Minimed Auto-insulin Pump Shutoff For Hypoglycemic For Type 1 Diabetics

U.k.'s Nice Recommends Medtronic Minimed Auto-insulin Pump Shutoff For Hypoglycemic For Type 1 Diabetics

U.K.'s NICE recommends Medtronic MiniMed auto-insulin shutoff for hypoglycemic Type 1 diabetics From www.fiercemedicaldevices.com Nyhetsinfo www red DiabetologNytt The notoriously tight-fisted National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE), which makes healthcare product payment decisions for the U.K. on what can be used in the country's National Health Service (NHS), has come out with a recommendation in support of the use of the MiniMed Paradigm Veo system from Medtronic ($MDT). It's specifically for adults and children with Type 1 diabetes who have had disabling episodes of hypoglycemia even with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion. The MiniMed Paradigm Veo sensor system includes an automatic insulin shut-off feature as part of the MiniMed 640G CGM and insulin pump system, which was CE-marked more than a year ago in January 2015. Still, NICE cautioned that all of its physician commentators involved in compiling the report that the recommendation was based on had "difficulties in adopting and using the MiniMed 640G system." The system isn't yet approved in the U.S. Specifically, the report noted concerns that the continuous glucose sensors used in the MiniMed 640G are not as accurate at those in a combination, competitive system made of a CGM from Dexcom ($DXCM) when used with an Animas Vibe insulin pump from Johnson & Johnson ($JNJ). But that Dexcom/J&J combo system lacks the insulin autoshutoff feature that Medtronic's MiniMed Paradigm Veo system offers. As part of its recommendation, NICE specifically required that Medtronic collect, analyze and publish data on the use of the MiniMed Paradigm Veo including demonstrating that it improves patient outcomes, raises quality of life for patients and caregivers, reduces the number of hypoglycemic episodes, Continue reading >>

A Diabetic Product Review For Non-diabetics - The Medtronic Minimed Paradigm

A Diabetic Product Review For Non-diabetics - The Medtronic Minimed Paradigm "revel" Insulin Pump And Cgm

Sponsored By This is a review for Diabetics. If you're not a diabetic, consider this and it might help you enjoy this review. This is a product that will never affect your life. You've probably not thought about how an insulin pump works or its features. Here's a nice analogy I use to explain how diabetes works. It's called Diabetes: The Airplane Analogy. I've just received an upgrade to my insulin pump and I'm thrilled. Products like this are as important to us (diabetics) as your phone, your fancy remote control, your new DVD Player. I touch this device as often as my phone. It's attached to me 24 hours a day, it's an "external organ" to me. I've worn an insulin pump every day, all day (except showers) for the last decade. If you find this interesting, please consider helping fight diabetes: or tweeting the link I've had Medtronic pumps since 2000. I upgraded to a Paradigm with a CGM "Continuous Glucose Meter" in 2006. Last week I upgraded to a new Paradigm "Revel" Insulin Pump with a number of new features. Insulin Pumps have come a long way since they were backpacks. If you're not familiar, here's some diabetic equipment basics. Diabetes Basics I'm a Type 1 Diabetic. That means my body produces no insulin of its own and I need to get insulin from outside sources. When I eat food, the sugar in my blood goes up and isn't delivered to my cells and my body starves while marinating it its own sugar. When I take insulin, my cells unlock, sugar (fuel) is delivered to the cells, and my blood sugar values go down. Eat, go up, take insulin, go down. What's a Blood Sugar Meter do? It does just that, it measures the level of sugar in my blood. I prick my finger, usually 10 times a day or so, and I put the drop of blood on a small gauze strip that goes into a machine and gives m Continue reading >>

Pump Cost Comparison For Private Funding

Pump Cost Comparison For Private Funding

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community These are interesting costs made by tim2000s what really grates my chin is that even if you want to go on any pump, you have to have the approval of a consultant or team before you can, I hate being dictated to as to what's good for me or not. You think that there would be more support, Also you do when purchasing yourself these brilliant machines enter the realms of private healthcare As much as I know a pump would benefit me. I'd never in a million years qualify: -No hospital admissions for hypoglycaemia, I still suffer the same highs and lows as every other type 1 diabetic, pay my NI, etc. Pretty unfair that there's not a part funding option available. Would be better for those who are interested in further improving BGL but have the condition fairly well managed as to not meet the NICE eligibility criteria. Pretty unfair that there's not a part funding option available. Would be better for those who are interested in further improving BGL but have the condition fairly well managed as to not meet the NICE eligibility criteria. Grant, have you checked the Input website? NICE are not the only guidelines. There's also the ABCD stuff on which far more people qualify. There's more here: ABCD recommends that insulin pump therapy is also considered in the following situations: Acute painful neuropathy or symptomatic autonomic neuropathy if conventional treatment fails to enable adequate blood glucose control Severe insulin resistance with poor blood glucose control Excessive number of injections for optimised control Impaired exercise capacity, abnormal eating behaviour or an unacceptable number of sick days Shift work or frequent travel across time zones Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump Smackdown: Revel Vs 522

Insulin Pump Smackdown: Revel Vs 522

I’ve been wearing the newest pump available from Minimed in the U.S., the Revel, for almost four months now. Minimed made it available to me through their temporary loaner pump program, and have kindly allowed me to hang on to it while I decide whether the Revel, an upgrade from the Minimed 522 I currently own, is worth the $400 that it costs to upgrade via their Paradigm Pathway Program. So I’ve been putting off sitting down and detailing how I like or don’t like the Revel for far too long now, knowing that as soon as I finally put my thoughts on paper, I will be forced to either pay for the upgrade or send the pump back. But the time has come, my friends. And that brings me to the big questions: is the Minimed Revel, full of the promise of its new features, worth $400 more to me than the Minimed 522? Is the new pump an improvement, and, if so, what is the dollar value of the incremental improvement for me? In thinking about this, there are several important angles to consider. Notably, I am coming from the position of having a Minimed pump already, and one that is jut one generation older to boot. However, there are several scenarios under which you might be considering the Revel*: 1. Having no insulin pump vs. getting the Minimed Revel Get it. Get it get it get it. I know there are those who insist on staying away from pumps, appreciating the freedom of injections in that there is no machine tethered to their bodies, but I for one am a pump advocate. A pump devotee. The freedom of motion lost because of the machinery is far outweighed by the flexibility of schedule and insulin delivery gained. Plus, the ability to have a constant basal rate of insulin is hugely beneficial, both in terms of daily control and long-term mimicry of the natural pancreas. But this is Continue reading >>

Medtronic And Novo Nordisk Announce Agreement To Enhance And Simplify Diabetes Management

Medtronic And Novo Nordisk Announce Agreement To Enhance And Simplify Diabetes Management

Medtronic and Novo Nordisk announce agreement to enhance and simplify diabetes management Companies expect to offer prefilled insulin cartridges of U-100 NovoLog (insulin aspart [rDNA origin] injection) for Paradigm pump therapy, conduct clinical studies and expand medical education initiatives NORTHRIDGE, CALIF. AND PRINCETON, N.J., Nov. 22, 2004 The Diabetes business unit of Medtronic, Inc. (NYSE: MDT), the world leader in insulin pump therapy, and Novo Nordisk (NYSE: NVO), the world leader in diabetes care, today announced an agreement to develop the first prefilled cartridges designed for use with Paradigm external insulin pumps. The two companies also agreed to conduct clinical studies and expand medical education highlighting the benefits of maintaining good blood glucose (sugar) control in people with diabetes who use U-100 NovoLog (insulin aspart [rDNA origin] injection) and Paradigm pump therapy. Prefilled cartridges containing NovoLog are expected to offer a convenient option for people using Paradigm pump therapy. Currently, pump users must transfer insulin every two to three days from a vial to a reservoir that fits inside their pump. When available, prefilled cartridges will eliminate this manual transfer process, simplifying pump therapy for Paradigm insulin pump users. "The benefits of using NovoLog in an insulin pump to achieve good blood glucose control are well-documented," said Martin Soeters, president of Novo Nordisk Inc. "Our partnership with Medtronic supports our goal to improve diabetes treatment in the United States by pairing the market's leading insulin pump with our rapid-acting insulin analog." In addition to developing prefilled cartridges, the companies intend to initiate clinical studies to demonstrate the advantages of NovoLog insulin Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump Rundown

Insulin Pump Rundown

Choosing an insulin pump doesn’t have to be an overwhelming process. Should you go with a more traditional pump where you can monitor your insulin levels directly? Are you looking for a model that works with a BGM monitor and allows you to administer insulin via a remote? Maybe you need a pump that offers integration with a CGM system. What about size? Color? To use tubes or not to use tubes? Presenting the options so you can find out what pump best fits your lifestyle is our goal. So, with several models on the market, let us help you sort through the choices by taking a look at what’s available and breaking down the various features of each. We’ve separated the pumps into four categories: pumps that incorporate or work with a Blood Glucose Monitor (BGM) and offer Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM), pumps with just CGM capability, pumps with just a BGM, and standalone pumps that don’t work with a BGM or offer CGM. Hybrid Closed-Loop System The 670 G system is the newest member to the Medtronic pump family and the first hybrid closed-loop system. In other ways, it is a like a “basal modulator” where you have to still bolus but it predicts your basal rate. Every 5 minutes, the auto-mode option (hybrid closed-loop) automatically adjusts basal insulin delivery based on your sugar levels to keep you range. It is excellent at catching lows because it stops your insulin dosage 30 minutes before you reach your pre-selected low limits, then it will automatically restart insulin when your levels recover. Possible concerns: excessive alerts and extended menu that needs clearing. Only approved for ages 14+ because it has a total daily dose requirement of at least 8 units a day. Feeling of loss of control of management with closed-loop system. Pumps with BGM and CGM ca Continue reading >>

Medtronic Minimed® 630g Insulin Pump System

Medtronic Minimed® 630g Insulin Pump System

The MiniMed® 630G Insulin Pump System is a complete solution designed for advanced diabetes control. Waterproof design with a user-friendly color screen and simple menu Built-in CGM allows for wireless transmittal of glucose information Remote insulin dosing with the Bolus Wizard®, which helps to calculate mealtime insulin and may avoid insulin stacking Continuously delivers insulin, with a tubing change needed only every two or three days Multiple insulin delivery settings to meet unique needs Enlite Sensor® sends readings to insulin pump every 5 minutes, helping to identify trends and make adjustments CGM tracks glucose levels throughout the day, including the effects of food or exercise Predictive alerts given up to 30 minutes ahead, if trending high or low CCS Medical offers Ascensia Diabetes Care strips for use with Medtronic pumps for many insurance plans. Continue reading >>

Touchscreen Meets Insulin Pump In Tandem’s New T:slim

Touchscreen Meets Insulin Pump In Tandem’s New T:slim

“Design is a funny word. Some people think design means how it looks. But of course, if you dig deeper, it's really how it works … To design something really well, you have to get it. You have to really grok what it’s all about. It takes a passionate commitment to really thoroughly understand something, chew it up, not just quickly swallow it. Most people don’t take the time to do that.” Those were the words of the late Steve Jobs in an interview with Wired in February 1996. More than a decade later, Tandem Diabetes Care took this idea to heart with its new t:slim touchscreen insulin pump, which it designed after conducting a remarkable 4,000 in-depth interviews with patients, healthcare providers, and caregivers. Tandem really wanted to get inside the minds of people who take insulin – pumpers and non-pumpers alike. The new pump was approved by the FDA in November 2011 (see new now next in diaTribe #38) and launched just last month. I was able to get trained on the t:slim at Tandem’s San Diego headquarters soon after it launched, and what follows is my experience wearing the device over the past week. So far, three themes have emerged: some clear differences from other pumps, a focus on simplicity and convenience, and an attention to safety. Part One: Differences from Other Pumps Adam’s Favorites iPhone-like touchscreen Rechargeable battery Highly customizable “personal profiles” for insulin delivery From the minute I opened the shipping box, it was clear that the t:slim pump was somewhat different from other pumps I’ve used – included with the pump were a USB charging cable and adapters for both the wall and car. Even the included user manual comes on a credit-card-like thumb drive. But the most obvious difference between the t:slim and other p Continue reading >>

Medtronic Paradigm Reservoirs

Medtronic Paradigm Reservoirs

Because the safety of our customers is our top priority, we are voluntarily recalling certain manufacturing lots of part number MMT-326A (1.8 mL) and MMT-332A (3.0 mL) reservoirs used with our Paradigm insulin pumps. We are recalling these reservoirs due to the potential that reservoirs from these lot numbers may be at increased risk for leaking. A leak in the reservoir may result in delivery of less insulin than intended. In addition, if you have a leaky reservoir and an insulin blockage occurs in the infusion set, the pump may not alarm to notify you. Our investigation has indicated that this increased potential for reservoir leakage was caused by abnormal wear on a manufacturing tool involved in the production of reservoir stoppers. We are recalling all lots of reservoirs that contain any stoppers from that tool. We have corrected this problem and have placed additional testing and inspection steps into our manufacturing process. We are instructing all customers not to use reservoirs from these lot numbers and are providing replacement product at no additional charge. We are asking customers to verify the lot numbers of the reservoirs they have on hand using our online tool. If the tool determines that any of your lot numbers are affected, further instructions will be provided within the tool. For any further questions about this issue, please contact us at 1.866.450.0890 Monday through Friday, 8AM – 6 PM Central Time. At Medtronic, making quality products that you can trust is our top priority. We are committed to improving our products and to communicating about potential issues when they arise. We will continue to communicate as often as needed because we know that is what you expect from Medtronic as your partner in diabetes care. We believe doing so makes our Continue reading >>

A Primer On Buying Your Insulin Pump

A Primer On Buying Your Insulin Pump

After you decide to get an insulin pump, you’ll quickly learn there’s a process involved. How you pay for your pump will determine how soon it arrives to you. The other thing is you can only purchase it through a pump manufacturer. If you’re paying out-of-pocket for the $6,500 to $7,500 a pump typically costs in Canada, you’ll be happy to know it will be at your door in a matter of days. The manufacturer will arrange training through a healthcare professional or diabetes education centre in your community. But if you’re among the many who rely on public or private health insurance, the process can take a few months and sometimes much longer. In this case, your doctor must confirm you meet the criteria to use a pump. You’ll also need a prescription and pump training from a diabetes educator or clinic. After that, you’ll receive a list of pumps sold in Canada. The pump manufacturer will help process your insurance funding. The key considerations in choosing your pump are: Pump type – line or patch Compatibility with other brands of infusion sets Cost and availability of supplies Ease of use Battery life Reservoir size Ability to work with a blood glucose monitor Resistance to water Training and support There currently are four pumps sold in Canada made by four manufacturers: ACCU-CHEK® Spirit Combo (line pump) Animas® OneTouch® Ping® and Vibe™ (line pumps) Medtronic MiniMed® Paradigm® Veo™ (line pump) Insulet OmniPod® (patch pump) We can assist you in the purchase of your pump. We’ll be glad to answer general questions you may have. Or if you’re interested in a specific product, we can forward your name to a manufacturer’s representative who’ll contact you. Whichever you prefer, simply complete and email form below. Option 1: Please type Continue reading >>

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