diabetestalk.net

Medtronic Reservoir 1.8 Ml

Newsflash: Medtronic Launches New Minimed 630g System

Newsflash: Medtronic Launches New Minimed 630g System

A new Medtronic insulin pump is now available in the United States, introducing a new des ign and color-screen as part of a complete makeover to these diabetes devices that have fundamentally looked the same for 30 years! Say hello to the Minimed 630G, which Medtronic announced on Thursday after receiving the FDA's Pre-Market Approval on Aug. 10. This news caught many by surprise, as the California pump-CGM company hadn't previewed this product in advance as they typically do before launches. Instead, they've focused on their forthcoming 670G hybrid closed loop system, expected to be the first-gen commercial Artficial Pancreas system to hit market in 2017. A number of users are actually upset that they weren't warned of this interim product launch, because they've recently purchased new products or upgrades. Others were holding out for the future closed loop system. So we're all wondering: Just what is this 630G that we've heard nothing about before? Remember, Medtronic got FDA approval in September 2013 for its 530G that automatically stops insulin delivery once a user crosses a certain low glucose level. That was step one in moving toward closed loop technology. Next up is their Predictive Low Glucose Suspend (PLGS) features that can anticipate oncoming hypos in advance and shut off insulin to prevent them from happening. That's built into the Minimed 640G system that hit the market outside the U.S. in early 2015. Medtronic ultimately decided it would not pursue bringing that device to the U.S., opting instead to leapfrog that model and focus on getting the first hybrid closed loop 670G to market in 2017. So now, it seems we're getting this 630G as a sort of stop-gap device in between the two D-tech generations. Here's a quick glance at the Minimed 630G: Fresh Design: Continue reading >>

Re: [ip] How To Fit A 3ml Reservoir Into A 1.8ml Pump

Re: [ip] How To Fit A 3ml Reservoir Into A 1.8ml Pump

RE: [IP] How to fit a 3ml reservoir into a 1.8ml pump From: Adam Brock < Adam_Brock+email @ redacted > Will IP not accept supplies if the box is open? I understand not acceptingsupplies where the individual seal is broken, but I'd hope they'd accept themout of the original box.________________________________________ From: email @ redacted on behalf of Steven SchochSent: Tuesday, May 06, 2014 12:59 PMTo: IPSubject: [IP] How to fit a 3ml reservoir into a 1.8ml pumpI have switched Medtronic pumps several times and am currently usingthe 551, which takes 1.8ml reservoirs. After I opened my latest box, Irealized that it contained 3.0ml reservoirs, which do not fit into the551. If I had noticed this before I opened it, I would have just givenit to IP, but now it's too late.The different reservoirs are only different in their length, so Ifigured that I could just cut off the excess. I used an ordinary knifeto trim it, and guess what? It works!Just thought I'd share that with you.--Steve----------------------------------------------------------for HELP or to subscribe/unsubscribe/change list versions,contact: [email protected] us at Make a long URL short at .----------------------------------------------------------for HELP or to subscribe/unsubscribe/change list versions,contact: [email protected] us at Make a long URL short at Continue reading >>

Infusion Set Comparison

Infusion Set Comparison

Although patch pumps applied directly to the skin are more available, most pumps infuse insulin from a pump reservoir through an infusion set. No single set works well for everyone, so choosing an infusion set can be difficult. The type of set shipped with a new pump is usually one manufactured by the pump company and this set may or may not be the best choice. Fortunately, there are many alternatives to choose from. Metal or Teflon: Today's straight-in metal sets offer fine gauge needles that are comfortable, reliable, and the easiest to insert. Teflon sets use a metal needle inserter that is removed after insertion, leaving only the Teflon tubing under the skin. Generally, the longer the Teflon, the more reliable the set. Slanted Teflon sets tend to be more reliable for many pumpers than straight-in Teflon Sets, but are generally best inserted by hand rather than with an automatic inserter. Length: Infusion sets come in different line lengths and different needle lengths. Typical needle lengths for straight-in sets are 6 mm for infants, 8 mm for a child, 10 mm for an adult, and 12 mm for larger adults while 13 mm and 17 mm serve similar functions for the slanted Teflon sets. Most infusion lines are 24, 31, or 42 inches in length. Shorter lines work better for small children and those who prefer a short line, while longer lines work well for those who are taller. Needle Gauge: Gauge is a standard way to measure diameter of a needle. A lower gauge means a larger needle. For example, 25 gauge is larger than 27 gauge. Connection Compatibility: Most infusion sets have a standard threaded luer lock connection that can be used on most pumps. The Medtronic Paradigm and the Sooil Diabecare pumps use their own proprietary connections, so these pumps work with only a limited nu Continue reading >>

Recall Of Various Lots Of Medtronic Minimed Insulin Reservoirs

Recall Of Various Lots Of Medtronic Minimed Insulin Reservoirs

Recalls and alerts more than 4 years old are automatically archived. While this information can still be accessed in the database, it has not been altered or updated since it was archived. Web pages that are archived on the Web are not subject to the Government of Canada Web Standards. As per the Communications Policy of the Government of Canada , you can request alternate formats by contacting us . Recall of Various Lots of Medtronic MiniMed Insulin Reservoirs Medtronic of Canada Ltd., in consultation with Health Canada, is recalling select lots (see list below) of Paradigm Medtronic MiniMed Insulin Reservoirs, model # MMT-326A and MMT-332A, manufactured by Medtronic MiniMed. These insulin reservoirs are used with Paradigm insulin infusion pumps. Medtronic is recalling these lots due to the potential risk of a leak in the reservoir that may result in under-delivery of insulin. As well, if there is an obstruction in the infusion set, the pump alarm may not be triggered. The under-delivery of insulin may cause hyperglycemia (high blood sugar), and in extreme cases may cause loss of consciousness or death. Medtronic of Canada Ltd is notifying all customers who have purchased products from them of this recall and advising them to check their supplies to see if they have received affected lots. The lot number can be found on the side panel of the reservoir box and on the packaging of each individual reservoir. Patients who have devices from the affected lots or who are concerned about this device should contact Medtronic of Canada Ltd.s Diabetes Consumer Care lineimmediately at 1-800-284-4416 or email [email protected] . Patients who have health concerns related to their use of this device should speak with their health care professional. Continue reading >>

Medtronic Minimed Insulin Reservoirs (mmt-326a And Mmt-332a Models)

Medtronic Minimed Insulin Reservoirs (mmt-326a And Mmt-332a Models)

Consumers and health professionals are advised that Medtronic Australasia, in consultation with the TGA, is recalling certain batches of the following models of its Medtronic MiniMed insulin reservoirs: MMT-326A (1.8 mL reservoir) MMT-332A (3 mL reservoir) The affected batch numbers that have been supplied in Australia* are: H8442973 H8463297 H8467888 H8469703 H8473271 H8478398 H8492449 H8494645 H8496561 H8510440 H8512826 H8517079 H8539013 H8627745 * There are 47 affected batch numbers worldwide, but only the above 14 have been supplied in Australia. Medtronic MiniMed insulin reservoirs are a single-use medical device intended to be filled with insulin and used with Medtronic Paradigm insulin pumps for the management of insulin-dependent diabetes. It has been identified that the above batches of the reservoirs have an increased risk of leakage, which could result in less insulin being delivered than intended. An investigation of the manufacturing process has revealed the cause of the issue. The problem has now been corrected and extra testing and inspection steps have been introduced to avoid similar issues in the future. Information for consumers Medtronic Australasia has written to Medtronic Paradigm insulin pump users who have received Medtronic MiniMed insulin reservoirs from an affected batch, providing further information about this issue and advice on how to arrange replacement of any reservoirs they currently have (at no cost). Users should check the batch numbers of any unused Medtronic MiniMed insulin reservoirs to see if they are affected by this recall. The batch number can be found on the side panel of the reservoir box and on the packing of each individual reservoir (see picture below). If you only have reservoirs from affected batches, switch to your back Continue reading >>

Ethical/legal Question: Selling Humalog Vials, Mio Infusion Sets, Paradigm Reservoirs

Ethical/legal Question: Selling Humalog Vials, Mio Infusion Sets, Paradigm Reservoirs

This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. Ethical/Legal Question: Selling Humalog vials, Mio Infusion sets, Paradigm Reservoirs Our 10 year old daughter with Type 1 diabetes, after a long battle of resistance to using her Medtronic insulin pump (MiniMed 530G with Enlite), which she used for 2 years, switched to pen shots, 6 months ago. She is much happier now as she is in much more control of her diabetes management. We are now convinced that she will not be using her pump again, at least for some years. We have lots of supplies (listed below) that we cant use. If we were even middle income, we would donate them to her clinic, Specially for Children in Austin, Texas. But we are low income, and therefore would like to sell them if this ethical and legal. Can anyone tell me if this is okay, and if so, if you have any ideas on how to sell them? (21) Humalog vials, expiration dates in 2017 and 2018 (continuously refrigerated) Humalog Insulin lispro injection, USP (rDNA origin); (10 mL vial: 100 units per mL) (64) Mios, expiration dates in 2017 and 2018 Mio Infusion Set: mio 6mm Cannula / 23" Tubing BLUE (78) Reservoirs, expiration dates in 2018 Continue reading >>

Minimed Distribution Cent Paradigm Medtronic Paradigm Pump Reservoir 1.8ml, Paradigm Connection, Traditional Luer Lock System, Silicone Membrane, For 5 Series Insulin Pumps | Edgepark Medical

Minimed Distribution Cent Paradigm Medtronic Paradigm Pump Reservoir 1.8ml, Paradigm Connection, Traditional Luer Lock System, Silicone Membrane, For 5 Series Insulin Pumps | Edgepark Medical

To order, a prescription from your doctor is required. Please log in to your account and provide your doctor's information to initiate the ordering process for this item. Medtronic Paradigm Pump Reservoir 1.8mL, Paradigm Connection, Traditional Luer Lock System, Silicone Membrane, For 5 Series Insulin Pumps Custom made for Medtronic MiniMed Paradigm 51x insulin pumps and can be used with all Medtronic MiniMed Paradigm infusion sets. Paradigm Reservoirs have also been designed with a great deal of attention and with your safety in mind. The connection point between your infsuion set and reservoir are actually patented* and unique to Medtronic for that reason. Fast, efficient reservoir filling and ease of handling - No assembly required, the reservoir is ready to use. Less risk of injury - No extra needle to handle, it is incorporated into the TransferGuard. Secure, stable and easy reservoir filling - the TransferGuard fits neatly onto the insulin vial. Reservoir also allows for pen filling. No risk of leakage or spillage, even if pressure is applied on the syringe. WARNING: This product contains chemicals known to the State of California to cause cancer and birth defects or other reproductive harm. Continue reading >>

Reusing Reservoirs - Pumping Insulin - Diabetes Forums

Reusing Reservoirs - Pumping Insulin - Diabetes Forums

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. Does anyone do this? And if so how many times? I really don't see any reason why you couldn't. Thoughts? I've done it a few times. But only one reuse. Does anyone do this? And if so how many times? I really don't see any reason why you couldn't. Thoughts? When I was on the 722, I use to do it every now and then. I would re use just once tho I've also done it a few times over the course of 3.5 years. I have done it a few times, just reusing once. I've had to do it...I went out of town and forgot to bring extra res. Had to reuse 2xs. I've had to do it...I went out of town and forgot to bring extra res. Had to reuse 2xs. Yup, another "me too" post. I only do it once because I have had one reused on fail on me. I have so many extra supplies that I don't really worry about it anymore. Nancy....I would venture to say many insurance companies are not so generous....securing a pump sounds only half the battle They aren't, Lori. At least, not all of them. If I get the pump, I plan to reuse as many of the products as I can to help keep my costs at a minimum. I know their position on reusing stuff, like the reservoirs. However, I also know that I use in excess of 300 units of insulin a day overall. Their statement that the plastic reservoir breaks down insulin is bunk. If you people that use a single reservoir over more than 3 days is true... then surely reusing the reservoir to last for 2 cycles in a single day wouldn't hurt anything. I have had a Cozmo pump for about 5 1/2 years. A full cartridge lasts me about 8 days, and I use each cartridge 3 times before starting a new one. I have never, ever, had Continue reading >>

Medtronic Question On Reservoir Connector

Medtronic Question On Reservoir Connector

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Medtronic question on reservoir connector Hia - during my set change last night and I tried to half turn and click the connector on to the insulin reservoir after filling and it wouldn't click in like normal. Thought I'd got a faulty one so tried a second and the same thing happened. I didn't want to waste any more than I had to so I took the second and literally had to force down the little cap onto reservoir with quite some force to get it in before being able to half turn and click it. Anyone else finding this with their sets recently? (Normally it's a light push, turn and click into place) Nope all been fine here. Maybe you e got a bad batch? novorapidboi26 Type 1 Well-Known Member when I put mine on to the reservoir I turn it until I get some resistance between the end of the tubing and the reservoir top..............however, if I continue turning it clicks out and the resistance is gone......... begin a wee tad ocd I turn it again to feel it tighten......... I don't think mine is meant to click as such and once the pump piston has engaged with the reservoir bottom I don't think it matters....... Ta guys. Think it is a new batch I'm using. Once I'd got it in its been working perfectly fine. Just have to remember at my next change that I have to use a bit more force and not go into panic mode (like yesterday!) novorapidboi26 Type 1 Well-Known Member novorapidboi26 Type 1 Well-Known Member different from me but from the images the reservoir connection is the same.... and the reservoirs are the same even with the 1.8ml and 3.0ml.... next time try turning till you feel it tighten, then stop....... Hi it turns fine it's just getting to that point wher Continue reading >>

Reservoirs

Reservoirs

The MiniMed reservoirs have been designed to make the filling a convenient process. Minimed reservoir's unique features: Fast, efficient reservoir filling and ease of handling - no assembly required, the reservoir is ready to use Less risk of injury – unlike luer reservoirs, no extra needle to handle, it is incorporated into the TransferGuard Secure, stable and easy reservoir filling - the TransferGuard fits neatly onto the insulin vial The rounded shape is designed to eliminate air bubbles Less leakage or spillage - once the TransferGuard is removed, a silicone membrane seals the reservoir The MiniMed reservoirs are available in 1.8 and 3 ml size in order to meet your daily insulin needs. Continue reading >>

Minimed Reservoir Paradigm 1.8ml 10

Minimed Reservoir Paradigm 1.8ml 10

Normally 2 Business Day Handling. We will choose the most cost effective and/or fastest option for a fixed price.This service is supported by Australia Post or a courier company of our choice. All deliveries are fully tracked, signature may be required.You authorise the delivery company to leave the parcel at the front door.No PO Box, GPO Box, Parcel Lockers or other similar addresses. Must be a street address only. Normally 1 Business Day Handling. Toll is one of Australia's largest courier companies. Deliveries usually arrives next business day in all Australian metro cities, however it is not guaranteed. All deliveries are fully tracked, no signature required. You authorise Toll to leave the parcel at the front door. Must be a street address only. Normally 1 Business Day Handling. Local Pickup at David Jones Pharmacy 448 Neerim Road Murrumbeena Victoria 3163. Drivers license must be presented for collection. Pick up is usually available next business day, an email is sent to confirm this. Continue reading >>

Pump Reservoirs - Size Comparison - Bionic Wookiee

Pump Reservoirs - Size Comparison - Bionic Wookiee

By David Burren / February 6, 2018 February 6, 2018 / 2 Comments The above photo shows the retail boxes of reservoirs for three different insulin pumps. The size differences are quite noticeable! When packing for travel Ill always take at least twice the consumables I need, separated into two packages. One set will be with me in my carry-on luggage, and one will probably be in checked luggage. So the space all that stuff takes up is something Ive been keenly aware of for years. The centre box in the above image contains 10 Animas 2.0 ml reservoirs, as used on the Animas pumps I used from 2010 through 2017. The box on the left contains 10 Medtronic 1.8 ml reservoirs (as used in my current Veo pump), while the box on the right contains 25 Accu-Chek 3.15 ml reservoirs for the Spirit Combo pump. That box is almost the same size as the Animas 10-reservoir box!Theres also an Animas Inset II (a different version of the Medtronic Mio) cannula in the photo for scale. The Animas reservoirs never really packed neatly into my luggage, while the Medtronic and Accu-Chek reservoirs are conveniently compact.As you can see in the following photo, a lot of the Animas box is just taken up with space due to the size of the individual reservoir packaging. It usually didnt fold up neatly for me. Continue reading >>

Medtronic Paradigm Reservoirs

Medtronic Paradigm Reservoirs

Because the safety of our customers is our top priority, we are voluntarily recalling certain manufacturing lots of part number MMT-326A (1.8 mL) and MMT-332A (3.0 mL) reservoirs used with our Paradigm insulin pumps. We are recalling these reservoirs due to the potential that reservoirs from these lot numbers may be at increased risk for leaking. A leak in the reservoir may result in delivery of less insulin than intended. In addition, if you have a leaky reservoir and an insulin blockage occurs in the infusion set, the pump may not alarm to notify you. Our investigation has indicated that this increased potential for reservoir leakage was caused by abnormal wear on a manufacturing tool involved in the production of reservoir stoppers. We are recalling all lots of reservoirs that contain any stoppers from that tool. We have corrected this problem and have placed additional testing and inspection steps into our manufacturing process. We are instructing all customers not to use reservoirs from these lot numbers and are providing replacement product at no additional charge. We are asking customers to verify the lot numbers of the reservoirs they have on hand using our online tool. If the tool determines that any of your lot numbers are affected, further instructions will be provided within the tool. For any further questions about this issue, please contact us at 1.866.450.0890 Monday through Friday, 8AM – 6 PM Central Time. At Medtronic, making quality products that you can trust is our top priority. We are committed to improving our products and to communicating about potential issues when they arise. We will continue to communicate as often as needed because we know that is what you expect from Medtronic as your partner in diabetes care. We believe doing so makes our Continue reading >>

Www.realitycheck.org.au

Www.realitycheck.org.au

This is a secure and safe place for people to bitch, moan, argue, or rejoice (yes, really) about having Type 1 Diabetes. If something has inspired you or enraged you, here's your opportunity to let everyone know. Last night at who-knows-when o'clock, I was woken by my pump's low battery alarm. I told it to shut up, figured I'd change it in the morning, and went back to sleep. Early in the morning I woke up again to the pump freaking out that it had less than 30min of battery left. So I changed the battery. About an hour ago with no warning, my pump went straight to the '30 min remaining' stage. I assume a faulty battery, but I hadn't bought more in the meantime, so I'm back on the Veo. Going back on the Veo has made me realise: I hate the @#$% 640G. The Veo always gave me more than 24 hours notice of dead battery. I didn't have to have batteries stashed at work, I never got woken up by my pump threatening imminent failure. I hate that the 640G runs on expensive batteries I don't have lying around yet seems to get less battery life and give me less warning. I hate that the larger battery makes it chunkier for seemingly no gain, and that I only use 1.8 ml cartridges but the smaller reservoir version has never appeared in Oz. I hate that it has a compulsory unlock key which is different every time so I can't commit it to muscle memory. I had the menu sequence of the Veo down pat yet I have had the 640G for over a year and the bolusing sequence still intrudes on my day. I hate trying to clear out of the 'low blood sugar' screen to try and find my insulin on board so I can determine how to respond and getting stuck with shaky hypo fingers at the lock screen. I hate that the slogan is "it thinks" - wtf, no it doesn't. It's got a fancy algorithm, that's not "thinking". Most o Continue reading >>

Us9144645b2 - One Piece Sealing Reservoir For An Insulin Infusion Pump - Google Patents

Us9144645b2 - One Piece Sealing Reservoir For An Insulin Infusion Pump - Google Patents

US9144645B2 - One piece sealing reservoir for an insulin infusion pump - Google Patents One piece sealing reservoir for an insulin infusion pump US9144645B2 US13053724 US201113053724A US9144645B2 US 9144645 B2 US9144645 B2 US 9144645B2 US 13053724 US13053724 US 13053724 US 201113053724 A US201113053724 A US 201113053724A US 9144645 B2 US9144645 B2 US 9144645B2 Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.) Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.) Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.) A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR A61M5/00Devices for bringing media into the body in a subcutaneous, intra-vascular or intramuscular way; Accessories therefor, e.g. filling or cleaning devices, arm-rests A61M5/14Infusion devices, e.g. infusing by gravity; Blood infusion; Accessories therefor A61M5/142Pressure infusion, e.g. using pumps A61M5/145Pressure infusion, e.g. using pumps using pressurised reservoirs, e.g. pressurised by means of pistons A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR A61M5/00Devices for bringi

More in diabetes