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Medtronic Pump Battery Cap

Six Until Me.: Pump Battery Fail.

Six Until Me.: Pump Battery Fail.

A funny thing happened on the cruise ship two weeks ago. My pump refused to accept shiny new Energizer batteries. About two days into our vacation , my pump threw out the familiar boop beep boop, and a quick glimpse at the screen confirmed what had been looming for a few days - low battery. Since the low battery alarm goes off every few weeks, I keep a spare AAA battery at the ready in my testing kit. Using a quarter, I unscrewed the battery cap, pulled out the dead battery, and slid in a brand new Energizer AAA. Oh come on. I took the battery in and out again, trying the insulin pump version of "roll the batteries in the remote to get it to work" theory. Bullshit! I went over to my suitcase and snagged another battery from the back-up stash. The package of batteries was about a month old - Energizer, like the Medtronic manual recommends - and tried two new batteries. Half expecting Chris to ask me if Lucy moved the football , I asked if he would run to the onboard cruise shop and purchase a package of batteries. "I don't know what's up with the pump, but it refuses to acknowledge my new batteries. It's being a prick." Chris nodded and took off. I proceeded to try each of the four batteries in the pack I had in my suitcase, and they all refused to work. OMGWTFBBQ , what is up with this pump? Why isn't it accepting new batteries? This happened once before, of course when I was traveling, and it caused panic on my end. Even though I had a tattered box in my medical bag with an almost-expired bottle of Lantus in it, and even though I had enough syringes to finish the trip without the pump, coming off the pump isn't easy. I did it once before and it was a hassle of highs and lows - not what I wanted to wrangle with while I was on vacation. Chris quickly returned with new, Continue reading >>

The Insulin Crowd: Battery Caps And Needle Nose Pliers At 2am.

The Insulin Crowd: Battery Caps And Needle Nose Pliers At 2am.

Battery Caps and Needle Nose Pliers at 2am. Don't get me wrong, I absolutely love and adore my insulin pump. But a few weeks ago we had a teensy weensy incident that ended up being one of those comedy of errors things that made me realize how ridiculous technology is sometimes. It's about 2am, the house is dark, I'm sleeping, my husband is sleeping, all is right in the world. All of the sudden I'm jolted out of my deep slumber by my head buzzing. It's my insulin pump needing attention. I keep it on the "vibrate" alert mode, and when I sleep I tuck it under my pillow. So, you can see how at 2am when it started vibrating it would've rattled my brain a little bit. My pump was alerting me that I needed to change my battery. No big deal. I knew this was going to happen soon since I'd been keeping a close eye on the battery symbol on my pump for days and knew that I'd need to "power up" soon. I'm a cheapskate, and I like to get as much power out of one battery as I possibly can, so I usually wait to change the battery until my pump alerts me to do it. This time the alert happened in the middle of the night, but that's the price I pay for saving a buck or two at the store. Any way, back to the story. The pump alert jolts me out of my sleep. I groggily fumble with the pump to see what it needs, realize that I need to change the battery, and proceed to stumble around in our dark house trying to find the extra batteries I keep. I get the battery, find a penny with which to unscrew the battery cap and start unscrewing it. And keep unscrewing it. And keep unscrewing it. My sleepy brain thinks "huh, this is taking a lot longer than usual," but because I'm half asleep I continue to unscrew the cap for probably another 5 minutes until I finally realize that something is very, very wr Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Insulin Pumps

Everything You Need To Know About Insulin Pumps

Everyone needs insulin to live. Insulin is a hormone that helps our bodies use and store the food we eat. People with Type 1 Diabetes no longer make insulin and have to give insulin in order to sustain life. People with Type 2 Diabetes don’t use their own insulin well, and over time can have trouble making enough. So, all people with Type 1 diabetes and some people with Type 2 diabetes need insulin. When people give insulin injections, they may take 1-2 injections of a long acting insulin every day and 3+ injections of rapid acting insulin for meals and snacks. The typical person with Type 1 Diabetes could take anywhere from 4-7+ injections a day. Many people currently give insulin through an insulin pen or a syringe. But, there is another option, an insulin pump. An insulin pump delivers rapid acting insulin in two ways. First, the pump is programmed to give you insulin every hour throughout the hour referred to basal insulin. Basal, think “base,” is the insulin your body needs even in the absence of food, it is also referred to as background insulin. This basal rate replaces the long acting injection that you take. Second, is bolus, this is the insulin you take for food or to correct a high blood sugar. If you get basal and bolus confused, think “bowl”, as in you eat out of a bowl, to help you remember bolus is for food. Once you are on a pump, all insulin is delivered through the pump and shots are no longer necessary. Components There are a few things necessary to make a pump work. When a pump is shipped to someone: they will also need to send infusion sets, reservoirs, and possibly batteries, depending on your pump. Let’s talk about each component. Infusion Sets An infusion set is the part that is actually inserted into the body and has tubing that conn Continue reading >>

Medtronic 640g Problems With Cracking?

Medtronic 640g Problems With Cracking?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I have been on the Medtronic 640g since last March, my first ever pump! Diagnosed T1 11 years ago. I am on Pump no.5 as all my previous pumps have cracked around the neck where you insert the reservoir. This weekend I have found a crack in pump No.5. Medtronic say that this hasn't happened to anyone else which is totally freeking me out as I have NEVER dropped it or banged it, wear it in my bra, face down on my skin in a silicone case and a sports padded case at night. The cracks are hairline, so very hard to see! Has this happend to anyone else? the plastic white ring bit where the reservoir goes in cracked and fell off mine and so they sent a new one. it just fell off. I've had mine since May2015 and no problems. There was a crack in my old Minimed at the end of 4 years use but had new 640g since last November and haven't noticed any cracks @Rubyloo are you tightening the reservoir cap to much? I don't have a Medtronic pump so no idea how the reservoir is held in place, with the Animas pump there are strict instructions on how far to turn the cap and if you over do it the casing can crack. So read your manual to make sure you are doing the right thing, as it will get to a stage where Medtronic will refuse to issue another pump to you. No I'm not over tightening! After so many that have cracked I am paranoid about it! I have even changed the reservoirs in front of a Medtronic rep and he said I am not! It's really rocket science though is it! I don't see as you can over tighten!! You have to click it into place and if it's that easy to over tighten then there must be a design fault!! No I'm not over tightening! After so many that have cracked I am par Continue reading >>

Cracked Again | Test Guess And Go

Cracked Again | Test Guess And Go

Even with testing, diabetes is a guess every day. I just received a replacement Animas Vibe pump. At my last battery change, I discovered a crack in mypump from the top of the battery compartment down about 5/8 inch. Did I over-tighten the battery cap? I have no idea. Is it a design flaw or weakness in the type of plastic used for the pump case? Maybe. I would label it as an isolated problem but less than a year ago, I had my Animas Ping replaced for the same problem. In the seven years that I used Medtronic pumps, I cracked at least 3 pumps (maybe 4?). All of the cracks were in the exact same location: from the reservoir view window to the Esc button. Maybe I am a kid who is rough with my pumps and break them whenever I wrestle and beat up my older sister. Nope. Maybe I get frustrated with diabetes and throw my pumps against cement walls whenever my BG tops 300. Nope. Maybe I have unlimited money and dont take care of my diabetes devices. Nope. So what is the truth? I am a middle-aged woman who will soon be called old. I line up my diabetes supplies in LIFO (last in, first out) order and never once in 39 years have I ever run out of supplies. I am not perfect at the diabetes game but I do a pretty good job. If nothing else, I am definitely mega-organized, methodical, and careful. After cracking the 3rd (or was it the 4th?) Medtronic pump, I spoke witha phone representative who told me that they would not replace any more pumps for me. Huh??? I called back a few days later and got a rep who asked how I was carrying my pump. I was using the Medtronic clip attached to my waistband as I had been ever since I started pumping. She suggested that after they replaced this pump that I should quit using the clip. She arranged for a free leather case (brown and ultra-masculine) Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump Dangers

Insulin Pump Dangers

The U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) is working to reduce risks from dangerous problems that affect what it described as tens of thousands of diabetics. While the has not provided specific insulin pump manufacturers names in its report, there are known insulin pump makers, including Medtronic Inc, Roche Holding AG, and Johnson & Johnson, said Reuters. Insulin pumps are primarily used by people with Type I diabetes, a condition in which the pancreas produces little or no insulin, a hormone needed to help the body properly use sugars from foods. People with Type 1 diabetes need to administer insulin daily whether through a pump or other methods like shots. The more common form of diabetes, Type 2, which is often associated with obesity and typically develops later in life, is managed with oral medications designed to help the body properly use insulin, although some cases do require insulin. The FDA said the number of Type I diabetics using insulin pumps has increased, with about 375,000 U.S. users in 2007, up from about 130,000 in 2002. The thin plastic tubes are used with the MiniMed Paradigm Medtronic insulin pump to deliver insulin to diabetes patients. The infusion set is typically replaced every three days. However, thousands of patients may have been sold infusion sets that may not allow the insulin pump to vent air pressure properly, potentially resulting in the device delivering too much or too little insulin. Over or under delivery of insulin from an insulin pump could have serious and catastrophic consequences for diabetes patients. Medtronic announced that approximately 60,000 Quick-set infusion sets used with the Medtronic MiniMed Paradigm insulin pumps could be defective and not work properly. Therefore, they recalled an estimated 3 million of the infu Continue reading >>

Medtronic Warns Of Stuck Minimed Pump Buttons

Medtronic Warns Of Stuck Minimed Pump Buttons

Changes in air pressure might cause an issue, the pump maker warns. Stuck insulin pump button on a plane! … sounds like a straight-to-video Samuel L. Jackson thriller, but it’s actually the gist of a safety notice issued by Medtronic for those who use its MiniMed pump systems. sponsor Medtronic issued a field safety notification about a rare, temporary, but still annoying glitch that can happen with MiniMed 600 series pumps. When atmospheric pressure around the pump increases or decreases rapidly, it can cause the keypads on the pumps to become stuck or difficult to push down. The notice states that if the button seems difficult to push down, it’s most likely a temporary situation which will usually resolve itself within 30 minutes. The bigger problem is when the pump button gets stuck in a pressed position. The pumps are designed to cut off insulin delivery (both bolus and basal) within three minutes of detecting such a problem, but this can cause a siren to go off if the situation isn’t resolved within 10 minutes, and insulin delivery won’t resume until you clear the alarm. To solve this, they suggest the elegantly low-tech solution of removing the pump’s battery cap and then installing it again. They warn, however, that you might need to have a AA battery handy, as the pump might decide then that it needs a new one. Medtronic is currently not suggesting that MiniMed pumps need to be recalled or repaired because of this issue. The Medtronic MiniMed 600 series includes the 630G, the 640G, and the 670G. Customers should already have received notice of this issue from Medtronic. This isn’t the first reported issue to arise with the MiniMed pump systems. Earlier this year, Medtronic warned that kinked cannulas could cause insulin delivery interruption in Min Continue reading >>

Onetouch Ping® Insulin Pump And Meter Remote

Onetouch Ping® Insulin Pump And Meter Remote

Say hello to the OneTouch Ping® Glucose Management System The OneTouch Ping® is the two-part system with one thing on its mind: helping you perform at your best. When used together with the OneTouch Ping® Insulin Pump, the Meter Remote communicates wirelessly to deliver insulin from the pump. Start the process to get your OneTouch Ping® System Our inside sales department will help you every step of the way. GET STARTED The OneTouch Ping® Meter Remote controls pump functions from up to 10 feet away, which means you can keep your OneTouch Ping® Insulin Pump under cover. With the OneTouch Ping®, you get great clinical performance* and features designed with your lifestyle in mind. Basal insulin keeps your blood sugar steady between meals. OneTouch Ping® System gives you a wide range of dosing options with a low basal insulin increment of 0.025 U/hr. Because how much you need is unique to you, OneTouch Ping® System precision is key. Superior post-meal control1‡ The bolus calculator designed by Animas delivers superior post-meal control compared to the Medtronic Paradigm® Bolus Wizard®. The bolus calculator in the OneTouch Ping® System automatically determines how much bolus insulin you may need to cover carbs eaten and/or correct a high BG. Pumpers using the automated bolus calculator in the OneTouch Ping® pump stayed in control longer—and closer to target range—than those using Medtronic Paradigm® Bolus Wizard® in a clinical study.1‡ Give yourself an insulin dose—and never touch your pump. The pump and Meter Remote can share information wirelessly, the Meter Remote can do more than just check your blood sugar. It is also able to control pump functions. Use it to calculate how much bolus insulin you need and tell your pump to deliver the dose, all w Continue reading >>

Defective Battery Cap?

Defective Battery Cap?

D.D. Family Type 2 since 1993, on pump since 3/10 Last week the screen on my Minimed Paradigm went blank for no reason. I had just changed the battery the day before. I changed the battery and was requested to update the time and date. Everything else seemed in order. I called Medtronic to see if they had an explanation. The rep could not come up with an explanation but offered to send me a new battery cap thinking Thst possibly it had gotten worn out and was no longer making good contact. Yes, this is a common trouble. I think they should send an extra battery cap with every new pump. It's a pretty important component! When you change the cap, change the battery also, in case the rep did not tell you. I have not had that problem but the cap I do have on my pump is very hard to take off the top is all scratched up like a screw that got stripped A1C December 6= 8.1 put on MDI Pumping Madtronic 4-4-13 I did not know the battery cap could wear! I know we're not supposed to use cheap batteries. Maybe this prevents us from the leaky, corroding issues. Continue reading >>

Medtronic Warns On Button Glitch With Minimed 640g Insulin Pump

Medtronic Warns On Button Glitch With Minimed 640g Insulin Pump

Medtronic warns on button glitch with MiniMed 640G insulin pump Medtronic (NYSE: MDT ) issued a field safety notice in May, warning users that keypad buttons on its MiniMed 640G insulin pump may become temporarily stuck when the atmospheric pressure around the pump suddenly increases or decreases like during air travel. If the keypad buttons are stuck, users may not be able to program a bolus or stop insulin delivery, Medtronic said, but the issue usually resolves itself within 30 minutes. The company told users that theres no need to return or replace the pump. If a button is stuck in a pressed position, an alarm is triggered after 3 minutes and insulin delivery stops. In the rare situation where this continues for more than 10 minutes, the pump will begin to siren, the company wrote . Once the alarm is triggered and insulin is suspended, you will be unable to program a bolus or resume insulin delivery until the alarm is cleared. If a user needs to resolve the problem immediately, Medtronic instructed them to remove the battery cap from the pump and then place it back on. The company also cautioned that users should have a fresh AA battery with them in case the pump prompts them to use a new battery. Continue reading >>

Medtronic: Making Life A Bit Easier - Interbrandhealth

Medtronic: Making Life A Bit Easier - Interbrandhealth

Medtronic: Making life a bit easier across all touchpoints In this years Fortune 500 issue, this question was asked: Is Medtronic the Apple of medical technology? Medtronics CEO, Bill Hawkins, response was: Id say Apple is the Medtronic of computing. As a type 1 diabetic and the owner of a Medtronic MiniMed insulin pump, I found myself nodding my head in approval. After years of daily insulin injections, my once rigid blood glucose control had begun to slip and I switched, somewhat reluctantly, to the Medtronic MiniMed insulin pump in October 2008. I found that Medtronic had not only managed to produce a device that helped me to regain the control I had somewhat lost, but the company had also made it exceptionally easy to order supplies online. And I found Medtronics customer service to be truly exemplary. They were, in fact, almost Apple-like. Case in point: One day last year, my insulin pump began to chirp loudly, indicating that something was amiss. It turned out the battery was dead. When I tried to unscrew the cap to replace it, I was unable to do so. The cap was stuck firmly in place. Feeling a bit on edge and slightly panicked, I called Medtronic. Id grown very accustomed to apathetic customer service representatives, so I was truly shocked when the Medtronic representative seemed to genuinely connect with me and understand exactly how upsetting the experience must be. He had me try numerous tricks and when it became clear that the battery cap would simply not budge, he assured me that a new insulin pump would be waiting for me at work the very next morning. I switched back to injections that evening, but going off routine is very jarring for someone like me and I didnt sleep well as a result. I was afraid that adjusting my treatment regimen would bring on a hyp Continue reading >>

Do You Have To Buy New Battery Caps Or New Cartridge Caps For Medtronic ?

Do You Have To Buy New Battery Caps Or New Cartridge Caps For Medtronic ?

This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. do you have to buy new battery caps or new cartridge caps for medtronic ? do you have to buy new battery caps or new cartridge caps for medtronic ? The battery cap is basically indestructible. It gets a bit scratched if you are like me and use a coin to open it but it can't really break. I would imagine Medtronic would just replace the pump (under warranty) if it were to break. I don't think you can buy a new one. There isn't really a cartridge cap. I think what you are talking about is built into the reservoir connector and you get a new one of those with each infusion set. ETA: I just checked the online store and there is no battery cap listed. I believe any issues with it would result in replacement of the whole pump or medtronic would just send you a new cap. ETA (again): So it looks like in Canada you can buy a battery cap online. I would guess though they would replace it free if you are under warranty. Continue reading >>

Medtronic Minimed 670g System Review

Medtronic Minimed 670g System Review

After months of waiting, I finally received the world’s first hybrid closed loop system, the Minimed 670G system. Medtronic’s Minimed 670G system is an insulin pump and continuous glucose monitor that also has technology to put you in “auto” mode where it will automatically adjust your basal insulin every 5 minutes based on your blood sugar levels. I’ve had the system for about two weeks now so I thought I’d share my thoughts on it. I’m going to break this down into two posts because I feel the auto mode review needs it’s on page. I’ve been with Medtronic and on an insulin pump since 1997, 20 years! For most of the 20 years, the insulin pump has looked the exact same. It has “mainly” had the same features and not a lot of technology advancements. This new pump, however, is completely different than anything Medtronic has released in the last 20 years, with one caveat that they did release the Minimed 630G a few months prior. I received the Minimed 630G as part of the Minimed 670G Priority Access Group. In case you weren’t aware, Medtronic released a new pump, the 630G, last year and a few weeks (or months, not positive on the timing), the FDA approved their 670G pump faster than they realized. To not waste all the millions of dollars they probably spent on the 630G, they started a Priority Access Group for the 670G where you had to get the 630G first and then once the 670G was released, you could be the first to get it. The stars aligned for me where my pump went out of warranty last year and I had reached my out of pocket max because of the birth of my baby, so I was able to get the 630G for free! I never did use the 630G though because the new design of the pump sort of scared me and I was happy with my old pump. Because I never used the 630G, Continue reading >>

Re: [ip] Medtronic 722 : Pump Won't Start After Changing The Battery

Re: [ip] Medtronic 722 : Pump Won't Start After Changing The Battery

Re: [IP] Medtronic 722 : Pump won't start after changing the battery I was told by minimed that a reason I was getting bad battery messages might bethat I was putting the new battery in too fast. I've had better results since Islowed down a little. I have noticed, however, that my batteries don't last aslong as they used to. I used to get three weeks out of one but now get onlyabout teo.StaceySent from my iPadOn Jul 15, 2012, at 9:18 AM, Amanda Laforet wrote:> Sometimes if you don't put the battery in fast enough it will blank out.> Also, sometimes it could be a bad battery. When you do the next battery> change have the new battery in your left had, unscrew the cap, remove old> battery by turning your pump downward, quickly insert new battery, put the> cap back on.> On Jul 15, 2012 7:28 AM, "John S Wilkinson" wrote:> >> Try to clean the terminals. Use a pencil eraser hold the pump upright and>> insert the pencil eraser from the bottom.>> This is to allow the particles to fall out the bottom. Rotate the pencil a>> few times. Do the same thing on the cap.>> >> -----Original Message----->> From: email @ redacted>> [ mailto:email @ redacted ] On Behalf Of Dilip Ladhani>> Sent: Saturday, July 14, 2012 6:11 PM>> To: email @ redacted>> Subject: [IP] Medtronic 722 : Pump won't start after changing the battery>> >> Hey guys,>> >> I got the usual "low battery" signal and I unscrewed the cap with a penny>> and put a new Energizer in. The display will not light up and the screen is>> blank. I tried 3 new batteries. No luck.>> >> It was working just fine and I am just out of warranty since August of last>> year.>> >> Anything I am doing wrong? Has this happened to anyone?>> .> ..----------------------------------------------------------for HELP Continue reading >>

Changing Your Battery | Medtronic Diabetes

Changing Your Battery | Medtronic Diabetes

Device: MiniMed 530G (551/751), MiniMed Paradigm RevelTM (523/723), MiniMed Paradigm 522/722, Guardian REAL-Time System, MiniMed Paradigm 515/715, MiniMed Paradigm 512/712 Your pump accepts a new AAA alkaline battery, size E92, type LR03. As a safety measure, if you insert a battery that does not have full power, the WEAK BATTERY or FAILED BATT TEST alarm may sound. If you receive a WEAK BATTERY alarm, respond to the alarm and continue. The pump will suspend insulin delivery until you clear the alarm. After you clear the alarm, the pump will operate normally, with a decreased battery life. Clear (ESC, ACT) any alarms and/or alerts before removing and replacing the battery. Make sure the pump is at the HOME (idle) screen when you remove the battery. Do NOT remove the battery during a bolus or Fill Cannula delivery. Use the edge of a coin to remove the battery cap. Turn the cap in a counter-clockwise direction. Remove the old battery and dispose of it per the disposable requirements of your state or country. Put the new battery in the pump with the negative end [(-) symbol] going in first. Check the label on the back of the pump to make sure the battery is inserted correctly. Note: Do not use cold batteries, as the life of the battery may incorrectly appear as low. Allow cold batteries to reach room temperature before you insert them into your pump. Place the battery cap in the pump and tighten so the slot is aligned horizontally with the pump as shown here: Caution:Do not overtighten the battery cap. You should not turn the cap more than four half turns. If you overtighten the cap you may not be able to remove it, and you can damage your pump. While the pump turns on, it will show one or more screens until the HOME screen appears. The HOME screen displays, your battery Continue reading >>

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