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Medtronic Enlite Sensor Problems

Medtronic Sensor Problems

Medtronic Sensor Problems

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I have been a pump user for about 10 years and started using the medtronic 530 cgm about 6 months ago. Several times, the sensor has failed because the wire going into me became kinked. I am using sites within 2 " of my belly button and am holding the insertion device so that the sensor should go straight in. Has anyone experienced this? What about exercise? Could this dislodge the sensor? If I'm lifting something and it comes in contact with the sensor/battery, could this dislodge it? I have had to learn not to respond immediately to my sensor readings. At first I was micromanaging and this was actually leading to more lows and subsequent highs. My first A1C with the sensor was significantly HIGHER than before. On the plus side, before this season, I couldn't play a round of golf without my bg sneaking up on my and ruining it. I am hoping that as I learn the subtleties of sensor use, I will like it more. Any words of wisdom/advice you can give me would be greatly appreciated. I have noticed the bit of delay between sensor readings and actual BG's. I had a "low" the other night (Sensor was reading 54) I checked it manually and got a FSBG of 78. I calibrated the my sensor with that reading and it still alarmed low for another 30 minutes or so. The problem I am having with my sensor is I have to have the pump right next to it for it to work. If I have the sensor on my left side and pump on my right it will alarm weak signal and if I don't move the pump closer it will lose the sensor completely. That frustrates me because I thought the sensor would at least be good for 6-8ft or so. Have you had Continue reading >>

My Experience With Medtronic's Enlite Cgm System.

My Experience With Medtronic's Enlite Cgm System.

Because this post seems to be getting a lot of traffic via Google searches, I want to update it with a couple of thoughts: I am very aware that trying a medical device for two days may not be sufficient enough time to form a well-rounded opinion on it, and you should remember that while reading this. I wasn't willing to stab myself a seventh time just for blog fodder. Many other people are writing about their experiences with the Enlite CGM and the 530G system, and I hope what they're sharing will be useful to you. Christel, Karen, Scott, and Jeff are a few that come to mind. tl;dr: I tried the Medtronic Enlite CGM and my experience was reminiscent of an internet meme. I did a shorter-than-I-envisioned trial with Medtronic's new Enlite CGM system this week. Medtronic's marketing team contacted me after reading my post about looking for a new insulin pump and asked if I would like to try out the 530G with Enlite system, to aid my decision process. I thanked them for the offer, but reiterated that I have no interest in switching to Medtronic's pump (as I mentioned in that post) but the opportunity to try out the new Enlite sensor intrigued me a bit. I've only ever been a Dexcom customer when it comes to CGM technology, and while Dexcom's Seven Plus, and now the G4 Platinum, come with their faults... I've grown very fond of them. It occurred to me that my opinion/crush/moderate-fangirldom of Dexcom's CGM wasn't really backed up by a well-rounded education - how could I know it was so great if I had nothing to compare it to? - and so would Medtronic maybe just let me try the sensor part of the system? Yep, they would. On Monday afternoon I went to my endocrinologist's office to meet with my local Medtronic rep and get hooked up to the Enlite CGM. Because Enlite doesn't have Continue reading >>

Troubleshooting Your Sensor & Transmitter | Medtronic Diabetes

Troubleshooting Your Sensor & Transmitter | Medtronic Diabetes

If yes, apply steady pressure using a sterile gauze or clean cloth for up to 3 minutes. If bleeding does NOT stop do not attach the sensor to the transmitter and follow these steps: Check the site for bleeding, irritation, pain, tenderness or inflammation and treat accordingly. Insert a new sensor in a different location. Did the green light flash after connecting? If not, your sensor may not be inserted. Review the Changing Your Sensor support video for information on how to insert a sensor correctly. If not, your transmitter will not flash green or send signals to your device until the sensor is inserted in your body. Review the Changing Your Sensor support video for information on how to insert a sensor correctly. If yes, you need to disconnect the transmitter from the sensor, wait for several seconds and then reconnect. If the green light still does not flash, charge your transmitter. Wait 10-15 minutes after calibration to see the first sensor glucose reading on your device screen. After 15 minutes, you can view the CALIBRATE HISTORY screen to confirm: If yes, this alert occurs if your device does not accept the calibration. Follow these actions . Continue reading >>

Enlite Calibration - Thomas Goffe

Enlite Calibration - Thomas Goffe

I didn't want this. Nobody does. But it will teach you a lot about yourself. Type I Diabetes. You don't get it from being fat, or lazy, or eating sugar. There is no cure - nothing is even close. Walk a day in my shoes. I use a device made by Medtronic called a Continuous Glucose Monitor - or CGM. It uses a small wire that is inserted under the skin to give me an idea of my blood glucose (BG)every 5 minutes. It does that by sampling the fluid that flows between cells, then using an algorithm attempts to convert it to what it thinks my actualBG reading might be. It transmits that data to my insulin pump and from there to my iPhone. It is most useful in telling me when my BG is rising or falling, or if it is too high or too low. At best, it is pretty inexact. In fact, users are cautioned not to use it as the basis for deciding to take extra insulin to move the BG lower, or to consume some glucose to raise it. As a result of that inability to accurately measure BG by itself, the user is required to calibrate the CGM 3 to 4 times a day with a traditional blood glucose meter. Normally (and ideally) the numbers you get from the BG meter and the CGM are fairly close. If not, trying to get the CGM to work right is going to be a problem. For the last couple of days, I've had problems calibrating the CGM unlike anything I've seen in the 4+ years that I've been using them. On Monday, I inserted a new CGM sensor. I did the calibration and things seemed fine. A few hours later, my insulin pump issued an alarm telling me to calibrate the CGM. I did that. That is when things got ugly. Before I calibrate, I take a look at the CGM reading. Then I run the BG test on my meter. Before using the meter reading to calibrate the CGM, they need to be fairlyclose. Long story short - the sensor t Continue reading >>

Progress With The Enlite

Progress With The Enlite

On the 6th of this month, I wrote a post about how I was doing on the new Medtronic 530G system, and how things were going with the Enlite. Im not going to lie, at the time of the writing, I was pretty upset that I had already used as many sensors as I had just trying to get one to last. In that post though, I had one inserted at the time that had lasted successfully for 5 days by then. Well, I actually got a full 10 or 11 days out of it (shh!! dont tell!) and was ever more excited to do so. The accuracy I had compared to my meter checks was almost spot on, and if not, it was within 10% or so. It wasnt until the last day that I knew it was conking out on me and I had t pull it because the readings were terribly off and the ISIG value was very very low. Either way, I was able to get that one to last and get back the time I lost in the one sensor that got terribly kinked, so Im happy with that. I hope to be able to get at least 10 days out of all of them if I can so I can extend them as much as possible. Granted, I knew going in that I probably wouldnt be able to extend them as long as a Dexcom sensor, so Im not terribly upset if I cant. Its probably healthier for my skin that way anyway. It seems, though, that a lot of people have trouble with even the Enlite sensors, so I thought Id offer a few things Ive learned in hopes that it helps someone else. 1. Try to get your basal and bolus ratios worked out as fine-tuned as possible. If youre someone who swings a lot (and I mean, like, a LOT), the sensors cant be calibrated properly enough to give you good information. Granted, theyve loosened up the calibration requirements (you can now calibrate at any time unless you have two arrows showing. I dont recommend it, but you can if you have to) 2. Try other insertion spots. Ye Continue reading >>

Cgm Sensor Delays Plaguing Medtronic | Diabetesmine

Cgm Sensor Delays Plaguing Medtronic | Diabetesmine

We're sorry, an error occurred. We are unable to collect your feedback at this time. However, your feedback is important to us. Please try again later. Not surprisingly, there's been a lot of hype about Medtronic's new 670G "hybrid closed loop" semi-automated insulin delivery system since it was approved by the FDA just over a year ago. After all, it's the first of its kind -- so far the only "pre-Artificial Pancreas" technology connecting an insulin pump and continuous glucose monitor with smart algorithms that's gotten the green light from regulators, much quicker than anyone expected in fact. Truly, there's a lot to be exited about. Yet despite all the good vibes (and mostly good press), Medtronic has faced a number of speed bumps over the past year -- from the company's slower-than-announced rollout that left many would-be customers frustrated, its inability to keep up with the high demand for CGM sensors and other supplies, to Anthem's initial refusal to cover the 670G, and Hurricane Maria in September hobbling Medtronic's Puerto Rico manufacturing operations. Of course any company can be hit with operational snags, or be affected by a natural disaster. But what makes this particularly alarming for the D-Community is the contracting of the diabetes device market these days, with a Nov. 12 Star Tribune story noting that some now see Medtronic as the "only game in town" for some of these products. With the insulin pump market shrinking and access to diabetes necessities becoming more uncertain, Medtronic is edging ever closer to monopolizing this med-tech segment and that means people with diabetes may not have many options except to make do. Bottom line: Many patients face fewer choices, and are afraid of being left twisting in the wind if they can't even get acces Continue reading >>

Bloody Enlite Sensor

Bloody Enlite Sensor

D.D. Family T1 since 1985, MM Pump 2013, CGM 2015 I just changed Enlite sensors, and when I inserted the new sensor, I noticed that it immediately turned dark , as if a "gusher" underneath. A bit of blood leaked out around the adhesive area of the sensor, but not more than I could wipe away with a fingertip. It doesn't hurt or anything. Is it ok to use the sensor, or is it toast? D.D. Family Getting much harder to control How goes it Peter good to see you post, I get gushers but not with sensors my finger is a a bleed factory at times. Wish you the best bud hope you get your answer. I just changed Enlite sensors, and when I inserted the new sensor, I noticed that it immediately turned dark , as if a "gusher" underneath. A bit of blood leaked out around the adhesive area of the sensor, but not more than I could wipe away with a fingertip. It doesn't hurt or anything. Is it ok to use the sensor, or is it toast? If it's painful, don't leave it in. An easy fix is to call MM and tell them you have a bleeder and they'll replace the sensor. Then pull it out. When you pull it out, have paper towels ready to clean up the mess. And if you're wearing anything white, take it off. D.D. Family T1 since 1985, MM Pump 2013, CGM 2015 Well, so far it has been super frustrating. I'm giving he sensor a couple more hours, but it's not looking good. No errors through the warm-up period, and when it came time to calibrate I tested and was 62. OK, a bit low, but no problem. I hit the calibrate button and went for a small snack (a plum actually). Despite eating, the sensor seemed determined that my Bg was still dropping. It almost immediately read 55, and wanted to suspend my basal. i played along for about 15 minutes, giving that plum a moment to digest, and also grabbed an ice cream bar (18g Continue reading >>

What I’ve Learned About My Cgm

What I’ve Learned About My Cgm

I’ve been using a Medtronic Minimed continuous glucose monitor (CGM) for a little more than a year and a half now, and here’s what I’ve learned about it. Having CGM is the greatest thing. It’s a decision-support tool, a dashboard, and a security blanket. I’ve learned so much about my diabetes from it, and it’s provided the data I needed to make some important changes to my self-management. I wish everyone had it. The BG values it reports are delayed by 15 minutes. This is a fact of life. The CGM looks at “interstitial glucose” between cells (ISIG) instead of blood glucose, and there’s a lag time between the two. Don’t expect the BG numbers from your meter and your CGM match unless your having very stable BGs. The most important factor in getting believable CGM readings is calibration. Wait until your interstitial glucose (ISIG) is the most stable before calibrating. If my BG is on the move but the system says I need to calibrate it, I’ll let it go past the “Meter BG Now” deadline and look at the “Sensor ISIG” values on the CGM information screen. When this value isn’t changing much, that’s when I’ll calibrate. Lots of things affect ISIG values and therefore CGM accuracy: the rate of change of BGs, the level of hydration, and the wetness of the sensor (both too wet and not wet enough). I find that if I keep my sensor and transmitter covered, I get a longer sensor life and better readings. Tegaderm film works the best for me. Unlike IV-3000, it doesn’t come off when I’m swimming or sweating a lot from exercise; it doesn’t leave behind a lot of residue; and it’s stretchy enough to cling nicely and create a good barrier. Hydration matters a whole lot to accuracy. If you’re dehydrated, the sensor will read incorrectly, or perhaps Continue reading >>

Troubleshooting Your Sensor & Transmitter | Medtronic Diabetes

Troubleshooting Your Sensor & Transmitter | Medtronic Diabetes

Change the sensor and insert it into a different location Avoid sites where clothes may rub, where your body bends a great deal and their beltline if possible. These areas present a higher risk of the sensor and transmitter being accidently pulled out. Do not insert the sensor into an area that is lean, scarred, or hardened. If inserted in these areas it may decrease the flow of interstitial fluid or the sensor may kink. Try a different orientations for the sensor and transmitter. For example, insert so the sensor on the bottom and the transmitter sits on top. This orientation may help prevent a teeter-totter action at the sensor and transmitter connection which could lead to a lost signal. Note: Make sure blood does not enter the connection point between the transmitter and glucose sensor. Did not flash a green light when connected to the sensor Try to disconnect the transmitter, wait for several seconds and then reconnect. If the green light still does not flash, charge your transmitter . If that doesnt work, double check to make sure the sensor is fully inserted into your body, review the technique on how to insert correctly. Review the Changing Your Sensor support videofor information on how to insert a sensor correctly Note: For optimal performance, connect the transmitter right away once youve inserted and taped the Enlite sensor. May or may not have been accepted by your device Wait 10-15 minutes after calibration to see the first sensor glucose reading on your device screen. After 15 minutes, you can view the CALIBRATE HISTORY screen to confirm: MAIN MENU > SENSOR > Calibration Hist. If you receive a CAL ERROR then your device has not accepted the calibration, follow these actions . When calibrating your sensors, remember to always: Wash hands before taking a f Continue reading >>

Continuous Glucose Monitoring With Medtronic/minimed Updated

Continuous Glucose Monitoring With Medtronic/minimed Updated

I decided to create a new post for this so that my initial reaction to continuous metering would remain untouched and available for review. If you would like to see my first reactions to this device, please refer to my original post on the same topic. I am now at the point where I am satisfied with the sensor glucose readings about 75% of the time. This has taken me a number of months, despite the fact that I consider myself quite technical and quite good at caring for my diabetes. Thus far, the sensor has helped my go from an A1C of 5.8 to 5.3, an improvement of about 9%. I do not know yet whether my next A1C will be as good. My doctor has cautioned be about going low too often. Being even more careful about lows than I had been may raise this slightly. So, the number one topic you need to know about in order to get results is also the hardest to understand and the hardest to get straight information about. ISIGs: ISIG is short for Interstititial SIGnal. This has nothing at all whatsoever to do with the strength of the transmission signal between the transmitter and the insulin pump. (Or presumably, the CGM device if you are not using one of the new pumps that serves both functions.) The sensor inserted beneath your skin has enzymes on it that react with your interstitial fluids to produce a “signal”. Personally, I would call this the raw glucose reading. However, a representative from Medtronic just assured me that this is not the case. She even assured me that it is possible for the ISIGs to be rising or falling while the reading is doing the opposite. I’m remaining skeptical about this point at this time. I have not seen that happen and do not understand how the simple measuring of the rate of reaction of the enzyme can produce two numbers. She also assured me Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump Issues | Diabetic Connect

Insulin Pump Issues | Diabetic Connect

I've been on the pump for 10 years, and just recently (within the past few months) have been having lots of issues (no delivery alarms, mainly). I take all the "corrective" actions, and they still seem to continue more than they should. Has anyone else had similar problems and what, if anything, seems to help? I'm thinking it could be scar tissue at the site, but I'm unsure. Also, what brands do you pump users like best? I use a Medtronic Minimed Revel 523 pump with no CGM. It is an older pump and I haven't had any such problems. Please continue to call Medtronic's help line about these issues. Whenever, I've called them about problems I was having, I've always found them receptive and responsive. If I had insurance coverage for CGM's, I would upgrade my 4 year old pump to the 530G with Enlite (CGM). I'm sorry to hear that you're having all of these problems. I've only been using a pump for the past 4 years of my total 39 years with diabetes and hope I never have to go back to injections. Stuart1966, I seriously don't think it's scar tissue either. I always rotate my sites and I have no bumps or anything. I'm getting ready to call Medtronic now and see what kind of story they give me this time. I'm on the Minimed 530G, and this is actually my 2nd one in a year. The first one had a bunch of no delivery errors over a few days, followed by a motor error, so they replaced it a couple of months ago. I changed my site at 3 AM today after the alarm went off almost every 5 minutes, and so far, so good. However, my BS was 228 this morning! Scar tissue after only 10 years unlikely. Infusion set issues, fatal design flaws with the meter maybe, scar tissue, extremely unlikely. Have you used only one spot that entire time? Closed-loop & fully integrated (essentially "sentient"), I' Continue reading >>

Medtronic Minimed 530g And Enlite Cgm – Opening The Door To Closing The Loop

Medtronic Minimed 530g And Enlite Cgm – Opening The Door To Closing The Loop

twitter summary: Medtronic MiniMed 530G is 1st step to artificial pancreas, ideal 4 nighttime hypo safety; Enlite CGM improves, though accuracy < Dexcom G4 In 2009, JDRF’s Dr. Aaron Kowalski wrote a landmark paper in the Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology that laid out a roadmap to bring an artificial pancreas to market. He set out six steps needed to close the loop, starting with low glucose suspend and ultimately progressing to a fully automated artificial pancreas that uses insulin and other hormones. The first step on this roadmap was in 2009 with the launch of the Medtronic Veo system with low glucose suspend in over 50 countries around the world. The US version, the MiniMed 530G system with Enlite, was launched in the US in October 2013. While the MiniMed 530G is not an “artificial pancreas” as most think of the term, it is an important first step on the road to automating insulin delivery – that’s because this is the first device that makes a decision, any decision, about insulin delivery without the user’s involvement. The Medtronic MiniMed 530G system pairs a MiniMed insulin pump with the Enlite CGM. A user selects a specific “threshold” glucose value (between 60 and 90 mg/dl in the US) in the pump’s settings menu, and when the CGM hits that threshold, the pump will automatically suspend insulin delivery for up to two hours. At any time within the two-hour period, the patient can resume insulin delivery. This article reviews my experience wearing the MiniMed 530G/Enlite CGM system over a three-week period (alongside wearing the Dexcom G4 Platinum CGM for comparison purposes). My thoughts are broken down into five sections: Threshold Suspend – Does it Work? Enlite CGM vs. the Medtronic Sof-Sensor and Dexcom G4 Platinum Who should cons Continue reading >>

Skin And Adhesive Issues With Continuous Glucose Monitors

Skin And Adhesive Issues With Continuous Glucose Monitors

Go to: Abstract The purpose of this article is to describe challenges associated with successful use of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) by young children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and to detail the techniques and products used to improve the duration of sensor wear. Methods: The DirecNet Study Group conducted 2 studies in 169 children with T1D between the ages of 1 and 9 years who were instructed to wear a CGM device daily. Problems related to skin irritation and sensor adhesiveness in these young children presented challenges to daily use of the CGM. Study coordinators instituted a variety of techniques using commercially available products to attempt to overcome these problems. Three primary factors that contributed to reduced CGM use were identified: the limited body surface area in smaller children, ambient temperature and humidity, as well as the type and duration of physical activity. Using supplemental products to minimize the impact of these factors resulted in improved adherence and reduced skin irritation. Conclusion: Achieving satisfactory adhesion of the CGM sensor and transmitter may involve finding the right supplemental product or combination of products through trial and error. Optimizing adhesion and minimizing skin irritation can significantly improve duration of use and tolerability of CGM devices by young children. Keywords: CGM, adhesive, irritation, children While the benefits of near-normalization of blood glucose levels are well established, the ability to achieve optimal glycemic control is limited by an increased risk of both mild and severe hypoglycemia.1-5 This is particularly difficult in young children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) due to a number of factors that contribute to inadequate glycemic control including nonphysiologic insulin d Continue reading >>

Www.realitycheck.org.au

Www.realitycheck.org.au

I got hitched up to CGMS last Thursday using the 640G and the Medtronic Enlite Sensors. The sensor died early this morning, not quite 5 days after it was inserted. I know that Medtronic quotes 6 days for the sensor, but I am interested in how long other people get from each sensor. Also it pissed me right off at night with all the various alarms. I turned off the high alarms, but I'd still get the red blinking light, and if my husband was awake, he'd wake me to ask what was wrong! It did, though, alert me to hypos, and even turned the plump off twice. Nice to know it works. by straygaijin Tue Mar 24, 2015 10:22 pm I use the sensors with a paradigm pump not the newer 640G and typically get 2 weeks from them. Most likely it 'died' because the battery in the transmitter went flat, just remove it carefully from the sensor, recharge it and then reconnect and start the sensor again. You should get another week. If you are consistently getting less than the 6 days, you might ask Medtronic to replace the transmitter. Can't help with the flashing lights on the pump but you might trying setting your high alarm higher so that it doesn't trigger so soon. Failing that, you could try just taping over the light! Any chance on an update on how you are going with the enlite sensors please? I haven't been usig them regularly, but have just put one in this morning, as I have decided to use them on a regular basis. Will update you in a couple of weeks, Justin. I've been using them regularly since I got the 640G in March. They are so much more accurate with this combo that with the Veo, you get a new transmitter and this seems to make all the difference. My readings are only ever a few points off between both readings unless I've stuffed up the calibration. I've been getting 6 days out of Continue reading >>

Enlite Sensor Misbehaving (roller Coaster)

Enlite Sensor Misbehaving (roller Coaster)

Enlite sensor misbehaving (roller coaster) Enlite sensor misbehaving (roller coaster) I've been using the Enlite sensors for a couple of months now, and most of them go into a wild roller coaster in day 5. It makes the sensor reading unreliable for a couple of days. Yet worse, when the pump (MM530) stops the insulin due to a false low reading, it creates havoc with my blood sugar. What can be done to make the sensor reliable for the 6 days of life they are supposed to have. I think it's impossible. Mine is crazy for the first 3 days, and then it's right on target. Then 3 days passes and it starts all over. Medtronic has replaced nearly all of the sensor . . . I just get tired of answering the same old stupid questions and nothing gets done to fix them My sensors don't start to act weird until about day 20ish. I only calibrate when the ISIG value is stable, and also get a calibration factor (BG divided by ISIG) and make sure it's within the recommended 3-8 range. I've read on other forums where users say 2-20 is the range. I've found, so far, that the 3-8 range is safest. I also tape the whole thing down with Hypafix tape (4" width). It is my personal belief that the sensor shouldn't "wiggle" around at all if you want to try to get a decent amount of accurate time from it. I've been doing this since I started with the original Sof Sensors and have always had good luck. There is the odd dud sensor but for the most part I've found that taping them down completely helps a lot. I've also read that the new Enlites shouldn't be allowed to "wet" overnight which was recommended for the Sof Sensors. Once you insert the sensor you should start it. All that said, I've usually had pretty good success with sensors in general - I'm one of those people that it just works for. I unders Continue reading >>

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