diabetestalk.net

Medtronic Change Of Address

Jdrf Announces Anthem Policy Change On Medtronic Artificial Pancreas

Jdrf Announces Anthem Policy Change On Medtronic Artificial Pancreas

The Coverage2Control campaign has worked to convince payers of the value of life-saving technology and the need to control out-of-pocket costs. Anthem has changed its coverage policies to include the Medtronic MiniMed 670G, the first device to meet FDA’s definition of “artificial pancreas.” JDRF announced the policy change as a victory for its Coverage2Control campaign, which has advocated with payers to ensure choice in diabetes technology for people living with diabetes. Specifically, the Anthem update says the payer will cover the MiniMed 530G, the 630G, and the 670G. The document does not specifically address supplies related to the devices. Anthem will cover the devices only for patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) who are age 7 or older and who have a glycated hemoglobin (A1C) value of 5.8% to 10% and for whom the device is “medically necessary.” “This is a great victory for the T1D community. By taking a tremendous step, Anthem is giving its members with diabetes access to this breakthrough in diabetes management,” said JDRF president and CEO Derek Rapp in an e-mail to The American Journal of Managed Care®. “I am so proud of how the Coverage2Control campaign helped make this happen. We applaud Anthem for this decision, and will continue to push insurers to make changes to coverage that enable better diabetes management.” Launched last spring, the JDRF campaign has 3 elements: (1) it asks health insurers to keep out-of-pocket costs for insulin, technology, and supplies “predictable and reasonable,” (2) it calls on insurers to give people the “freedom to choose the insulin pump that’s right for them,” and (3) it asks insurers to cover “all life-saving technology.” That last element became a focal point after leading insurers declined Continue reading >>

Medtronic Addresses Fda Recall For Strata Ii/strata Nsc And Stratamr Valves

Medtronic Addresses Fda Recall For Strata Ii/strata Nsc And Stratamr Valves

Medtronic Addresses FDA Recall for Strata II/Strata NSC and StrataMR valves Medtronic Addresses FDA Recall for Strata II/Strata NSC and StrataMR valves Tags: brain shunt , FDA recall , Strata II , Strata NSC , StrataMR Discussion on social media around the FDA notification regarding the Strata II/Strata NSC and StrataMR valves has led to a number of questions from patients. There are two actions currently being taken by the FDA and Medtronic to address issues with each of these products respectively. Medtronic has proactively implemented a Field Corrective Action (FCA) for its Strata II/Strata NSC valves. This type of FCA is referred to by the FDA as a Class II Recall. No actual shunt products are being recalled by Medtronic from the medical community. The FCA involves Medtronic updating their Instructions for Use (IFU) to make providers aware of a rare condition related to the Strata Valve that can lead to an inaccurate pressure level (PL) reading on the Strata Indicator Tool or StrataVarius system. The condition occurs only if a patient has been exposed to 3T MRI magnetic field or greater, and if biological debris is present to an extent that the valve magnet adjustment mechanism is impacted. This recall was initiated as a result of reported problems with the shunts in patients which occurred at an extremely low incident rate. Moving forward, new instructions will include this information in the packaging so medical professionals are aware as they monitor their patients after shunt surgery. Medtronic has also made a proactive decision to physically recall StrataMR valves still in stock at hospitals and medical facilities. This is to address an issue where the valve pressure level may be higher than anticipated. Medtronic is not recommending patients with the StrataMR Continue reading >>

Medtronic Likely To Be Booted From Fortune 500 Over Deal To Move Hq Overseas

Medtronic Likely To Be Booted From Fortune 500 Over Deal To Move Hq Overseas

Medtronic likely to be booted from Fortune 500 over deal to move HQ overseas Medtronic will maintain its operating headquarters at its home address until now, in Fridley. Medtronic , long a star of the prestigious Fortune 500 roster, is on course to be kicked off the list as a result of its plan to relocate its headquarters to tax-friendly Ireland. The move is part of the $42.9 billion acquisition, announced late Sunday, by Medtronic of Dublin-based Covidien. The deal has tax implications favorable to the combined companies' financial structure, but the tax consequences of the transaction got little mention in the press release announcing the deal . "This transaction is strategic first," Medtronic CEO Omar Ishrak told the Financial Times . "The financial structure and optimization of tax discussion came after. The tax rates for Medtronic do not change a significant amount, but the structure gives us access to the cash generated by Covidien assets abroad, which we can then reinvest into US technologies." Under current laws, U.S. corporations pay taxes to nations abroad on the profits they earn there, but they can't easily bring those profits back to the U.S. without having them taxed at higher U.S. rates. The Covidien deal is designed to enable Medtronic to deploy its foreign profits in the U.S. without incurring the higher U.S. tax levies. Ishrak also promised that the company's new financial structure will enable it to commit $10 billion more, "above and beyond Medtronic's and Covidien's current plans," to technology investments in the United States over the next decade. Medtronic will maintain its operating headquarters at its home address until now, in Fridley. More than 8,000 of the company's 46,000 worldwide employees work in Minnesota (before the Covidien deal). Continue reading >>

Medtronic's New Business Model: You Only Pay If It Works

Medtronic's New Business Model: You Only Pay If It Works

Medtronic's new business model: You only pay if it works Written by Julie Spitzer| February 21, 2018| Print | Email Medtronic CEO Omar Ishrak, PhD, is taking the medical device company in a slightly different direction: accepting more risk in how it gets paid for its products, according to The Wall Street Journal. Medtronic, which specializes in products such as implantable cardiac devices and insulin pumps, has been signing more and more supply contracts in which prices change based on how well its products work in patients.These outcomes-based contracts are in-line with the shift toward value-based healthcare reimbursement models, Mr. Ishrak told WSJ. Since early last year, Medtronic has signed almost 1,000 contracts that require it to reimburse hospitals if its product Tyrx, an antibacterial sleeve, doesn't protect against infections in patients receiving cardiac-device implants. It also has a deal with the insurance giant Aetna to alleviate some of the reimbursements the insurer pays for Medtronic's insulin pumps if patients' diabetes improve when they switch to a different brand. "Medtronic is focused on technologies to improve outcomes. We use biomedical engineering to alleviate pain, restore health and extend life. Historically we've done that by creating credible evidence that our technologies do change outcomes. But at the end of the day, we and the industry get paid on the technology itself and a promise that those outcomes will actually be changed," Mr. Iskrak told WSJ. He added: "We are moving, just like the rest of healthcare, to a value-based model, where we get paid in some fashion for actually achieving the outcome. It's a step we have to take to make sure that the value we create with our technologies is truly realized. And when it gets realized, we wi Continue reading >>

Investor Faqs | Investors | Medtronic

Investor Faqs | Investors | Medtronic

I have a shareholder question. How do I know whom to call? Please call Investor Relations (763-505-2692) for General investor questions about Medtronic plc Requests for Paper Copies of Financial Materials: Annual Reports, SEC Filings etc. (Electronic copies are available on under the SEC filings menu on the Medtronic Investor Relations page or through www.sec.gov) If you are a Stock Analyst, Institutional Investor, Portfolio Managers, Stock Brokers or Individual Investor with a question about Medtronics operations. Please call Shareholder Services (763-505-2510) for Inquires about Medtronic's transfer agent - EQ Shareowner Services (Contact information about EQ is listed below) Inquires about shares in a company that was acquired by Medtronic or questions about acquisition share redemption. Investor Relations can be contacted several ways. To contact us via U.S. mail: To phone Investor Relations, call (763) 505-2692. To phone Shareholder Services, call (763) 505-2510. Can I purchase shares of Medtronic stock directly from the company? How do I reinvest my dividends or change my address for my dividend payments? All of these questions require action by Medtronic's transfer agent, EQ Shareowner Services. Medtronic has a direct dedicated phone number for Medtronic shareholders. To reach EQ within the continental United States dial: (888) 648-8154. If you are calling from outside the U.S. dial: (651) 450-4064. Medtronic shares are traded on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) under the ticker MDT and may be purchased though any licensed broker dealer. Medtronic also has a direct stock purchase plan, called Shareowner Service Plus Plan and a Dividend Reinvestment Plan. These plans are administered by EQ Shareowner Services. Direct purchase accounts set up though EQ can be vi Continue reading >>

Patient Device Registration: Idcards

Patient Device Registration: Idcards

Help us keep your patient record up-to-date. Using this service and receiving an ID Card from Medtronic is completely free of charge, and will only take 3-5 minutes to fill out our online form. In case of emergency, we recommend all Medtronic patients carry their ID Card with them in order to identify you as having an implanted device. The ID Card includes a toll-free number to contact Medtronic, and helps maintain current and accurate information for your record. How Do We Use the Information You Provide? Medtronic places very high value on safety and security of your private information. The information you provide is over a secure network, and is used to keep your device record current and accurate. We also use the information in order to process an updated Device US Patient Identification Card for you, that will be mailed to you shortly after completing our online form. All of the information you provide is used in compliance with FDA requirements and as otherwise described in our Terms of Use and Privacy Statement . Medtronic patients with any of the following devices should have an ID Card: CRDM Device (Pacemaker & Defibrillator, Leads, Loop Recorder, LINQ Monitor) Neuro Device (Pump, Stimulators, Catheters) If you meetALLof the following criteria, please use this form to update your information, and a new ID Card will be sent to you at your address provided: Medtronic is the manufacturer of your deviceand Your medical device was implanted in the USAand One of the following pieces of information need to be updated: Continue reading >>

How Medtronic Manages Machine Data In Mongodb

How Medtronic Manages Machine Data In Mongodb

How Medtronic Manages Machine Data in MongoDB Thanks for subscribing to the newsletter. This is your channel for getting the latest notifications of server and driver releases, details on local MongoDB events, updates on education programs, and the skinny on all things MongoDB. Medical equipment maker Medtronic, perhaps best known for its pacemakers, offers devices and therapies that address more than 30 diseases. Last year the company served 9 million patients and this year the company announced that it serves a patient in some way every three seconds. In addition, Medtronic collects more than 30 million data samples about its devices every day. Matthew Chimento, principal test engineer and project manager at Medtronic, notes that more than 150 data collection and processing steps have been added to Medtronics manufacturing process in the last three years, and 40% of all of Medtronics stored data has been collected in the last two. Humans arent great at collecting data, but machines are, and we have a lot of machines. Now if only those machines all spoke the same language. Unfortunately, with a proliferation of machines comes a proliferation of different data types. And while the media likes to talk about Big Data as if it were all about volume, companies like Medtronic realize Big Data is primarily a matter of data variety, as a NewVantage Partners survey discovered: Furthermore, for regulatory reasons, Medtronic must save device data for 10 years after the last implant of the device. Since those devices can last 20 years, some data is 30 years old, which means that Medtronic must contend with information spread across a multitude of obscure database systems, in a wide variety of formats. To manage this data complexity, Medtronic turned to MongoDB. About two years ag Continue reading >>

Medtronic, Now Based In Ireland, Still Reaps U.s. Benefits

Medtronic, Now Based In Ireland, Still Reaps U.s. Benefits

Medtronic, now based in Ireland, still reaps U.S. benefits Since its "inversion," the company has been awarded more than $40 million in federal contracts and its executives still work at its Fridley campus. By Renae Merle Washington Post DAVID PAUL MORRIS • Bloomberg News Medtronic CEO Omar Ishrak at the 2016 Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas, Nevada, U.S., on Jan. 6, 2016. Medical device maker Medtronic PLC found itself in an enviable position in March when one of its executives joined a U.S. trade mission to Peru, where there is a booming health-care market. The trip included matchmaking meetings with Peruvian businesses and networking luncheons with the Lima Chamber of Commerce. The delegation of more than a dozen health-care companies also visited a new $75 million hospital serving 600,000 people in Villa El Salvador, a sprawling shantytown on the outskirts of Lima. There, Medtronic received an influential shout-out. Toured new state of the art hospital Mission member @Medtronic provided their tech, Bruce Andrews, the deputy secretary of Commerce leading the trip, said in a Twitter post. In promoting the three-day trip, the Commerce Department had promised opportunities for U.S. companies to expand their footprint in the country, and Medtronic was now a featured player. Except by the time the trip took place, Medtronic, a behemoth that started humbly in a Minnesota garage in 1949, had claimed Ireland as its corporate home and given up its U.S. citizenship. In doing so, Medtronic joined a parade of prominent U.S. companies that have set up operations overseas to lower their tax bills. The migration has grown so large it is attracting scrutiny from tax collectors on both sides of the Atlantic. In late August, the European Union ruled that Apple must Continue reading >>

Medtronic - Heart Failure: Identification Card

Medtronic - Heart Failure: Identification Card

The identification (ID) card that you receive from Medtronic identifies you as having an implanted device. The card has important information about your device including your doctor's phone number in case of a medical emergency. You should receive a temporary ID card before you leave the hospital. A few weeks after surgery, you will receive a permanent, plastic ID card from Medtronic. According to United States federal law, medical device manufacturers must maintain an accurate database of all people in the U.S. who have an implantable medical device such as an InSync System. By keeping your information updated at all times, you also allow Medtronic to promptly inform your physician of any device-related data. It is helpful to have this card with you at all times especially for follow-up appointments, to clear airport security or other theft detection systems, and in case of a medical emergency. If you change doctors, move, or receive a new telephone number or area code, please contact the Medtronic Patient Services Department to immediately update your information by email, phone, or mail. Continue reading >>

Medtronic

Medtronic

Medtronic Public Limited Company is a medical device company. Its headquarters are in Dublin, Ireland.[1][3][4][5] Its operational headquarters are in Fridley, Minnesota.[1][6] Medtronic is among the world's largest medical equipment development companies.[7] In 2015, at the time of its acquisition of Covidien, its market capitalisation was about $100 billion.[8] Medtronic operates in more than 140 countries.[1] It employs over 85,000 people and has more than 53,000 patents.[9] History[edit] Early history[edit] Medtronic Operational Headquarters in Fridley, Minnesota, a suburb of Minneapolis. Medtronic was founded in 1949 in northeastern Minneapolis by Earl Bakken and his brother-in-law, Palmer Hermundslie, as a medical equipment repair shop.[10] Through his repair business, Bakken came to know C. Walton Lillehei, a doctor of heart surgery at the University of Minnesota Medical School. The deficiencies of the pacemakers of the day were made painfully obvious following a power outage over Halloween in 1957, which affected large sections of Minnesota and western Wisconsin.[11] A pacemaker-dependent paediatric patient of Lillehei died because of the blackout. The next day, Lillehei spoke with Bakken about developing some form of battery-powered pacemaker. Bakken modified a design for a transistorised metronome and created the first battery-powered external artificial pacemaker. Medtronic's old headquarters in St. Anthony, Minnesota The company expanded through the 1950s, mostly selling equipment built by other companies but also developing some custom-made devices. Bakken built a small pacemaker that could be strapped to the body and powered by batteries. Work in the new field later produced an implantable pacemaker in 1960. The company built headquarters in the Minneapoli Continue reading >>

Contact Us - Medtronic Diabetes Uk

Contact Us - Medtronic Diabetes Uk

I am a healthcare professional~A diabetologist, a diabetes nurse I use a Medtronic Diabetes device~Such as an insulin pump or a continuous glucose monitoring device I DON'T use a Medtronic Diabetes device~But I am interested in learning more I prescribe Medtronic Diabetes products~I'm an existing Medtronic Diabetes customer I DON'T yet prescribe Medtronic Diabetes products~I'm not yet an existing Medtronic Diabetes customer By submitting this form, I agree to the terms of use. This question is for testing whether you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions. In case of an emergency please DO NOT use this contact form but call our 24/7 helpline immediately. This is our 24hr technical helpline for Emergency pump assistance. The content and all information provided on this website is for your informational use only and is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment in any manner. The patient stories provided are experiences specific to a particular patient. Responses to a treatment may vary from patient to patient. Always talk with your physician about diagnosis and treatment information and ensure that you understand and carefully follow that information. 2016 Medtronic International Trading Sarl. All Rights Reserved. No part of this website may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means without permission from Medtronic International Trading Sarl. MiniMed, Bolus Wizard, SMARTGUARD, Guardian, Enlite and CareLink are trademarks of Medtronic, Inc. and its subsidiaries. CONTOUR is a trademark of Ascensia Diabetes Care. Continue reading >>

Medtronic Minimed 9/19/13

Medtronic Minimed 9/19/13

Department of Health and Human Services Public Health Service Food and Drug Administration WARNING LETTER VIA UNITED PARCEL SERVICE Continuous Improvement Request (CIR) CIR#D08-012 (opened 12/23/2008) and CIR#G08-009 (opened 12/23/2008) were opened to address data taken from process audit results from 2006-2009 that showed that process validation procedures and policies were not followed (this appears to affect all product lines). The root cause was identified as insufficient training and lack of attention to detail. As a corrective action, training of personnel was completed (3/21/2009). There is no documentation in the record to verify or validate that training as a corrective action was effective and would prevent recurrence of your employees not following process validation procedures and policies (Master validation procedure SOP 109-12); the CAPAs were closed on 04/27/09. CIR#E-08-008 (opened 09/15/2008) was opened to address (b)(4) periodically seen in device verification testing and during the qualification tests on Paradigm Insulin Infusion Pumps which could cause (b)(4). The CAPA was closed on 7/10/09 recommending implementation of a (b)(4) test to be performed on (b)(4) on a (b)(4) basis as a periodic check to provide assurance that process stability and capability are maintained. No verification or validation documents were found in the CAPA file to document that the effectiveness of this corrective action (conducting (b)(4) tests on (b)(4)) identified in CAPA CIR#E-08-008 was assessed and that this corrective action identified was implemented. Mr. Henry Sanders, the firm’s Director of Pump Value Stream, stated that (b)(4) test was performed as required. Quality Improvement Request (QIR) QIR#08-002 (opened 04/15/2008) was opened to address failure analysis Continue reading >>

Worlds Tiniest Pacemaker Debuts: About 1 Inch Long

Worlds Tiniest Pacemaker Debuts: About 1 Inch Long

(1 of ) Medtronic in 2017 releases Micra TPS, a tiny, leadless pacemaker. (Medtronic) (2 of ) Medtronic's new Micra TPS is about one-tenth the size of a regular pacemaker. (Medtronic) (4 of ) Medtronic's new Micra TPS is about one-tenth the size of a regular pacemaker. (Medtronic) Worlds tiniest pacemaker debuts: about 1 inch long NORTH BAY BUSINESS JOURNAL | December 13, 2017 The pacemaker dates back to the early 1940s. They were external devices to help regulate heart rhythm, but were large, bulky, relied on external electrodes and had to be plugged into a wall outlet. They could also fail during a power blackout. In the mid-1950s, Dr. C. Walton Lillehei, a pioneer in open-heart surgery at the University of Minnesota Medical School, and his colleagues set out to develop a better system with the help of Medtronic engineers. One of those was Earl Bakken, who developed a new kind of pacemaker that was not much larger than a paperback book. He used parts from electrical devices he had in the shop. The devices circuitry was based on a design for a transistorized metronome he had seen in a trade publication. The pacemaker was powered by mercury batteries, provided a 9-volt DC pulse, and could easily and comfortably be worn by young patients, according to Medtronic. The original Bakken pacemaker was tested in the University of Minnesotas laboratory, then applied to a pediatric heart patient. The device immediately restored the childs heartbeat to near normal. Within days, the childs heart resumed a normal rhythm on its own, and the pacemaker was removed. In the U.S., the first implantable pacemaker was developed in 1960. Billed as the worlds smallest pacemaker, Medtronics new Micra TPS (Transcatheter Pacing System) is about the size of a large vitamin capsule. At about one- Continue reading >>

Medtronic Deep Brain Stimulation | Patient Resources

Medtronic Deep Brain Stimulation | Patient Resources

While receiving Medtronic DBS Therapy, this will be your go-to place if you have a question, want instructions, or need help. You can return to your usual activities, always following your doctor's guidance on what's okay and what to avoid. DBS will have only minimal impact on your daily activities, the clothes you can wear, or how you travel. DBS delivers therapy 24 hours a day, so it will be working to control your symptoms when you wake up first thing in the morning. DBS doesn't require any maintenance from you (except for recharging if you have a rechargeable system). WATCH TO SEE WHAT YOU CAN EXPECT DURING DBS THERAPY. Be sure to attend all the scheduled checkups with the doctor who manages your DBS therapy. Tell your doctor if your Parkinson's symptoms have changed. Your doctor will: Make sure that your DBS system is working properly. Adjust your stimulation to best control your symptoms. Check the battery of your neurostimulator to see if you will soon need a device replacement. Continue reading >>

Research: Rating Action: Moody's Changes Medtronic's Outlook To Negative From Stable; Affirms A3 Ratings - Moody's

Research: Rating Action: Moody's Changes Medtronic's Outlook To Negative From Stable; Affirms A3 Ratings - Moody's

Moody's changes Medtronic's outlook to negative from stable; affirms A3 ratings New York, March 10, 2017 -- Moody's Investors Service, ("Moody's") changed Medtronic, Inc.'s outlook to negative from stable. At the same time, Moody's affirmed Medtronic's A3 senior unsecured and Prime-2 short-term ratings. "Medtronic faces several challenges that will likely impede its ability to deleverage as planned," said Diana Lee, a Moody's Senior Credit Officer. Moody's anticipates that Medtronic will need to borrow additional debt to fund its cash needs. In addition to the rating agency's previous concerns regarding a delay in resolving its Puerto Rico IRS tax matter, Moody's now believes that the company's cash flow will be constrained by one-time items. As the company noted in January, it will only be able to access about 55% of its cash (or 60% post-Puerto Rico settlement) without paying higher taxes. However, it is committed to giving at least 50% of its free cash flow to shareholders and expects to undertake $1.5 billion in acquisitions per year. Last year, the company stated that it would reduce gross debt by another $5 billion to $6 billion between mid-2016 and end of April 2018. At this time, given cash flow constraints and the need to borrow for its cash needs, Moody's believes it will be difficult for Medtronic to accomplish this. The negative outlook reflects Moody's concerns that Medtronic will face challenges in completing its planned deleveraging. If Moody's believes that fundamental operating issues and additional borrowings will constrain deleveraging beyond April 2018, the ratings could be downgraded. Specifically, debt/EBITDA sustained above 3.0 times could result in a downgrade. If the company is able to generate better earnings growth and cash flow, such that de Continue reading >>

More in diabetes