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Medtronic Cgm Acetaminophen

New Diabetes Technology To Expect In 2018

New Diabetes Technology To Expect In 2018

We're sorry, an error occurred. We are unable to collect your feedback at this time. However, your feedback is important to us. Please try again later. The start of a new year always brings curiosity about what's on tap in new diabetes technology, and we're excited to take an inside look, especially with the big JP Morgan Healthcare and Consumer Electronics Show events underway this month. Of course, these days Amazon and Google generate quite the medtech buzz, not to mention wearable smartwatches and Apple talk and the very many mobile health apps being developed . Some of the recent buzz includes FitBit investing $6M to develop a continuous glucose sensor, and rumors that Apple's developing its own super-secret continuous monitor built directly into its Apple Watch. On the flip side, you can't talk about innovation or D-tech these days without the lockstep concerns of access and affordability. It's encouraging to see reimbursement being more of a focus at the R&D stage of new products, and the latest news of Medicare coverage for the tubeless OmniPod pump and new Abbott FreeStyle Libre flash glucose monitor are big moves forward. We've reached out to many leading diabetes vendors and combed through public reports from investor earnings calls and other news announcements to compile this (not exhaustive) look at what's ahead in D-tech for this coming year. You might refer to this as Artificial Pancreas systems , but whatever the name it's about "closing the loop" in glucose-monitoring and insulin dosing. While we won't see any fully closed loops (requiring no user intervention) on the market during 2018, we'll certainly see progress from numerous players. Beta Bionics: This B-Corp startup in Boston now has its fourth-generation prototype of its iLet4 system, a dual-hor Continue reading >>

Acetaminophen Can Falsely Raise Glucose Sensor Readings

Acetaminophen Can Falsely Raise Glucose Sensor Readings

Acetaminophen Falsely Raises Glucose Sensor Readings by Wide Margin Acetaminophen falsely elevates continuous glucose monitor (CGM) readings by a large margin, according to a new report that quantifies and raises cautions about the phenomenon as the devices are used increasingly by patients. The results of an analysis conducted with 40 type 1 diabetes patients were published online August 12, 2015 in Diabetes Care by David M Maahs, MD, associate professor of pediatrics at the Barbara Davis Center for Childhood Diabetes, University of Colorado, Denver, and colleagues. In the current study, CGM readings were as much as two- to nearly fourfold higher than finger-stick readings following ingestion of acetaminophen. User guides for currently licensed CGM devices made by Dexcom and Medtronic Minimed include a warning about acetaminophen interference with the devices. Moreover, since the CGM devices aren't approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in making treatment decisions, the product guides also advise patients to instead base insulin dose calculations on finger-stick blood glucose monitor results. The degree to which the instructions are heeded isn't known. Few published studies have documented the magnitude of the acetaminophen effect, particularly on newer sensors. The rapid development of closed-loop technology, which uses CGM readings to automate insulin delivery, also makes this a concern, the authors say. "It's very important that the effect of acetaminophen on CGM and its magnitude be known, especially as CGM technology is being used increasingly by patients. Also, with artificial-pancreas technology rapidly advancing and with the potential for insulin dosing based on CGM instead of only with meter glucose, this is an important topic," Dr Maahs tol Continue reading >>

Important Safety Information

Important Safety Information

Indications, Contraindications, Warnings and Precautions All Medtronic MiniMed devices and associated components listed below are limited to sale by or on the order of a physician and should only be used under the direction of a healthcare professional familiar with the risks associated with the use of these systems. Patients should always discuss potential risks and benefits with a physician. Please review the product manual prior to use for detailed instructions and disclosure. For a full list of reference documents please visit our Download Library. Insulin Pumps Continuous Glucose Monitor (CGM) Sensors and Serters Meters Injection Port Mobile Accessory Remote Glucose Monitor CareLink Therapy Management Software Medtronic MiniMed® Insulin Infusion Pumps This section applies to insulin infusion function of all MiniMed external pumps, with or without Continuous Glucose Monitoring function, including MiniMed pump model MMT-508 or older, MiniMed Paradigm pumps, MiniMed Paradigm REAL-Time pumps and MiniMed Paradigm REAL-Time Revel pumps. Please refer to Medtronic MiniMed REAL-Time Continuous Glucose Monitoring section for important safety information regarding Continuous Glucose Monitoring function of the MiniMed Paradigm REAL-Time pumps or MiniMed Paradigm REAL-Time Revel™ pumps. Indications for Use The insulin pump is indicated for the continuous delivery of insulin, at set and variable rates, for the management of diabetes mellitus. Age restrictions apply depending on pump model. Contraindications Pump therapy is not recommended for people who are unwilling or unable to perform a minimum of four blood glucose tests per day and to maintain contact with their healthcare professional. Successful insulin pump therapy requires sufficient vision or hearing to allow recogn Continue reading >>

Cgm Tips And Tricks For Better Accuracy And Less Frustration

Cgm Tips And Tricks For Better Accuracy And Less Frustration

CGM Tips and Tricks for Better Accuracy and Less Frustration What Ive learned from 50,000 hours using CGM Ive been extremely lucky to use and study CGM since my first summer at diaTribe and Close Concerns seven years ago (over 50,000 hours now!), and Ive seen this technologys high points, limitations, and progress. Since I often hear frustration that CGMs are not accurate, that alarms are annoying, and adhesive is a pain, I wanted to share some tips and tricks from personal experience and research. Separately, Ive also been very hard at work finishing my upcoming book, Bright Spots & Landmines stay tuned for updates very soon in diaTribe! [Editors Note: As always, this article should not be interpreted as medical advice. Consult your healthcare provider before making significant changes to your routine, particularly if you are on insulin.] Take CGM calibration extremely seriously: (i) always wash hands before taking a fingerstick; OR (ii) when hand washing isnt possible, wipe the first drop of blood and use the second drop. These two strategies can help avoid a major source of CGM inaccuracy: dirty hands -> inaccurate BG meter readings -> inaccurate CGM calibration -> worse CGM accuracy. When the CGM and fingerstick meter values are very different, wash hands and take another fingerstick to confirm the BG meter is actually correct (especially if dosing insulin). Upon a second fingerstick, I often find the CGM is correct and the first meter value was reading falsely high (from not washing my hands!). This strategy has prevented me from taking dangerous insulin overdoses many, many times. Try not to calibrate a CGM when glucose is low or rapidly changing. Both of those times can drive worse accuracy. I find morning and right before bed are great times to calibrate hands Continue reading >>

Continuous Glucose Monitoring Systems (cgm) Medtronic & Dexcom Review & Comparison

Continuous Glucose Monitoring Systems (cgm) Medtronic & Dexcom Review & Comparison

Since my first detailed report comparing the various Continuous Glucose Monitoring Systems (CGMs) back in 2014, a lot has happened. And not much has changed. The systems have improved in terms of accuracy, features and ease of use, but the main players remain the same (Medtronic and Dexcom). Access via insurance coverage and professional loaner systems has grown exponentially, yet less than 20% of those eligible for CGM are currently using them. In many cases, insurers make the process of receiving coverage onerous and needlessly complex. This doesn’t even touch on Medicare, which continues to sit idly by with its head up its proverbial butt while older Americans suffer needlessly from dangerous glucose swings. New and improved software programs (plus a brilliant new book called “Practical CGM”) provide guidance on how to interpret/analyze CGM reports, yet few patients bother to look at their own data, and very few healthcare providers have the expertise to convert the reports into useful therapeutic insight to help guide their patients. So let’s get down to business. How do the latest Medtronic and Dexcom CGM systems compare? Dexcom’s latest and greatest, the G5, features a transmitter that sends data directly to either a handheld receiver or a mobile phone. Dexcom’s G5 Mobile App displays data on the phone and generates the various alerts; Dexcom’s Clarity App generates reports for retrospective analysis. G5, as well as G4 Platinum, utilizes Dexcom’s up-to-date 505 algorithm for translating subcutaneous electrical impulses into glucose values. Why call it 505? My best guess is that Medtronic copyrighted every other number below 1000. (for some reason, they skipped 505 when naming their various pumps) Medtronic’s latest CGM features their new-generati Continue reading >>

Freestyle Libre System: The New Continuous Glucose Monitor

Freestyle Libre System: The New Continuous Glucose Monitor

FreeStyle Libre System: The New Continuous Glucose Monitor The FreeStyle Libre is a continuous blood glucose monitor on the market for type 1 and diabetics produced by Abbott, the manufacturer of the FreeStyle meter lines. The main difference between the FreeStyle Libre system from most blood glucose meters on the market is that it uses a sensor that is left on the body for a continuous reading, rather than getting traditional finger stick blood glucose readings throughout the day. Upon the first fill, each patient requires a reader, along with sensors. Each sensor can be worn for up to 10 days, requiring 3 sensors for a 1-month supply. FreeStyle estimates that the Libre meter has a mean lifespan of 3 years. FreeStyle Libre is used with a sensor that is placed on the back of the upper arm, and a sensor filament is inserted into the skin and measures glucose readings based on interstitial fluid. Readings are taken by swiping the reader system over the sensor for a painless 1-second scan. For each scan, users get a blood glucose reading, a trend, and an 8-hour history. The sensor continuously measures the glucose level every 60 seconds and stores the readings every 15 minutes, requiring it to be scanned every 8 hours. The reading device can then use that data to provide daily patterns, the percentage of time that the blood glucose was within the target range, and the number of low-glucose events. The reading device stores 90 days of glucose data to allow accurate readings to present to health care professionals in coordination of their A1c, which is a 3-month average of the patients blood glucose. According to the IMPACT Trial of type 1 diabetics, patients used the device by scanning an average of 15.1 times per day, compared with testing with traditional blood glucose f Continue reading >>

Acetaminophen Can Falsely Elevate Cgm Readings

Acetaminophen Can Falsely Elevate Cgm Readings

With commentary by David Maahs, MD, associate professor of pediatrics at the Barbara Davis Center for Childhood Diabetes at the University of Colorado Acetaminophen can affect the accuracy of continuous glucose monitors (CGMs), a fact that is well known in the diabetes education and treatment field, but not necessarily recognized by all patients who use them. What’s also not known is how much acetaminophen changes CGM readings. Though manufacturing companies have reported the problem, there has been little data on the impact of this effect on patients who self monitor their glucose levels. David Maahs, MD, associate professor of pediatrics, the Barbara Davis Center for Childhood Diabetes at the University of Colorado, studies complications with CGMs and wanted to investigate the effect of the pain reliever on CGM readings. In his study, which was published online in Diabetes Care, he tested the effects of acetaminophen on CGM in 40 patients with diabetes. He compared the CGM glucose values to blood glucose meter values. The subjects used a Dexcom G4 CGM system, and were given 1,000 mg of acetaminophen, the equivalent of two extra strength Tylenol, in the morning with breakfast. Glucose meter readings were taken before they took the pills, a half hour later, and several more times throughout the day. The researchers found significant differences in values, even as long as eight hours after taking the pain reliever. The greatest difference (61 mg/dL) occurred two hours after taking acetaminophen. Dexcom, a leading manufacturer of CGMs, warns users that “Taking medications with acetaminophen (such as Tylenol) while wearing the sensor may falsely raise your sensor glucose readings. The level of inaccuracy depends on the amount of acetaminophen active in your body and ma Continue reading >>

Continuous Glucose Monitoring: Everything You Need To Know

Continuous Glucose Monitoring: Everything You Need To Know

Continuous glucose monitors or CGMs can be a lifesaving device for people with any type of diabetes. They continually check your blood sugar 24 hours a day and alert you you before you begin experiencing low or high blood sugar levels. They can reduce the number of times you have to check your blood sugar each day which is welcome news for everyone with diabetes! Insurance coverage is changing this year with Medicare jumping on board also, so this is the time to learn about this awesome piece of technology available to you. I know there are a lot of questions surrounding the use of continuous glucose monitoring, so we will break it all down here for you! What is a CGM and how does it work? Is it right for me? Will I still have to check my blood sugar? What choices do I have currently on the market? Will my insurance cover a CMG? How much will it cost? Can I travel and play sports with a CGM? In this article I will answer all your questions. What Is Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM)? A continuous glucose monitoring system or CGM is a system that does just what it sounds like, it monitors you glucose (blood sugar) continuously…well, every 5 minutes, 24 hours a day! You are able to see what your blood sugars are with a receiver; the data is transmitted from a sensor which is inserted right beneath your skin which is attached to a transmitter which sends the data to the receiver. Now, the newest system are even integrated with a Smartphone; with this advancement you can check your data right from your cell phone. For parents with children, this technology is peace of mind, allowing them to check their child’s blood glucose level any time-day or night. There are two different types of systems: The first is a personal continuous glucose monitoring system that you wear a Continue reading >>

Cgm Reinvented | The Freestyle Libre System

Cgm Reinvented | The Freestyle Libre System

Notice of Privacy Practices | Unsubscribe | Privacy Policy | Terms of Use | Contact Us We regret to inform you that weve had some difficulty processing your request. To further assist you, please contact the FreeStyle Libre Consumer Relations at 1-844-330-5535 , Monday through Friday, 8 AM to 8 PM Eastern Time. Thank you. You have already signed up to the FreeStyle Libre email list. To further assist you, please contact the FreeStyle Libre Customer Support at 1-844-330-5535 , Monday through Friday, 8AM to 8PM Eastern Time. Thank you. Are you sure you are ready to submit the date of birth? You must be 18 or older to sign-up for the FreeStyle Libre Prescription Retrieval Service We apologize. The FreeStyle Libre prescription retrieval offer is not available to Kaiser patients at this time. To learn more, please ask your physician about the FreeStyle Libre system. Download - How to talk to your doctor? Thank you for your interest. At this time, the Prescription Retrieval offer is not available to beneficiaries of Medicare, Medicaid, or other federal or state healthcare programs. To learn how you can get access to FreeStyle Libre, please call the Consumer Relations support team at 1-844-330-5535 , Monday through Friday, 8am to 8pm eastern standard time. Note: With the new physician information provided, it may take a few more days to process your prescription request. If you no longer wish to receive marketing emails from us, you may opt-out by entering your details below and clicking unsubscribe. You will no longer receive marketing emails from us. If you subscribed to the FreeStyle Libre prescription retrieval service, you may still receive updates on your prescription status. Before we issue your eSample Voucher, we can also assist you with requesting a prescription fro Continue reading >>

Tylenol And Enlite Sensors

Tylenol And Enlite Sensors

Can Tylenol (aka Acetaminophen/APAP) be used while using an Enlite sensorI know that with the Dexcom system they advise against Tylenol and Tylenol Products. Also, I have seen Posts here that that address Hydrocodone as well, and there appears to be a mis-understanding about what the different names given to Hydrocodone are, so here is a partial list of what other names Hydrocodone goes by: Also, Tylenol/Acetaminophen is also sometimes called by its chemical make up name(?): APAP, as well as paracetamol. So, if you are having pain and have a Dexcom CGM and you see or are perscribed any of the above or APAP, just remember that Tylenol is involved and you probably should ask for something different for pain. Its not the Hydrocodone thats the problem, its the acetaminophen in the formulation that matters, so ibuprofen versions are no problem (like Vicopofen). When I had dental work, the oral surgeon prescribed Percodin, which has aspirin in it, instead of Percocet. I have heard that the Tylenol problem did not apply to Medtronics older sensors, but have not heard that whether or not the Enlite are affected. Call and ask your pumps tech support? However, if you must take hydocodone it does come in a formulary with Advil. This is a little bit more rare but does work with Dexcom sensors. I have to wait one to two days to refill my script but luckily it is available. Continue reading >>

How Long Does Tylenol (acetaminopen) Affect Cgm Sensors?

How Long Does Tylenol (acetaminopen) Affect Cgm Sensors?

How long does Tylenol (Acetaminopen) affect CGM sensors? D.D. Family T1 since 1985, MM Pump 2013, CGM 2015 How long does Tylenol (Acetaminopen) affect CGM sensors? So, thanks to DD I know that Tylenol affects CGM readings, but how long does that effect linger after taking Tylenol? I rarely take any OTC pain relief, and due to kidney issues I've been told to avoid most, except Tylenol and Aspirin, I already take low-dose Aspirin nightly for my heart. But today I did have some pain in my leg, and a bit of a headache, and finally gave in and took 2 Tylenol. And also this morning my Sensor ended, and it was time to insert a new one. I've waited, as I don't see the point in attempting to calibrate with the Tylenol in my system. But anyone have any guesses as to when I should expect the "all-clear"? Moderator T2 insulin resistant Using Basal/Bolus Therapy I would call my pharmacy where the majority of my prescriptions are filled. My package says not to exceed 4000mg in 24 hours, these being 500 mg tablets but I do not use a CGM. This stuff sure can get tricky! D.D. Family diabetic since 1997, on insulin 2000 I would call my pharmacy where the majority of my prescriptions are filled. My package says not to exceed 4000mg in 24 hours, these being 500 mg tablets but I do not use a CGM. This stuff sure can get tricky! Wow 4000 mg in 24 hours I would be totaled for days thereafter. D.D. Family T1 since 1985, MM Pump 2013, CGM 2015 Wow 4000 mg in 24 hours I would be totaled for days thereafter. 4000 mg is just 8 extra strength pills. Considering that, if I do take any, I usually take 2 at a time, I can easily see taking that amount in a day. But I'm not worried about taking too much. In fact, after taking the two this morning, I didn't take any more. My concern is/was how long befo Continue reading >>

Safety Information

Safety Information

Dexcom G5 Mobile Safety Information Dexcom G4 PLATINUM (Pediatric) Safety Information Dexcom G4 PLATINUM Safety Information Dexcom Share Secondary Displays Safety Information Dexcom SEVEN PLUS Safety Information Dexcom CLARITY Safety Information Dexcom STUDIO Safety Information Dexcom G5 Mobile Continuous Glucose Monitoring System Indications for Use The Dexcom G5 Mobile Continuous Glucose Monitoring System (Dexcom G5) is a glucose monitoring system indicated for the management of diabetes in persons age 2 years and older. The Dexcom G5 is designed to replace fingerstick blood glucose testing for diabetes treatment decisions. Interpretation of the Dexcom G5 results should be based on the glucose trends and several sequential readings over time. The Dexcom G5 also aids in the detection of episodes of hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia, facilitating both acute and long-term therapy adjustments. The Dexcom G5 is intended for single patient use and requires a prescription. Important User Information Failure to use the Dexcom G5 and its components according to the instructions for use and all indications, contraindications, warnings, precautions, and cautions may result in you missing a severe hypoglycemia (low blood glucose) or hyperglycemia (high blood glucose) occurrence and/or making a treatment decision that may result in injury. If your glucose alerts and readings from your Dexcom G5 do not match your symptoms or expectations, use a fingerstick blood glucose value from your blood glucose meter to make diabetes treatment decisions. Seek medical attention when appropriate. Please review the product instructions before using the Dexcom G5. Indications, contraindications, warnings, precautions, cautions, and other important user information can be found in the product instruct Continue reading >>

Direct Evidence Of Acetaminophen Interference With Subcutaneous Glucose Sensing In Humans: A Pilot Study

Direct Evidence Of Acetaminophen Interference With Subcutaneous Glucose Sensing In Humans: A Pilot Study

Direct Evidence of Acetaminophen Interference with Subcutaneous Glucose Sensing in Humans: A Pilot Study 1Endocrine Research Unit, Saint Mary's Hospital, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. 2Immunochemical Core Laboratory, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota. 3Automated Glucose Control LLC, Palo Alto, California. Address correspondence to:, Rita Basu, MD, Endocrine Research Unit, Joseph 5-194, St. Mary's Hospital, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905, E-mail:Email: [email protected] This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Background: Recent advances in accuracy and reliability of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) devices have focused renewed interest on the use of such technology for therapeutic dosing of insulin without the need for independent confirmatory blood glucose meter measurements. An important issue that remains is the susceptibility of CGM devices to erroneous readings in the presence of common pharmacologic interferences. We report on a new method of assessing CGM sensor error to pharmacologic interferences using the example of oral administration of acetaminophen. Materials and Methods: We examined the responses of several different Food and Drug Administrationapproved and commercially available CGM systems (Dexcom [San Diego, CA] Seven Plus, Medtronic Diabetes [Northridge, CA] Guardian, and Dexcom G4 Platinum) to oral acetaminophen in 10 healthy volunteers without diabetes. Microdialysis catheters were placed in the abdominal subcutaneous tissue. Blood and microdialysate samples were collected periodically and analyzed for glucose and acetaminophen concentrations before and after oral ingestion of 1 g of acetaminophen. We compared the response of CGM sensors with the measured acetaminophen concentrations in the blood and interstitial fluid. Res Continue reading >>

Continuous Glucose Monitoring

Continuous Glucose Monitoring

Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) can be a wonderful tool to help people with diabetes manage their blood glucose levels. CGM systems use a thin wire sensor inserted into the fatty tissue just below the skin to detect glucose in the fluid between the cells (called the interstitial fluid). Information from the sensor is transmitted using radio waves to a receiver/monitor, which displays an estimate of the current glucose concentration. An updated glucose reading is provided every one to five minutes, depending on which system is being used, and the system can be set to sound an alarm if the glucose level goes above or below a target range set by the user. The monitor also displays line graphs showing glucose trends over the past several hours. Sensor data can be uploaded to a computer, where compatible software permits detailed analysis of glucose trends over longer time intervals. This type of information can be useful for making both daily decisions about diabetes care and decisions regarding a persons overall diabetes regimen. As helpful as the data from a CGM can be, getting accustomed to using one can take some time and can sometimes be frustrating. This article addresses some of the common questions that come up about CGMs and presents strategies for getting the most from continuous glucose monitoring. A sensor can be inserted anywhere you give an injection or put in a pump infusion set . Ideally, it should be in an area where you can pinch up some skin. Typically, sensors are inserted into the fatty areas of the abdomen, buttocks, thighs, lower back, and arms. They should not be inserted into areas of hypertrophy (scar tissue from giving insulin in the same spot too many times) because they will not work as well in those areas. You should also avoid inserting a Continue reading >>

Abbott Receives Fda Approval For The Freestyle Libre Pro System, A Revolutionary Diabetes Sensing Technology For Healthcare Professionals To Use With Their Patients - Sep 28, 2016

Abbott Receives Fda Approval For The Freestyle Libre Pro System, A Revolutionary Diabetes Sensing Technology For Healthcare Professionals To Use With Their Patients - Sep 28, 2016

Abbott Receives FDA Approval for the FreeStyle Libre Pro System, a Revolutionary Diabetes Sensing Technology for Healthcare Professionals to Use with Their Patients - Freestyle Libre Pro is a continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) system designed to provide a clear, visual snapshot of a patient's glucose levels, trends and patterns for up to 14 days - Requires no fingersticks to calibrate the system -- an advantage over other professional use CGM devices - Significantly lower cost than other professional CGM systems - Consumer version of the technology, FreeStyle Libre, is currently under review by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration ABBOTT PARK, Ill., Sept. 28, 2016 Abbott today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the company's FreeStyle Libre Pro system, a revolutionary continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) system for healthcare professionals to use with their patients with diabetes. FreeStyle Libre Pro system is designed to empower healthcare professionals to provide better diabetes management for diabetes patients. The system provides healthcare professionals with a visual snapshot of glucose data, known as the Ambulatory Glucose Profile (AGP), giving a more simplified and clear overview of not only glucose levels, but also patterns and trends within those levels. This valuable information helps healthcare professionals make better, customized treatment decisions for their patients and for a significantly lower cost than other professional CGM products availablei. Onnearly adaily basis, Eugene E. Wright, Jr., M.D. of DukeSouthern Regional Area Health Education Center in Fayetteville, N.C., finds it challenging to effectively treat his patients with diabetes when it comes to decisions around insulin, nutritionand medication. "My pati Continue reading >>

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