diabetestalk.net

Medtronic Battery Life

Longevity Of Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators: A Comparison Among Manufacturers And Over Time

Longevity Of Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators: A Comparison Among Manufacturers And Over Time

Longevity of implantable cardioverter defibrillators: a comparison among manufacturers and over time We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in. The ePub format is best viewed in the iBooks reader. You may notice problems with the display of certain parts of an article in other eReaders. Generating an ePub file may take a long time, please be patient. Longevity of implantable cardioverter defibrillators: a comparison among manufacturers and over time Simon von Gunten, Beat A. Schaer, [...], and Dominic A.M.J. Theuns Longevity of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) is crucial for patients and healthcare systems as replacements impact on infection rates and cost-effectiveness. Aim was to determine longevity using very large databases of two teaching hospitals with a high number of replacements and a rather homogeneous distribution among manufacturers. The study population consists of all patients in whom an ICD was inserted in. All ICD manufacturers operating in Switzerland and the Netherlands and all implanted ICDs were included. Implantable cardioverter defibrillator replacements due to normal battery depletion were considered events, and other replacements were censored. Longevity was assessed depending on manufacturers, pacing mode, implant before/after 2006, and all parameters combined. We analysed data from 3436 patients in whom 4881 ICDs [44.2% VVI-ICDs, 27.4% DDD-ICDs, 26.3% cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT)-ICDs, 2.0% subcutaneous ICDs] were implanted. The four major manufacturers had implant shares between 18.4 and 31.5%. Replacement due to battery depletion (27.4%) was performed for 1339 ICDs. Patient su Continue reading >>

Neurostimulation For Chronic Pain Faqs - Medtronic Neuromodulation

Neurostimulation For Chronic Pain Faqs - Medtronic Neuromodulation

What is neurostimulation and how does it work? Neurostimulation is a proven, effective, reversible treatment alternative when other pain treatments provide unsatisfactory relief. Results may vary from patient to patient. Neurostimulation uses a small system, surgically placed under the skin, to send mild electrical impulses to the spinal cord or to a peripheral nerve via a special medical wire. These impulses block the pain signals from reaching the brain. Because neurostimulation works in the area where pain signals travel, its electrical impulses (which are felt as tingling) can be directed to cover the specific sites where you are feeling pain. Neurostimulation can decrease the need for pain medications. Will I hear or feel the neurostimulation system inside me, and will people notice it? The neurostimulator is usually implanted in the lower abdomen or buttock, where it is most comfortable and least visible. The device does not make any noise. It may be felt as a small bulge under your skin but it does not normally show through your clothes. The device ranges from 61 millimetres (mm) by 76 mm, to 56 mm by 61 mm or 49 mm by 65mm, depending on which system you receive. It is 15 mm to 10.16mm thick and weighs 42 grams (g) to 83 g. If your doctor recommends a radio-frequency system, the transmitter will be visible and is usually worn on the belt like a pager. In addition, an antenna must be placed on your skin for the system to work. Will I be able to adjust my neurostimulation system? The totally implantable system has a patient programmer (similar to a computer mouse) that allows you to adjust the stimulation produced by the neurostimulation system. In the external system, a transmitter similar to a pager is used to adjust the system. This transmitter, with an antenna Continue reading >>

Short Battery Life Of Cardiac Devices: A Scandal?

Short Battery Life Of Cardiac Devices: A Scandal?

Short Battery Life of Cardiac Devices: A Scandal? Cardiologists disagree but point to strategies to maximize use by Nicole Lou, Reporter, MedPage Today/CRTonline.org The short battery life of cardiac devices, such as pacemakers and implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs), is a "scandal," two cardiologists argued. A depleted device leads to replacement procedures and the increased odds of infection that go along with them, so it is "critical that we prolong the life of implantable devices as much as possible," John Dean, MD, of Royal Devon and Exeter Hospital, and Neil Sulke, MD , of Eastbourne Hospital, both in the U.K., wrote online in BMJ. Faisal M. Merchant, MD , of Emory Healthcare in Atlanta, agreed, telling MedPage Today in a telephone interview that "the more times you change the battery, the more the patient is exposed to risks such as infection. And the risk is cumulative, so every time you do it, the risk goes up a little more." He added that the problem with pacemakers and ICDs today is that "the battery technology is not there the way it is for other devices, like cell phones." Device manufacturers may have had a hand in that, according to Dean and Sulke. "The current financial model discourages the development of longer life devices. Increasing longevity would reduce profits for manufacturers, implanting physicians, and their institutions," they explained, suggesting why "it is hardly surprising that longer life devices do not exist." However, "I don't know that the financial incentives are so misaligned that it's a scandal," Merchant countered. "It implies that there's some sort of collusion on the part of the device companies. There may be some truth to that, but if a manufacturer came out with a device with a longer battery life that would actual Continue reading >>

Medtronic Drops The Ball On Pacemakers - | Seeking Alpha

Medtronic Drops The Ball On Pacemakers - | Seeking Alpha

I have a pacemaker. I have always used Medtronic (NYSE: MDT ) or Guidant ( GDT ) devices in the past. In 2005, biventricular pacing, aka cardiac resyncronization therapy (CRT), was a new and somewhat controversial approach to improving cardiac function. My cardiac function was declining, and so I convinced my surgeons to implant a Medtronic CRT device. As a result of this pacer, I went from not being able to jog, to doing 5ks. I am absolutely convinced that CRT is a powerful approach to heart failure in certain cases, and I was very pleased with Medtronic for developing this technology. However pacemakers do not last forever, and the Medtronic device that I had implanted in 2005 was nearing end of life after approximately 5yrs, 4m. When I visited my physician I was told that Medtronic had a device, but it was a 2006 device. They were awaiting approval for new devices. I was told however that the Medtronic device and the similiar St. Jude (NYSE: STJ ) devices were not very different. Not being satisfied with this anwser, I set about my own research. St. Jude's latest pacemaker-CRT device, the Anthem CRT-P, was released in 2009, not 2006 like Medtronic's device. Additionally, St. Jude's device has an average expected life of 7.8 yrs and in some cases patients are experiencing up to 10yrs life. Additionally, biventricular pacers may need "optimization" in pace timing between the atrial and two ventricular lead pacings. Traditionally this had to be accomplished using a echocardiogram guided assesment of ejection fraction with various timing settings. However St Jude's Anthem device uses an intracardiac electrogram method of optimization, tradenamed QuickOpt, which can be done in a routine device interogation without the need for an additional, expensive, and time consuming Continue reading >>

Boston Scientific Takes On Medtronic, Launches Upgraded Implantable Defibrillators With Longer Battery Life

Boston Scientific Takes On Medtronic, Launches Upgraded Implantable Defibrillators With Longer Battery Life

Boston Scientific takes on Medtronic, launches upgraded implantable defibrillators with longer battery life Boston Scientific's Dynagen EL--Courtesy of Boston Scientific Industry players are scrambling to differentiate their implantable cardioverter defibrillators that deliver electric shocks to correct abnormal heart rhythms in patients with ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation. Medtronic ($MDT) has touted studies showing that its devices produce fewer unnecessary shocks than the industry norm and are easy to program. Today, it's Boston Scientific's ($BSX) turn. The company announced the launch of ICDs with a battery life of 12 years, or as much as double that of competitors. The upgraded "extended longevity" ICD models are the Dynagen EL and Inogen EL. "Battery longevity has a direct impact on patient outcomes and the cost of care," said Dr. Samir Saba in a statement. He implanted the first extended-release longevity ICD at The University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. "The EL ICD is an important advancement that can help minimize the frequency of avoidable replacement procedures to help reduce costs and the potential for replacement-related complications," he added. Boston Scientific also said its ICDs are 11% smaller and 24% thinner than Medtronic's Evera XT. The press release cites a variety of studies, including one based on a Danish ICD data registry and another that followed patients on devices made by Boston Scientific, St. Jude Medical ($STJ) and, you guessed it, Medtronic. "Boston Scientific is proud to build upon the world's most innovative ICD technology with the world's smallest ICD, the world's longest-lasting ICD and the world's only subcutaneous ICD," said Joe Fitzgerald, the president of the company's rhythm management unit. The company's cardiac rh Continue reading >>

Icd Manufacturers Must Increase Battery Life To Cut Costs, Improve Care

Icd Manufacturers Must Increase Battery Life To Cut Costs, Improve Care

Feature | July 31, 2012| Mike Vintges, Novation ICD Manufacturers Must Increase Battery Life to Cut Costs, Improve Care Implantable cardioverter defibrillator battery longevity has big impact on healthcare costs Without a doubt, implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICD) and cardiac resynchronization therapy devices with integrated defibrillators (CRT-D) have made a positive impact on millions of individuals by slowing the progression of heart failure and giving patients better health and quality of life. Studies have shown that earlier intervention in heart failure patients can significantly decrease hospitalization rates and many patients now receive cardiac rhythm management (CRM) devices at a younger age than in the past.[1] In fact, between 35 and 45 percent of patients with an ICD of CRT-D are under the age of 65. Despite these clear benefits and the work that CRM device manufacturers have done to enhance their products, there are still strides to be made, especially in the battery life of devices. Historically, ICT and CRT-D devices have needed to be replaced every three to seven years as the device's battery life deteriorates. Consequently, it is not unusual for patients to require several device replacements over their lifetime meaning additional costly procedures and increased risk of complications with each procedure. As the baby boomer population in the United States continues to age, and the average life expectancy in the United States increases to 76 years for men and 81 years for women, the number of patients who would benefit from a CRM device will grow exponentially. For the average patient whose CRT-D or ICD device lasts three to five years, this could result in two to four device change-outs over their lifetime. Device change-outs can often be com Continue reading >>

Www.realitycheck.org.au

Www.realitycheck.org.au

This is a secure and safe place for people to bitch, moan, argue, or rejoice (yes, really) about having Type 1 Diabetes. If something has inspired you or enraged you, here's your opportunity to let everyone know. How long does the battery last after it goes down to the last charge block on the medtronic meter? I've been on the last block for 1 week and not sure when i should change it. Does it warn you before it dies completely, i don't want to be sleeping when it drains out My batteries usually last about a week to 9 days once the last bar appears on the screen on my Medtronic Veo. Thanks, does it beep or alarm you an hour or so before it dies? I find batteries highly unpredictable - I've gone from 3/4 full to empty in a few hours, and also had a 1/4 full one last for ages. Since I don't like to carry huge amounts of gear with me all the time, I change at half full, so I don't need to carry spares unless I'll be away from civilisation. Am trying to remember when the alarm happens. I have certainly been woken at night by it, but I can't remember whether it was the Doomsday alarm (your pump is dead, your pump is dead), or a warning one. Haven't had a dead battery situation with this particular pump, so probably can't help much. I find it depends on the battery type. If i buy a cheap one from the Reject shop as an example I might get 2 - 4 weeks, other high strength ones tends I usually keep an eye on the battery mark as once you get in the last third it tends to decrease quite rapidly. I agree mine beeps if it runs out just out of coincidence, my battery died at 4am today and it woke me up with a few beeps by straygaijin Sat Jul 07, 2012 12:50 pm I only change it when it gives me the warning - it can stay on 1 bar for weeks. Typically I am getting 6 weeks or so out of a Continue reading >>

6 Battery Tips For Keeping Your Insulin Pump Powered Up

6 Battery Tips For Keeping Your Insulin Pump Powered Up

Home Education and Information 6 Battery Tips For Keeping Your Insulin Pump Powered Up 6 Battery Tips For Keeping Your Insulin Pump Powered Up Posted by Naomi Ruperto On October 8, 2012 In Education and Information Ive always believed that as a person with diabetes its important to take what I learn and share this information with others. I have many times benefited by being on the receiving end and learning from my friends with diabetes. I like to use my blog posts as a way to educate and share interesting tips, but to also share my personal experiences (even if it means sharing my mistakes, like Im about to) Last night I got a Low Battery alert on my insulin pump and I knew this meant my battery had less than 10% of power, so I should change it before bedtime. I grabbed a battery and a quarter from my drawer, changed it out, and quickly did a few more things in my nightly routine, then crawled into bed. As I began to drift off to sleep I realized I forgot to check my blood glucose. So, I pushed the button to turn the backlight on my pump to shine over my glucose meter screen so I could see what I was doing in the dark. Hmmmthats weird; I wonder why my backlight isnt turning on. I turned on my lamp to realize that I put a completely dead battery in my pump before I went to sleep. Based on this experience and many others in my almost 10 years of changing pump batteries, here are some tips: 1) When you put a battery in your pump make sure to double check that its working. 2) Use a new AAA alkaline battery, not carbon zinc or lithium. You can use any brand, but we recommend Energizer for the best performance. 3) Use a coin such as a nickel or a quarter to open the battery cap when you change it out instead of sharp objects, like a knife. 4) The average life span of a bat Continue reading >>

Problems With Medtronic 670g: (

Problems With Medtronic 670g: ("beginner's Frustration" And Reps Promising That Will Eventually Go Away...)

Problems with Medtronic 670G: ("Beginner's frustration" and reps promising that will eventually go away...) I have been an Animas/Dexcom customer for years. Upon receiving word that Animas was going out of business, I wanted to switch to another pump. I heard about the closed loop system that Medtronic offered via the 670G. I was really excited about it. I started using the 670G 2 weeks ago, and Ive been very unhappy with certain aspects of it well, thats putting it nicely. To be honest I actually hate this system so far I met with a Medtronic rep today to help adjust some of my pump settings. She told me that "everyone hates the 670G in the beginning and that its even more difficult when youve been a good diabetic who likes to micromanage your care* but to give it about a month and I will eventually love it! Im still having roller coaster ups and downs, so the celebrated function of the 670G makes no difference to me right now. The complaints at this point outweigh the good. A few nights ago, my 670G told me that I was at a BG of 60 and dropping. I ate a snack, but felt a bit suspicious given my symptoms. Upon testing a finger stick (before the snack even had time to sink in) I discovered that I was (actually) at a high BG of 434. I tried to re-calibrate, and this caused a sensor fail. What I really dont like about the 670G is the Gaurdian sensor system. In addition to the fails, there is not an adequate amount of warning time before it suddenly expires and needs to be replaced. I actually have to keep track of a separate, tiny, battery powered charger and when I change my sensor, place the transmitter in the charger for what feels like a long time before it is inserted. I THEN wait the additional [2 hours] for the warm up period,(not a fun experience when a sensor fa Continue reading >>

Medtronic Recalls Insync Iii Pacemakers Due To Power-failure Problem

Medtronic Recalls Insync Iii Pacemakers Due To Power-failure Problem

Medtronic recalls InSync III pacemakers due to power-failure problem Medtronic says battery problem affects 3 models of discontinued InSync III. The first unexpected power failure in a Medtronic InSync III pacemaker didn't set off the alarm bells. But by the fourth time, doctors at the Minneapolis Heart Institute knew they had to act quickly. They took their concerns about the discontinued-but-popular pacemaker to Medtronic in late September, after a fourth device among the 448 InSync IIIs implanted at the institute had a power failure. By Thanksgiving, Minnesota-run Medtronic had issued a recall for nearly 100,000 of the devices worldwide, including all 22,000 that still rest in patients' chests. As many as 162 of the devices fewer than 1 percent may fail because of the power trouble, a Medtronic spokeswoman confirmed. The recall affects three models of the InSync III 8042, 8042B and 8042U. In letters posted online last week by regulators in the United States and overseas, Medtronic acknowledged that its InSync III pacemakers have a higher-than-expected rate of power output failures. But a relatively low failure rate made the problem difficult to detect. "Sometimes you could have random failure, and you don't know if this is an isolated event. When we started to see two, three, and then four patients affected by potentially the same problem, that's when we took it straight to [Medtronic]," said Dr. Jay Sengupta, a heart doctor with in the Minneapolis Heart Institute's Pacemaker and ICD Follow Up Clinic Program. Header here here97,000 advanced InSync III pacemakers are being recalled by Medtronic. Medtronic's cardiac device division in Mounds View is handling the worldwide recall, including about 9,300 implanted units in the United States. "Due to the unpredictable nat Continue reading >>

Replacing Your Medtronic Neurostimulator For Chronic Pain | Medtronic

Replacing Your Medtronic Neurostimulator For Chronic Pain | Medtronic

Spinal Cord Stimulation for Intractable Chronic Pain Spinal cord stimulation systems are designed to last for several years without replacement. Neurostimulators may need to be replaced if the device malfunctions or if the battery depletes. Some neurostimulators have rechargeable batteries and others have non-rechargeable batteries. The battery life of a nonrechargeable neurostimulator depends on the model and individual usage. Why settle for anything but the best? When talking about a replacement neurostimulation system with your doctor, be sure to ask about the Intellis spinal cord stimulation system, which sets the new standard for managing chronic pain. The Intellis system eliminates a top concern for many patients: issues related to battery or recharge. Powered by Medtronic Overdrive battery technology, the Intellis system features fast battery recharge, minimal loss of capacity over time, and the smallest size device ideal for an active lifestyle. Sometime in the future, you may need an MRI* to diagnose an unrelated condition. The Intellis spinal cord stimulation system uses Medtronic SureScan MRI technology so you can have an MRI anywhere on your body just like a patient without an implanted neurostimulator. The Intellis system with Medtronic AdaptiveStim technology automatically adjusts the therapy as you move your body. Delivers personalized treatment based on seven unique body positions Increases or decreases stimulation to provide optimal pain relief Tracks your daily movement to help your physician assess your progress and, if needed, adjust the stimulation Your treatment-related information, including your daily movement log and spine images, is stored on your Intellis device, so it's with you wherever you go. Provides activity information captured by Adap Continue reading >>

Medtronic 640 - Battery

Medtronic 640 - Battery

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Hello. Would anyone mind telling me how long the battery lasts on their medtronic pump? My daughters seems to need a new one every 2 or 3 days. Thanks About a week. But I've probably got the screen displaying a bit too long. There are decent warnings that that battery doesn't have long left, just make sure to include a spare battery in your pump kit. Also, instead of using the AA batteries that Medtronic supply, use the Energizer Lithium batteries that you can buy in supermarkets. They last significantly longer. Wow that's not long at all, mine lasts about 3 weeks, I would call Medtronic and ask them if this is a technical issue with the pump, 2-3 days is not good, if there is a technical issue then they should resolve this for you. Mine lasts for around a week, but it does depend on how often you keep activating the screen, press buttons etc... But also as catapillar suggests, the screen duration could be on to long too. I agree with @Juicyj , contact Medtronic to let them know of a possible fault. I use the Enlite sensor along with the 640G which is supposed to reduce the battery life even further. I get about a fortnight from Medtronic's batteries and around a month with lithium ones, so it does look like there could be a problem with your daughter's pump. Continue reading >>

Insulin Pumps | Customer Support - Medtronic Diabetes Ireland

Insulin Pumps | Customer Support - Medtronic Diabetes Ireland

high basal rates excessive button pressing, bolusing and priming frequent lost sensor/weak signal alerts (sensor feature) LOW GLUCOSE AND PREDICTIVE SUSPEND FEATURES What is the low glucose suspend feature on the MiniMed 640G and the MiniMed Veo insulin pump? The low glucose suspend feature is a continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) feature to help people who may have a fear of hypoglycaemia or hypoglycaemia unawareness. If the feature is turned on, the pump automatically suspends insulin infusion for 2 hours when glucose levels reach a pre-determined threshold and, without intervention, will resume basal insulin delivery to its pre-set rate. All other sensor functions remain operational during insulin suspension. What should I do if the low glucose suspend feature is triggered on the MiniMed 640G and the MiniMed Veo insulin pump? If you DO NOT respond to the alarm, the pump suspends insulin delivery, sounds a siren alarm and displays I have diabetes, call for emergency assistance. The pump suspends insulin delivery for 2 hours. After 2 hours pump resumes basal insulin delivery. If blood glucose (BG) is still low 4 hours after resuming basal, insulin delivery re-suspends. If you DO respond to the alarm, you can choose to suspend or resume basal insulin delivery. If you resume basal delivery then your pump will continue to deliver insulin. If you choose to suspend, the pump suspends insulin delivery as above. When the Low Glucose Suspend feature is triggered the pump sirens to ensure the alarm is heard and acted upon. Why does insulin delivery stop for 2 hours and resume for 4 hours on the MiniMed 640G and the MiniMed Veo insulin pump? The two hour period is based on clinical evidence and allows blood glucose to return to normal. The 4 hour period for resuming insulin del Continue reading >>

Medtronic Deep Brain Stimulation Therapy Lunch & Learns

Medtronic Deep Brain Stimulation Therapy Lunch & Learns

Medtronic Deep Brain Stimulation Therapy Lunch & Learns Medtronic DBS series includes Battery Longevity Clinic and Behind the Surgical Curtain By Karen Hales, Neurology Solutions Contributing Writer Medtronic has scheduled a series of lunch and learns for implanted and new patients considering Deep Brain Stimulation implant surgery in the Austin area. The Lunch and Learns include a Battery Longevity Clinic for implanted patients from 10 a.m. to noon and Behind the Surgical Curtain for new patients from noon to 2 p.m. The Medtronic Deep Brain Stimulation lunch and learns are scheduled for March 24, May 26, June 23 and July 28 at Homewood Suites by Hilton Austin-Arboretum/NW, 10925 Stonelake Blvd. in Austin. There is no fee. Seating is limited. RSVP to [email protected] . Medtronic is one of two device companies that has FDA approved deep brain stimulation devices , used in the treatment of Parkinsons disease, essential tremor, dystonia and other neurological syndromes affecting mobility. DBS involves implanting an electrode in the brain and connecting it with an extension wire to an implantable pulse generator (IPG), which is a pacemaker-like device or battery most often placed in the chest. The Battery Longevity Clinic will assist DBS patients in planning and scheduling the procedure to replace the battery in their IPG. DBS battery life is predictable per Medtronic documentation, as each brain target has ranges for stimulation intensity for symptom relief. Using more stimulation than needed will put increased demand on the battery and decrease battery life. A Medtronic specialist will assist patients with DBS in estimating the longevity of their battery life so they can plan when to undergo a replacement procedure. Behind the Surgical Curtian will help those Continue reading >>

Management Of Deep Brain Stimulator Battery Failure: Battery Estimators, Charge Density, And Importance Of Clinical Symptoms

Management Of Deep Brain Stimulator Battery Failure: Battery Estimators, Charge Density, And Importance Of Clinical Symptoms

Management of Deep Brain Stimulator Battery Failure: Battery Estimators, Charge Density, and Importance of Clinical Symptoms Affiliation Departments of Neurology and Neurosurgery, University of Florida Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration, Gainesville, Florida, United States of America Affiliation Departments of Neurology and Neurosurgery, University of Florida Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration, Gainesville, Florida, United States of America Affiliation Departments of Neurology & Neurosurgery, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, United States of America Affiliation Departments of Neurology and Neurosurgery, University of Florida Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration, Gainesville, Florida, United States of America Affiliation Departments of Neurology and Neurosurgery, University of Florida Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration, Gainesville, Florida, United States of America Affiliation Departments of Neurology and Neurosurgery, University of Florida Center for Movement Disorders and Neurorestoration, Gainesville, Florida, United States of America Continue reading >>

More in diabetes