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Medtronic 630g Review

New Medtronic 630g - 3 Hour Review (first Impressions) : Diabetes

New Medtronic 630g - 3 Hour Review (first Impressions) : Diabetes

by tubetraveller T1 1999 Medtronic 670g/CGM I received my new pump, Medtronic's latest, about 2 weeks ago. Unfortunately I had to travel for work on back-to-back weeks and didn't want to be going through a learning curve while out of town. So, this morning I finally sat down and spent some time to get it going. I know it would have been faster/easier to have a Medtronic rep. help me through it, but it's honestly not that complicated. The first thing that jumps out is size. It's big. I'm not sure what historical precedent there is when a new technological device is larger than the one it is replacing. Imagine if the next macbook was thicker than the one it was replacing - there'd be outrage. If you put on the silicone case that Medtronic is nice enough to provide to you, it's even bigger. It's honestly, without exaggeration, easier to conceal a handgun than it is to conceal this pump. If this was something about which I was aware, it might have dissuaded me from moving to this device. With its larger size, I worry it's going to get clunked on things easier - which will bring up questions of its durability. To help prevent this, you can put on the silicone case, but then it's even bigger - catch 22 in effect. The plastic is glossy compared to the matte finish of previous models - which will surely show more scratches and dings than its predecessor. It now carries an AA battery, versus the AAA of the previous model. I'm not sure if this is due to increased power demand of the larger color screen, or if it is to extend the time between battery changes. Time will tell, but it's a minor weight penalty. As for functionality, it operates pretty-much the same. The menus take a little bit to get used to, now that you have more options than just the UP/DOWN/ESC/ACT buttons of the Continue reading >>

Minimed 630g Review

Minimed 630g Review

630G Introduction MiniMed 630G seemed to be the pump for Champ. We looked at Animus, the TSlim X2, Insulet Omnipod, and a couple more. The one that settled best with me was the MiniMed630G. We chose MiniMed630G because in the summer (ish), Medtronic is scheduled to release a new system called Medtronic MiniMed 670G/Enlite 3 Hybrid Closed Loop. We did not get the Closed Loop system yet since it isn’t FDA approved. Although, as soon as it comes to market, we will give back our MiniMed630G, and Medtronic will replace it with the full Closed Loop System! (That was tedious to type, let alone say it out loud). The Why One reason I chose the MiniMed630G at this time, was knowing the Closed Loop system is coming. That should be a huge milestone for my ten year old, T1D, Champ! The pump will shut off when he is active, heading into low blood sugar land. The CGM, will communicate with the pump. This new CGM system is said to be as precise as the Dexcom G5! Another reason I chose the MiniMed630G is because it is “waterproof.” While I don’t want to test this out for ourselves (it is supposed to last twenty-four hours in water), I am assured that I no longer will have to whisk Champ out of the rain. In the past, anything wet sent me into a tizzy, “Get away from the water! You are too close! Don’t you dare ruin your pump!” See what I mean? Those outbursts are most likely embarrassing for Champ and myself. Thus, now I can take a deep breath of relaxation, “It is waterproof.” On the other hand, Champ wanted to wear it swimming and in the shower. To this end, I replied, “No!” I just don’t want to tempt fate with such a precious device. Another Why is the new MiniMed630G has a new option of putting insulin in the body faster than the older MiniMed Revel that we ha Continue reading >>

Our Decision To Switch To Medtronic Minimed 630g Insulin Pump – Part 1

Our Decision To Switch To Medtronic Minimed 630g Insulin Pump – Part 1

A few months ago, I was at home with the kids, and didn’t feel quite right. After a quick fingerstick, I saw that I was in the 20’s. In a panic, I couldn’t get anyone on the phone to talk with me until my sugars came up. I began to “eat the kitchen”, as it were. I finally reached my sister-in-law, who came to sit with the kids until I could get back to myself again. After that day, I was scared out of my mind to go below 100 if I was at home with the kids by myself. So, I started running my numbers higher — much higher than I’m comfortable with, and I knew I would be risking damage doing so. That’s when I realized, Dexcom Share wasn’t enough. It’s great to be able to Share and have people call to check on you… but what if they can’t actually reach you? My son and daughter can’t use my iPhone just yet (he can’t remember my unlock code), and neither know how to use a glucagon kit. I looked into the Loop system, but honestly, while I love that everyone is so willing to jump on board, I’m not. I’m not confident in my own abilities to make this thing happen since it’s something done from home. I don’t mind tinkering and playing with Nightscout because it’s not directly affecting my insulin dosing, whereas the Loop system does. That’s a-okay if you’re on it – I’m not trying to down the system or anything. I’m just not comfortable with the idea of using it myself. So, we looked into Medtronic. I know. It’s known as the big evil empire of the insulin pump world. And, while I am interested in the 670G, I was more interested it the 630G since it suspends insulin if the user is low. I know this is the exact same technology as 530G, but somewhere along the way, they’ve improved the CGM technology. I kept reading about how sucky th Continue reading >>

Pros & Cons Of The Medtronic Minimed 630g With Enlite

Pros & Cons Of The Medtronic Minimed 630g With Enlite

Unique Advantages: Pros Large, secure, long-established company Industry leader in R & D Data from Medtronic Enlite CGM displayed on-screen Automatic basal shutoff when low glucose detected by sensor (may help prevent severe hypos) High-contrast full-color screen Optional “Connect” feature for sharing CGM data on smartphones Slim attachable clip Integrated meter serves as remote control for bolusing Frequently used boluses & temp basals can be stored as “presets” Easily downloadable to online Carelink program Choice of slow or fast bolus delivery Generates insulin/carb/BG statistics “Airplane Mode” option CGM accuracy, longevity, transmission range, ease-of-use considered inferior to competitors Automatic low-suspend feature may be disruptive and counter-productive Must pay for loaner/backup pumps Insulin-on-board only deducted from correction boluses Attached clip is upside-down Downloading restricted to Carelink program Screen and text are relatively small Multiple menus and programming can be complex to master Lots of button-pushing and confirmation steps with basic programming Company’s marketing can be overly aggressive Continue reading >>

If You’re In The Us, Is The Medtronic 630g Really Worth It?

If You’re In The Us, Is The Medtronic 630g Really Worth It?

If you take a look at the Facebook page for the Medtronic 640G, you’d be forgiven for thinking that the US has something similar available, and it’s called the Medtronic 630G. You’d also think that the new 630G is a brilliant new innovation and that it does some amazing things. But if you think that, then you’d better go and double check what you’re getting. Why you might as well “Just say ‘No thanks'”…. The marketing bumph from Medtronic includes a helpful side by side comparison of the 630G and the 530G, and you can take a look at it here. If you’ve been told that the 630G is like the 640G, then it’s worth you taking a look at this document. From this you’ll see that it is in fact a 530G in new, waterproof clothes, with the ability to do a remote bolus, name your basal profiles, colour screen and loss of the Connect functionality. Sure, it has a colour screen and a different menu, which I’m rather a fan of, but it doesn’t do a great deal more than your old pump, or even a 522 before it. What it doesn’t do is the clever SmartGuard stuff that we get in Europe. The “Predictive Low Glucose Suspend”, which, if you read pretty much every user’s review of the 640G, is the stand out feature. For me and many others, this is the halfway house to an artificial pancreas. Let’s just reiterate this, this is not what the 630G does. So unless you really need to get the waterproofing capabilities of the 630G, or the remote bolus, my view is that you should wait to upgrade. Just say no to the 630G. Why? The 670G… No, it isn’t. But it’s going through the FDA approval process now. The Critical Trial that Medtronic published earlier in September provides some great results, and comparing those to the OpenAPS data that was in the wild was positiv Continue reading >>

Medtronic Minimed 670g System Review

Medtronic Minimed 670g System Review

After months of waiting, I finally received the world’s first hybrid closed loop system, the Minimed 670G system. Medtronic’s Minimed 670G system is an insulin pump and continuous glucose monitor that also has technology to put you in “auto” mode where it will automatically adjust your basal insulin every 5 minutes based on your blood sugar levels. I’ve had the system for about two weeks now so I thought I’d share my thoughts on it. I’m going to break this down into two posts because I feel the auto mode review needs it’s on page. I’ve been with Medtronic and on an insulin pump since 1997, 20 years! For most of the 20 years, the insulin pump has looked the exact same. It has “mainly” had the same features and not a lot of technology advancements. This new pump, however, is completely different than anything Medtronic has released in the last 20 years, with one caveat that they did release the Minimed 630G a few months prior. I received the Minimed 630G as part of the Minimed 670G Priority Access Group. In case you weren’t aware, Medtronic released a new pump, the 630G, last year and a few weeks (or months, not positive on the timing), the FDA approved their 670G pump faster than they realized. To not waste all the millions of dollars they probably spent on the 630G, they started a Priority Access Group for the 670G where you had to get the 630G first and then once the 670G was released, you could be the first to get it. The stars aligned for me where my pump went out of warranty last year and I had reached my out of pocket max because of the birth of my baby, so I was able to get the 630G for free! I never did use the 630G though because the new design of the pump sort of scared me and I was happy with my old pump. Because I never used the 630G, Continue reading >>

Fda Approves Medtronic’s Minimed 630g System, Ships In September

Fda Approves Medtronic’s Minimed 630g System, Ships In September

By Brian Levine and Adam Brown Adds waterproof, color screen, and remote meter bolus. Will it speed FDA review of the 670G hybrid closed loop? Earlier this month, Medtronic unexpectedly announced FDA approval of the MiniMed 630G. This pump offers the same threshold (low glucose) suspend algorithm as the MiniMed 530G with Enlite, but on the company’s next-gen pump platform – adding a color screen, waterproofing, remote bolusing from the Contour Next Link glucose meter, more alarm customization, insulin on board displayed on the home screen, and other key improvements listed in the table below. The pump is approved for people 16 years and up and will begin shipping in September. Medtronic has more information posted on its website. There was a lot of confusion in the diabetes community about this product and why it is launching, so some common questions are answered below. Can current Medtronic pumpers upgrade to the 630G? Yes, but it is pricey and not covered by insurance if the pump being upgraded is less than four years old. The out of pocket cost to upgrade to the 630G is $599 for Medtronic pumps purchased after May 1, 2016 and $3,100 for pumps purchased before May 1, 2016 (assuming the old pump is sent in to Medtronic). Current MiniMed 530G/Enlite users who want the 630G’s Enlite CGM integration will also need to buy a new transmitter for $511. How does this compare to the 640G (predictive low glucose suspend) available in Europe and the MiniMed 670G (hybrid closed loop) under FDA review? The MiniMed 630G is the same pump platform as the 640G and 670G, meaning it has the same overall pump body design, waterproofing, screen, buttons, etc. However, the 630G has the simplest control algorithm in it: suspending basal insulin delivery when the low threshold is cross Continue reading >>

Product Review: The Minimed 630g System

Product Review: The Minimed 630g System

By Phyllis Kaplan, MiniMed Ambassador, living with type 1 diabetes After 16 years of using insulin pump therapy with Medtronic Diabetes, I was excited to see the updated design of the MiniMed® 630G system. After seeing pictures online, I thought the new insulin pump looked bigger, and I wondered if the new system was much different than my MiniMed® 530G system. I did have some doubts about upgrading, but in the end, the appeal of being able to bolus from the meter, the larger screen, and options to change the volume, won me over. Prior to receiving the new system, I assumed that it would be fairly easy to understand and almost like getting used to a new phone, but I was still anxious about it. It turns out my assumption was correct. The MiniMed 630G system has been easy for me to get used to and just makes sense to me. The day I met with my trainer, as she walked me through setting everything up, I kept thinking “Wow, this is awesome.” One thing I appreciate is the polished, current look and feel. On top of what the new MiniMed 630G system looks like, there are also so many other features that I really like. Here are a few of my favorites: 1) The home screen: I call this screen “diabetes at a glance,” as it's easy to see and find the things we tend to use most often: CGM data: I didn’t think it was hard to find the CGM information on the MiniMed 530G system, but being able to see the CGM reading and graph from this screen feels right. The CGM data now includes sensor graphs, so you don’t need to wait to upload to CareLink® software to see this representation of the data. Active insulin: It’s wonderful to see active insulin right on the main screen! No more going through several menus and multiple button clicks! Bolus and basal: With the click of a butto Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump Rundown

Insulin Pump Rundown

Choosing an insulin pump doesn’t have to be an overwhelming process. Should you go with a more traditional pump where you can monitor your insulin levels directly? Are you looking for a model that works with a BGM monitor and allows you to administer insulin via a remote? Maybe you need a pump that offers integration with a CGM system. What about size? Color? To use tubes or not to use tubes? Presenting the options so you can find out what pump best fits your lifestyle is our goal. So, with several models on the market, let us help you sort through the choices by taking a look at what’s available and breaking down the various features of each. We’ve separated the pumps into four categories: pumps that incorporate or work with a Blood Glucose Monitor (BGM) and offer Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM), pumps with just CGM capability, pumps with just a BGM, and standalone pumps that don’t work with a BGM or offer CGM. Hybrid Closed-Loop System The 670 G system is the newest member to the Medtronic pump family and the first hybrid closed-loop system. In other ways, it is a like a “basal modulator” where you have to still bolus but it predicts your basal rate. Every 5 minutes, the auto-mode option (hybrid closed-loop) automatically adjusts basal insulin delivery based on your sugar levels to keep you range. It is excellent at catching lows because it stops your insulin dosage 30 minutes before you reach your pre-selected low limits, then it will automatically restart insulin when your levels recover. Possible concerns: excessive alerts and extended menu that needs clearing. Only approved for ages 14+ because it has a total daily dose requirement of at least 8 units a day. Feeling of loss of control of management with closed-loop system. Pumps with BGM and CGM ca Continue reading >>

Review Of The Medtronic 630g Insulin Pump

Review Of The Medtronic 630g Insulin Pump

I am going to break with tradition and state my recommendation at the outset I love the Medtronic 630G. However, please read the entire story because it is worth knowing my full experience with the pump. Because like with most things there are both good and some not so good parts to owning a new piece of technology. Getting started When the 630G arrived, there were all kinds of warnings about leaving the pump alone until you call the local trainer. So I immediately picked it up and started messing with it. I also called my local representative and explained that I had my new pump, but due to insurance issues, I could not start the sensor for another month. The trainer suggested I proceed with pump only training and then tag on sensor training when I received it. So a few days after receiving the pump I was in class. The day of training went very well. The trainer gets a high five for adapting the class to the learner’s level. She made sure it was valuable for me (I have used Medtronic pumps for 17 years) and my wife who seldom if ever touches my pump. About 30 days later insurance released my sensors, so we took the sensor training in the same place with a different trainer. The sensor trainer was incredibly good. Since I relate everything to the Dexcom experience, she again took me where I was and helped me develop insights about how my new sensor and pump work together. Wearing the pump I love the color screen. The operation of the pump is easy and straightforward if you are familiar with prior Medtronic pumps. But and this is a big “but” there are some new features and ways of doing things so don’t blow off training and expect to run the pump well. I have no doubt I could be running the pump based entirely on what I knew from using the 530G, but I doubt I cou Continue reading >>

An Update On Medtronic’s Minimed 670g System

An Update On Medtronic’s Minimed 670g System

This morning, the Medtronic Diabetes Group held a conference call for a small group of diabetes writers to give an update on its new MiniMed 670G system, otherwise known as the world’s first hybrid closed loop system. Louis Dias, Chief Patient Officer of Medtronic Diabetes and Mike Hill, Vice President of Marketing for Medtronic’s Intensive Insulin Management Business were both on the call, as was Karrie Hawbaker, Senior Manager of Social Media. First, a recap on what the system is and what it does: The MiniMed 670G system is a combination of an insulin pump and a continuous glucose monitor. What sets it apart from its predecessors—and, for that matter, every other pump on the market—is that it can actually give you insulin. This makes it a major step forward toward the goal of a truly closed loop system. How does the 670G system work? Users must program their insulin-to-carb ratios, calibrate the system twice a day with a blood glucose reading from a finger stick, and give the system a “meal announcement” when they’re about to eat by entering the number of grams of carbohydrate that they intend to consume. The system then uses the grams of carbohydrate users have entered and their insulin-to-carb ratio to estimate an initial bolus to cover the meal. In the hours that follow, the system makes tiny tweaks to basal rates in order to get blood sugar levels as close as possible to 120 mg/dL. This means that you don’t need to enter correction boluses and that there’s no longer such thing as dual wave or square boluses—the pump is taking care of it for you. How’s it different from the most recent MiniMed pump? Medtronic Diabetes’s current top-of-the-line pump is the MiniMed 630G system with Enlite Sensor. The 530G uses something called SmartGuard™ te Continue reading >>

Medtronic Continuous Glucose Monitoring With The Elite Sensor Review

Medtronic Continuous Glucose Monitoring With The Elite Sensor Review

You’ve probably heard of the word “CGM” before. If you haven’t and you have stumbled upon this guide as a newbie to the diabetes world, then first, I’d like to welcome you to the club we all never wanted to be a part of, but is amazing nonetheless. Now in case you are unfamiliar, a CGM refers to a Continuous Glucose Monitor. What is a CGM? Continuous glucose monitoring allows you to gain a better, more in depth picture of what your blood sugar levels really are doing. This can help you to not only make better choices when it comes to treatment options, but even help to prevent severe hypo and hyperglycemic episodes. For someone that doesn’t have diabetes, their body is able to track its own glucose levels in the body 24/7 to make sure it secretes just the right amount of insulin at the right time. To successfully manage type 1 or type 2 diabetes it requires constant dosing decisions on when to take insulin, or oral medications. You must take into account the food you’ve eaten, the time this food begins to cause a rise in your blood sugar as well as any activities you may have participated in during the day. As you can see, it can all be rather overwhelming, and not to mention pretty time consuming. That is where a CGM can come in handy. I advise reading the following articles: How Does a CGM Work? A CGM provides you with a way to measure your blood sugar levels over the period of 24 hours without the constant finger sticks. A sensor is inserted just underneath the skin to measure these levels from the fluid in your tissues. It is then attached to a transmitter which allows the sensor to relay this information to your monitoring device or receiver. You can receive alarms on the device if your blood sugar goes too high or drops too low. The latest CGM system Continue reading >>

Newsflash: Medtronic Launches New Minimed 630g System

Newsflash: Medtronic Launches New Minimed 630g System

A new Medtronic insulin pump is now available in the United States, introducing a new des ign and color-screen as part of a complete makeover to these diabetes devices that have fundamentally looked the same for 30 years! Say hello to the Minimed 630G, which Medtronic announced on Thursday after receiving the FDA's Pre-Market Approval on Aug. 10. This news caught many by surprise, as the California pump-CGM company hadn't previewed this product in advance as they typically do before launches. Instead, they've focused on their forthcoming 670G hybrid closed loop system, expected to be the first-gen commercial Artficial Pancreas system to hit market in 2017. A number of users are actually upset that they weren't warned of this interim product launch, because they've recently purchased new products or upgrades. Others were holding out for the future closed loop system. So we're all wondering: Just what is this 630G that we've heard nothing about before? Remember, Medtronic got FDA approval in September 2013 for its 530G that automatically stops insulin delivery once a user crosses a certain low glucose level. That was step one in moving toward closed loop technology. Next up is their Predictive Low Glucose Suspend (PLGS) features that can anticipate oncoming hypos in advance and shut off insulin to prevent them from happening. That's built into the Minimed 640G system that hit the market outside the U.S. in early 2015. Medtronic ultimately decided it would not pursue bringing that device to the U.S., opting instead to leapfrog that model and focus on getting the first hybrid closed loop 670G to market in 2017. So now, it seems we're getting this 630G as a sort of stop-gap device in between the two D-tech generations. Here's a quick glance at the Minimed 630G: Fresh Design: Continue reading >>

Review: Medtronic’s Minimed 630g Insulin Pump

Review: Medtronic’s Minimed 630g Insulin Pump

I have used the Minimed 630G Insulin Pump System by Medtronic for the past 30 days. This review is my opinion of the pump, both positive and negative. I have used insulin pumps since I got my first Disetronic H-Tron V-100 in 1994. I got a Minimed 506 pump in 1998 and have been a fan of the Minimed/Medtronic pumps since. Until now. Minimed 630G Insulin Pump System The Minimed 630G Insulin Pump System comes with the pump, the CGM transmitter, and a Contour Next Link 2.4 blood glucose meter. The three devices work well together, once set up right. Medtronic also has an early access program. This lets you buy the Minimed 630G now, and upgrade to the upcoming Minimed 670G in spring of 2017. Receiving the Pump The 630G Pump comes in several boxes. The pump comes in an 8″x10″x2.25″ box that has the pump and several small items like clips, batteries, a manual, and a quick start guide. Another box of the same size has the Contour Next Link 2.4 meter. A second box arrived a few days later with the infusion sets and reservoirs, followed by another box a few days later with the CGM sensors. I got another box a week later with the CGM transmitter. In the past, the local Medtronic trainer would call me to train me on using the pump, with a request not to use it before the training. I normally ignore this request, since I have used Minimed pumps for so long. I do go to these trainings every once in a while, but I was never contact this time. Unusual, considering how new this version of the pump is. Even so, the pump was fairly easy to set up. I also got a pile of 8.5″x11″ manuals. One was a “previous pump users manual” and one was a “pump users manual’. There was a large manual in the box that had everything in it. And another “how to use the CGM” manual. Quite d Continue reading >>

6 Things You Probably Don’t Know About The New Minimed 630g System

6 Things You Probably Don’t Know About The New Minimed 630g System

You might have already heard about the exciting updates made on our new MiniMed® 630G system, from the remote bolusing option to waterproofing. But when it comes to diabetes tech, sometimes the little things make a big difference. That’s why we listened to the diabetes community and incorporated your feedback throughout the design process. As a result, here are six features/capabilities that are new in the MiniMed 630G system. Intuitive navigation and a new status bar for easy access to your information Your home screen now shows the following: Any BG reading taken within the last 12 minutes (only when CGM isn’t active, otherwise it shows the latest CGM reading) Bolus and basal options Customized Basal Patterns Different insulin needs on sick days or active game days? There are now up to 8 basal patterns which include new settings for Workday, Day Off, and Sick Day. And there are also 8 preset temp basals which include new settings for “High Activity, Moderate Activity, Low Activity, and Sick”. Preset Bolus Option Do you eat the same breakfast every morning? You can save a preset bolus so that with a couple of button pushes you can receive the exact dose of insulin that you know you need. Event Markers and Reminder Options You can now set various event markers to optimize your diabetes management. Account for blood sugar checks, injections, food and exercise all on your pump. This means that when you’re reviewing your data with your doctor, you can have more context to your discussions. You can also set reminders just like you would on your cell phone. You can set personal reminders or things like a reminder to check your blood sugar, complete a bolus, or change your infusion set. Optional Airplane Mode The MiniMed 630G system now offers an airplane mode opti Continue reading >>

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