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Mediterranean Diet Diabetes Study

How The Mediterranean Diet Alone Can Fight Diabetes

How The Mediterranean Diet Alone Can Fight Diabetes

There is no ultimate diet, but if there were, the Mediterranean plan would come darn close. Featuring staples like olive oil, nuts and vegetables, the Mediterranean diet has been heralded as a game changer for health and longevity. Countless studies have connected the eating plan to lower risks of heart attack and stroke and some have suggested the diet can even slow or prevent memory loss. Researchers speculate that the protective benefits likely stem from the combined effect of the diet’s healthy fats and nutrients. Now a new study shows that the Mediterranean diet alone may be enough to reduce the risk of diabetes, without the need to lose weight or exercise. The research, published in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine, involved more than 3,500 elderly adults who were at high risk for heart disease but did not yet have diabetes. The participants were split into three groups. The first ate a Mediterranean diet high in fruits, vegetables, whole grains and fish, and low in red or processed meat, butter and sweets, supplemented with extra-virgin olive oil. The second group had a Mediterranean diet supplemented with nuts, and the final group, the control group, consumed a low-fat diet. All the participants were told that they did not have to restrict calories or increase their physical activity. (MORE: Eat More Mediterranean Foods Now: Your Later Self Will Thank You) After four years, the researchers found that the individuals who developed diabetes were most likely to be in the control group. Of all the participants, 273 developed diabetes; 101 were in the control group. Among those eating the Mediterranean diet, 80 participants in the olive-oil group developed diabetes and 92 in the nut group did. Interestingly, there were no differences in weight loss among the Continue reading >>

Diabetic Mediterranean Diet

Diabetic Mediterranean Diet

She can increase intensity by increasing the weight of those dumbbells Youve heard that sitting is the new smoking, right? Regular physical activity prevents disease and prolongs life. But if you nevertheless still spend to much time sitting around either at work or home, the sitting tends to counteract the benefits of your exercise. A new study says that your fitness level is more important for long-term health than the number of hours you exercise. Fitness level in this context was cardiorespiratory fitness, probably measured by a maximal-effort treadmill or bicycle test. Some of your fitness level is inherited, but you can also improve your fitness with the proper intensity or duration of exercise. Rather than exercise longer, I prefer more intensity. Just strolling around the mall at 2 mph for two hours isnt going to improve fitness in most folks. The team conducted a cross-sectional study of 495 women and 379 men from Norway aged between 70-77 years. Sedentary time and physical activity were assessed by accelerometers, while cardiorespiratory fitness was determined by peak oxygen uptake (VO2 peak) the measurement of the volume of oxygen that the body can utilize during physical exertion. Researchers compared different levels of activity with fitness levels and cardiovascular risk factor clusters. A cardiovascular risk factor cluster was defined as the presence of three to five risk factors for heart disease. These risk factors included: elevated waist circumference, elevated blood triglycerides or reduced good cholesterol levels, high blood pressure or treatment for hypertension, and elevated fasting blood sugar levels combined symptoms commonly referred to as metabolic syndrome. High cardiorespiratory fitness reduced risk of heart diseaseFindings published in May Continue reading >>

Canola-mediterranean Diet Study In T2dm

Canola-mediterranean Diet Study In T2dm

You have reached the maximum number of saved studies (100). Please remove one or more studies before adding more. The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study sponsor and investigators. Listing a study does not mean it has been evaluated by the U.S. Federal Government. Read our disclaimer for details. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02245399 Recruitment Status : Active, not recruiting Information provided by (Responsible Party): Study Description Study Design Arms and Interventions Outcome Measures Eligibility Criteria Contacts and Locations More Information The purpose of the study is to assess whether a Mediterranean-type weight-loss diet, enriched with canola oil, high in plant protein, and low in carbohydrates will produce blood sugar control, reduce coronary heart disease (CHD) risk factors and maximize weight loss, better than conventional higher carbohydrate diets in overweight diabetic patients. Type 2 Diabetes Obesity Overweight Cardiovascular Diseases Behavioral: A canola oil enriched mediterranean diet Behavioral: A high wheat fiber diet The investigators plan to assess the effects of increasing both canola oil and plant protein foods while reducing carbohydrate intake in the context of a Mediterranean type diet on weight loss, glycemic control and cardiovascular risk factors in type 2 diabetes. Obesity rates in Western nations have shown a dramatic rise in the last 20 years and diabetes rates have doubled, a trend which is predicted to be repeated over the next 20 years. In Canada the predicted cost to the healthcare system in only 7 years will rise to $17 billion. Weight loss diets (such as Atkins, Eddies, South Beach and Zone) emphasizing carbohydrate restriction have become increasingly popular for the prevention Continue reading >>

Study: Low-carb Mediterranean Diet Beats Low-fat Diet For Heart Health

Study: Low-carb Mediterranean Diet Beats Low-fat Diet For Heart Health

Study: Low-Carb Mediterranean Diet Beats Low-Fat Diet for Heart Health In a recent study , researchers compared a Mediterranean low-carb diet with a low-fat diet in moderately obese individuals to find that the low-carb diet was better for heart health. Over the course of 18 months, 80 participants were randomly assigned one of the two dietsa Mediterranean style low-carbohydrate diet plus 28 grams of walnuts per day and a calorically equal low-fat diet. The mean age of the participants was 48 and their mean BMI was 31 percent. Both groups had some moderate weight loss but the low-carb group lost more waist circumference, which is important for lowering risks associated with heart disease. The low-carb group also improved their cholesterol levels and had a reduction in pericardial adipose tissue, which is fat that can gather on the heart, increasing heart disease risks. The researchers concluded in their study abstract that The Mediterranean diet, rich in unsaturated fats and restricted carbohydrates, is superior to a [low-fat] diet in terms of the [intrapericardial fat] burden reduction. Get your animal protein from foods like eggs, fish, chicken, and lamb. Fill your plate with non-starchy vegetables. Use herbs, spices, vinegar, and lemon to add flavor to foods. Eat a handful of heart healthy nuts like walnuts, almonds, and pistachios every day. Have legumes if you can handle them. They make great additions to soups and salads. Dont be afraid of olive oil. Get extra-virgin cold pressed olive oil and use liberally on foods. (Dont cook in medium/high or high heat. For cooking use regular olive oil or avocado or coconut oil) For snacks try foods like olives, sardines, nuts, berries, avocado, cucumber, and hummus with vegetables. For fruits, have berries, apples, pears ins Continue reading >>

Mediterranean Diet May Slow Diabetes Progression

Mediterranean Diet May Slow Diabetes Progression

Mediterranean diet may slow diabetes progression NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - For people recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, eating lots of olive oil, fish and whole grains slows progression of the disease more than restricting fat, according to a new analysis. In a trial that followed participants for more than eight years, those following a so-called Mediterranean diet went significantly longer before needing diabetes medication and more of them had their diabetes go into remission, compared to those on a low-fat diet. Theres been lots of epidemiology suggesting that a Mediterranean diet was beneficial with metabolic syndrome and diabetes, Dr. Leanne Olansky told Reuters Health. But this was a randomized controlled trial, so we know it really was the diet causing the results, she said. This is the kind of evidence that we use to determine if drugs are effective. Everybody thinks of fat as being bad, but this shows that it depends on what kind of fat, said Olansky, an endocrinologist at the Cleveland Clinic who was not involved in the new study. People diagnosed with diabetes should aim to have a healthy diet, and a Mediterranean diet is a good, healthy option, lead study author Katherine Esposito told Reuters Health in an email. Cutting calories is important, and cutting fat is an easy way to cut calories, but according to this study, maintaining the right levels of healthy fats is important, she said. One of the main aspects of the Mediterranean diet is the percentage of daily fat, which is higher than 30 percent of daily calories, however, the main fat is monounsaturated, usually from olive oil in the Mediterranean basin, said Esposito, of the Diabetes Unit at University Hospital at the Second University of Naples in Italy. She and her colleagues continued to f Continue reading >>

Mediterranean Diet - Diabetes Self-management

Mediterranean Diet - Diabetes Self-management

A diet, based on the traditional one in certain areas of the Mediterranean region, that may reduce the risk of heart disease especially in people with diabetes. In 1970, the Seven Countries Study first determined that people in Mediterranean countries (Greece, Italy, and the former Yugoslavia) have a lower incidence of cardiovascular disease, and much of this reduced risk has been attributed to diet. The Mediterranean diet is composed of more vegetables, fruits, legumes, nuts, grains, unrefined cereals, bread, olive oil, garlic, and fish and less red meat than the typical Western diet. It also includes low to moderate intake of cheese and yogurt. It includes relatively few foods with refined carbohydrates and tends to be high in fiber and low in saturated fat. The Mediterranean diet has been shown to reduce blood pressure , improve blood lipid levels (cholesterol and triglycerides), improve the function of the inner walls of blood vessels, and reduce markers of blood vessel inflammation. A number of clinical studies have shown that the Mediterranean diet can reduce a persons risk of heart disease. One study published in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine compared the Mediterranean diet with a low-fat diet in people at high risk for heart disease. Compared with those on the low-fat diet, people on the Mediterranean diet had improved markers of heart disease risk, including lower plasma glucose levels, lower systolic blood pressure, and lower blood lipid levels. In a study published in The New England Journal of Medicine, the Mediterranean diet was compared with a low-fat diet and a low-carbohydrate diet in 322 moderately obese employees of a research center in Israel. Researchers assigned each employee to one of the three diets and followed them over a two-year per Continue reading >>

Mediterranean Diet And Glycaemic Control In A Mediterranean Population With Type 1 Diabetes: A Pilot Study

Mediterranean Diet And Glycaemic Control In A Mediterranean Population With Type 1 Diabetes: A Pilot Study

Endocrine Abstracts (2017) 49 EP481 | DOI: 10.1530/endoabs.49.EP481 Mediterranean diet and glycaemic control in a Mediterranean population with type 1 diabetes: a pilot study Alexis Kyriacou1,2, Josie M M Evans1 & Angelos Kyriacou2,3 1School of Health Sciences, University of Stirling, Stirling, UK; 2CEDM Centre of Endocrinology, Diabetes & Metabolism, Limassol, Cyprus; 3Endocrinology and Diabetes, Salford Royal NHS Foundation Trust, Salford, UK. Background: The Mediterranean diet (MD) is the traditional diet of the people living in the Mediterranean basin and has been linked with positive health outcomes e.g. reduced incidence of cardiovascular and neoplastic disease. No study has investigated the relationship between the MD and glycaemic control in a Mediterranean population with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Furthermore, it is unknown how well controlled are such patients and whether they follow the MD. Methods: Patients known with T1DM were randomly conducted through the registry of the Cyprus Diabetes Association. Ethics: Received from the University of Stirling and the Cyprus National Bioethics Committee. Results: Twenty patients were conducted; eight patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria and completed antropometrics and the questionnaires; six had biochemistry. Age was 34.610.7 years. All patients were classified as having moderate adherence to the MD using the MedDietScore scoring system (28.95.2; max score 55). Lowest score was seen for potatoes and non-refined cereals (1.40.7 and 1.40.9; max score 5) and the highest for use of vegetables and olive oil in cooking (4.11.5 and 4.80.7; max score 5). All six patients with biochemical testing had undetectable levels of fasting blood c-peptide. HbA1c was 63.55.8 mmol/mol and fasting glucose levels 227.764.8 mg Continue reading >>

Mediterranean Diet And Diabetes

Mediterranean Diet And Diabetes

Olive oil is a key component of the Mediterranean Diet Mediterranean diets rich in fruit and vegetables are known to be healthy for people with diabetes. As well as being protective against type 2 diabetes , Mediterranean diets rich in fruit, vegetables and fibre can help people with diabetes to control their blood sugar levels. Where does the Mediterranean diet come from? The Mediterranean diet is thought to have originated in Crete, Southern Italy and Greece. Previous large-scale studies have linked a Mediterranean diet with a lower chance of developing diabetes. A traditional Mediterranean diet is principally composed of: One of the reasons why Mediterranean diets are healthy is that they include a strong vegetable content. Vegetables such as tomatoes, peppers, aubergines, olives, onions, rocket and lettuce are not only great for blood glucose levels but make for very visually appealing meals too. Most people should be able to include a moderate amount of fruit. If you are susceptible to sharp spikes in blood glucose levels opt for lower carb fruits such as berries. A Mediterranean diet typically includes a good intake of fat from a diverse set of foods including feta and mozzarella cheeses, yoghurt, olive oil, avocado, oily fish and nuts. Beans nuts, seeds, eggs, poultry and a moderate amount of red meat provide protein. Pasta and bread, which would ideally be freshly made, provide carbohydrate in addition to starchy vegetables . Not everyone with diabetes can handle starchy foods as well as others so stick to portion sizes that wont greatly raise your sugar levels. You do not need to stick to just having Mediterranean dishes but should embrace the spirit of the diet which is to focus on fresh rather than processed foods. Why is the Mediterranean diet recommended? Continue reading >>

Mediterranean Diet Helps Control Diabetes

Mediterranean Diet Helps Control Diabetes

Mediterranean Diet Helps Control Diabetes Low-Carbohydrate Mediterranean Diet Better Than Low-Fat Diet at Managing Diabetes Aug. 31, 2009 -- Eating a Mediterranean-style diet may help people with type 2 diabetes keep their disease under control without drugs better than following a typical low-fat diet. A new study from Italy shows that people with type 2 diabetes who ate a Mediterranean diet rich in vegetables and whole grains with at least 30% of daily calories from fat (mostly olive oil) were better able to manage their disease without diabetes medications than those who ate a low-fat diet with no more than 30% of calories from fat (with less than 10% coming from saturated fat choices). After four years, researchers found that 44% of people on the Mediterranean diet ended up requiring diabetes medications to control their blood sugars compared with 70% of those who followed the low-fat diet. Its one of the longest-term studies of its kind, and researchers, including Katherine Esposito, MD, of the Second University of Naples, say the results reinforce the message that benefits of lifestyle interventions should not be overlooked." In the study, researchers randomly assigned 215 overweight people recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes who had never been treated with diabetes medications to either a Mediterranean-style diet or a low-fat diet. The Mediterranean diet was rich in vegetables and whole grains and low in red meat, which was replaced with fish or poultry. Overall, the diet consisted of no more than 50% of daily calories from carbohydrates and no less than 30% of calories from fat. The low-fat diet was based on American Heart Association guidelines and was rich in whole grains and limited in sweets with no more than 30% of calories from fat and 10% from satura Continue reading >>

5 Studies On The Mediterranean Diet - Does It Really Work?

5 Studies On The Mediterranean Diet - Does It Really Work?

5 Studies on The Mediterranean Diet - Does it Really Work? Written by Kris Gunnars, BSc on May 29, 2017 Back in the early 20th century, heart disease had become a huge problem. At that time, researchers studying the cause of heart disease noted a striking pattern... The people in certain countries around the Mediterranean sea (like Italy and Greece) had very little heart disease compared to Americans. The researchers believed that the reason for their low heart disease rates was their healthy diet. This diet was high in plants, including fruits , vegetables, whole grains, breads, legumes, potatoes, nuts and seeds. They also used hefty amounts of both extra virgin olive oil and red wine, along with moderate amounts of fish, poultry, dairy and eggs . Red meat was eaten only rarely. Although this type of diet has been consumed for a long time around the Mediterranean, it only recently gained mainstream popularity as a good way to improve health and prevent disease. Since then, numerous studies have been conducted on this diet, including several randomized controlled trials... which are the gold standard in science. This article takes an objective look at 5 long-term controlled trials on the Mediterranean Diet. All of them are published in respected, peer-reviewed journals. Most of the participants are people who already have health problems such as diabetes and metabolic syndrome, or are at a high risk of heart disease. The majority of the studies looked at common health markers like weight, heart disease risk factors and markers of diabetes. The larger and longer-term studies also looked at hard end points like heart attacks and death. The PREDIMED study made headlines in 2013 for having caused a substantial reduction in cardiovascular disease. This was a large study, wi Continue reading >>

Mediterranean Diet And Type 2 Diabetes.

Mediterranean Diet And Type 2 Diabetes.

1. Diabetes Metab Res Rev. 2014 Mar;30 Suppl 1:34-40. doi: 10.1002/dmrr.2516. (1)Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy. Consumption of selected dietary components is favourably associated withprevention of type 2 diabetes, but discordant results for some foods or singlenutrients continue to appear. The study of complete dietary patterns representsthe most adequate approach to assess the role of diet on the risk of diabetes.The term 'Mediterranean diet' essentially refers to a primarily plant-baseddietary pattern whose greater consumption has been associated with highersurvival for lower all-cause mortality. At least five large prospective studiesreport a substantially lower risk of type 2 diabetes in healthy people or at riskpatients with the highest adherence to a Mediterranean diet. Five randomizedcontrolled trials have evaluated the effects of a Mediterranean diet, as comparedwith other commonly used diets, on glycaemic control in subjects with type 2diabetes. Improvement of HbA1c levels was greater with a Mediterranean diet andranged from 0.1% to 0.6% for HbA1c . No trial reported worsening of glycaemiccontrol with a Mediterranean diet. Although no controlled trial specificallyassessed the role of a Mediterranean diet in reducing cardiovascular events intype 2 diabetes, there is evidence that post-infarct or high-risk patients,including diabetic patients, may have cardiovascular benefits from aMediterranean diet. The evidence so far accumulated suggests that adopting aMediterranean diet may help prevent type 2 diabetes; moreover, a lowercarbohydrate, Mediterranean-style diet seems good for HbA1c reduction in persons with established diabetes.Copyright 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/preve Continue reading >>

Keep Your Eyes Healthy With A Mediterranean Diet

Keep Your Eyes Healthy With A Mediterranean Diet

Keep Your Eyes Healthy With a Mediterranean Diet Mediterranean Diet, Retinopathy, Nephropathy, and Microvascular Diabetes Complications: A Post Hoc Analysis of a Randomized Trial, by Diaz-Lopez and Associates. Diabetes Care 2015;38:21342141 What is the problem and what is known about it so far? A Mediterranean (Med) diet includes lots of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes, nuts, fish, and healthy fats, like olive oil. Studies have shown the health benefits of eating a Med diet, but none have looked at how a Med diet affects the chances of getting complications from diabetes, including eye disease (called retinopathy) and kidney disease (called nephropathy). Why did the researchers do this particular study? Researchers wanted to know whether eating a Med diet could reduce the risk of developing eye disease or kidney disease in people with diabetes. People with type 2 diabetes and no complications at the start of the study and who were 5580 years old were asked to participate. A total of 3,614 people were enrolled in the study. Participants were divided into three groups: group 1 ate a Med diet with lots of extra virgin olive oil, group 2 ate a Med diet with lots of mixed nuts, and group 3 ate a diet low in fat. After 6 years on each diet, researchers looked at how many participants got diabetic eye disease, how many got diabetic kidney disease, and which group they were in. Both groups that ate a Med diet developed less diabetic eye disease than the low-fat-diet group. The group that ate a Med diet with lots of olive oil had less diabetic eye disease than the group that ate a Med diet with lots of nuts. No difference was found in the rate of diabetic kidney disease among the three groups. There were more men in the group that ate a Med diet with lots of nuts than Continue reading >>

Adherence To Mediterranean Diet Pattern Among Spanish Adults Attending A Medical Centre: Nondiabetic Subjects And Type 1 And 2 Diabetic Patients

Adherence To Mediterranean Diet Pattern Among Spanish Adults Attending A Medical Centre: Nondiabetic Subjects And Type 1 And 2 Diabetic Patients

Journal of Diabetes Research Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 5957821, 11 pages 1Department of Endocrinology and Nutrition, Hospital Royo Villanova SALUD, Barrio San Gregorio, s/n, 50015 Zaragoza, Spain 2Physiotherapy Research Unit, University of Zaragoza, C/Domingo Miral, s/n, 50009 Zaragoza, Spain 3Faculty of Health Sciences, Physiotherapy Research Unit, University of Zaragoza, C/Domingo Miral, s/n, 50009 Zaragoza, Spain 4ALCER EBRO (Aragonese Association of Patients with Chronic Renal Insufficiency), Santa Teresa de Jesús, No. 29-35 Bajos, 50006 Zaragoza, Spain Academic Editor: Eusebio Chiefari Copyright © 2017 Concepción Vidal-Peracho et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Abstract Objective. To identify adherence to Mediterranean diet among two groups of Spanish adults: diabetic patients and nondiabetic subjects. Methods. Adherence to Mediterranean diet was measured by a 14-item screener (scale: 0–14; ≤5: low, 6–9: moderate, and ≥10: high) in 351 volunteers. Results. Mean age was 50.97 ± 12.58 in nondiabetics () and 59.50 ± 13.34 in diabetics (). The whole sample scored 8.77 ± 1.82. Score was 9.19 ± 1.84 in nondiabetic females () and 8.15 ± 1.79 in diabetic females () (), due to lower consumption of olive oil () and nuts (). Type 2 diabetic males (; 8.76 ± 1.88) consumed less olive oil than healthy males (; 9.36 ± 1.59) (). Up to 30-year-old nondiabetics scored lower than more than 60-year-old nondiabetics (8.40 ± 1.5 versus 9.74 ± 2.03; ). The youngest ate less olive oil () and more pastries (). Conclusions. The sample presented moderate adherence to Mediterranean di Continue reading >>

Is The Mediterranean Diet Best For Diabetes?

Is The Mediterranean Diet Best For Diabetes?

Is the Mediterranean Diet Best for Diabetes? Research shows the heart-healthy Mediterranean diet is also beneficial for people with type 2 diabetes. Find out how this approach can improve your blood sugar and help you lose weight. Sign Up for Our Living with Diabetes Newsletter Thanks for signing up! You might also like these other newsletters: Sign up for more FREE Everyday Health newsletters . Years of research shows that this way of eating offers advantages for people living with type 2 diabetes. Following a Mediterranean diet can help people with type 2 diabetes improve blood sugar control and lose weight, all the while satisfying the taste buds with fresh, flavorful ingredients. The diet which gets its name from the traditional eating and cooking patterns of people in countries bordering the Mediterranean Sea has long been studied for its heart health benefits , but research also suggests this approach can offer advantages for people living with type 2 diabetes. In a study published in March 2013 in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition , researchers in the United Kingdom compared the Mediterranean diet to vegetarian, vegan, low-carbohydrate, high-protein, high-fiber, and low-glycemic index diets, and found that the Mediterranean diet came out on top. Study participants following Mediterranean, low-glycemic index, low-carbohydrate, and high-protein diets all experienced better blood sugar control, as was indicated by their lower A1C scores. (A1C is a measure of average blood sugar levels over a three-month period.) However, people following the Mediterranean diet saw significant additional benefits they lost the most weight and saw improved cardiovascular health, including better cholesterol levels. "The Mediterranean diet is rich in fruits and vegetables, an Continue reading >>

Low Carb Mediterranean Diet Results In Higher Rate Of Remission In Type 2 Diabetes

Low Carb Mediterranean Diet Results In Higher Rate Of Remission In Type 2 Diabetes

Low Carb Mediterranean Diet Results in Higher Rate of Remission in Type 2 Diabetes A low-carb Mediterranean diet delays medication use and results in higher rate of remission in type 2 diabetes compared to low-fat diet. Type 2 diabetes is a serious health condition that commonly results in health decline and an increasing need for medication. However, some studies indicate that dietary intervention can, in fact, not only delay the need for medication but can result in a higher rate of complete remission of diabetes. Moreover, a dietary intervention replacing carbohydrate for fat, particularly healthy monounsaturated fat such as olive oil , appears to provide greater overall benefits compared to low-fat diets. In a 4-year randomized control trial published in the Annals of Internal Medicine, 2009, Esposito and Colleagues compared the effects of a low-carbohydrate Mediterranean diet (LCMD) (less than 50 percent carbohydrate) to a typical low-fat diet (LF) (less than 30 percent fat) on the need for antihyperglycemic medication in patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes. The trial followed 215 overweight participants with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes who had never been treated with antihyperglycemic drugs and had HbA1c levels less than 11 percent. Primary outcomes included the start of antihyperglycemic drug therapy, defined by a protocol as indicated for follow-up HbA1c level greater than 7 percent. Secondary outcomes included changes in weight, glycemic control, and coronary risk factors. After 4 years, only 44 percent of patients in the LCMD group required medication compared to 70 percent in the LF group, LCMD reduced HbA1c by 2 percent compared to LF 1.6 percent, there was higher reduction in serum triglycerides in the LCMD group (23.4 mg/dl compared to 12.6 Continue reading >>

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