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Mediterranean Diet And Diabetes Prevention And Treatment

Nutrients | Free Full-text | Mediterranean Diet And Diabetes: Prevention And Treatment

Nutrients | Free Full-text | Mediterranean Diet And Diabetes: Prevention And Treatment

Nutrients 2014, 6(4), 1406-1423; doi: 10.3390/nu6041406 Mediterranean Diet and Diabetes: Prevention and Treatment Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Harokopio University, 70 El. Venizelou Street, Athens 17671, Greece Author to whom correspondence should be addressed. Received: 24 December 2013 / Revised: 3 March 2014 / Accepted: 20 March 2014 / Published: 4 April 2014 View Full-Text | Download PDF [225 KB, uploaded 4 April 2014] The aim of the present review is to examine current scientific knowledge on the association between the Mediterranean diet and diabetes mellitus (mostly type 2 diabetes). A definition of the Mediterranean diet and the tools widely used to evaluate adherence to this traditional diet (Mediterranean diet indices) are briefly presented. The review focuses on epidemiological data linking adherence to the Mediterranean diet with the risk of diabetes development, as well as evidence from interventional studies assessing the effect of the Mediterranean diet on diabetes control and the management of diabetes-related complications. The above mentioned data are explored on the basis of evaluating the Mediterranean diet as a whole dietary pattern, rather than focusing on the effect of its individual components. Possible protective mechanisms of the Mediterranean diet against diabetes are also briefly discussed. View Full-Text Continue reading >>

Mediterranean Diet Could Inspire Functional Food Development To Tackle Type 2 Diabetes: Review

Mediterranean Diet Could Inspire Functional Food Development To Tackle Type 2 Diabetes: Review

Mediterranean diet could inspire functional food development to tackle type 2 diabetes: Review Related tags: Functional foods , Nutrition Components of the Mediterranean diet could provide a multi-component model for functional foods to combat type 2 diabetes, according to a recent review. Biologically active ingredients in functional foods are linked to physiological health benefits for preventing and treating chronic diseases like type 2 diabetes. Regular consumption of such foods may enhance antioxidant, anti-cholesterol and anti-inflammatory activity, as well as greater insulin sensitivity, all of which are considered crucial in the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes. In particular, foods central to the Mediterranean diet such as oily fish, olive oil, fruits, tree nuts, and vegetables could act as a model for functional foods, thanks to their natural nutraceutical content. This includes flavonoids, polyphenols, sterols, alkaloids, pigments, terpenoids, and unsaturated fatty acids. Furthermore, polyphenols in the Mediterranean diet and certain herbs (such as coffee, green and black teas, and yerba mate) have exhibited clinically significant benefits on microvascular and metabolic function, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity, and cholesterol- and fasting glucose-lowering in high-risk type 2 diabetes patients. In addition, functional food benefits can now be detected using what is known as 'omics' biological profiling of a persons molecular genetics, transcriptomics, proteomics, and metabolomics. However, this is"under-investigated in multi-component interventions". Based on this, researchers at Kuwait's Dasman Diabetes Institute, the UK's Edge Hill University, the University of Mauritius, and Saudi Arabia's King Abdulaziz University conducted a revi Continue reading >>

Prevention Of T2 Diabetes | Diabetic Mediterranean Diet

Prevention Of T2 Diabetes | Diabetic Mediterranean Diet

Nearly Half of Adults in California HavePrediabetes The actual figure is 46%, according to researchers at UCLA. The LA Times has the story . Our genes and our environment are kind of on a collision course, said Dr. Francine Kaufman, the former head of the American Diabetes Assn., who was not involved with the research. Its not stopping. The problem with prediabetes is that it often evolves into full-blown diabetes.Its also associated with increased risk for cardiovascular disease such as heart attack and stroke. The Times article says up to 70% of those with prediabetes develop diabetes in their lifetime. Id never heard that vague number before; I say vague because up to 70% could be anything between zero and 70. Its more accurate to note that one in four people with prediabetes develops type 2 diabetes over the course of three to five years. fasting blood sugar between 100 and 125 mg/dl (5.566.94 mmol/l), or blood sugar level 140199 mg/dl (7.7811.06 mmol/l) two hours after drinking 75 grams of glucose Most adults with prediabetes dont know they have it How To Prevent Progression of Prediabetes Into Diabetes If youre overweight or obese, lose excess fat weight. How much should you lose? Aim for at least 5% of body weight and see if that cures your prediabetes. For instance, if you weigh 200 lb (91 kg), lose 10 lb (4.5 kg). If youre sedentary, start exercising regularly. Cut back on your consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages, other sugar sources, and other refined carbohydrates like wheat flour. Continue reading >>

How The Mediterranean Diet Alone Can Fight Diabetes

How The Mediterranean Diet Alone Can Fight Diabetes

There is no ultimate diet, but if there were, the Mediterranean plan would come darn close. Featuring staples like olive oil, nuts and vegetables, the Mediterranean diet has been heralded as a game changer for health and longevity. Countless studies have connected the eating plan to lower risks of heart attack and stroke and some have suggested the diet can even slow or prevent memory loss. Researchers speculate that the protective benefits likely stem from the combined effect of the diet’s healthy fats and nutrients. Now a new study shows that the Mediterranean diet alone may be enough to reduce the risk of diabetes, without the need to lose weight or exercise. The research, published in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine, involved more than 3,500 elderly adults who were at high risk for heart disease but did not yet have diabetes. The participants were split into three groups. The first ate a Mediterranean diet high in fruits, vegetables, whole grains and fish, and low in red or processed meat, butter and sweets, supplemented with extra-virgin olive oil. The second group had a Mediterranean diet supplemented with nuts, and the final group, the control group, consumed a low-fat diet. All the participants were told that they did not have to restrict calories or increase their physical activity. (MORE: Eat More Mediterranean Foods Now: Your Later Self Will Thank You) After four years, the researchers found that the individuals who developed diabetes were most likely to be in the control group. Of all the participants, 273 developed diabetes; 101 were in the control group. Among those eating the Mediterranean diet, 80 participants in the olive-oil group developed diabetes and 92 in the nut group did. Interestingly, there were no differences in weight loss among the Continue reading >>

Diet And Diabetes

Diet And Diabetes

Gary Deed John Barlow Dev Kawol Gary Kilov Anita Sharma Liew Yu Hwa Background Guidelines for the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) reinforce lifestyle management, yet advice to guide general practitioners on principles around dietary choices is needed. Objective/s This article provides current evidence regarding the differing diets in diabetes prevention and management once T2DM arises, including the role in management of complications such as hypoglycaemia. Discussion Diets should incorporate weight maintenance or loss, while complementing changes in physical activity to optimise the meta-bolic effects of dietary advice. Using a structured, team-care approach supports pragmatic and sustainable individualised plans, while incorporating current evidence-based dietary approaches. Diabetes mellitus is expected to be the leading cause of chronic disease in Australia by 2023. Being overweight or obese carries significant risks for developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Lifestyle modification remains the bedrock of management of T2DM and its related comorbidities in Australian and international treatment guidelines.1,2 Once T2DM develops, the combination of diet, lifestyle changes and physical activity has a major impact on glycaemic control, weight management and complication prevention. The role of diet in diabetes prevention It is estimated that 16.4% of Australians have prediabetes.3 This is defined as impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and impaired glucose tolerance, or an HbA1c of 6.0–6.4% (42– 46 mmol/mol).4 Prediabetes carries an independent risk for cardiovascular disease, separate from the risks of developing T2DM.3 Thus, prediabetes risk prevention must address the prevention of cardiovascular risks as much as managing progressive d Continue reading >>

Mediterranean Diet And Diabetes

Mediterranean Diet And Diabetes

Olive oil is a key component of the Mediterranean Diet Mediterranean diets rich in fruit and vegetables are known to be healthy for people with diabetes. As well as being protective against type 2 diabetes , Mediterranean diets rich in fruit, vegetables and fibre can help people with diabetes to control their blood sugar levels. Where does the Mediterranean diet come from? The Mediterranean diet is thought to have originated in Crete, Southern Italy and Greece. Previous large-scale studies have linked a Mediterranean diet with a lower chance of developing diabetes. A traditional Mediterranean diet is principally composed of: One of the reasons why Mediterranean diets are healthy is that they include a strong vegetable content. Vegetables such as tomatoes, peppers, aubergines, olives, onions, rocket and lettuce are not only great for blood glucose levels but make for very visually appealing meals too. Most people should be able to include a moderate amount of fruit. If you are susceptible to sharp spikes in blood glucose levels opt for lower carb fruits such as berries. A Mediterranean diet typically includes a good intake of fat from a diverse set of foods including feta and mozzarella cheeses, yoghurt, olive oil, avocado, oily fish and nuts. Beans nuts, seeds, eggs, poultry and a moderate amount of red meat provide protein. Pasta and bread, which would ideally be freshly made, provide carbohydrate in addition to starchy vegetables . Not everyone with diabetes can handle starchy foods as well as others so stick to portion sizes that wont greatly raise your sugar levels. You do not need to stick to just having Mediterranean dishes but should embrace the spirit of the diet which is to focus on fresh rather than processed foods. Why is the Mediterranean diet recommended? Continue reading >>

Mediterranean Diet And Its Effects On Preventing And Managing Typetwo Diabetes: A Literature Review

Mediterranean Diet And Its Effects On Preventing And Managing Typetwo Diabetes: A Literature Review

Received date: November 23, 2016; Accepted date: January 24, 2017; Published date: January31, 2017 Citation: Kathryn A, Heather S, Tina T (2017) Mediterranean Diet and Its Effectson Preventing and Managing Type Two Diabetes: A Literature Review. Prim HealthCare 7:256. doi:10.4172/2167-1079.1000256 Copyright: 2017 Kathryn A, et al. This is an open-access article distributed underthe terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricteduse, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author andsource are credited. Diabetes has become a major epidemic in the United States. In 2012, 29.1 million Americans had type 2 diabetes and it is projected that there will be 1.4 million new cases each year. Having diabetes is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease, renal disease, blindness and limb amputation. Due to the debilitating effects and complications diabetes can have on ones body, research has been conducted to find the best ways to prevent this chronic illness. Diet tends to be a primary focus around diabetes prevention. A Mediterranean-style diet has been suggested as a good diet plan to prevent type 2 diabetes. A Mediterranean diet consists of high consumption of fruits and vegetables, whole grains, legumes and nuts, moderate intake of seafood and poultry with very minimal intake of red meat. Olive oil is the primary source of fat as well as a moderate intake of wine with meals. The diet suggests avoiding foods with added sugars, refined grains, Trans fats and anything highly processed. According to the literature, this diet can be used to prevent and also help control already diagnosed diabetics. A review of the literature was performed to determine if there is enough evidence to support recommending a Mediterranean Continue reading >>

5 Studies On The Mediterranean Diet - Does It Really Work?

5 Studies On The Mediterranean Diet - Does It Really Work?

5 Studies on The Mediterranean Diet - Does it Really Work? Written by Kris Gunnars, BSc on May 29, 2017 Back in the early 20th century, heart disease had become a huge problem. At that time, researchers studying the cause of heart disease noted a striking pattern... The people in certain countries around the Mediterranean sea (like Italy and Greece) had very little heart disease compared to Americans. The researchers believed that the reason for their low heart disease rates was their healthy diet. This diet was high in plants, including fruits , vegetables, whole grains, breads, legumes, potatoes, nuts and seeds. They also used hefty amounts of both extra virgin olive oil and red wine, along with moderate amounts of fish, poultry, dairy and eggs . Red meat was eaten only rarely. Although this type of diet has been consumed for a long time around the Mediterranean, it only recently gained mainstream popularity as a good way to improve health and prevent disease. Since then, numerous studies have been conducted on this diet, including several randomized controlled trials... which are the gold standard in science. This article takes an objective look at 5 long-term controlled trials on the Mediterranean Diet. All of them are published in respected, peer-reviewed journals. Most of the participants are people who already have health problems such as diabetes and metabolic syndrome, or are at a high risk of heart disease. The majority of the studies looked at common health markers like weight, heart disease risk factors and markers of diabetes. The larger and longer-term studies also looked at hard end points like heart attacks and death. The PREDIMED study made headlines in 2013 for having caused a substantial reduction in cardiovascular disease. This was a large study, wi Continue reading >>

Mediterranean Diet And Diabetes: Prevention And Treatment.

Mediterranean Diet And Diabetes: Prevention And Treatment.

Mediterranean diet and diabetes: prevention and treatment. Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Harokopio University, 70 El. Venizelou Street, Athens 17671, Greece. [email protected] Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Harokopio University, 70 El. Venizelou Street, Athens 17671, Greece. [email protected] Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Harokopio University, 70 El. Venizelou Street, Athens 17671, Greece. [email protected] Nutrients. 2014 Apr 4;6(4):1406-23. doi: 10.3390/nu6041406. The aim of the present review is to examine current scientific knowledge on the association between the Mediterranean diet and diabetes mellitus (mostly type 2 diabetes). A definition of the Mediterranean diet and the tools widely used to evaluate adherence to this traditional diet (Mediterranean diet indices) are briefly presented. The review focuses on epidemiological data linking adherence to the Mediterranean diet with the risk of diabetes development, as well as evidence from interventional studies assessing the effect of the Mediterranean diet on diabetes control and the management of diabetes-related complications. The above mentioned data are explored on the basis of evaluating the Mediterranean diet as a whole dietary pattern, rather than focusing on the effect of its individual components. Possible protective mechanisms of the Mediterranean diet against diabetes are also briefly discussed. Continue reading >>

A Lean Mediterranean-style Diet Can Prevent Diabetes & Heart Disease

A Lean Mediterranean-style Diet Can Prevent Diabetes & Heart Disease

A Lean Mediterranean-style Diet Can Prevent Diabetes & Heart Disease It should be definitively clear that our clinical focus is helping patients prevent or treat cardiometabolic disease including diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and subsequently atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. So when we see patients in clinic, we focus on lifestyle changes like diet , exercise, sleep, and other miscellaneous components of non-pharmacologic treatment because these are most imperative and work the best [1] for diabetes prevention, treatment, and likely longevity. Hopefully you have previously reviewed our basic dietary recommendations, so in this article I will endorse a popular dietary pattern which is very similar to what we have always recommended and whose studies have driven the basis of many of our recommendations. For a more detailed, yet simple, direction on eating to beat diabetes, sign up for our newsletter and get our upcoming free e-book, 5 Steps to Beat High Blood Sugar (and get Leaner!) Plan. Olives and olive oil are a staple of Lean Mediterranean diet. Im sure if you are reading this, you have possibly heard about the benefits of a Mediterranean diet based upon veggies, legumes, fish/lean meats, olive oil, and nuts. Well recently a study came out (PREDIMED trial) which made big news regarding how a Mediterranean-style diet tested versus a low-fat diet decreases risk of cardiovascular events (heart attacks & strokes) in adults who are at high risk of heart disease [2] (including 50% being diabetics). A Mediterranean-style diet has previously shown decreased occurrence of heart attacks and strokes in a population cohort [3] and subsequent heart attacks in people who already had known heart disease [4] but this new study was an interventional trial for primary preventio Continue reading >>

Preventing Diabetes With The Mediterranean Diet

Preventing Diabetes With The Mediterranean Diet

Preventing Diabetes with the Mediterranean Diet If you are among the people of a certain age and a certain (over)weight, you will be grateful for the following news. Eating a Mediterranean diet is so beneficial that it appears to keep the risk of developing diabetes at bay. The reduced risk was seen even in people who did not engage in more traditional diabetes prevention methods such as counting calories, exercising, or losing weight. People who had at least three risk factors for cardiovascular disease, but were still free of diabetes, were randomly assigned to follow one of three diets: a Mediterranean diet supplemented with extra virgin olive oil; a Mediterranean diet supplemented with mixed nuts; or a low-fat diet. The diets were not calorie-restricted. After four years the people who ate the Mediterranean diet supplemented with olive oil were less likely to develop type 2 diabetes compared to those who ate the low-fat diet. Those who followed the Mediterranean diet supplemented with nuts also saw a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes, but not to the point of being considered statistically significant. When data from both Mediterranean diet groups were merged, there was a 30 percent reduction in the risk for diabetes. The low-fat diet group had the most new cases of diabetes. More people in this group dropped out of the study, as well. The study, by Spanish researchers, examined data collected from over 3,500 people aged 55 to 80 years. The Mediterranean diet is heavy on fruits and vegetables, high-fiber grains, legumes, fish, and foods high in unsaturated fats like olive oil and nuts. Red meat and high-fat dairy foods, which are high in saturated fat, are generally limited or avoided. The diet is also an excellent source of two types of beneficial fats monounsaturate Continue reading >>

Preventing Diabetes With The Mediterranean Diet

Preventing Diabetes With The Mediterranean Diet

Preventing Diabetes with the Mediterranean Diet If you are among the people of a certain age and a certain (over)weight, you will be grateful for the following news. Eating a Mediterranean diet is so beneficial that it appears to keep the risk of developing diabetes at bay. The reduced risk was seen even in people who did not engage in more traditional diabetes prevention methods such as counting calories, exercising, or losing weight. People who had at least three risk factors for cardiovascular disease, but were still free of diabetes, were randomly assigned to follow one of three diets: a Mediterranean diet supplemented with extra virgin olive oil; a Mediterranean diet supplemented with mixed nuts; or a low-fat diet. The diets were not calorie-restricted. After four years the people who ate the Mediterranean diet supplemented with olive oil were less likely to develop type 2 diabetes compared to those who ate the low-fat diet. Those who followed the Mediterranean diet supplemented with nuts also saw a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes, but not to the point of being considered statistically significant. When data from both Mediterranean diet groups were merged, there was a 30 percent reduction in the risk for diabetes. The low-fat diet group had the most new cases of diabetes. More people in this group dropped out of the study, as well. The study, by Spanish researchers, examined data collected from over 3,500 people aged 55 to 80 years. The Mediterranean diet is heavy on fruits and vegetables, high-fiber grains, legumes, fish, and foods high in unsaturated fats like olive oil and nuts. Red meat and high-fat dairy foods, which are high in saturated fat, are generally limited or avoided. The diet is also an excellent source of two types of beneficial fats monounsaturate Continue reading >>

Take Heart: Mediterranean Diet Combats Type 2 Diabetes, Study Says

Take Heart: Mediterranean Diet Combats Type 2 Diabetes, Study Says

THURSDAY, March 27, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Adhering to a so-called Mediterranean diet may reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes , especially if you're at high risk for heart disease . That's the finding of researchers who reviewed 19 studies that included more than 162,000 people in different countries for an average of 5.5 years. The analysis revealed that a Mediterranean diet -- which is rich in fish, nuts, vegetables and fruits -- was associated with a 21 percent lower risk of type 2 diabetes compared with other eating patterns. A Mediterranean diet reduced the risk of diabetes even more -- by 27 percent -- among people at high risk for heart disease. Diabetes prevention is especially important for people at risk of heart disease , according to the authors of the study, which is to be presented Saturday at the American College of Cardiology annual meeting, in Washington, D.C. "Adherence to the Mediterranean diet may prevent the development of diabetes irrespective of age, sex , race or culture," lead investigator Demosthenes Panagiotakos, a professor at Harokopio University in Athens, Greece, said in a college news release. "This diet has a beneficial effect, even in high-risk groups, and speaks to the fact that it is never too late to start eating a healthy diet." Panagiotakos noted that the studies included in the review included Europeans and non-Europeans. This is important because most studies that have examined the effects of a Mediterranean diet have been European-based and there have been concerns that region-specific factors such as genetics, environment, and lifestyle might affect the results. This review showed that a Mediterranean diet reduces type 2 diabetes risk in both Europeans and non-Europeans. This type of large-scale analysis "is important to hel Continue reading >>

Mediterranean Diet And Diabetes: Prevention And Treatment

Mediterranean Diet And Diabetes: Prevention And Treatment

Mediterranean Diet and Diabetes: Prevention and Treatment Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Harokopio University, 70 El. Venizelou Street, Athens 17671, Greece; E-Mails: [email protected] (M.G.); [email protected] (M.D.K.) *Author to whom correspondence should be addressed; E-Mail: [email protected] ; Tel.: +30-210-9549-268; Fax: +30-210-9577-050. Received 2013 Dec 24; Revised 2014 Mar 3; Accepted 2014 Mar 20. Copyright 2014 by the authors; licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution license ( ). This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. The aim of the present review is to examine current scientific knowledge on the association between the Mediterranean diet and diabetes mellitus (mostly type 2 diabetes). A definition of the Mediterranean diet and the tools widely used to evaluate adherence to this traditional diet (Mediterranean diet indices) are briefly presented. The review focuses on epidemiological data linking adherence to the Mediterranean diet with the risk of diabetes development, as well as evidence from interventional studies assessing the effect of the Mediterranean diet on diabetes control and the management of diabetes-related complications. The above mentioned data are explored on the basis of evaluating the Mediterranean diet as a whole dietary pattern, rather than focusing on the effect of its individual components. Possible protective mechanisms of the Mediterranean diet against diabetes are also briefly discussed. Keywords: Mediterranean diet, dietary patterns, diabetes, glycemic control, obesity, cardiovascular diseases, prevention, treatment, public health Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a group of metabolic diseases character Continue reading >>

Preventing Diabetes

Preventing Diabetes

Q: I have been following the Miami Mediterranean diet to reduce my risk of heart disease. I read somewhere that this diet may be helpful for those with high blood sugar and diabetes. Can you tell me more about this? A: I’m glad to hear that you’re following the healthy Miami Mediterranean diet. In my practice, I’ve found that patients who adopt the diet, along with lifestyle changes such as exercise and stress reduction, are healthier and happier. Studies have long proven that a Mediterranean-type diet reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease, and it also has been linked to protection against some cancers. But now there’s more good news: a new study published in the British Medical Journal shows that eating a traditional Mediterranean diet regularly may reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by as much as 83%!1 The results of this study are astonishing. Previous research has shown the benefits of a Mediterranean-type diet for reducing insulin resistance. But earlier studies were not as large as this new one which, for four-and-a-half years, followed 13,380 Spanish university graduates who had no history of diabetes. At the study’s conclusion, it was found that the participants who most strictly adhered to the diet had a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes. And from that large population, only 33 cases of type 2 diabetes were documented. How well one adheres to a Mediterranean-type diet appears to be the real key to successfully lowering the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, and even preventing it. In addition to closely monitoring the types of foods that study participants ate, researchers rated each person on how well they adhered to the diet. Those with the highest adherence to the diet reduced their risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 83% Continue reading >>

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