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Medical Innovations For Type 1 Diabetes

Which New Diabetes Devices And Apps Are Best For You?

Which New Diabetes Devices And Apps Are Best For You?

Admittedly, it is difficult,even frustrating, to try and keep up with what's new and which technology innovation may benefit which people, soEndocrineWebasked two experts to weigh in on what they see as the most promising new health-based devices offering advances that don't just impress a tech expert but might just inspire and motivate people with diabetes who are looking for solutions to make self-managing their health easier and may even simplify their lives. Ask your healthcare provider about whether or not new devices may be help you manage your diabetes. This list has been compiled with guidance from our two experts, with the understanding new products and solutions are being introduced daily so this list may need updating regularly. David T. Ahn, MD, is an associate clinical professor of medicine at the UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine, who is an endocrinologist and diabetes technology expert. Amy Hess-Fischl, MS,RD, LDN, BC-ADM, CDE, is a diabetes educator at the transitional program coordinator at Kovler Diabetes Center in Chicago, Illinois. Continuous Glucose Monitoring Minus Calibration Abbott's continuous glucose monitoring system (CGM), FreeStyle Libre, requires no patient calibrationneither by fingerstick or manual data entry.1This newest approach to continuous glucose monitoring can replace the traditional blood glucose finger prick check. Instead, blood glucose levels are read through a sensor worn on the back of the upper arm. The sensor can be left in place for up to 10 days, according to the manufacturer. Among the perks of the FreeStyle Libre versus other CGMs is that it has just two components, the sensor and the reader. Other systems typically also have a transmitter. The FreeStyle Libre user captures glucose readings by passing the hand-held Continue reading >>

Artificial Pancreas For Diabetes Treatment Tops Cleveland Clinic's 2018 Top 10 Medical Innovations

Artificial Pancreas For Diabetes Treatment Tops Cleveland Clinic's 2018 Top 10 Medical Innovations

Artificial pancreas for diabetes treatment tops Cleveland Clinic's 2018 top 10 medical innovations Imagine curing blindness with gene therapyor a simple implant to treat sleep apnea. What about an artificial pancreas to better treat diabetes? Copyright 2017 Scripps Media, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. Imagine curing blindness with gene therapyor a simple implant to treat sleep apnea. What about an artificial pancreas to better treat diabetes? These are real medical breakthroughsamong the top 10 innovationsjust released by Cleveland Clinic that are expected to make waves in 2018. "Normally, if you'd gone ten years ago, it was a drug or a device that was going to change one thing," explained Dr. Michael Roizen, chief wellness officer for Cleveland Clinic."Now, it's really at the interface and multiple things for each innovation." Some of the greatest minds in medicine -- from all around the world -- are in Cleveland this week for the Clinic's 15th annual Medical Innovation Summit. The highlight: the ten medical innovations expected to have the biggest impact across the United Statesin the coming year. "We interview between 150 and 200 physicians, another 30 to 40 venture capitalists and media people," explained Dr. Roizen. That begins the process of whittling hundreds of innovations down to ten. At the top of the list this time around isthe world's first artificial pancreas to treat diabetes. "The innovation and the new development is a hybrid, closed-system pump, that is linked to a sensor that can be placed in the abdomen or on the abdomen," said Dr. James Young, executive dean of Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine. The sensor constantly monitors glucose levels and communicates with the pu Continue reading >>

New And Innovative Diabetes Treatments

New And Innovative Diabetes Treatments

Post a comment / May 21, 2012 at 9:57 AM Drugs that mimic beneficial bacteria found in the human gut, implantable and incisionless weight loss devices and stem cells that restore pancreatic function. If the world is going to make a dent in the diabetes epidemic , itll require innovative approaches like those mentioned above and more. Solutions to the whole body problem of diabetes are coming from a wide variety of sources: the chairman of Whole Foods, innovative but largely unknown startups, entrenched industry giants and stem cell researchers, for example. The following innovations in the treatment of diabetes provide some hope of lowering blood sugar levels and the economic toll of this costly and chronic condition. Gut bacteria: The gut is home to trillions of bacteria, some of which can improve or worsen insulin resistance in mice and perhaps humans. Plus, certain types of bacteria are more often found in the guts of lean or obese mice. If researchers can figure out which bacterial species in the gut are beneficial and which are pathogenic, they might be able to reduce diabetes or even cure it, Nature reported . It may be possible to develop drugs that mimic the chemicals produced by the bacteria found in lean peoples guts, or inhibit molecules that lead to insulin resistance and diabetes. Nu Me Health , co-founded by the chairman of Whole Foods Market, is developing a proprietary blend of prebiotics and other natural, plant-derived ingredients that are designed to alter the composition of the bacteria living in the gastrointestinal tract in order to help people with prediabetes maintain healthy blood glucose levels and body weight. Incisionless, implantable devices: Medical device startup EndoSphere has developed an incisionless, anti-obesity device that could be Continue reading >>

New Diabetes Breakthrough May Mean New Treatments

New Diabetes Breakthrough May Mean New Treatments

New Diabetes Breakthrough May Mean New Treatments New research may mean advancements in treatment options for individuals living with type 1 diabetes. Researchers from the Diabetes Research Institute at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine have identified the existence of stem cells in the pancreas that can be developed into beta cells that are responsive to glucose. The study addresses a critical factor in finding a cure for diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune condition in which the pancreas produces little to no insulin. "The immune system of individuals living with type 1 diabetes is overactive and sees the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas as a threat to the body. As a result, it sets out to destroy them," said Dr. Bill Johnson. Johnson is a Dallas, Texas, physician who treats patients living with diabetes using stem cell therapy. About 1.25 million people in the United States are living with type 1 diabetes, according to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. Numbers from the JDRF indicate that 40,000 people are diagnosed with the autoimmune disease each year. The JDRF also estimates that 15 percent of those living with type 1 diabetes in the U.S. are children. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, over 29 million people in the U.S. are living with type 2 diabetes, a form of the disease often caused by genetics, lifestyle choices and obesity. The CDC also estimates that 8.1 million of these people are undiagnosed. More than 1.4 million cases of type 2 diabetes are diagnosed nationwide each year, and more than one in every 10 adults over the age of 20 has the disease. Researchers have long believed that the pancreas contains progenitor stem cells that could help to regenerate islets, the cells of the pancrea Continue reading >>

New Diabetes Treatment Tops Cleveland Clinic's Top 10 Medical Innovations 2018 List (photos)

New Diabetes Treatment Tops Cleveland Clinic's Top 10 Medical Innovations 2018 List (photos)

CLEVELAND, Ohio -- An insulin pump that functions like an artificial pancreas ranked No. 1 on Cleveland Clinic's list of the Top 10 Medical Innovations for 2018. The announcement of the entire list will be made Wednesday as part of the Cleveland Clinic Medical Innovation Summit. Other innovations being honored include gene therapy for blindness, new ways of creating vaccines and targeted breast cancer treatment. The insulin pump, which will help patients with Type 1 diabetes, was judged to be the innovation that will have the biggest impact on healthcare next year. "This is a major breakthrough," said Dr. James Young, chairman of the Endocrinology and Metabolism Institute at the Cleveland Clinic. The pump senses blood glucose levels and delivers insulin via subcutaneous sensors, Young said. This year, a 20-person committee looked at more than 300 nominated innovations to find ones that are likely to have the biggest immediate impact, said the Clinic's Dr. Michael Roizen, who will host a multi-media presentation of the Top 10 Medical Innovations. Roizen is chairman of the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute and chief wellness officer. Roizen is excited about the rapid development of new vaccines, and the development of new ways to deliver them, an innovation that earned a spot on the list. "It means really radical changes in vaccine prevention," Roizen said. The presentation of the Top 10 Medical Innovations comes on the final day of the Medical Innovation Summit, which started Monday at the Huntington Convention Center. Below, the Top 10 Medical Innovations of 2018 are listed in order of importance: No. 1: Hybrid Closed-Loop Insulin Delivery System Hailed as the world's first artificial pancreas, the hybrid closed-loop insulin delivery system allows a glucose monitoring Continue reading >>

7 Innovations That Are Changing The Way We Manage Diabetes, A Disease That Affects 371 Million People Worldwide

7 Innovations That Are Changing The Way We Manage Diabetes, A Disease That Affects 371 Million People Worldwide

It's been almost a century since researchers discovered a way to treat diabetes. Since then, there have been a number of medical and technological advances that aim to make the lives of people living with diabetes — both type 1 and type 2 — more manageable. Around the globe, the group of conditions affects 371 million people worldwide, a number that's expected to increase to 552 million by 2030. From monitoring blood sugar levels — a taxing experience that people with diabetes must grow used to doing every day — to ways that make insulin easier to deliver, here are some of the innovations that are changing the way we manage diabetes. Medtronic created the world's first 'artificial pancreas.' In September, the FDA approved a device that's often referred to as an "artificial pancreas" for use in people with type 1 diabetes over age 14. The device, made by Medtronic, is called the MiniMed 670G, and it works by automatically monitoring a person's blood sugar levels and administering insulin as needed — no constant checking and injecting required. That way, it can act like a pancreas, the organ in our bodies that in healthy people is able to moderate our blood sugar levels by pumping out insulin that can process the sugars found in food. Livongo is making a glucose monitor that can get software updates just like your phone. "No one cares about the technology," Glen Tullman, the CEO of California-based startup Livongo and whose son has Type 1 diabetes, told Business Insider. "They simply want to live their life." On Wednesday, the company added the capability for the monitor to receive software updates, eliminating the need for people to constantly upgrade to new glucose meters when the technology advances. Livongo also offers the testing strips the machine uses for Continue reading >>

Advances In Medical Technology

Advances In Medical Technology

Improving Diabetes Care Treatment of diabetes, like most areas of medicine, has changed considerably over the years as a result of technological advances. From the discovery, purification, and mass production of insulin to the development of less painful ways to deliver it, the lives of people with diabetes have been improved — and sometimes greatly extended — by both diabetes-focused research and broader improvements in medical care. Although it can be difficult to predict the impact of an emerging technology, there are several exciting developments on the horizon that may soon significantly change how people with diabetes receive medical care or manage the condition on their own. At least one relatively new innovation, the continuous glucose monitor, is already changing the daily routine for some. This article examines several innovations that are likely to change — or are already changing — the way medical care is delivered and the way medical information is communicated. Not all assessments of medical technology are completely upbeat, however. Especially when it comes to electronic health records, many experts are either frustrated at the pace of progress or skeptical of how the technology will be used. Electronic health records Dr. Richard Hellman, who is past-president of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and has an endocrinology practice in North Kansas City, Missouri, laments that although someone can get money from an ATM or use a credit card anywhere in the world, medical information often cannot be easily accessed when it is needed. “The tragedy is that information doesn’t move around to the benefit of the patient,” he says. “There is much too much information that can’t be transmitted.” The problem is not a technologic Continue reading >>

Technological Advances In The Treatment Of Type 1 Diabetes

Technological Advances In The Treatment Of Type 1 Diabetes

Technological advances in the treatment of type 1 diabetes D. Bruttomesso, G. Grassi, editors. Karger, Basel, Switzerland. 2015. 264. US$ 258.00/CHF 219.00 / EUR 205.00. ISBN 978-3-318-02336-7. Chellaram Diabetes Institute Bavdhan Budruk Pune 411 021, Maharashtra, India [email protected] Author information Copyright and License information Disclaimer Copyright : Indian Journal of Medical Research This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License, which allows others to remix, tweak, and build upon the work non-commercially, as long as the author is credited and the new creations are licensed under the identical terms. Type 1 diabetes is an endocrine deficiency disorder, and individuals with this condition need to be on insulin lifelong. The aim of therapy is to replace insulin in a pattern mimicking natural production of insulin. This means that a background, 24 h slow release of insulin (basal insulin) is used to cover the inter-meal periods, on which is superimposed multiple boluses of insulin to counter meal-related rise in blood glucose levels. As per current knowledge, insulin treatments do not perfectly mimic physiological insulin release due to which, there is an interest in partnering with technology to smoothen out glucose control in these individuals. Glucose control is difficult in type 1 diabetes, as these patients are young, often children with unpredictable diet and exercise patterns, and their blood glucose levels fluctuate widely. Importantly, hypoglycaemia can occur with inappropriate insulin therapy, which can interfere with cognitive function. It is in this light that this book is written, focusing on technological advances like insulin pump therapy and continuous glucose Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Program | Research And Innovation

Type 1 Diabetes Program | Research And Innovation

#1 Ranked Children's Hospital by U. S. News & World Report Type 1 Diabetes Program | Research and Innovation Here in the Diabetes Program at Boston Childrens Hospital, we understand that when a child is diagnosed with diabetes, fears for her safety and uncertainties surrounding lifestyle changes can loom large for the entire family. Thats why our multidisciplinary team is in constant communication with you every step of the way to provide information and support. Throughout the entire treatment process, youll receive compassionate family-centered care from a truly integrated medical team that includes: specialists in diabetes and endocrinology who will determine the proper course of treatment for your child diabetes nurse educators who specialize in training and educating families with children who have diabetes. Our nurses will educate you about every aspect of caring for your child, including measuring insulin, injecting it, measuring blood glucose levels, and using an insulin pump. Most importantly, they will give you the information you need to ensure your childs best health and well-being. registered dietitians to help plan a customized meal plan for your child. They will also educate your whole family on the role of nutrition in the management of your childs diabetes. medical social workers to help the whole family navigate the challenges of life with diabetes and connect with support groups and other community resources. If theres an emergency complication, you can rest easy knowing that were here for you 24 hours a day, 7 days a week Because diabetes requires lifelong management, researchers at Boston Childrens Hospital are investigating the earliest stages of the disease in order to understand how the disease develops and how it can be treated. Perhaps the mos Continue reading >>

Managing Type 1 Diabetes: New Technology And Its Application

Managing Type 1 Diabetes: New Technology And Its Application

Managing type 1 diabetes: new technology and its application Insulin pumps, continuous glucose monitoring, smart glucose meters and phone apps are rapidly changing the way people with diabetes manage their blood glucose levels. General practitioners need to keep up with these innovations to feel comfortable managing people with type 1 diabetes both now and into the future. An understanding of how new devices for managing type 1 diabetes work and familiarity with the terminology used will help GPs support patients presenting with the common problems of hyperglycaemia and hypoglycaemia. Insulin pumps use only rapid-acting insulin and achieve the effect of long-acting insulin through constant delivery of rapid-acting insulin at varying rates across a 24-hour period. The common complication of insulin pump therapy of an occluded insulin delivery infusion set can be quickly corrected out of hospital if recognised and appropriately managed before diabetic ketoacidosis develops. Continuous glucose monitoring is now available for people using multiple daily injection insulin regimens as well as those using insulin pump therapy. It will be used increasingly by young people with type 1 diabetes because of new funding for those aged under 21 years. Smart glucose meters and phone apps can be used to calculate bolus insulin doses in people on multiple daily injection insulin regimens similarly to as in those using insulin pumps. Picture credit: BSIP/Belmonte/Diomedia.com Model used for illustrative purposes only Continue reading >>

Innovative Approaches To Treating Type 1 Diabetes Addressed In Beta-cell Replacement Presentations

Innovative Approaches To Treating Type 1 Diabetes Addressed In Beta-cell Replacement Presentations

Innovative Approaches to Treating Type 1 Diabetes Addressed in Beta-Cell Replacement Presentations Transplanting islet cells from pigs into humans and developing "universal donor" stem cell lines are two innovative approaches being explored for replacing deteriorating beta cells in people with type 1 diabetes, investigators explained during a news briefing and symposium on June 10, 2016, at the American Diabetes Association's 76th Scientific Sessions at the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center in New Orleans. Pancreatic islet cell transplantationusing islet cells from the pancreas of a deceased human organ donorhas been successfully performed in patients with type 1 diabetes whose blood glucose levels are difficult to control. The procedure can improve blood glucose control, temporarily eliminate the need for insulin injections and improve a patient's ability to detect hypoglycemia. It is still considered experimental, however, and, due to a shortage of donors, only approximately 1,000 such surgeries have been performed during the last decade. There is growing evidence to suggest that pig islet cells could provide a viable substitute for human pancreatic islet cell transplantation. David K.C. Cooper, MD, PhD, FRCS, Professor of Surgery, Thomas E. Starzi Transplantation Institute, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, reviewed progress to date on treating diabetes with the transplantation of pig pancreatic islet cells that produce insulin, during his symposium presentation, "Pig Islet Xenotransplantation." Previous studies have shown successful transplantation of pig islet cells into nonhuman primates (monkeys) with diabetes. "Monkeys with diabetes who received pig islet transplants and received immunosuppressant drug therapy experienced survival rates of more than Continue reading >>

Diabetes Technology In 2018: Where To Start, What To Know

Diabetes Technology In 2018: Where To Start, What To Know

Diabetes Technology in 2018: Where to Start, What to Know Advances in technology aimed at making diabetes management simpler and better are plentiful, so where to start? Advances in diabetes technology are plentiful. Ask your healthcare provider which new device or technology might simplify or improve your diabetes management. Even if you're a techno-phobe, you're likely to know that advances in technology aimed at helping those with type 1 and type 2 diabetes manage better are multiplying quickly. Your doctor or diabetes educator may have talked about continuous glucose monitoring (CGM), an artificial pancreas system, smart pens, smartphone apps and other options. Even if you are a techno-geek, it's enough to make your head spin. So OnTrackDiabetes asked two experts to weigh in on what to know and do, and which advances look most promising in the immediate future. Technology must be personalized to the person, says Amy Hess-Fischl, MS, RD, DN, BC-ADM, CDE, the transitional program coordinator at Kovler Diabetes Center, Chicago, and an editorial board member for OnTrack Diabetes. Everyone must figure out which system or technology is their system or best bet, she says. That can start with an informed discussion between you and your diabetes educator or your doctorbut be sure your health care professional is up to speed on technology. (Not an easy question to ask them, but an important one that will serve you better in the long run.) When she discusses technology with patients, Hess-Fischl takes their approach to management of their diabetes, among other factors, into account. For instance, the new closed-loop system (AKA the artificial pancreas ) has wonderful features, but someone who wants to manipulate their insulin may not want to give up what they perceive as a go Continue reading >>

Cleveland Clinic Innovations - Top 10 Medical Inventions | Cleveland Clinic Innovations

Cleveland Clinic Innovations - Top 10 Medical Inventions | Cleveland Clinic Innovations

#1 Hybrid Closed-Loop Insulin Delivery System Its the middle of the night, and once again, you cant sleep. You try to convince yourself that your child is OK, but can you ever be completely sure? You have done everything youre supposed to as the parent of a child with Type 1 Diabetes by maintaining a strict regimen of glucose tests, insulin injections, and a highly regulated diet. Yet, every night you relinquish all control to the unpredictable pancreas that resides within your child. While it is rare, 5% of T1D1 associated deaths occur without warning while sleeping, a statistic that distresses an exponential amount of patients, relatives, and caregivers all over the world. In late 2016, the FDA approved the first hybrid closed-loop insulin delivery system. This replaces the open loop concept in which there are essentially three separate systems at play: (1) the continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) device; (2) the insulin pump, and (3) the patient, who must use the information from the CGM to determine how much insulin to inject. This new technology enables direct communication between the CGM and insulin pump, and essentially removes the patient from the equation, save two to four pricks per day for calibration. It is being hailed as the worlds first artificial pancreas. This approach has not just made T1D management easier than ever, it is also getting praise for stabilizing blood glucose at an unprecedented level. In one study, adolescent average levels of blood glucose (also referred to as A1C levels) dropped from 7.7% to 7.1%, and adult levels dropped from 7.3% to 6.8%. Sensor readings also showed participants raised their target blood glucose range by nearly 7 percentage points for the adolescents and 4 points for adults. The remarkable results led to an FDA appr Continue reading >>

Artificial Pancreas For Type 1 Diabetes Could Reach Patients By 2018

Artificial Pancreas For Type 1 Diabetes Could Reach Patients By 2018

A new report brings welcome news to patients with type 1 diabetes: an artificial pancreas that continuously monitors blood glucose levels and delivers insulin to the body as and when needed could be available in the next 2 years. Type 1 diabetes is estimated to affect around 1.25 million children and adults in the United States. The condition arises when the beta cells of the pancreas stop producing insulin - the hormone that is responsible for removing glucose from the blood and transporting it to cells, where it is used for energy. Without insulin, blood glucose levels become too high. In order to control blood glucose levels, patients with type 1 diabetes require daily doses of insulin, either through injections or an insulin pump. Injections remain the most common form of insulin administration; two daily injections are normally recommended for patients who have just been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, normally increasing to three or four over time. Insulin pumps are a more advanced form of insulin delivery. They are devices that deliver a continuous dose of insulin 24 hours a day via a catheter that is inserted under the skin. The problems with current insulin therapies However, while mostly effective for blood glucose control in type 1 diabetes, current insulin delivery methods do not account for variability of insulin needs among patients with type 1 diabetes. The amount of insulin a patient needs can vary from day to day, depending on their diet, physical activity levels, and - for women - changes in insulin sensitivity during menstruation. According to report authors Drs. Roman Hovorka and Hood Thabit, of the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom, this puts pressure on patients with type 1 diabetes to regularly measure their blood glucose levels to mak Continue reading >>

These Developments In Diabetes Care Will Shape The Industry Next Year

These Developments In Diabetes Care Will Shape The Industry Next Year

How Medtronic's MiniMed 670G grows Production delays hobbled the June launch of Medtronic's hybrid closed-loop system. The technology has been hailed as a milestone because it's the first insulin pump that delivers insulin somewhat automatically. The system combines a continuous glucose monitor, an algorithm and a pump. They work together to measure and analyze glucose levels to adjust the amount of insulin delivered accordingly. Medtronic's system is considered a hybrid closed-loop because although the Guardian Sensor 3 and MiniMed 670G pump work together, they still require some patient input. For example, patients need to enter information about what they're eating and calibrate their pumps using fingerstick testing. The Food and Drug Administration approved the system in September 2016, months earlier than expected. Medtronic had recently introduced the MiniMed 630G system, meaning a number of patients had just purchased a new device. The number of people wanting the new system caused a spike in demand that slowed production, creating a backlog of people waiting to buy it. The slowdown weighed on Medtronic's total diabetes segment, which accounts for about 7 percent of its total revenue. The category declined 2 percent in constant currency last quarter. It rose 4 percent last fiscal year, which ended in April. The company does not break out the total diabetes segment revenue by category, but intensive insulin management represents the bulk of its sales. That group declined low single digits last quarter. Last fiscal year, it grew high single digits. Medtronic expects to ramp up production in its fourth quarter, which ends in April. Analysts expect fixing the slowdown will help the diabetes segment grow again. Impact of Abbott's FreeStyle Libre Abbott launched its Fr Continue reading >>

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