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Medical Innovations For Diabetes

7 Innovations That Are Changing The Way We Manage Diabetes, A Disease That Affects 371 Million People Worldwide

7 Innovations That Are Changing The Way We Manage Diabetes, A Disease That Affects 371 Million People Worldwide

It's been almost a century since researchers discovered a way to treat diabetes. Since then, there have been a number of medical and technological advances that aim to make the lives of people living with diabetes — both type 1 and type 2 — more manageable. Around the globe, the group of conditions affects 371 million people worldwide, a number that's expected to increase to 552 million by 2030. From monitoring blood sugar levels — a taxing experience that people with diabetes must grow used to doing every day — to ways that make insulin easier to deliver, here are some of the innovations that are changing the way we manage diabetes. Medtronic created the world's first 'artificial pancreas.' In September, the FDA approved a device that's often referred to as an "artificial pancreas" for use in people with type 1 diabetes over age 14. The device, made by Medtronic, is called the MiniMed 670G, and it works by automatically monitoring a person's blood sugar levels and administering insulin as needed — no constant checking and injecting required. That way, it can act like a pancreas, the organ in our bodies that in healthy people is able to moderate our blood sugar levels by pumping out insulin that can process the sugars found in food. Livongo is making a glucose monitor that can get software updates just like your phone. "No one cares about the technology," Glen Tullman, the CEO of California-based startup Livongo and whose son has Type 1 diabetes, told Business Insider. "They simply want to live their life." On Wednesday, the company added the capability for the monitor to receive software updates, eliminating the need for people to constantly upgrade to new glucose meters when the technology advances. Livongo also offers the testing strips the machine uses for Continue reading >>

Cleveland Clinic Innovations - Top 10 Medical Inventions | Cleveland Clinic Innovations

Cleveland Clinic Innovations - Top 10 Medical Inventions | Cleveland Clinic Innovations

#2 Diabetes Drugs that Reduce Cardiovascular Disease and Death Nearly a decade ago, a wave of new diabetes drugs hit the market with promises of lowering blood sugar. While an admirable goal, the first attempts came far short from reducing some of the scariest statistics for type II diabetes patients. Namely, half of all patients with type II diabetes will die from complications from cardiovascular disease. On their 65th birthday, those odds go up to 70%. In 2016, companies reemerged to reveal how a couple of new medications were dropping the rates in the double digits. The first drug, empagliflozin, was approved in 2014 as a prescription medication to improve glycemic control. A study of the drugs benefits in 2015 yielded significant results: patients showed reduction in non-fatal heart attack or non-fatal stroke by 14 percent when added to standard of care. This showed to reduce CV death by 38% and all mortality by 32%. This past June, the FDA Advisory Committee recommended the approval of the cardiovascular indication of empagliflozin. In the same month, liraglutide, an injected medicine approved in 2010, also showed a marked reduction in major CV events by 13% in CV death by 22%, and all mortality by 15%. While the mechanisms are still being researched, empaglifozin showed to modify the progression of heart disease by working with the kidney, while liraglutide has a comprehensive effect on many organs. Given the positive results, experts predict 2017 will mark a complete shift in the lineup of medicines prescribed for diabetes patients, as well as a new wave of research into new avenues to target Type II diabetes and its comorbidities. With the contribution of these new drugs, more patients will live to see the benefits. Continue reading >>

These Developments In Diabetes Care Will Shape The Industry Next Year

These Developments In Diabetes Care Will Shape The Industry Next Year

How Medtronic's MiniMed 670G grows Production delays hobbled the June launch of Medtronic's hybrid closed-loop system. The technology has been hailed as a milestone because it's the first insulin pump that delivers insulin somewhat automatically. The system combines a continuous glucose monitor, an algorithm and a pump. They work together to measure and analyze glucose levels to adjust the amount of insulin delivered accordingly. Medtronic's system is considered a hybrid closed-loop because although the Guardian Sensor 3 and MiniMed 670G pump work together, they still require some patient input. For example, patients need to enter information about what they're eating and calibrate their pumps using fingerstick testing. The Food and Drug Administration approved the system in September 2016, months earlier than expected. Medtronic had recently introduced the MiniMed 630G system, meaning a number of patients had just purchased a new device. The number of people wanting the new system caused a spike in demand that slowed production, creating a backlog of people waiting to buy it. The slowdown weighed on Medtronic's total diabetes segment, which accounts for about 7 percent of its total revenue. The category declined 2 percent in constant currency last quarter. It rose 4 percent last fiscal year, which ended in April. The company does not break out the total diabetes segment revenue by category, but intensive insulin management represents the bulk of its sales. That group declined low single digits last quarter. Last fiscal year, it grew high single digits. Medtronic expects to ramp up production in its fourth quarter, which ends in April. Analysts expect fixing the slowdown will help the diabetes segment grow again. Impact of Abbott's FreeStyle Libre Abbott launched its Fr Continue reading >>

New And Innovative Diabetes Treatments

New And Innovative Diabetes Treatments

Post a comment / May 21, 2012 at 9:57 AM Drugs that mimic beneficial bacteria found in the human gut, implantable and incisionless weight loss devices and stem cells that restore pancreatic function. If the world is going to make a dent in the diabetes epidemic , itll require innovative approaches like those mentioned above and more. Solutions to the whole body problem of diabetes are coming from a wide variety of sources: the chairman of Whole Foods, innovative but largely unknown startups, entrenched industry giants and stem cell researchers, for example. The following innovations in the treatment of diabetes provide some hope of lowering blood sugar levels and the economic toll of this costly and chronic condition. Gut bacteria: The gut is home to trillions of bacteria, some of which can improve or worsen insulin resistance in mice and perhaps humans. Plus, certain types of bacteria are more often found in the guts of lean or obese mice. If researchers can figure out which bacterial species in the gut are beneficial and which are pathogenic, they might be able to reduce diabetes or even cure it, Nature reported . It may be possible to develop drugs that mimic the chemicals produced by the bacteria found in lean peoples guts, or inhibit molecules that lead to insulin resistance and diabetes. Nu Me Health , co-founded by the chairman of Whole Foods Market, is developing a proprietary blend of prebiotics and other natural, plant-derived ingredients that are designed to alter the composition of the bacteria living in the gastrointestinal tract in order to help people with prediabetes maintain healthy blood glucose levels and body weight. Incisionless, implantable devices: Medical device startup EndoSphere has developed an incisionless, anti-obesity device that could be Continue reading >>

Will These Three Innovations Change Your Clinical Practice?

Will These Three Innovations Change Your Clinical Practice?

Will these three innovations change your clinical practice? Wearable gadgets, personalized diagnostics, and computer-assisted music: the world of healthcare technology aims to improve the patient experience, contribute to long-term health outcomes and, ultimately, make it easier for physicians to deliver care. What's new and in the pipeline in 2017? Medical News Today report from the recent WIRED Health conference in London, United Kingdom. How can healthcare professionals harness the latest technological advancements to help their patients? One of the recurring themes woven into the speakers' sessions was placing the patient at the center of care. Despite the rapidly advancing pace of technological innovation, many of the health problems faced by the wider population persist. In light of this, how can innovative technology be harnessed to help each patient and their individual needs? Microlevel focus is key in fighting sickness and disease, and this means finding a way to look at the individual. Whether you are looking for new ways to address your type 2 diabetes patients' care, are interested in the world of personalized molecular diagnostics for cancer , or just want to recommend some soothing music for your patients' anxiety and pain, Medical News Today report on some of the technological innovations that could change patient care. Verily: Creating solutions with the user in mind "We're going to start leveraging technologies and place them in the hands of providers and patients," said cardiologist Dr. Jessica Mega of Verily , formerly Google Life Sciences, addressing the large audience at WIRED Health's main stage. "From a provider standpoint, how do we create solutions with the user in mind?" asked Dr. Mega. "What is valuable to an individual and how do we do that Continue reading >>

How Digital Innovation Is Influencing Diabetes Care

How Digital Innovation Is Influencing Diabetes Care

How Digital Innovation is Influencing Diabetes Care How Digital Innovation is Influencing Diabetes Care Adherence is one of the biggest challenges physicians face in diabetes management.The reasons for noncompliance are multiple, including time-consuming and complicated care plans that require regular glucose monitoring, insulin injections, food-intake monitoring, multiple logs and diaries, and, if not controlled, the addition of new therapies. For physicians and clinical care teams, the commitment to keep their patients engaged with their care is significant and frustrating. Additionally, the types of care protocols physicians need to think through have increased due to innovations in diabetes management and advances in classes of treatments. The mixture of disease escalation and progression coupled with reduced clinical time, increased demand on physicians, and ongoing adherence challenges have created the perfect storm for personalization and digital health solutions. As scientific and care breakthroughs have advanced, so have new digital solutions, which offer a wider range of targeted and personalized support to physicians and people with diabetes. Such digital solutions, like mobile apps, are rapidly changing the management and care of patients with diabetes from simple blood glucose tracking to more sophisticated clinical decision tools that enable behavioral changes, better adherence, and proactive diabetes management. Furthermore, the capacity to collect and analyze real-world data has moved the real-time management of diabetes even further forward. See also: Changing Behavior is Ongoing, And That's Why It Requires Communications Unfortunately, data alone cannot solve the compliance and adherence issues. Nor has access to better real-time data helped address t Continue reading >>

Advances In Medical Technology

Advances In Medical Technology

Improving Diabetes Care Treatment of diabetes, like most areas of medicine, has changed considerably over the years as a result of technological advances. From the discovery, purification, and mass production of insulin to the development of less painful ways to deliver it, the lives of people with diabetes have been improved — and sometimes greatly extended — by both diabetes-focused research and broader improvements in medical care. Although it can be difficult to predict the impact of an emerging technology, there are several exciting developments on the horizon that may soon significantly change how people with diabetes receive medical care or manage the condition on their own. At least one relatively new innovation, the continuous glucose monitor, is already changing the daily routine for some. This article examines several innovations that are likely to change — or are already changing — the way medical care is delivered and the way medical information is communicated. Not all assessments of medical technology are completely upbeat, however. Especially when it comes to electronic health records, many experts are either frustrated at the pace of progress or skeptical of how the technology will be used. Electronic health records Dr. Richard Hellman, who is past-president of the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and has an endocrinology practice in North Kansas City, Missouri, laments that although someone can get money from an ATM or use a credit card anywhere in the world, medical information often cannot be easily accessed when it is needed. “The tragedy is that information doesn’t move around to the benefit of the patient,” he says. “There is much too much information that can’t be transmitted.” The problem is not a technologic Continue reading >>

Artificial Pancreas For Diabetes Treatment Tops Cleveland Clinic's 2018 Top 10 Medical Innovations

Artificial Pancreas For Diabetes Treatment Tops Cleveland Clinic's 2018 Top 10 Medical Innovations

Artificial pancreas for diabetes treatment tops Cleveland Clinic's 2018 top 10 medical innovations Imagine curing blindness with gene therapyor a simple implant to treat sleep apnea. What about an artificial pancreas to better treat diabetes? Copyright 2017 Scripps Media, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. Imagine curing blindness with gene therapyor a simple implant to treat sleep apnea. What about an artificial pancreas to better treat diabetes? These are real medical breakthroughsamong the top 10 innovationsjust released by Cleveland Clinic that are expected to make waves in 2018. "Normally, if you'd gone ten years ago, it was a drug or a device that was going to change one thing," explained Dr. Michael Roizen, chief wellness officer for Cleveland Clinic."Now, it's really at the interface and multiple things for each innovation." Some of the greatest minds in medicine -- from all around the world -- are in Cleveland this week for the Clinic's 15th annual Medical Innovation Summit. The highlight: the ten medical innovations expected to have the biggest impact across the United Statesin the coming year. "We interview between 150 and 200 physicians, another 30 to 40 venture capitalists and media people," explained Dr. Roizen. That begins the process of whittling hundreds of innovations down to ten. At the top of the list this time around isthe world's first artificial pancreas to treat diabetes. "The innovation and the new development is a hybrid, closed-system pump, that is linked to a sensor that can be placed in the abdomen or on the abdomen," said Dr. James Young, executive dean of Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine. The sensor constantly monitors glucose levels and communicates with the pu Continue reading >>

Innovations Diabetes Mine

Innovations Diabetes Mine

The DiabetesMine Innovation Project began in 2007 as an idea to improve the functionalityand aesthetics of the medical devices and tools that patients with diabetes use andoften wear on their bodies every day of their lives. The initiative went viral, and quicklydeveloped from online conversations into the DiabetesMine Design Challenge, aninternational crowdsourcing competition that has awarded over $50,000 in prize moneyover the years. In Spring of 2007, DiabetesMine editor-in-chief Amy Tenderich posted an Open Letter toSteve Jobs , calling for the gurus of consumer design to help revolutionize design ofdiabetes devices. The outcry was picked up by TechCrunch, the New York Times,BusinessWeek and a whole bunch of other leading blogs and publications. San Francisco-based design firm Adaptive Path came forward to tackle the challengehead-on. Their team created a prototype for a new combo insulin pump / continuousglucose monitor called the Charmr. Unlike anything designed for diabetes before, it wasabout the size of a USB stick, with a flat, color touch screen and can be worn on a chainas a necklace or dangled on your keychain! Watch the video about this visionary creation here: In the weeks and months that followed, numerous individuals and organizations cameforward with more compelling new prototypes, designs, and ideas. These included newconcepts for glucose meters, insulin pumps, lancing devices (for testing blood glucose),devices for transporting medical records or tracking glucose results, diabetes supply carrycases, educational programs, and more. Inspired by the passion and commitment to device innovation, we launched the firstannual DiabetesMine Design Challenge in Spring 2008. We sparked the imagination ofhundreds across the nation and globe, and received press Continue reading >>

The Future Of Diabetes Management

The Future Of Diabetes Management

One in eleven persons has to cope with diabetes worldwide on a daily basis According to the latest estimates of the WHO, 422 million people suffer from diabetes worldwide – and the number is growing steadily. It means that one person in eleven has to manage the chronic condition on a daily basis, which might lead to stroke, blindness, heart attack, kidney failure or amputation. There are two types of diabetes: when the body does not produce enough insulin (type 1 diabetes) and when the organism cannot utilize the generated insulin (type 2 diabetes). While the latter can be prevented with conscious lifestyle choices, the former is a mystery to the medical community. But if someone has diabetes, that means having a constant companion. In both cases, the treatment of the symptoms requires constant blood glucose control, which usually requires a kind of insulin intake at regular intervals, as well as blood pressure control and/or foot care. It is a truly technologically dependent condition: you need to monitor your blood glucose level, your blood pressure, your weight, follow a meal plan, test your blood every now and then. Luckily, there are so many digital health innovations for diabetes patients out there that diabetes management has been improving for years steadily – and it will significantly change in the coming years. But technology in itself is insufficient: you need people to utilize it – and diabetes patients do. It is one of the largest and most motivated communities both online and offline, sharing their experiences on social media and other platforms. I believe one of the most amazing development is due to the diabetes community: the #wearenotwaiting movement advocated the absolutely efficient DIY artificial pancreas for so long and so successfully that t Continue reading >>

New Diabetes Treatment Tops Cleveland Clinic's Top 10 Medical Innovations 2018 List (photos)

New Diabetes Treatment Tops Cleveland Clinic's Top 10 Medical Innovations 2018 List (photos)

CLEVELAND, Ohio -- An insulin pump that functions like an artificial pancreas ranked No. 1 on Cleveland Clinic's list of the Top 10 Medical Innovations for 2018. The announcement of the entire list will be made Wednesday as part of the Cleveland Clinic Medical Innovation Summit. Other innovations being honored include gene therapy for blindness, new ways of creating vaccines and targeted breast cancer treatment. The insulin pump, which will help patients with Type 1 diabetes, was judged to be the innovation that will have the biggest impact on healthcare next year. "This is a major breakthrough," said Dr. James Young, chairman of the Endocrinology and Metabolism Institute at the Cleveland Clinic. The pump senses blood glucose levels and delivers insulin via subcutaneous sensors, Young said. This year, a 20-person committee looked at more than 300 nominated innovations to find ones that are likely to have the biggest immediate impact, said the Clinic's Dr. Michael Roizen, who will host a multi-media presentation of the Top 10 Medical Innovations. Roizen is chairman of the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute and chief wellness officer. Roizen is excited about the rapid development of new vaccines, and the development of new ways to deliver them, an innovation that earned a spot on the list. "It means really radical changes in vaccine prevention," Roizen said. The presentation of the Top 10 Medical Innovations comes on the final day of the Medical Innovation Summit, which started Monday at the Huntington Convention Center. Below, the Top 10 Medical Innovations of 2018 are listed in order of importance: No. 1: Hybrid Closed-Loop Insulin Delivery System Hailed as the world's first artificial pancreas, the hybrid closed-loop insulin delivery system allows a glucose monitoring Continue reading >>

A New Innovation For Type 2 Diabetes

A New Innovation For Type 2 Diabetes

It is often the simple fixes (and fixers) that make all the difference in the world: the genius who came up with giving out numbers to deli customers rather than having them mob the counter; assigned seating in movie theaters; E-ZPass . Indeed, for all the excitement over paradigm-shifting technologies in healthcare and medicine gene-editing through CRISPR , virtual reality surgical training it seems we are seeing more and more examples of people solving age-old problems through a stroke of ingenuity. With the proverbial popsicle stick and chewing gum, that is. And sometimes, the two are combined: a bold new technology is coupled with a strikingly simple, intuitive innovation. That has been my initial impression of a new drug-delivery system , called the Medici, which is made by Intarcia Therapeutics . The Medici is an osmotic pump about the size of a matchstick, whichin a procedure that takes about a minute or so to performis inserted under the skin. From there, its makers claim, the pump delivers medicine in a steady-state dose for several months (and even up to a year). Intarcia has completed several late-stage clinical trials in which it uses the pump to deliver a glucose-controlling drug continuously for monthsan idea, that if successful (and approved by the FDA) could significantly help patients with type 2 diabetes , fewer than half of whom maintain the recommended glycemic levels. One big reason why is that its often hard to adhere to rigorous schedules for administering medicine. Intarcia is expected to seek a new drug application for the product from the FDA soon, says Christine Aylward, managing director at Foresight Capital Management, which has backed the company. Im always leery of writing about medicines and procedures that are still in the experimental Continue reading >>

Driving Innovation In Diabetes At Profil

Driving Innovation In Diabetes At Profil

Discover how Profil Germany supports innovation in diabetes research and treatment. As part of our deep commitment to improving the quality of life and healthcare of people with diabetes and other metabolic diseases, we support our clients to explore the full range of diabetes treatment and prevention innovationstaking into account the high diversity of disease trigger and pathogenetic traits (Figure 1). One major challenge to be addressed by innovations in diabetes is the demographic transition towards an ageing society, especially with the related predisposition to frailty, disability and premature death. Implementing smart products and services fordiabetes prevention and care to address ageing has great potential. At Profil, we concur with WHO policy and are committed to an integrated approach to lifestyle and disease when aligning target groups to health goals, considering riskbenefit balances of innovations, and exploring health- and process-related performance indicators (Figure 2). Combining molecular profiling with the consideration of an individuals traits, goals and preferences may optimize the precision fit of measures for diabetes prevention and treatment. The identification of patient-specific diabetes signatures and polypharmacy profiles promotes the implementation of more personalized treatments. Comorbidity-adjusted diabetes care acknowledges the high diversity in functional reserves and cognitive performancesfactors that critically determine self-management capabilities, treatment benefit and the likelihood of hospitalization. Profil has a large methodological portfolio for anthropometric, metabolic and cardiovascular assessments , and our clinical trials include careful monitoring of treatment effect modifiers, such as dietary and physical activity ha Continue reading >>

Innovations In Technology For The Treatment Of Diabetes: Clinical Development Of The Artificial Pancreas (an Autonomous System)

Innovations In Technology For The Treatment Of Diabetes: Clinical Development Of The Artificial Pancreas (an Autonomous System)

Innovations in Technology for the Treatment of Diabetes: Clinical Development of the Artificial Pancreas (an Autonomous System) 2General Hospital Devices Branch, Office of Device Evaluation, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, Maryland 2General Hospital Devices Branch, Office of Device Evaluation, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, Maryland 2General Hospital Devices Branch, Office of Device Evaluation, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, Maryland 3Division of Chemistry and Toxicology Devices, Office of In Vitro Diagnostic Device Evaluation and Safety, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, Maryland 4Office of Clinical Pharmacology, Office of Translational Sciences, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, Maryland 5Glucose Sensing and Insulin Delivery Technologies Program, Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology, and Metabolic Diseases, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 1Mills-Peninsula Health Services, San Mateo, California 2General Hospital Devices Branch, Office of Device Evaluation, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, Maryland 3Division of Chemistry and Toxicology Devices, Office of In Vitro Diagnostic Device Evaluation and Safety, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, Maryland 4Office of Clinical Pharmacology, Office of Translational Sciences, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, U.S. Food and Dru Continue reading >>

Top 10 Medical Innovations For 2018 Revealed

Top 10 Medical Innovations For 2018 Revealed

An artificial pancreas to help diabetics. A pacemaker for sleep apnea. Gene therapy for blindness. These are some of the innovations that will change healthcare in 2018, according to a panel of Cleveland Clinic physicians and scientists led by Chief Wellness Officer Michael Roizen, MD . Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services Policy The Top 10 Medical Innovations of 2018 were announced as the culminating event of Cleveland Clinics Medical Innovation Summit , held in Cleveland, October 23-25, 2017. Here they are, in order of anticipated importance: Hybrid Closed-Loop Insulin Delivery System Hailed as the worlds first artificial pancreas, the hybrid closed-loop insulin delivery system helps make Type 1 diabetes more manageable. Approved by the FDA in late 2016, this new technology enables direct communication between the continuous glucose monitoring device and insulin pump to stabilize blood glucose at an unprecedented level. The technology replaces the open loop concept that requires patients to use information from their continuous glucose monitor to determine how much insulin to inject. More patients are expected to demand the technology in 2018 as more insurers reimburse for the system. Experts are optimistic that outcomes in patients with Type 1 diabetes will accelerate a similar technology for Type 2 diabetes. Neuromodulation to Treat Obstructive Sleep Apnea Sleep apnea, the most common sleep disturbance, impacts 21 million Americans and can lead to high blood pressure, heart disease and stroke. While the continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) device is the gold-standard treatment, more than 40 percent of sleep apnea patients refuse Continue reading >>

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