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Medical Abbreviation For Diabetes

Pre-diabetes, Ifg And Igt

Pre-diabetes, Ifg And Igt

Diabetes is diagnosed by either an overnight fasting blood sugar greater than 125 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or by a blood sugar of 200 mg/dL or greater two hours after an oral glucose tolerance test (GTT). Two terms are used to describe what used to be called “borderline diabetes.” Impaired fasting glucose (IFG) is a condition in which the fasting blood sugar is elevated between 110 and 125 mg/dL after an overnight fast butis not high enough to be true diabetes. Impaired Glucose Tolerance (IGT) is a condition in which the blood sugar is elevated between 140 and 199 mg/dL after a two-hour glucose challenge. Among U.S. adults 40-74 years of age, 16 million (15.6 percent) have IGT and 10 million (9.7 percent) have IFG. If you are diagnosed with either IFG or IGT, consider yourself lucky as it is an early warning, a wake up call. Ignorance of diabetes is anything but bliss. We screen for diabetes with a Glucose Insulin Tolerance Test (GITT). It gives the extra advantage of knowing your insulin and sugar levels. If you’re over 40, obese, have high blood pressure, a family history of diabetes, low energy, excessive thirst or urination, or have slow healing of skin injuries, ask your doctor if you need diabetes screening. Continue reading >>

Common Medical Abbreviations And Acronyms List

Common Medical Abbreviations And Acronyms List

Medical abbreviations: What do they mean? Have you ever wondered why you can't read the doctor's note or the letters and numbers on a prescription? Health care professionals often quickly scribble notes with important medical information that they would like a patient to reference in regard to the type of current, or recently diagnosed disease, syndrome, or other health condition(s). Have you ever see the doctor's notes in your medical record and found peculiar abbreviations and jargon? Do you wonder what the letters and numbers mean on your prescriptions or other items related to a disease, syndrome, or disorder? Doctors and other health care professionals commonly use a list of abbreviations, acronyms, and other medical terminology as a reference to rapidly search and accurately record information about, and give instructions to their patients. There is no standard or approved list used by health care professionals to search for medical acronyms or abbreviations. Therefore, it is important to understand the context in which the abbreviation or term has been used. Abbreviations, acronyms, and medical terminology are used for many conditions, and for instructions on medication prescribed by your doctor. This is a short list of common abbreviations you may have seen on a doctor's notepad; a prescription drug package or bottle; lab or other test results; or in your doctor's notes. B-ALL: B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia FSH: Follicle stimulating hormone. A blood test for follicle stimulating hormone which is used to evaluate fertility in women. IBS: Irritable bowel syndrome (A medical disease that involves the gastrointestinal tract.) MDS: Myelo dysplastic syndrome TSH: Thyroid stimulating hormone. A blood test for TSH is used to diagnose thyroid disease. Use this list Continue reading >>

What Should My Diabetic Bracelet Say?

What Should My Diabetic Bracelet Say?

Choosing your Diabetic bracelet should be fun! You get to pick a piece of jewelry that will look amazing and can help keep you safe. Figuring out what to engrave on your bracelet shouldn’t be hard either. Follow these 5 easy steps for the Best Diabetic Bracelet Engraving! Step 1: Your condition – be as specific as you can. Think about how long you want it to take the medical responders to figure out how to help you. Common Diabetic engravings and abbreviations include: Diabetes | Diabetic | T1 | T2 | T1 Diabetes | T2 Diabetes | Diabetes Type I | Diabetes Type II Step 2: Your Name – First and Last. In order for first responders to get your medical records and let your ICE contacts know who they have. You may lose your purse or wallet, so having your name clearly engraved on a medical ID is a safe bet. Step 3: Insulin Situation: Are you insulin dependent or need an insulin pump? This is important information for first responders. Add to the Diabetes condition: Insulin Pump | Ins.Dep | Insulin Dependent Step 4: Medications or allergies: Any long term medications are good to list (don’t worry about dosages). Listing severe food and drug allergies is crucial to avoid accidental drug administration. Step 5: Emergency contact information: Who do you want to be notified first if something were to happen to you? Emergency contacts aren’t just there for you, these contacts are helpful to nurses and doctors if you’re unconscious. If there’s room add a second number or a doctor’s number. ICE 727-123-5658 727-125-5489 FOR kiddos with juvenile diabetes, add as many numbers that space allows Mom 727-222-5869 Dad 727-111-8569 Dr. 504-888-5869 If you have Diabetes, the engraving on your medical ID bracelet should look a little like this: Diabetes Lori Smith insulin pump Continue reading >>

Medical Definition Of Diabetes Mellitus

Medical Definition Of Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes mellitus: More commonly referred to as "diabetes" -- a chronic disease associated with abnormally high levels of the sugar glucose in the blood. Diabetes is due to one of two mechanisms: Inadequate production of insulin (which is made by the pancreas and lowers blood glucose), or Inadequate sensitivity of cells to the action of insulin. The two main types of diabetes correspond to these two mechanisms and are called insulin dependent (type 1) and non-insulin dependent (type 2) diabetes. In type 1 diabetes there is no insulin or not enough of it. In type 2 diabetes, there is generally enough insulin but the cells upon which it should act are not normally sensitive to its action. The signs and symptoms of both types of diabetes include increased urine output and decreased appetite as well as fatigue. Diabetes is diagnosed by blood glucose testing, the glucose tolerance test, and testing of the level of glycosylated hemoglobin (glycohemoglobin or hemoglobin A1C). The mode of treatment depends on the type of the diabetes. The major complications of diabetes include dangerously elevated blood sugar, abnormally low blood sugar due to diabetes medications, and disease of the blood vessels which can damage the eyes, kidneys, nerves, and heart. Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosis, Treatment, Medication Last Editorial Review: 1/26/2017 Continue reading >>

Diabetes (type 1 And Type 2) In Children And Young People: Diagnosis And Management.

Diabetes (type 1 And Type 2) In Children And Young People: Diagnosis And Management.

Go to: Abbreviations from the 2004 guideline Abbreviation CI Confidence interval CGMS Continuous glucose monitoring system CSII Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion DCCT Diabetes Control and Complications Trial GDG Guideline Development Group GPP Good practice point GRP Guideline Review Panel HbA1, HbA1c Glycated haemoglobin IQ Intelligence quotient LSHTM London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine NCB National Children's Bureau NCC-WCH National Collaborating Centre for Women's and Children's Health NICE National Institute for Clinical Excellence NICE TA NICE Technology Appraisal NNT Number needed to treat OGTT Oral glucose tolerance test OR Odds ratio QALY Quality-adjusted life year RCT Randomised controlled (clinical) trial RR Relative risk (or risk ratio) SD Standard deviation SE Standard error WMD Weighted mean difference Go to: Abbreviations and acronyms from the 2015 update Abbreviation/acronym Definition 3-OHB 3-hydroxybutyrate Ab+ Antibody positive ACE Angiotensin converting enzyme ACR Albumin:creatinine ratio ADA American Diabetes Association AER Albumin excretion rate AGREE Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation BDR Background diabetic retinopathy BFST Behavioural family systems therapy BMI Body mass index BMI-SDS Body mass index – standard deviation score BSPED British Society for Paediatric Endocrinology and Diabetes CASCADE Child and Adult Structured Competencies Approach to Diabetes Education CBT Cognitive behavioural therapy CGMS Continuous glucose monitoring system CHF Chronic heart failure CI Confidence interval CO2 Carbon dioxide CSII Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion CST Coping Skills Training CVD Cardiovascular disease DCCT Diabetes Control and Complications Trial DKA Diabetic ketoacidosis DQOLY-SF Diabetes Quality of Lif Continue reading >>

The Alphabet Soup Of Diabetes - What Do All Of Those Acronyms Mean?

The Alphabet Soup Of Diabetes - What Do All Of Those Acronyms Mean?

Being diagnosed with a chronic condition like diabetes not only leads to doctor appointments and lifestyle changes, but also the necessity of learning more about the condition. Enter the alphabet soup of medical acronyms and abbreviations. Although they certainly come in handy once you’ve mastered their meaning, acronyms and abbreviations can be downright confusing and difficult for a layperson to decode, especially those who are newly diagnosed, their family members and friends. We’re here to help. The following are some of the more common acronyms that are associated with and used by diabetes-related organizations, caregivers and PWDs (persons with diabetes). It is not intended to be an all-inclusive list, so remember.....when dealing with medical professionals, don’t be embarrassed to ask about abbreviations, especially if they involve a medication or procedure. AACE: American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, a professional community of physicians specializing in endocrinology, diabetes, and metabolism committed to enhancing the ability of its members to provide the highest quality of patient care (www.aace.com). AADE: American Association of Diabetes Educators, a multi-disciplinary professional membership organization dedicated to improving diabetes care through education. ACE: American College of Endocrinology, the scientific, educational and charitable arm of AACE dedicated to promoting the art and science of clinical endocrinology, diabetes, and metabolism for the improvement of patient care and public health. ACE also stands for angiotensinconverting enzyme, a class of medication used to treat high blood pressure that can have additional benefits by decreasing protein in the urine, a marker of diabetes involving kidney function. ADA: American Diab Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes- Abbreviations And Medical Terms Defined

Type 1 Diabetes- Abbreviations And Medical Terms Defined

Type 1 Diabetes- Abbreviations and medical terms defined While in nursing school I had a classmate who had a rather anxious way about herself. During our hospital training we would have a short debrief, err – drilling from our clinical instructors and then head off for our researched clinical experience. As we sat down this classmate sheepishly told our instructor, “I have looked everywhere and I cannot seem to figure out what my patient is allergic to.” (15 years ago we didn’t have the convenience of Google, can you imagine?) The Instructor replied, “What is the abbreviation?” My classmate blurted out, “She’s allergic to NKA!” My Instructors head looked like it was about to pop off as she said: “That means she has No Known Allergies!” Case in point being… what do all these abbreviations and medical terms mean to the rest of us? Newly diagnosed we see and hear many acronyms. With Type 1 Diabetes- Abbreviations and medical terms defined you will begin to understand this new language. ADA- American Diabetes Association Autoimmune- An overactive immune response of the body to itself. The Immune system creates antibodies that attack and destroy healthy cells and tissues. BMI- Body Mass Index, uses height and weight to determine body fat BS- Blood Sugar is the amount of glucose in your blood. CDE- Certified Diabetes Educator CGM- Continuous glucose monitor, used for “real time” blood sugars. DKA – Diabetic Ketoacidosis is a life threatening condition that develops in response to insufficient insulin. The body begins to break down fat and muscle to use for energy forming ketones and metabolic acidosis. Endocrinologist- (Endo Doc) A physician who specializes in diagnosing and treating problems in the endocrine system. You should have one of these Continue reading >>

Diabetes Jargon, Abbreviations And Terminology

Diabetes Jargon, Abbreviations And Terminology

Diabetes Jargon, Abbreviations and Terminology This list of diabetes jargons includes most of the terminology and abbreviations that are used by those with diabetes, support nurses and in general on the forum. This list has been compiled from the Useful Abbreviations thread on the Diabetes Forum . Thanks go to Jem, Stuboy, SarahQ, Dennis, Tubolard and Timo2. This page will be updated regularly in accordance with any more terms added to the forum thread. For more information on terms used regarding diabetes, see the diabetes glossary . Amylin (Islet Amyloid Polypeptide) - Slows the rate at which digested carbohydrate appears as glucose in the blood and thus reduces total insulin demand Basal - referred to as the slow acting insulin used to cover your bodies own glucose stores Beta cells - Pancreatic cells responsible for the production of insulin, amylin and C-peptide BG - blood glucose (this is the measurement of glucose circulating in the blood) Biphasic insulin - An insulin mixture containing both fast acting and slow acting insulin, usually injected twice daily Bolus - referred to as the fast acting insulin used to cover food, typically carbohydrates, some cover for protein as well. Brittle diabetes (labile diabetes) - Most often seen in type 1 CHO - Carbohydrate (Carbon Hydrogen Oxygen) C-peptide - A by-product of normal insulin production Double diabetes - Comprises symptoms of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes Fulminant type 1 - An idiopathic subtype which has a very rapid onset and no honeymoon period G.I - Glycemic index. A G.I value tells you how rapidly a particular carbohydrate is turned G.L - Glycemic load. A G.L value takes into account not only G.I, but also the total quantity GAD (Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase) - Antibodies test Glucagon - A hormone produced Continue reading >>

What Does The Diabetes Term Mdi Mean?

What Does The Diabetes Term Mdi Mean?

Virtually all type 1 diabetics (people with type 1 diabetes) and some type 2 diabetics (people with type 2 diabetes) take both basal and fast-acting insulin. This is called MDI (for multiple daily injection) or Basal/Bolus therapy. Bolus is a medical and patient slang term for an injection of fast-acting insulin taken with a meal. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Terms

Diabetes Terms

Common Diabetes Daily Forum Acronyms and Abbreviations A1c – Blood test which measures average glucose level over roughly the past 3 months A&E – Accident & Emergency department ADA – American Diabetes Association ADAG – A1c-Derived Average Glucose ADE – Adverse Drug Event AHA – American Heart Association ALA – Alpha Lipoic Acid AMA American Medical Association APMA – American Podiatric Medical Association APRN – Advanced Practice Registered Nurse AST – Alternate Site Testing BG – Blood Glucose Level BGM – Blood Glucose Monitor or Meter BMI – Body Mass Index BMR – Basal Metabolic Rate BP – Blood Pressure BG – Blood Glucose Level (we don’t use the term blood sugar or bs) BTW – By the Way BUN – Blood Urea Nitrogen CBT – Cognitive Behavioral Therapy CCU – Critical Care Unit CDA – Canadian Diabetes Association CDC – Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (United States) CDE – Certified Diabetes Educator CGMS – Continuous Glucose Monitoring System CHF – Congestive Heart Failure CKD – Chronic Kidney Disease COPD – Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease CR – Controlled Release CRP – C-Reactive Protein CVD – Cardiovascular Disease D – Diabetes DAFNE – Dose Adjustment For Normal Eating DCCT – Diabetes Control and Complications Trial DD – Diabetes Daily (This site) DE – Diabetes Educator DIA – Duration of Insulin Action DKA – Diabetic Ketoacidosis DM – Diabetes Mellitus DP – Dawn Phenomenon DPN – Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy DSN – Diabetes Specialist Nurse DUK – Diabetes United Kingdom DVT – Deep Vein Thrombosis DX – Diagnosis or Diagnosed eAG – estimated Average Glucose EMG – Electromyogram EMR – Electronic Medical Record EMT – Emergency Medical Technician Endo – Endocrinolog Continue reading >>

Terms And Definitions For Your Diabetic Bracelet

Terms And Definitions For Your Diabetic Bracelet

Simple ways to engrave your conditions and meds so first responders know what to do and what not to do. DIABETES 1 or DIABETES 2—Every worldwide Diabetes Organizations strongly recommends using Arabic Numbers instead of Roman Numerals for "type" catagories to avoid serious mistakes. Diabetic Abbreviations: DI (Diabetes Insipidus) DM (Diabetes Mellitus) GDM (Gestational Diabetes Mellitus) Engraving Examples: DIABETES 2-ON MEDS JANE DOE ICE: 555-555-1212 Don’t forget: Include other serious medical conditions and meds. See the ADA for more help... To buy a diabetic ID bracelet through the ADA and have Medical ID Fashions contribute directly for all products purchased, please go to Shop Diabetes Store and select the Medical ID Fashions ad for over 600 bracelet styles—the most complete line of diabetic bracelets anywhere. The ADA thanks you for your support. How the ADA works with Medical ID Fashions: Please go to Diabetes-ADA on this website for how Medical ID Fashions works hand-in-hand with the ADA to help diabetes patients all over the world. • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 2014 National Diabetes Statistics Report: Estimates of Diabetes and Its Burden in the United States. Fact Sheet, Atlanta: US Department of Health and Human Services, 2014. • Mayo Clinic: DM1 Complications August 02, 2014 (accessed May 2016) Why do diabetics need a medical bracelet? People with diabetes can have a number of symptoms such as confusion, slurred speech, unconsciousness and lack of coordination. Sometimes these symptoms can come on rapidly without warning. Your slurred speech and lack of coordination could give the appearance of being drunk to police, and you may end up in jail instead of a hospital. In any accident, if you’re unconscious and can’t speak for you Continue reading >>

Dm | Definition Of Dm By Medical Dictionary

Dm | Definition Of Dm By Medical Dictionary

DM | definition of DM by Medical dictionary Diabetes mellitus, also, doctor of medicineMD is used in the US (di?a-bet'ez) [Gr. diabetes, (one) passing through] A general term for diseases marked by excessive urination and elevated blood sugar, esp. diabetes mellitus (DM). DM that is exceptionally difficult to control. The disease is marked by alternating episodes of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia. Frequent adjustments of dietary intake and insulin dosage are required. Diabetes may be brittle when insulin is not well absorbed; insulin requirements vary rapidly; insulin is improperly prepared or administered; the Somogyi phenomenon is present; the patient has coexisting anorexia or bulimia; the patient's daily exercise routine, diet, or medication schedule varies; or physiological or psychological stress is persistent. 1. Asymptomatic DM, a stage in which no obvious clinical signs and symptoms of the disease are present but blood glucose measurements are abnormal. 2. Type 2 DM occurring in an obese child or adolescent. The syndrome is sometimes referred to as mature onset diabetes of youth (MODY). DM arising in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). It is the most common complication of CF other than those conditions that affect the lungs. It is caused by destruction of islet cells (the cells in the pancreas that make insulin) as well as a decrease in sensitivity of the liver and muscles to the actions of insulin. The disease usually first becomes clinically obvious in young adults. Although CFRD can be diagnosed with fasting glucose blood tests or hemoglobin A1c levels, many experts recommend using an oral glucose tolerance test. Fifteen to thirty percent of patients with CF are affected by their 20th birthday, and perhaps as many as half have the disease by age 30. CFRD i Continue reading >>

Rds Standard Abbreviations

Rds Standard Abbreviations

The following list of standard abbreviations may be used without further definition within the text (not the abstract) of your manuscript considered for publication in the RDS. See information for manuscript preparation for further details on the use of abbreviations within abstracts. For a printable version of this list use the 'Print page' link at the end of this page or download the PDF version. Å: angstrom (10-10 m) Ab: antibody Ag: antigen ADP: adenosine diphosphate ADPase: adenosine diphosphatase AIDS: acquired immunodeficiancy syndrome AMP: adenosine monophosphate APC: antigen presenting cell ATP: adenosine triphosphate ATPase: adenosine triphosphatase BMI: body mass index bp: base pair(s) BSA: bovine serum albumin °C: degrees Celsius cAMP: cyclic adenosine monophosphate cal: calorie(s) CD: cluster of differentiation (in combination with numbers, CD1, CD4 etc.) cDNA: complementary DNA CFA: complete Freund's adjuvant Ci: curie(s) CI: confidence interval CNS: central nervous system CoA: coenzyme A Con A: concanavalin A cpm: counts per minute cRNA: complementary RNA CSF: colony-stimulating factor CTLA: cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen Δ: delta (change in) Da: dalton(s) DEAE: diethylaminoethyl DMEM: Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium DMSO: dimethylsulfoxide DNA: deoxyribonucleic acid DNase: deoxyribonuclease DNP: dinitrophenyl dpm: disintegrations per minute DTT: dithiothreitol EDTA: ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid EGF: epidermal growth factor EGTA: ethyleneglycol-bis (β-aminoethyl ether)-N,N'-tetraacetic acid ELISA: enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay ELISPOT: enzyme-linked immunospot °F: degrees Fahrenheit FAGS: flourescence-activated cell sorter (TM of Becton Dickinson and Co.) Fas: FS7-associated cell surface antigen FBS: fetal bovine serum Fc: crystallizable fr Continue reading >>

Appendix B: Some Common Abbreviations

Appendix B: Some Common Abbreviations

This is a list of some common abbreviations and acronyms. This appendix supplements the MedlinePlus Understanding Medical Words tutorial. Abbreviation Stands for More information ABG Arterial blood gases You may have an ABG test to detect lung diseases. ACE Angiotensin converting enzyme Drugs called ACE inhibitors are used to treat high blood pressure, heart failure, diabetes and kidney diseases. ACL Anterior cruciate ligament Commonly injured part of the knee ADHD Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder A behavior disorder AFIB Atrial fibrillation A disturbance of the rhythm of the heart AIDS Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome Infection caused by human immunodeficiency virus ALP Alkaline phosphatase You may have a blood test for ALP to detect liver or bone disease. ALS Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Also known as Lou Gehrig's Disease ALT Alanine aminotransferase You may have a blood test for ALP to detect liver disease. AMD Age-related macular degeneration An eye problem AMI Acute myocardial infarction Heart attack AODM Adult onset diabetes mellitus Type 2 diabetes AST Aspartate aminotransferase You may have a blood test for ALP to detect liver disease. AVM Arteriovenous malformation A defect in the circulatory system. BID Twice a day Your doctor may write this on your prescription. BMI Body mass index A measure of how much you should weigh based on your height BP Blood pressure The force of your blood pushing against the walls of your arteries BPH Benign prostatic hypertrophy Enlargement of the prostate gland BRCA Breast Cancer Gene People with the gene may be at increased risk for breast or ovarian cancer. BUN Blood urea nitrogen You may have a blood test for BUN to detect kidney disease problems. CA Cancer OR Calcium CA-125 Cancer antigen 125 You may have a blood t Continue reading >>

Search D-is-for-diabetes

Search D-is-for-diabetes

A A1C, A1c, GHB, GHb, hemoglobin A1c, HbA1c, Hb1c, HbA1c: Hemoglobin A1c (a lab test for diabetes) (See The A1C Test and Diabetes) AADE: American Association of Diabetes Educators (a not-for-profit diabetes organization) (Website: www.diabeteseducator.org) ACE-I: Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (a class of medications for treatment of hypertension) ADA: American Diabetes Association (a not-for-profit diabetes organization) (Website: www.diabetes.org) American Dietitic Association (previous name for The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, a not-for-profit nutrition organization) (Website: www.eatright.org) American Dental Association (a not-for-profit dental organization) (Website: www.ada.org) Americans with Disabilities Act (a U.S. law) (Website: www.ada.gov) AGEs: Advanced glycosylation end products (See AGEs) AODM: Adult-onset diabetes mellitus (a former term for type 2 diabetes) ARB: Angiotensin receptor blocker (a class of medications for treatment of hypertension) ASCVD: Arteriosclerotic cardiovascular disease or Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease Continue reading >>

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