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Mecobalamin In Diabetic Neuropathy

Neuropathy Support Formula - Clinicals

Neuropathy Support Formula - Clinicals

Clinical usefulness of intrathecal injection of methylcobalamin in patients with diabetic neuropathy Ide H Fujiya S Asanuma Y Tsuji M Sakai H Agishi Y, Clin Ther (1987) 9(2):183-92 Seven men and four women with symptomatic diabetic neuropathy were treated with methylcobalamine (2,500 micrograms in 10 ml of saline) injected intrathecally. Treatment was begun when patients had good metabolic control, as determined by measurements of plasma glucose and hemoglobin, and was repeated several times with a one-month interval between injections. Three patients were re-treated one year after the last intrathecal injection. Symptoms in the legs, such as paresthesia, burning pains, and heaviness, dramatically improved. The effect appeared within a few hours to one week and lasted from several months to four years. The mean peroneal motor-nerve conduction velocity did not change significantly. The mean (+/- SD) concentration of methylcobalamin in spinal fluid was 114 +/- 32 pg/ml before intrathecal injection (n = 5) and 4,752 +/- 2,504 pg/ml one month after intrathecal methylcobalamin treatment (n = 11). Methylcobalamine caused no side effects with respect to subjective symptoms or characteristics of spinal fluid. These findings suggest that a high concentration of methylcobalamin in spinal fluid is highly effective and safe for treating the symptoms of diabetic neuropathy. Division of Neurology, King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. We studied the clinical and neurophysiological effects of methylcobalamin on patients with diabetic neuropathy. In a double-blind study, the active group showed statistical improvement in the somatic and autonomic symptoms with regression of signs of diabetic neuropathy. Motor and sensory nerve conduction studies showed no statistical Continue reading >>

Efficacy And Safety Of Methylcobalamin, Alpha Lipoic Acid And Pregabalin Combination Versus Pregabalin Monotherapy In Improving Pain And Nerve Conduction Velocity In Type 2 Diabetes Associated Impaired Peripheral Neuropathic Condition. [maintain]: Results Of A Pilot Study Vasudevan D, Naik Mm, Mukaddam Qi - Ann Indian Acad Neurol

Efficacy And Safety Of Methylcobalamin, Alpha Lipoic Acid And Pregabalin Combination Versus Pregabalin Monotherapy In Improving Pain And Nerve Conduction Velocity In Type 2 Diabetes Associated Impaired Peripheral Neuropathic Condition. [maintain]: Results Of A Pilot Study Vasudevan D, Naik Mm, Mukaddam Qi - Ann Indian Acad Neurol

Peripheral neuropathy is a common complication of diabetes which can cause significant morbidity and mortality. [1] At least one of four diabetic patients is affected by distal symmetric polyneuropathy (DSP), which represents a major health problem. [2] Diabetic neuropathy is implicated in 50-75% of non-traumatic amputations. Sensorimotor neuropathy is marked by pain, paraesthesia, and sensory loss. [3] Neuropathic pain affects 16% of diabetic patients and exerts a substantial impact on the quality of life, particularly by causing interference of sleep and enjoyment or quality of life. [4] The pathology of diabetic neuropathy involves oxidative stress, advanced glycation end products, polyol pathway flux, and protein kinase C activation; all contribute to microvascular disease and nerve dysfunction. Hence while treating diabetic painful neuropathy, treating just pain will not cure the damaged nerves and decrease the oxidative stress. [5] Methylcobalamin [6] and Alpha Lipoic Acid (ALA) [7] have shown some promise in treatment of impaired diabetic neuropathic conditions associated with pain. Combination of methylcobalamin, ALA and pregabalin is available in Indian market. However, their comparative efficacy with pregabaline alone in treatment of diabetic painful diabetic neuropathy is not known. The study was conducted to evaluate whether methylcobalamin and ALA added to pregabalin provides additional benefit for pain relief compared to pregabalin alone in type 2 diabetes patients with impaired peripheral neuropathic condition associated with pain. This was an open, randomized, and controlled, parallel group 12-week pilot study conducted at a single centre in Chennai, Tamilnadu, India. Patients of both gender, >18 years of age with diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus ( Continue reading >>

Vitamin B For Treating Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

Vitamin B For Treating Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

Vitamin B for treating diabetic peripheral neuropathy School of Rural Health, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Moe, Victoria, Australia Hanan Khalil, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, School of Rural Health, PO Box 973, Moe, Victoria, 3825, Australia. [email protected] . University of the Philippines - College of Medicine and Philippine General Hospital, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Manila, Philippines Cited by (CrossRef): 0 articles Check for updates This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To assess the effectiveness and safety of vitamin B supplements for the management of pain and nerve damage in people with diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy is the most common risk factor for foot ulcers in people with diabetes ( Duby 2004 ). More than 80% of all non-traumatic amputations in diabetic patients are the result of foot ulcers ( Singh 2005 ). In 2010, the estimated world prevalence of diabetes was 285 million, a figure expected to rise to 439 million by 2030 ( Shaw 2010 ). Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is then expected to affect around 236 million, constituting a major cause of mortality and morbidity, with a significant associated financial cost ( Tesfaye 2012 ). The annual cost of DPN in the United States was estimated to be USD 10.9 billion in 2010 ( Gordois 2003 ; Zhang 2010 ). Diabetic neuropathy can be divided into four broad patterns, depending upon which nerves are affected: DPN, proximal neuropathy, autonomic neuropathy, and focal neuropathies ( American Diabetes Association 2014 ; Boulton 2004 ). Diabetic neuropathy affects long fibres first, including the feet and distal legs. Proximal neuropathy is often asymmetric and may involve the Continue reading >>

Methylcobalamin Effects On Diabetic Neuropathy And Nerve Protein Kinase C In Rats.

Methylcobalamin Effects On Diabetic Neuropathy And Nerve Protein Kinase C In Rats.

Eur J Clin Invest. 2011 Apr;41(4):442-50. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2362.2010.02430.x. Epub 2010 Dec 3. Methylcobalamin effects on diabetic neuropathy and nerve protein kinase C in rats. Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, Hirosaki University Graduate School of Medicine, Hirosaki, Japan. Methyl-base-attached cobalamin (Methycobalamin) (MC) has a special affinity for nerve tissues to promote myelination and transport of axonal cytoskeleton. It is not known, however, how MC influences on peripheral nerve in experimental diabetic neuropathy. We studied the effects of MC on expressions and activities of protein kinase C (PKC) in peripheral nerve of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Wistar rats, 8 weeks of age, were rendered diabetic by streptozotocin (40 mg kg(-1), iv) and followed for 16 weeks. A half of diabetic animals were treated with MC (10 mg kg(-1) per every other day, im) after the induction of diabetes. Normal Wistar rats were served as control. At the end, untreated diabetic animals developed significant delay of nerve conduction velocity (NCV), and MC treatment normalized the NCV. Nerve PKC activity was significantly suppressed in untreated diabetic rats, while the activity was normalized in treated animals. While PKC located in Schwann cells, PKC and II distributed in axoplasm, vascular walls and macrophages. The decreased PKC activity in diabetic nerve was associated with reduced expression of membrane PKC and increased membrane expression of PKCII, and MC treatment corrected these changes. Diabetic nerve contained an increased number of macrophages and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine-positive cells in the endoneurium, the latter of which was significantly suppressed by MC treatment. Elevated nerve polyol levels in diabetic nerve were partially corrected by Continue reading >>

Metformin And B12

Metformin And B12

Back in December 2006, Amy Campbell wrote in her blog about the possibility of the popular diabetes drug metformin causing vitamin B12 deficiency. In a follow-up comment, she mentioned that taking calcium supplements might help to remedy this deficiency. The information spurred an outpouring of comments and questions from concerned readers, so those of us on the magazine staff decided to investigate the matter further. Our Q&A editor, Alwa Cooper, contacted Mariejane Braza, MD, and James F. Hanley, MD, of the UTHSCSA-Regional Academic Health Center in Harlingen, Texas, who had recently conducted some research on the topic of metformin and vitamin B12 deficiency. As published in the November/December 2009 issue of Diabetes Self-Management, here is their answer: “Metformin is an important and effective medicine for the treatment of Type 2 diabetes; however, with prolonged use, as many as 30% of the people taking it develop a B12 deficiency. It has been our experience that not all physicians are aware of this association. Detecting B12 deficiency can be difficult, because the early symptoms, such as fatigue or loss of appetite, may be subtle. Other symptoms, such as numbness or tingling in the hands and feet, may be assumed to be complications of diabetes. In a study that we conducted, peripheral neuropathy (nerve damage in the hands, feet, and legs) was more common in subjects with both Type 2 diabetes and B12 deficiency than in those with Type 2 diabetes alone. Prior to our study, it was presumed that these participants’ neuropathy was a complication of their diabetes. We felt, however, that it was not clear whether this was the case or whether B12 deficiency had played a role in or caused the development of the neuropathy. Testing for B12 deficiency may not always b Continue reading >>

Vitamin B Supplementation For Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

Vitamin B Supplementation For Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

Vitamin B supplementation for diabetic peripheral neuropathy Bhavani Jayabalan , MBBS, MMed1 and Lian Leng Low , MBBS, MMed2 1Fullerton Healthcare AIA Alexandra, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore 2Department of Family Medicine and Continuing Care, Singapore General Hospital, Singapore Correspondence: Dr Bhavani Jayabalan, Senior Family Physician, Fullerton Healthcare AIA Alexandra, 371 Alexandra Road #01-04, Singapore 159963. [email protected] This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Vitamin B12 deficiency has been associated with significant neurological pathology, especially peripheral neuropathy. This review aims to examine the existing evidence on the effectiveness of vitamin B12 supplementation for the treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. A search of PubMed and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials for all relevant randomised controlled trials was conducted in December 2014. Any type of therapy using vitamin B12 or its coenzyme forms was assessed for efficacy and safety in diabetics with peripheral neuropathy. Changes in vibration perception thresholds, neuropathic symptoms and nerve conduction velocities, as well as the adverse effects of vitamin B12 therapy, were assessed. Four studies comprising 363 patients met the inclusion criteria. This review found no evidence that the use of oral vitamin B12 supplements is associated with improvement in the clinical symptoms of diabetic neuropathy. Furthermore, the majority of studies reported no improvement in the electrophysiological markers of nerve conduction. Keywords: cobalamin, diabetic neuropathy, vitamin B12 Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) affects approximately 44% of older diabetics.( 1 , 2 ) Some DPN patients may experience extremely painful symptoms, whereas those wh Continue reading >>

Vitamin B12 And Neuropathy Everything You Need To Know

Vitamin B12 And Neuropathy Everything You Need To Know

Neuropathy is defined as dysfunction or disease in at least one peripheral nerve. These peripheral nerves make up a complex network connecting the brain and spinal cord to the other regions of the body e.g. the organs, skin and muscles. Peripheral neuropathy is the condition wheresome of these peripheral nerves are damaged or diseased, causing the information they relay to becorrupted in some way. It is peripheral neuropathy specifically that well befocusing on here. Peripheral neuropathy can present in a number of different ways depending on which nerves have been damaged. The peripheral nerves can be split into three categories: sensory, motor and autonomic nerves.Damage can occur in any or all of these types of nerves, and the symptoms vary accordingly. The symptoms of peripheral neuropathy include (but are not limited to) the following: Pain/numbness/tingling sensations, most commonly in the hands and feet Sensory loss e.g. changes to temperature sensitivity Burning or shooting pains (often worse at night) There are many more possible symptoms, but those are some of the most frequently encountered. They do notall have to be present for peripheral neuropathy to be diagnosed (see below). Note that neuropathy is normally chronic rather than acutei.e. it usually develops slowly over a period of several weeks or months. There are many possible causes of peripheral neuropathy, the most commonof which is diabetes. Another common cause is vitamin B12 deficiency , and thats what were going to focus on here. Having said that, the two can sometimes be interlinked. Metformin is a standard medication given to patients suffering from type 2 diabetes. While metformin is a great drug from this perspective,it can also decrease B12 levels as an unfortunate side effect. In a healthy Continue reading >>

Methylcobalamin Abstracts

Methylcobalamin Abstracts

Improvement of autonomic neuropathy after mecobalamin treatment in uremic patients on hemodialysis. The effect of mecobalamin on autonomic neuropathy was evaluated in 20 hemodialyzed uremic patients; their mean age was 53 years and the duration of hemodialysis was 6.5 years; 14 were women. The cardiac beat-to-beat variation (BBV) was used as the measure of autonomic neuropathy. Twelve patients with normal BBV test results were either given 1,500 micrograms of mecobalamin daily for three months (six patients) or were untreated (six patients). The BBV test results did not change significantly over the three months in either the treated or untreated group, nor were there any significant between-group differences. Eight patients with abnormal results on the BBV test were given 1,500 micrograms of mecobalamin daily for six months. The mean BBV values increased significantly from 3.3 beats/min before treatment to 5.8 beats/min at six months (P less than 0.005); five of these patients (including three of the four patients with diabetes) showed normal BBV values by three months. It is concluded that mecobalamin can be used in the treatment of autonomic and peripheral neuropathy in both diabetic and nondiabetic patients with chronic renal failure. Published erratum appears in Altern Med Rev 1999 Feb;4(1):9 Methylcobalamin is one of the two coenzyme forms of vitamin B12. Evidence indicates this form of vitamin B12, in addition to having a theoretical advantage over cyanocobalamin, actually has some metabolic and therapeutic applications not shared by the other forms of vitamin B12. This monograph provides an overview of the pharmacokinetics of methylcobalamin, and will highlight the potential therapeutic relevance for Bell's palsy, cancer, diabetic neuropathy, eye function, hear Continue reading >>

Methylcobalamin And Diabetic Neuropathy. Why Is Methylcobalamin Best Option To Treat Diabetic Neuropathy

Methylcobalamin And Diabetic Neuropathy. Why Is Methylcobalamin Best Option To Treat Diabetic Neuropathy

Why is Methylcobalamin best option to treat Diabetic neuropathy. By Dr. Sanjay Agrawal, Leading Pharmaceutical Consultant and Editor-in Chief of IJMToday In the 21st century, diabetes became a tread of health issue. The predominance of this disease become double in this century. It has been expected that more than 366 million people will be globally affected by diabetes. Both lifestyle and genetic factors mainly influence diabetes incidence. Insulin insensitivity is main pathophysiology of diabetes, which may occur due to insulin resistance, decreased insulin synthesis and / or pancreatic beta cell damage. Diabetic neuropathy is a common peripheral nervous system dysfunction associated with diabetes. Almost 50 percent of diabetic affected individuals have complained of Diabetic neuropathy. Without treatment and care, Diabetic neuropathy can be a chronic and progressive condition. Initially, the sensory symptom appears in the toes and gradually it spreads to the upper limbs. A range of sensory symptoms such as insensitivity, pricking sensation of pins or needles, tingling, burning, electric shocks like feeling, some patients complaint loss of pain sensation, whereas others may have increased sensitivity to pain are included in diabetic neuropathy. These symptoms alter depending upon the type of nerve damages. Painful diabetic neuropathy poorly affects the quality of life of the patient. It decreases physical activity and movement increases fatigue, severe pain also causes sleep disturbance and these negatively affect social life. Metformin is widely used anti-diabetic medicine, which can accumulate in the body. Prolong consumption of this medicine leads to vitamin B12 deficiency and considered as one of the most common causes of Diabetic neuropathy. General people often Continue reading >>

Combined Therapy Of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy With Breviscapine And Mecobalamin: A Systematic Review And A Meta-analysis Of Chinese Studies

Combined Therapy Of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy With Breviscapine And Mecobalamin: A Systematic Review And A Meta-analysis Of Chinese Studies

Combined Therapy of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy with Breviscapine and Mecobalamin: A Systematic Review and a Meta-Analysis of Chinese Studies School of Public Health, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou 510182, China Received 20 September 2014; Revised 13 January 2015; Accepted 16 January 2015 Academic Editor: KonstantinosPapatheodorou Copyright 2015 Chanjiao Zheng et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Objective. A meta-analysis on combined therapy of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) with breviscapine and mecobalamin was performed to evaluate the efficacy of this therapy. Methods. Six English databases (Medline, Cochrane Library, PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science, and CINAHL) and four Chinese databases (China National Knowledge Infrastructure, VIP Journals Database, CBM, and Wanfang database) were searched for studies on the clinical trials in which DPN was treated with breviscapine and mecobalamin, and RevMan 5.1 package was employed for analyzing pooled trials and publication bias. Results. A total of 17 articles including 1398 DPN patients were identified. Homogeneity was observed among different studies ( ). The efficacy of combined therapy with breviscapine and mecobalamin was significantly better than that in control group [ , 95% CI: 3.706.78)]. Conclusion. Available findings suggest that the therapeutic efficacy of breviscapine combining mecobalamin is superior to mecobalamin alone, and this strategy is required to be popularized in clinical practice. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) is a diabetes mellitus (DM) induced disorder of the peripheral nervous system [ 1 ] a Continue reading >>

Methylcobalamin: A Potential Vitamin Of Pain Killer

Methylcobalamin: A Potential Vitamin Of Pain Killer

Methylcobalamin: A Potential Vitamin of Pain Killer Institute of Neurosciences, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xian 710032, China Received 19 September 2013; Revised 6 November 2013; Accepted 12 November 2013 Copyright 2013 Ming Zhang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License , which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Methylcobalamin (MeCbl), the activated form of vitamin B12, has been used to treat some nutritional diseases and other diseases in clinic, such as Alzheimers disease and rheumatoid arthritis. As an auxiliary agent, it exerts neuronal protection by promoting regeneration of injured nerves and antagonizing glutamate-induced neurotoxicity. Recently several lines of evidence demonstrated that MeCbl may have potential analgesic effects in experimental and clinical studies. For example, MeCbl alleviated pain behaviors in diabetic neuropathy, low back pain and neuralgia. MeCbl improved nerve conduction, promoted the regeneration of injured nerves, and inhibited ectopic spontaneous discharges of injured primary sensory neurons. This review aims to summarize the analgesic effect and mechanisms of MeCbl at the present. Vitamin B12 had been usually treated as sport nutrition, and used to keep old people from getting anemic in past years. Vitamin B12 was regarded as painkilling vitamin in some countries from 1950. Recently studies have shown that vitamin B12 played a key role in the normal functioning of the brain and nervous system and the formation of blood. Vitamin B12 is normally involved in several metabolisms such as DNA synthesis and regulation, fatty acid synthesis, and energy production. Vitamin B12 has some analo Continue reading >>

Medical Journal Of Babylon | Contact Us

Medical Journal Of Babylon | Contact Us

Efficacy of mecobalamin (Methylcobalamin) in the treatment of diabetic peripheral neuropathy Imad A J. Thanon , Ashraf H. Ahmed , Bashar S.Mahmood* Authors Emails are requested on demand or by logging in Keywords : Efficacy of mecobalamin (Methylcobalamin) ,treatment of diabetic ,peripheral neuropathy Eleven diabetic patients with painful peripheral neuropathy were included in this study. Theywere selected according to certain criteria, interviewed, information taken, pain score recorded according tothe visual analogue scale (VAS) and electromyography (EMG) done for them. Then, they put onmecobalamin for 5 months (initial 3 months as I.M injections 3 times/week and then for 2 months as tablet3 times a day), then pain score recorded, EMG done and any reported adverse effects recorded.The study concluded that mecobalamin not only reduces pain sensation (P<0.001) but alsoimproves nerve conduction velocity (NCV) in EMG in the tibial, peroneal and sural nerves without anyreported adverse effects. Diabetic neuropathy occurs withtype I and type II diabetes mellitus(DM), and is associated with pain,numbness and considerablemorbidity[1]. It can be diffuse or focal;the diffuse type can be peripheral (i.eaffecting the extremities) or autonomic(e.g cardiovascular, gastrointestinal,genitourinary). Focal neuropathy isrelatively uncommon and includecranial, truncal, proximal motor andcompression neuropathy[2]. Diagnosis isbased on the neurologic history andexamination, prevention andmanagement focus on glucose control,foot care and pain relief usingpharmacologic and non-pharmacologicagents[3].Mecobalamin ormethylcobalamin (methyl B12) (Fig 1) isthe neurologically active, most bioavailable and best utilized form of vitB12, actually has some metabolic andtherapeutic applications not sh Continue reading >>

Treating Feline Diabetic Neuropathy With Methylcobalamin

Treating Feline Diabetic Neuropathy With Methylcobalamin

Treating Feline Diabetic Neuropathy with Methylcobalamin Methylcobalamin is a type of vitamin that's used to treatcats suffering from feline diabetic neuropathy. Although pets that areobese or genetically predisposed to diabetes mellitus are likely todevelop diabetes, felinessuffering from prolonged high blood glucoselevels often develop diabetic neuropathy. In order to understand theeffectiveness of methylcobalaminin cats, it's necessary to know whatdiabetic neuropathy is and how it can be managed. Pets suffering from diabetes may eventually show signs of lameness,muscle wasting and weakness in the hind legs. A few cats may also walkon their hocks. These symptoms occur when the nerves are damaged in thehindquarters. Cats mayalso lose their ability to walk due to thedamage caused to the sensory and motor nerves. Pet ownersshould noticeany symptoms of diabetic neuropathyand seek prompt medical care, asthis condition can be reversed if treated in time. Methylcobalamin is asupplement used to alter the symptoms of diabetic neuropathy andcontrol tissue degeneration. Methylcobalaminis a kind of vitamin B12 that's administered in themethyl form. Other vitamin B supplements may not treat diabeticneuropathy if they aren'tformulated in the methyl form. Althoughmethylcobalamin is made available if the body breaks down cobalamin,methylcobalamin should be administered in the right form to benefitpets. Methylcobalamin supplements promote healthy nerves and brainfunction, and hence treat pets suffering from damaged nerves or motorcells due to hyperglycemia.The dosage is best prescribed by the vet.Most pet owners administer 3 to 5 mg of methylcobalamin daily.Severalpets suffering from diabetes are administered Xobaline, which isavailable in tablet form and contains methylcobalamin. Tr Continue reading >>

Impact Of L-methylfolate Combination Therapy Among Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy Patients

Impact Of L-methylfolate Combination Therapy Among Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy Patients

Impact of L-Methylfolate Combination Therapy Among Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy Patients Patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy taking L-methylfolate, pyridoxal-5'-phosphate, and methylcobalamin (MPM) had lower all-cause hospitalization risk and healthcare costs than patients not taking MPM. Rolin L. Wade, RPh, MS; and Qian Cai, MS, MSPH Objectives: To evaluate the clinical and economic impacts of treatment with L-methylfolate, pyridoxal-5'-phosphate, and methylcobalamin (MPM) among patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN). Study Design: Retrospective administrative claims analysis of DPN patients. Methods: Patients aged 18 to 64 years with 2 or more medical claims for type 2 diabetes or 1 pharmacy claim for antidiabetic agents and with at least 1 medical claim for peripheral neuropathy from January 1, 2004, through July 31, 2010, were selected. Patients needed a minimum of 12 months preindex and postindex continuous eligibility within the study period for baseline and follow-up evaluations, with no folate-containing prescriptions or severe lower limb morbidity at baseline. Propensity scores were used to match MPM patients to controls. Outcome measures included all-cause and disease-related hospitalization and healthcare costs. Multivariable analyses were used to adjust for baseline demographic and clinical characteristics. Results: The sample included 814 MPM patients and 814 matched controls. MPM patients had less risk of all-cause hospitalization (21.5% vs 25.9%, P = .036) during the follow-up period. Following multivariate analysis, MPM patients were less likely than the control group to be hospitalized for any reason (odds ratio 0.74, 95% confi dence interval 0.58-0.94) and had lower diseaserelated costs ($2258, P <.001). Conclusions: MPM use amo Continue reading >>

Neuropathy (diabetic)

Neuropathy (diabetic)

Dietary And Lifestyle Considerations Dietary and lifestyle modifications are essential for people with diabetic neuropathy because they can help prevent the disease from progressing further. One of the most important ways that diabetics can slow the progression of their neuropathy is to achieve better control of their blood glucose levels (Skyler 1996; Callaghan 2012a). It is in this goal that dietary and lifestyle changes can be most effective. In addition to the strategies outlined in this protocol, readers are encouraged to review the Diabetes and Weight Loss protocols. Diet Diet is one of the main ways that people with diabetes can control their blood glucose levels without taking additional medication. Eating well-balanced meals, with a mixture of fruits, vegetables, proteins, and fats will help prevent major swings in blood glucose levels. Eating meals on a regular schedule and coordinating meals with diabetes medications will also minimize blood glucose fluctuations (Mayo Clinic 2011). In addition, specific dietary patterns, such as high-protein, low-carbohydrate diets (Gannon 2004) or diets rich in foods with a low glycemic index (Rizkalla 2004) have been shown to improve blood glucose control. A healthy diet will also help diabetics lose weight, which has been shown to help keep blood glucose levels low (Wing 1987). Notably, a study found that making dietary changes to help keep blood glucose levels under control reduced diabetic neuropathy symptoms in patients with impaired glucose tolerance, which is considered to be a pre-diabetic condition (Smith 2006). Ideally, most people should target a fasting blood glucose level between 70 and 85 mg/dL, although this may be difficult for diabetics to achieve. Exercise Regular exercise is also important for people with Continue reading >>

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