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Meal Plan To Keep Blood Sugar Stable

Suggested Meal Plan For A Hypoglycemia Diet

Suggested Meal Plan For A Hypoglycemia Diet

Hypoglycemia is a condition that occurs when the level of sugar in the blood drops to below 70 milligrams per deciliter. The condition causes weakness, sweating, dizziness, confusion and shakiness, but these symptoms can be avoided by following a diet that keeps blood sugar levels stable throughout the day and by planning healthy meals in advance. Many traditional breakfast foods, like processed cereals, pancakes, bagels, fruit juices and jams, are low in protein and high in carbohydrates. Both of these characteristics can create a sharp rise in the level of sugars in the blood, triggering the symptoms of hypoglycemia within just a few hours after eating. To keep blood sugar levels stable, stick to breakfast meals that include eggs, nuts, cheese, smoked salmon, whole fruits, nut butters, plain yogurt, olive oil and vegetables. For example, indulge in a bowl of plain yogurt topped with fresh berries instead of sugary cereal. Skip toast and jam and instead have steel-cut oats with with sliced strawberries or an omelet with mushrooms and Swiss cheese. Lunch Ideas Carb-rich lunches like sandwiches, burgers and french fries can trigger hypoglycemia. To keep your blood sugar levels on track, opt for lunches that include a healthy balance of protein, fats and a small amount of carbs that are rich in fiber. A large salad is the perfect base for your lunch. Top it with avocado slices, an olive-oil based vinaigrette, almonds and chicken, or make an Asian version with ginger-based dressing and pork. Try a Greek variation with chicken, feta cheese, olives and red onions. Omelets, frittatas, bean-rich soups, or lean fish with shredded-zucchini "pancakes" are other easy, tasty suggestions. Dinner Ideas Skip pasta or pizza and instead choose meals that include protein, healthy fats, n Continue reading >>

Diet Plans For Hypoglycemia

Diet Plans For Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia means that you have low blood sugar. People with diabetes often experience low blood sugar levels. Certain medications, excessive alcohol consumption, some critical illnesses and hormone deficiencies can also cause hypoglycemia without diabetes. Reactive hypoglycemia is a condition that causes low blood sugar within a four-hour window after meals. Eating food raises your blood sugar levels, but people who have hypoglycemia make more insulin than is needed when they eat. This excess insulin leads to the drop in their blood sugar level. Hypoglycemia is a lifelong condition, but you can help manage its symptoms through your diet. Follow these rules of thumb: Eat small meals every 3 to 4 hours throughout the day, rather than 3 large meals per day. Avoid foods high in saturated fats or trans fats. Choose foods with a low glycemic index score. Reduce or eliminate processed and refined sugars from your diet. Choose complex carbohydrates over simple carbohydrates. Reduce or eliminate alcoholic drinks, and never mix alcohol with sugar-filled mixers, such as fruit juice. Eat lean protein. Eat foods high in soluble fiber. Here are some ideas for a diet plan for people with hypoglycemia. You should eat a small meal as soon as possible after waking. A good breakfast should consist of protein, such as scrambled eggs, plus a complex carbohydrate. Try these: hard boiled eggs and a slice of whole-grain bread with cinnamon (several small studies indicate that cinnamon may help reduce blood sugar) a small serving of steel-cut oatmeal, like this protein-packed oatmeal with blueberries, sunflower seeds, and agave plain Greek yogurt with berries, honey, and oatmeal In addition, be mindful of your consumption of juices. Stick to 100% juice varieties that do not have added sweeten Continue reading >>

8 Ways To Balance Your Blood Sugar Naturally

8 Ways To Balance Your Blood Sugar Naturally

When you master your blood sugar, you'll feel full of energy, cravings will subside, your weight will be controlled, your mood will stabilize, your memory will be better and you will balance your hormones. Also, when you learn to balance your blood sugar you minimize your risk of blood sugar-related diseases, metabolic syndrome, diabetes and heart disease. Eating foods that release energy quickly can cause feelings of fatigue, hunger and irritation. Processed foods and those full of refined sugar cause a spike in your blood sugars — they release their glucose in a sudden rush. Blood sugar spikes rapidly, but it quickly crashes back to earth! We have a lovely hormone that comes to the rescue: insulin. Insulin helps the body absorb and process sugar effectively, but the excess is stored as fat! When this cycle happens over and over again, our cells become tired and stop listening to insulin, which leads to insulin resistance, an early warning sign of diabetes. So if you're moody, irritable, hungry, have cravings, experience poor concentration or gain weight? You need to balance your blood sugar! Below are a few natural, diet-based methods to do just that: 1. Eat foods low on the glycemic index. These foods release energy SLOWLY into the bloodstream. You can probably guess what they may be: vegetables, legumes, some fruits (berries and stone fruits are best), whole grains, nuts and seeds. 2. Include a snack in between main meals. This will allow you to stay nice and stable throughout the day. I always encourage a protein-rich snack. 3. Eat protein with each meal. This is especially important to do when you eat carbohydrates, in order to slow down the release of energy. Protein is the most satiating macronutrient, meaning it releases energy slowly, which helps signal to t Continue reading >>

Try These 8 Best Snacks For Blood Sugar Control

Try These 8 Best Snacks For Blood Sugar Control

1 / 9 Snack the Smart Way to Help Keep Your Blood Sugar in Check If you have type 2 diabetes, smart snacking can be an important part of your healthy eating plan. Hunger can lead to dips and spikes in blood sugar that can cause dizziness, irritability, and weakness — and it can increase your risk for a host of other diabetes-related problems as well. One of the best ways to avoid the roller coaster? Eat nutritious snacks at regular intervals throughout the day, even if you're on the go. New types of insulin are better at matching the insulin your body needs at specific times, which has made snacking to prevent a blood sugar drop less necessary for some. But whether you still have to snack to keep your blood sugar levels steady, or just plain want to snack, it’s necessary to make healthy choices. That means that simple carbohydrates, which are digested quickly and turned into sugar that elevates your blood glucose levels, should be avoided. But there are other ways to satisfy those mid-afternoon or mid-morning cravings than a trip to the vending machine. It might take a little more advance preparation and a little more slicing and dicing than it does to rip open a bag of potato chips. But the snacks shown here, suggested by Erin Palinski-Wade, RD, CDE, an Everyday Health contributor, are quick, simple, made with ingredients that are either easily portable or easily kept in an office kitchen, and finished with dashes of flavor from ingredients you probably already have on hand, like lime, olive oil, and cinnamon. And when you control your ingredients, which you can’t do when you’re reaching for a processed food, it’s easier to control your condition, which can be empowering when you’re trying to manage this disease. So what makes a high-quality, high-satisfact Continue reading >>

The 4 Foods That Will Steady Your Blood Sugar

The 4 Foods That Will Steady Your Blood Sugar

Wondering what blood sugar has to do with you, if you don’t have diabetes? Keeping your blood sugar levels as steady as possiblenow may help you avoid getting diabetes later. “As you get older, your risk for type 2 diabetes goes up,” says Alissa Rumsey, Registered Dietitian and Spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. “Since you can’t modify your age, it is important to take other steps to lower your risk, including maintaining a healthy weight, getting enough exercise, and balancing your diet to prevent spikes in blood sugar.” Controlling your blood sugar will also just make you feel better. “It’s best to control blood sugar—it keeps your energy stable,” says Leann Olansky, M.D., an endocrinologist at the Cleveland Clinic. “If your blood sugar doesn’t vary that much before and after a meal, that’s a healthier way to be.” Unrelated to diabetes, symptoms of occasional high blood sugar aren’t life-threatening, but rather unpleasant and only potentially dangerous if you suffer from other health problems. “When your blood sugar is too high, it can make you feel sluggish,” says Dr. Olansky. “When it’s higher still, it can lead to dehydration and make your blood pressure unstable, and cause you to urinate more often, especially at night.” But when your blood sugar remains chronically high, insulin, a hormone that’s supposed to help your body store sugar as energy, stops working as it should. “Prolonged high blood sugar levels can lead to insulin resistance, meaning your body isn’t able to use insulin properly,” says Rumsey. “Over time this insulin resistance can develop into diabetes, when insulin isn’t able to keep your blood sugar within normal levels.” Current research reveals an association between spik Continue reading >>

Food Combinations To Steady Blood Sugar & Raise Metabolism

Food Combinations To Steady Blood Sugar & Raise Metabolism

Keeping your blood sugar levels steady can not only help you prevent type 2 diabetes and other chronic diseases, it can also help you have more even energy levels and feel more satiated between meals. A diet that allows you to maintain stable blood sugar levels will also help you feel less hungry and reduce your cravings for unhealthy foods. You can also improve your metabolism with the foods you choose to eat, which is key to making weight loss and maintenance easier. Your total carbohydrate intake at a meal is the main factor influencing your blood sugar levels, independently of the foods you combine your carbs with. If you want to stabilize your blood sugar levels, avoid choosing foods that are high in carbohydrates, or limit your serving size of high-carb foods. Be careful with foods that contain flour or sugar, such as breads, rice, pasta, soft drinks and desserts because of their high carbohydrate content. Both the starches and sugars found in these foods are converted into glucose, the main sugar circulating in your blood, during the digestion process. Low-Glycemic Carbohydrates The carbohydrates that you include at each of your meals and snacks should be low-glycemic carbohydrates. Carbohydrate foods that have a low glycemic index take more time to metabolize, which helps to keep your blood sugar levels steady for hours after your meal. Choose non-starchy vegetables, such as leafy greens, cauliflower and red bell peppers; fruits; nuts; sweet potato; quinoa; steel-cut oats; and sourdough bread to combine with protein and fat at each meal. Avoid high-glycemic carbohydrates, such as white potatoes, white and whole-wheat breads, corn flakes and puffed rice breakfast cereals, granola bars and baked goods, all of which can make your blood sugar levels increase rapidly Continue reading >>

5 Ways To Stabilize Blood Sugar With Meal Timing

5 Ways To Stabilize Blood Sugar With Meal Timing

When it comes to stabilizing your blood sugars, timing can be everything. From the hour of your first meal of the day to how late you eat at night, the timing of your meals can heavily dictate how well your blood sugars are managed on a daily basis. When my clients are in the habit of eating healthy still see peaks and valleys in their numbers, we sit down to re-evaluate when and how often they are eating. Here are five strategies to help you with better meal timing and keeping blood glucose in check: 1. Eat within the first few hours of rising Among the majority of my new clients, breakfast is the most-skipped meal of the day. Many people feel they don’t have time for breakfast, which is unfortunate because it truly is the most important meal – especially if you have diabetes. When you’re sleeping, your body is in a fasting-like state. When you wake up, eating within the first couple of hours can help break that fast (hence the name “breakfast”). And although it may seem like you’re saving yourself from extra calories or spiking your blood sugars, skipping breakfast can end up backfiring. You may find yourself over-eating at your first meal or gravitating more toward starchy or sugary foods. What’s worse, if blood glucose levels indeed drop too low, the body will send out hormones to release stored glucose into the blood stream, spiking your sugars and making it even harder to regulate your numbers throughout the day when you do finally eat. If you’re strapped for time, try to at least grab a small, balanced bite – pair a bit of protein with a high-fiber carbohydrate like peanut butter and whole-wheat toast, or a hard-boiled egg and fresh fruit. 2. Avoid Eating Right Before Bedtime It may be tempting to sneak in that late-night snack right before bedt Continue reading >>

How To Maintain Normal Blood Sugar

How To Maintain Normal Blood Sugar

If you are one of the millions of people who has prediabetes, diabetes, metabolic syndrome or any other form of “insulin resistance,” maintaining normal blood sugar levels can be challenging. Over the past several decades, these chronic disorders have swept through the U.S. and many other nations, reaching epidemic proportions and causing serious, but often preventable, side effects like nerve damage, fatigue, loss of vision, arterial damage and weight gain. Elevated blood sugar levels maintained for an extended period of time can push someone who is “prediabetic” into having full-blown diabetes (which now affects about one in every three adults in the U.S.). (1) Even for people who aren’t necessarily at a high risk for developing diabetes or heart complications, poorly managed blood sugar can lead to common complications, including fatigue, weight gain and sugar cravings. In extreme cases, elevated blood sugar can even contribute to strokes, amputations, coma and death in people with a history of insulin resistance. Blood sugar is raised by glucose, which is the sugar we get from eating many different types of foods that contain carbohydrates. Although we usually think of normal blood sugar as being strictly reliant upon how many carbohydrates and added sugar someone eats, other factors also play a role. For example, stress can elevate cortisol levels, which interferes with how insulin is used, and the timing of meals can also affect how the body manages blood sugar. (2) What can you do to help avoid dangerous blood sugar swings and lower diabetes symptoms? As you’ll learn, normal blood sugar levels are sustained through a combination of eating a balanced, low-processed diet, getting regular exercise and managing the body’s most important hormones in othe Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Stabilizing Meal Plan

Blood Sugar Stabilizing Meal Plan

Big shifts in your blood sugar level can leave you feeling stressed and irritable. Fix that with this meal plan. If your blood sugar spikes and dips are turning you into a ball of uncontrollable stress, this meal plan could help. Keeping your blood sugar level throughout the day can minimize stress-related cravings for sugar and carbs and help minimize spikes in cortisol, a stress hormone. The Outrageous Things Restaurants Do That Make You Sick Low blood sugar is very common in the morning, and can lead to increased stress throughout the day. Especially if you had a lot of carbohydrates or sugar the night before, or if you skipped breakfast, your blood sugar will bottom out and leave you feeling slow and sluggish. Start your day off with complex carbohydrates that have a low-glycemic index and can gradually raise your blood sugar to a stress-free level. Good choices include: 3 ounces of grilled chicken or turkey breast Dinner is an important meal when it comes to leveling out your blood sugar dips and spikes, so make sure you incorporate all the tips above to set yourself up for a good night's sleep and a stress-free day the next day. To make sure your blood sugar won't dive in the mornings, don't eat 2 to 3 hours before going to bed and avoid sugary foods in the evening. To prevent a nighttime stress spike, pack your dinner with protein and lots of veggies. If you need a sweet finish to your meal, pick a fiber-rich fruit like apples, apricots, bananas, blackberries or blueberries. Continue reading >>

The 7-day Meal Plan To Help Kick Your Sugar Habit

The 7-day Meal Plan To Help Kick Your Sugar Habit

This week-long low sugar diet aims to keep your energy levels high and your mood regulated by balancing blood sugar with the right combination of foods at each meal and naturally sweet foods that let you indulge in a healthy way. After the first few days, your sugar cravings should reduce, and by the end of the week, they’ll be much lower. Many of these dishes are filled with leafy green vegetables, and every meal has protein, which diminishes cravings by helping keep blood sugar constant. We’ve cut out almost all added sugar, as well as hyper-processed starchy foods, like bread, bagels and crackers, which are quickly digested and contribute to sugar cravings. Try to eat something every 3 to 4 hours to keep your blood sugar levels relatively stable and stave off cravings. If you’re used to eating a lot of sugar, it may have dulled your taste buds to the flavours of natural foods. Don’t worry — just as you learned to love all that extra sugar, you can learn to unlove it. You may even find you start to dislike overly sweetened foods. Related: Going Paleo? Here’s the truth about the latest fad diets After the week is over, carry your healthy habits forward by following the 80:20 rule. This means making 80 percent of what you eat similar to this plan, and the other 20 percent can include sweet treats like dark chocolate. Customize it This meal plan is intended for the average woman with a sedentary job who is working out 3 to 4 times per week. If you do endurance training, add in larger servings of whole-grain foods like sprouted-grain breads, whole wheat pasta, brown rice and quinoa. If the plan feels like too much food, simply cut portion size. MONDAY Breakfast 2 poached eggs over a bed of wilted spinach (start with about 6 cups fresh) sautéed with olive oil, Continue reading >>

Diet For Hypoglycemia Without Diabetes

Diet For Hypoglycemia Without Diabetes

The type of hypoglycemia that occurs in people without diabetes is referred to as reactive hypoglycemia. Reactive hypoglycemia would be the results of too much insulin secreted or not enough glucagon released after a meal, which lead to low blood sugar levels a few hours after eating. If you blood sugars are too low -- below 70 mg/dL -- you may feel dizzy, light-headed, tired, hungry and confused. A few changes to your diet can help you prevent reactive hypoglycemia. Video of the Day Instead of eating two to three large meals, split your food intake into five to six smaller meals. Eating too much at once can stimulate the overproduction of insulin and increase your risk of experiencing an hypoglycemic episode. Space your meals evenly throughout the day, every two to three hours, and don't forget to reduce the amounts of food you eat at each meal to avoid gaining weight. For example, if your lunch usually is a sandwich, an apple and a yogurt, divide your meal into two parts. Have the first part at one time and save the remaining for later. Choose Low-Glycemic Index Carbohydrates Carbohydrate-containing foods with a high-glycemic index make your blood sugar levels peak, overstimulate the secretion of insulin and can often result in reactive hypoglycemia within a few hours. Avoid processed and refined carbohydrates such as white flours, white bread, breakfast cereals, crackers, baked goods, sweets and desserts. Replace these foods with low-glycemic index carbohydrates that will help you stabilize your blood sugar levels. Low-glycemic index carbohydrate foods include old-fashioned oatmeal, steel-cut oat, stone-ground whole grain flour, sourdough bread, temperate climate fruit, barley, quinoa, basmati rice and whole-grain pasta. Never eat carbohydrates on alone. Protein help Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet Plan: Guidelines, Tips & Sample Menu

Diabetes Diet Plan: Guidelines, Tips & Sample Menu

Living with type 2 diabetes is not an easy feat. Add to that the hype around ‘Clean Eating’ which can easily overwhelm any diabetic with all the restrictions it poses. It’s true that living well with diabetes type 2 starts with the right diet plan. However, it doesn’t have to be an everyday challenge to figure out what to eat to keep your blood sugar levels balanced. Let’s look at what should be a good diet plan for diabetics. The Basics Of A Good Diabetes Diet Plan A Mix of Nutritious & Natural Foods Let me simplify this. A good type 2 diabetes diet plan ensures that you get: Adequate amount of fiber-rich whole grains Fresh fruits and vegetables Organic lean cuts of organic meats, and A good amount of healthy fats from sources like fatty fish, avocados, coconut oil and grass-fed butter The basics of a diabetes diet plan are simple. Smoke out all hidden sugars from your diet, cut back on carbohydrates, add more fiber to your diet and choose the fats you eat wisely. Minimum Carbohydrates It’s imperative that you understand it’s not just sugars that are responsible for elevated blood sugar. All carbohydrates get broken down into sugars. For this reason, choosing the right source of carb is an essential part of your diabetes diet plan. Vegetables and fruits are the right sources of carbs for any diabetic. Refined carbohydrates with a high glycemic index are best avoided, as the body readily transforms them into simple sugars. When choosing grains, complex carbohydrates are better choices. Brown rice, quinoa, barley, steel-cut oats, whole-wheat breads, buckwheat, and millets are some examples of complex carbohydrates. Here at Sepalika, we highly recommend a LCHF or Low Carb-High Fat diet to reverse diabetes, coupled with intermittent fasting. Together, these h Continue reading >>

Diet To Keep Sugar Levels Stable

Diet To Keep Sugar Levels Stable

Carbohydrates are sugars, starches and fibers that are in foods such as beans, milk products, cookies and rice. Carbohydrates break down into glucose, a sugar that fuels your body’s day-to-day functions. Some carbohydrates break down into glucose faster than others do. Eating too many of these carbohydrates can lead to blood sugar instability – dips and spikes – which can cause short-term problems such as mood swings and long-term problems such as Type 2 diabetes, according to MayoClinic.com. Video of the Day A classification called the glycemic index ranks carbohydrates on a scale of 0 to 100 based on how fast and high they cause your blood sugar to rise in comparison with pure glucose, according to the Harvard School of Public Health. Foods on the high end of the scale – 70 and higher – are foods that cause a high and rapid spike in your blood sugar, and foods on the low end are foods that cause your blood sugar to increase less and at a more gradual pace. Examples of foods in the low 55 and under range are raw carrots, raw apples and kidney beans, according to MayoClinic.com. To keep your blood sugar levels stable, increase your intake of foods on the low end of the scale. Limit your intake of foods that are in the 70 and up range of the glycemic index. Examples of these foods are white rice, plain white bread and watermelon. Foods such as cookies, candy, soft drinks, ice cream and cakes are the highest on the scale as they tend to be made with pure glucose or another fast sugar such as high-fructose corn syrup. Strictly limit your intake of these foods and find foods sweetened with a sugar alternative whenever possible, recommends the Jackson Siegelbaum Gastroenterology website. Foods in the medium 56 to 69 range, such as bananas and sweet corn, are best e Continue reading >>

What To Eat For Hypoglycemia

What To Eat For Hypoglycemia

In this article, we list meal plans for people with hypoglycemia, as well as other tips for managing the condition. What is hypoglycemia? People with persistent low blood sugar may have hypoglycemia. Having low blood sugar is often associated with diabetes, but it is possible to experience hypoglycemia without having diabetes. Other common causes include hormonal deficiencies, critical illnesses, and excessive alcohol consumption. When blood sugar drops within 4 hours of eating a meal, a person may be experiencing reactive hypoglycemia. This condition is caused by excessive insulin production after eating. Hypoglycemia symptoms including: trembling feeling weak or faint feeling mentally sluggish confusion feeling tearful heart palpitations turning pale blurred sight tingling lips Breakfast A person should always try to eat breakfast as soon as possible after waking up, as blood sugar levels may have dropped during the night. It is advisable to limit intake of fruit juices in the morning and stick to juices that do not have added sugar, as these may cause blood sugar levels to become unstable. Some ideal breakfast choices include: Cinnamon is thought to help reduce blood sugar levels and can be sprinkled on many breakfast foods. Lunch Lunch should be a small meal but packed with protein, healthful fats, and complex carbohydrates that will continue to release energy slowly. Some good lunch ideas for hypoglycemia are: tuna, chicken, or tofu sandwich on whole-grain bread with salad leaves chickpea and vegetable salad grilled fish, a baked sweet potato, and a side salad It is necessary for a person with hypoglycemia to be aware of the glycemic index or GI of the foods they eat. Some foods that appear to be healthful may have a high GI. Fortunately, there is often an alternat Continue reading >>

The One Thing No One Tells You About Low Blood Sugar

The One Thing No One Tells You About Low Blood Sugar

Photo: Dimitri Otis/Getty Images "That must suck!" one of my college classmates exclaimed when I explained to her why I had to bring my dinner to the gym and eat it right afterward on the subway. The hour-long subway ride would mean my blood sugar would crash. And by then, I'd learned the hard way that low blood sugar was to be avoided at all costs. Otherwise, I'd be stuck with a shattering migraine and intense nausea that would put me out of commission for the rest of the night. It did suck. And it still does. Back then, my classmate also caught on to one thing no one ever tells you about having low blood sugar. "It must be impossible to lose weight," she said sympathetically. Not that I needed to at the time, but I couldn't help but agree. Every time I try to tone up or lose a couple of post-holiday pounds, hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) makes it even more difficult. Whether I make an effort to eat a little less or exercise more, I end up getting shaky, clammy, and cold, with an intense fogginess that makes my head feel like it's going to explode. The remedy is to eat something that will bring my blood sugar back up, even if I'm not hungry. If you want to lose weight or be healthier, but have experienced the low-blood-sugar roadblocks, here are some tips on how I've made it work. (It's important to note that if you have diabetes, or haven't consulted with your doctor about these kinds of symptoms, do that first and foremost, as suggestions for dietary changes will be different for everyone.) Eat every three to four hours. Having something to eat every three to four hours keeps your blood sugar level on an even keel. Just make sure you keep those meals well balanced. If you just have carbohydrates, like a bowl of cereal or pasta with tomato sauce, your blood sugar will Continue reading >>

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