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Massage Therapy For Type 1 Diabetes

Safe And Effective Massage For Your Diabetic Clients

Safe And Effective Massage For Your Diabetic Clients

Safe and Effective Massage for Your Diabetic Clients Learn why massage is a proven, effective complement to traditional diabetes management, and discover what measures you should take to ensure sessions are both safe and beneficial for your diabetic clients. Approximately 17 million people in the United States currently have diabetes, and the number is growing. Odds are that most massage therapists either have a diabetic client, or will treat one soon. Diabetes is a complex disease, occurring when the body is unable to maintain the proper levels of blood sugar, or glucose, due to an inability to produce or properly use insulin. Studies have demonstrated the place bodywork has in diabetes maintenance, and an increasing number of sufferers are recognizing the value various alternative therapies can have on their health. Below are three reasons massage therapy is beneficial to diabetics: Relaxation Duke Medical University researchers have confirmed that stress management can lower blood glucose levels. A Touch Research Institute study demonstrated that massage therapy lowers blood glucose levels in children with Diabetes Mellitus. A study at New Mexico University showed that a short stress-relief program including touch could lower blood sugar and improve health in diabetic patients. When the body encounters stress, it prepares itself for a fight or flight reaction by raising blood glucose levels. Since raised blood glucose levels are detrimental to diabetics, methods of reducing stress, such as massage therapy, can have a profound effect on preventing blood sugar surges. Circulation There is no getting around the fact that massage can increase circulation, thereby encouraging the efficient transport of oxygen and nutrients throughout the body. Improved circulation, in tu Continue reading >>

5 Ways Massage Improves Diabetes Care

5 Ways Massage Improves Diabetes Care

In the U.S., more than 29 million people live with diabetes. Among U.S. seniorspeople aged 65 years and older11.8 million people, or 25 percent, have diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association . November is National Diabetes Month, a time to become more knowledgeable about this increasingly common disease and how massage can help people who have diabetes. Broadly defined, diabetes mellitus features elevated blood sugar levels and a failure to produce or utilize insulin. There are several varieties of this condition: Type 1 features an autoimmune destruction to pancreatic beta cells. Formally called insulin-dependent diabetes and/or juvenile diabetes. Type 2 is a more common type than Type 1, and features a failure of insulin production or inability to utilize what insulin the body does create. Formally called non-insulin-dependent diabetes. Type 1.5 involves signs and symptoms of both Type 1 and 2. Usually affects people later in life; some doctors believe some patients with Type 2 actually have this type. Gestational occurs when the fetus compromises the mothers ability to utilize sugar properly. Insipidus features kidney failure or pituitary gland dysfunction. The two most common causes of diabetic conditions are obesity and sedentary lifestyle, according to the American Diabetes Association. Other causes include genetics, trauma, or glandular dysfunction throughout the body. The most common signs and symptoms include polyuria, or excessive urination; polydipsia, or excessive thirst; fatigue, lethargy, neuropathy, or lower-limb nerve affectation; and paresthesia, or a burning or prickling sensation. The most common complications include heart and vascular conditions, dental disease, amputations, kidney disease, vision challenges and immobility. Among th Continue reading >>

Navigating The Path To Wellness With Massage Therapy

Navigating The Path To Wellness With Massage Therapy

Continue Learning: Massage Therapy for Osteoarthritis | 2 CE Credits Affecting 29.1 million Americans, Type 2 diabetes (T2D) accounts for 90 to 95 percent of all diabetes cases diagnosed.7 This chronic disease affects how the body metabolizes sugar, or glucose, by either resisting the effects of insulin, a hormone that regulates the movement of sugar into your cells, or not producing enough insulin to maintain a normal glucose level. In either case, an important source of fuel is compromised.8 A common T2D complication is peripheral neuropathy, which is nerve damage caused by chronically high blood sugar. Symptoms include numbness; loss of sensation; pain in the feet, legs or hands; and, specific to diabetic peripheral neuropathy in the feet, impaired balance.9 Two recent clinical studies report that patients with diabetic peripheral neuropathy in their feet can significantly benefit from foot massage. Each study relied on a different massage technique, although both shared similarly positive conclusions. A 2015 study, including 60 patients with T2D, suggests that Thai foot massage is a viable alternative treatment for balance performance, range of motion of the foot and the foot sensation in diabetic patients with peripheral neuropathy.10 Thai foot massage, somewhat similar in theory to acupressure massage, is a form of deep massage using thumb pressure applied along the meridian lines of the foot and leg. The application of pressure on particular areas of the soles of the feet is said to produce a reflex action in other parts of the body. A smaller study, conducted in 2016, investigated the effect of manual foot plantar massage, a classic friction massage, on functional mobility level, balance and functional reach in patients with T2D. Results indicated that applicat Continue reading >>

Massage For Diabetes

Massage For Diabetes

Massage is one of the oldest and safest methods practiced to ensure good health. Massage therapy is the practice of applying pressure on the muscles and soft tissues of the body by the use of hands, fingers, forearms, elbows or feet. It improves the blood circulation in the body thus relieving pain, reducing stress, depression and anxiety. A massage therapist can use different forms of massage techniques like strokes, circular movements, kneading, tapping or vibration depending upon the need and physical condition of the patient. The use of massage therapy for diabetes has been growing drastically in the last few years. Various studies have shown that the patients who suffer from diabetes use massage therapy in conjunction with their regular medical treatments. In diabetes, the blood sugar (glucose) levels are very high due to the imbalance in the secretion or utilization of the hormone insulin. Insulin is produced by the pancreas for helping the glucose to enter the cells as well as for regulating the blood sugar level in the body. When massage is given at injection sites, it increases insulin absorption in the body. In addition to this, it also has a positive effect on the blood glucose levels. The benefits of massage therapy is incredible and can range from stimulating the lymph system, lowering the blood sugar levels, to removing toxins from the body. Massage improves the blood circulation in the body and reduces the ill effects developed due to diabetes such as hardening of arteries. When the blood circulation in the body improves, more oxygen and nutrients are provided to the body cells and this in turn improves the utilization of the insulin by the cells. Massage is a great therapy for relaxing and reducing the stress. Any form of stress or mental fatigue is har Continue reading >>

Diabetes | Massagetherapy.com

Diabetes | Massagetherapy.com

Originally published in Massage & Bodywork magazine, February/March 2001. Diabetes is a disease of impaired carbohydrate metabolism that results from inadequate production or utilization of the hormone insulin. This vital substance is necessary to convert food into energy by facilitating the transfer of glucose (sugar) from the bloodstream into the bodys cells. Of the 16 million people in the United States with diabetes, most can be categorized into one of the following types: Type 1 diabetes, also known as Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus (IDDM), affects 10 percent15 percent of the total number of diabetics. Because of damage to the insulin-producing islet cells of the pancreas, little or no insulin is produced. As with Type 2 diabetes, there is a genetic predisposition to the disease. Often the onset of the disease occurs following significant physical or emotional stress. These individuals must take regular injections of insulin. Type 1 diabetes tends to present itself in childhood or early adulthood. Type 2 diabetes, also known as Non-Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus (NIDDM), affects more than 85 percent of the total number of diabetics. In these people, the pancreas is producing insulin, but the cells that use insulin create resistance to it. Because of this insulin resistance, glucose levels are elevated in the bloodstream. Type 2 diabetics may take one or more oral medications designed either to decrease insulin resistance or enhance the cells sensitivity to insulin. They may also need to take insulin by injection. Generally, Type 2 diabetes has a slower onset than Type 1 diabetes, and is more prevalent in the older population. While the types have different pathologies, they have the same common symptom, that of elevated blood glucose which has many short Continue reading >>

Massage Therapy And Reflexology

Massage Therapy And Reflexology

Massage therapy may relieve stress and anxiety Massage therapy can have several relaxing effects on the body, some of which could be particularly useful for people with diabetes. Studies have shown that massage therapy may help lower anxiety, stress and possibly blood pressure, all of which can increase your well-being. Note that massage therapy should not replace any medications you are taking for these conditions. If you are considering massage therapy for health reasons, it is advisable to consult your doctor first. Different types of massage therapy include: Swedish massage also known as classic massage Swedish massage also known as classic massage Thai massage combines acupressure techniques with yoga poses Reflexology involves applying pressure to the feet Shiatsu massage massage is provided by specialist machines These each work in different ways and will therefore have different benefits and precautions to consider. Massage therapy is known to have benefits on lowering anxiety and stress and the effects are likely to extend to people with diabetes to some extent. Stress is known to negatively affect diabetes control and therefore reductions in stress may result in improved blood glucose levels. However, there have been no well-run studies to show whether this applies in practice. [315] [316] Massage may also help lower blood pressure , however, there is a lack of good quality studies to confirm this. [317] There is evidence that message may improve glucose levels in children with type 1 diabetes but again more research is this needed in this area to confirm. [318] [319] Whilst research into massage for neuropathy treatment is scarce, one study from 1973 showed potential for massage to relieve symptoms of diabetic neuropathy . The study used a mechanical leg mas Continue reading >>

Massage And Body Work For The Diabetic Body

Massage And Body Work For The Diabetic Body

Massage and Body Work for the Diabetic Body A couple of weeks ago, I was having coffee with another massage therapist and she made the comment, You dont have the tough tissue I feel in other diabetics. Ive heard this before, but never thought to blog about the issue. However, it is a good point regarding what massage therapists and other body work professionals feel when they touch the skin of someone with diabetes . As a massage therapist, I can explain this comment: the muscle tissue of someone living with diabetes feels tough, fibrous and inelastic. There are many reasons why this can happen. Among the reasons: lack of hydration, high blood sugars for a prolonged period of time, and personal habits, for example lack of exercise and eating well. People living with diabetes have a tendency toward fibrous tissue and density caused by injection sites . Does dense, fibrous tissue impede our health and longevity? What we know is that CAD studies are abundant for Type 1 diabetes . If hardening of the cardiovascular system is without question problematic for people with diabetes and knowing our propensity for coronary arterial hardening, wouldnt the rest of the living tissue in the body be subject to the same "tough" problem? My philosophy has been to work at keeping my body supple, flexible and fit. My staple for keeping my body supple, flexible and recovering from working out has been massage more than anything else. My 20 years experience as a massage therapist, and someone who is type 1, I agree with my colleagues, there is a specific feel to the skin and tissue beneath in the diabetic body. I can also feel the difference between type 1 and type 2. Type 1 usually suffers thickening of the skin and underlying muscle hardness from injection sites, while a type 2 patients Continue reading >>

Therapeutic Massage - Diabetes Self-management

Therapeutic Massage - Diabetes Self-management

As more and more Americans incorporate alternative therapies into their program of health care, people with diabetes, too, are looking to the usefulness of different therapies to complement their lifestyle measures and medical care. One such alternative therapy is massage. The therapeutic use of touch might be seen as a new development in health care, but there are traditions of touch therapies that date back through the centuries in cultures around the world. The Chinese have written records of therapeutic massage dating to 3000 BC, and there are ancient Egyptian pictographs showing the practice of foot massage. In recent times, the field of massage has gained prominence in the areas of athletic training, medical massage, and spa and fitness centers. So a person with diabetes seeking to optimize his health care may well wonder whether massage therapy might be useful to him. There are many benefits of massage therapy for people with diabetes. Most of these would be similar to the benefits of massage for the general population, but the following are of particular interest for people with diabetes. Relaxation. The value of basic relaxation cannot be overemphasized. Living with diabetes is inherently stressful. Fluctuating blood sugar levels put tremendous strain on the bodys systems. The practical demands of balancing intake of insulin or oral medicines , blood glucose monitoring , nutrition , and exercise can seem like a daunting task for many. Worry about diabetic complications or anxiety relating to work or interpersonal relationships can add to the picture of stress. By sedating the nervous system, massage can bring a much-needed rest and an assuring sense of well-being to the body. Skillfully applied touch can have a profound effect on body chemistry, decreasing the Continue reading >>

Is Massage Useful In The Management Of Diabetes? A Systematic Review

Is Massage Useful In The Management Of Diabetes? A Systematic Review

In Brief Massage is among the fastest growing complementary therapies used in the United States. This article systematically reviews the available evidence on potential benefits and adverse effects of massage for people with diabetes. Massage at injection sites may increase insulin absorption. In addition, uncontrolled studies suggest that massage may have a positive effect on blood glucose levels and symptoms of diabetic neuropathy. However, randomized, placebo-controlled studies are needed to confirm any short- and long-term benefits of massage as a complementary treatment for diabetes and to further define an optimal massage treatment. Massage has been recommended for diabetes for nearly 100 years.1 However, the usefulness of massage for people with diabetes remains unclear as evidenced by a recent exchange on an Internet diabetes message board. One writer posts the message, “Does anyone know if massage can help diabetes?” The only reply is another inquiry: “Hi! If you find out any information on massage therapy, please let me know. I just want to help my 16-year-old daughter, who has been diagnosed with diabetes. How do you think massage can help? Even type 2 diabetics, do you think?”2 If these writers were to surf the World Wide Web in search of answers to their questions, they would likely be left confused and frustrated. Internet information on this topic is fraught with unsubstantiated claims. One site actually suggests that diabetes can be prevented through self-massage.3 Another reports on an individual who allegedly had the bottoms of his feet massaged, eliminated large amounts of sugar in his urine during the second week of treatment, and then recovered from his disease.4 How, then, do consumers decide, or clinicians advise, about the usefulness of m Continue reading >>

Can A Diabetic Get A Deep Tissue Massage?

Can A Diabetic Get A Deep Tissue Massage?

home / diabetes center / diabetes a-z list / can a diabetic get a deep tissue massage article Can a Diabetic Get a Deep Tissue Massage? Medical Author: Ruchi Mathur, MD, FRCP(C) Ruchi Mathur, MD, FRCP(C) is an Attending Physician with the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism and Associate Director of Clinical Research, Recruitment and Phenotyping with the Center for Androgen Related Disorders, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. Medical Editor: Melissa Conrad Stppler, MD Melissa Conrad Stppler, MD, is a U.S. board-certified Anatomic Pathologist with subspecialty training in the fields of Experimental and Molecular Pathology. Dr. Stppler's educational background includes a BA with Highest Distinction from the University of Virginia and an MD from the University of North Carolina. She completed residency training in Anatomic Pathology at Georgetown University followed by subspecialty fellowship training in molecular diagnostics and experimental pathology. Can a person with diabetes have a deep tissue massage ? A patient with well controlled diabetes has no limitations on what they can do provided they have suffered no damage from their diabetes , and other commonly occurring conditions (such as hypertension ) are well controlled. If you are interested in a deep tissue massage, there is no contraindication, but you should observe certain precautions. Stay well hydrated before during and after your treatment, notify your therapist of any particular areas that are bothering you, and make certain your blood sugars are controlled before the treatment. If you plan on delaying a meal because of scheduling, make certain you eat something before going into your treatment so you do not become hypoglycemic during your massage. If yo Continue reading >>

Massage And Diabetes

Massage And Diabetes

Comfort, relaxation, may make you think of-massage. Is it advisable for people with diabetes to partake in this activity or is it contraindicated? This blog will explore this issue. The first step is to ask your physician to counsel you on the safety of this activity for you and your health. By reading this blog you may have some discussion points for your conversation. With physicians approval and a prescription, some insurance companies will cover the cost of a massage. Other insurance plans may have a list of preferred providers for therapy and if you go to one, you can get a significant discount and others will not cover the cost at all. Massage may be expensive out of pocket so ask what the cost will be. Do you think of massage as a relaxing just me time where you troubles just seem to melt away? For many people with diabetes this is true. There also may be special benefits for a person with diabetes to consider. Helps to lower blood glucoseSome people with diabetes report a drop in blood glucose of 20-40 mg/dl. The pleasures of massage may cause a decrease in hormones that are related to stress and anxiety which may cause this significant drop in blood glucose levels. (1,2,3) Therapeutic massage will increase circulation. For people with type 2 diabetes, this may help with increasing the efficiency of insulin which will help decrease blood glucose levels. (4) With your physicians approval, therapeutic massage may be beneficial for people with diabetic neuropathy. (5) For people with diabetes, massage may ease problems with range of motion and increase flexibility. (2) It may help to decrease muscle tension and blood pressure. (3) Definitely consult with your physician to see if this is for you. Ask what types of massage would be beneficial if approved. There are Continue reading >>

Can Massage Therapy Help Treat Diabetes?

Can Massage Therapy Help Treat Diabetes?

Diabetes is a condition that is characterized by an excess amount of sugar in the blood. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), approximately 29.1 million people in the United States, or 9.3 percent of the population, suffer from this disease. While diet and exercise is paramount for mitigating the effects of diabetes, theres some belief that massage therapy can help as well. Massage therapy offers numerous benefits for people with diabetes, starting with its positive impact on blood circulation. People with poor circulation are particularly prone to diabetes and its related complications, simply because it takes longer for insulin to reach cells. By receiving massage therapy on a regular basis, however, youll encourage faster, healthier circulation, which in turn yields more insulin to your cells. Theres also the issue of stress associated with diabetes. Living with diabetes can undoubtedly bring a fair amount of stress to the individual. As this stress builds, it can promote the release of stress hormones like cortisol, which in turn can slow down the flow of insulin. Of course, massage therapy has been used for centuries for the purpose of stress relief, both mental and physical. Whether you prefer a light-tissue or deep-tissue massage, it will relieve your stress while possibly helping to aid in your fight against diabetes. Many people who suffer from diabetes experience chronic pain. Thankfully, this is a symptom thats easily treated through massage therapy. Massage slows down the release of cortisol, but at the same time it promotes the release of oxytocin and serotonin, both of which have are natural pain-relieving hormones. A report published by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) found massage to significantly increase serum ins Continue reading >>

Massage, Diabetes Type 1 , &hypoglycemia

Massage, Diabetes Type 1 , &hypoglycemia

The gateway to quality education & improved client care PART 1 OF 2: Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a group of diseases characterized by chronic elevated blood glucose levels. It is caused by insufficient amounts of insulin, resistance to insulin by the cells, or both. Several types of DM have been identified such as type 1 & type 2. Gestational diabetes discussed HERE . In type 1 DM, pancreatic beta cells are damaged or destroyed, creating a lack of insulin. Without insulin, glucose cannot enter cells. Hence the individual develops a dependence on insulin. Another term used to describe type 1 DM is insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). Type 1 accounts for approximately 5-10% of all diabetes cases (1) & affects approximately 1.25 million people in the United States (2). Glucose is the bodys main source of fuel & energy. Glucose can only enter cells with the help of the hormone, insulin. Insulin is produced by beta cells located in the pancreas. When glucose enters body cells, blood glucose levels are lowered. Without insulin, glucose does not enter the cells & blood glucose levels remain high called hyperglycemia. Signs and symptoms of DM are excessive urination, excessive thirst, & excessive hunger. Others include fatigue, blurred vision, unexplained weight loss, & increased frequency of infections. Persistent hyperglycemia damages cells & leads to complications such as vision problems or diabetic retinopathy, reduced sensations or diabetic neuropathy, & kidney, cardiovascular, & neurologic diseases. Treatment consists of a lifelong commitment of monitoring blood sugar, taking insulin, regular exercise, & controlled caloric intake. Some individuals check their levels daily with a glucose meter. This meter is also used to determine if a person with diabetes has hypogl Continue reading >>

The Benefits Of Massage For Diabetes

The Benefits Of Massage For Diabetes

Tags: Massage , Diabetes , Acupressure , Blood Sugar , Karyn Wofford , Massage is seen as a luxury we participate in during vacation or on a special occasion. However, according to Allied Health Schools , massage dates all the way back to 2700 BC and was originally used in medicine. My husband and I book a couples massage about twice a year. Being that I am a type 1 diabetic, I couldnt help but notice that my blood sugar was usually lower after a session. At first, I believed it to be coincidence, but decided to pay closer attention the next time. When my blood sugar dropped 54 points after a 60 minute, deep tissue massage, I was fascinated and began to read into it. 1. Medline states that massage controls and reduces the stress hormone, cortisol, which diabetics tend to have an excess of. Cortisol raises blood sugar and decreases insulin sensitivity, and massage counteracts this. 2. In the same Medline study, type 1 diabetic children were given daily, full body massages by their parents. The average blood sugar numbers decreased from 158 mg/dl to 118 mg/dl (thats milligrams of sugar per deciliter of blood if youre lucky enough to not be familiar with diabetes!) 3. Depression is highly prevalent among diabetics, so the relaxing nature of massage and acupressure can significantly reduce symptoms of depression and anxiety. 4. Massage Magazine notes that 6 weeks of acupressure, along with breathing exercises, can reduce blood sugar, anxiety, headaches, anger, depression and stress, along with improving sleep and relationships. 5. Massaging injection sites can increase insulin absorption. 6. Circulation is improved, delivering more oxygen to the tissues, benefiting overall well-being and preventing neuropathy. When blood is flowing better, the body uses insulin more effici Continue reading >>

How Shiatsu Therapy May Benefit People With Diabetes

How Shiatsu Therapy May Benefit People With Diabetes

In Japanese, Shiatsu means “finger pressure,” and there is evidence that using Shiatsu massage with a doctor’s approval as a complimentary approach to conventional treatment for those with diabetes may help to lower blood sugars 1. Current research is lacking in randomized, placebo-controlled studies, but suggests that shiatsu may decrease pain (painful menstrual cycles, lower back and labor pain), decrease post-operative nausea and vomiting, and improve sleep in elderly in long term facilities2. In addition, it may decrease symptoms of neuropathy in diabetics3. Shiatsu is a form of Japanese bodywork- an alternative medicine that uses fingers, thumbs, feet, palms, or various devices to apply pressure to the body. From traditional Chinese medicine, “meridians,” or channel networks are believed to provide the path for the life energy known as “Qi.” The massage therapist may use techniques of assisted stretching, joint manipulation and mobility. Before a Shiatsu session, the patient will be asked some general wellness and medical questions. Sessions take place at floor level or on a table, clothed or unclothed, based on the patient’s comfort level. “Meridians” are treated using gentle thumb, finger, elbow or knee pressure (acupressure). Sometimes where the flow may seem weak, deep thumb pressure is applied; in other areas where there is a build-up of “Qi”, shaking, chopping, or rubbing is used. The practitioner will gently manipulate and ease joints before moving onto treating specific meridians and acupoints (acupuncture points where acupressure is applied). Joints are also gently pulled and stretched to release energy (Qi). Throughout the treatment, the therapist listens to the movement of energy, sensing it through their fingers and the responses Continue reading >>

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