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Mary Tyler Moore Diabetes Amputation

Mary Tyler Moore Nearly Blind From Diabetes

Mary Tyler Moore Nearly Blind From Diabetes

By Tony Hicks | [email protected] | Bay Area News Group Mary Tyler Moore is nearly blind from her long fight with diabetes, according to friends of the TV icon. Moore, 77, was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at age 33. Shes mostly stayed out of the public eye the past two years while dealing with the disease, according to the New York Post. Her eyesight is what the big problem is right now, friend and former The Mary Tyler Moore Show co-star Betty White told Closer Weekly magazine. (Moore is now) almost beyond the point (of being able to see). She has managed to stay in touch with old friends. I dont see her often, but I talk to her a bunch, said Dick Van Dyke, who became famous playing Moores husband on The Dick Van Dyke Show. She hasnt been too well. Shes really having a battle with it, Im sorry to say. Valerie Harper, another co-star of Moores from The Mary Tyler Moore Show, said Moores diabetes has been brutal. (The diabetes) does ravage her body, but she stays healthy, said Harper, who called Moore a wonderful friend, who sounded great the last time they talked. Another friend of Moores said the actress is in good spirits. Mary is not a woe-is-me woman, the friend told Closer Weekly. She has her bad days emotionally, but she just tries to find enjoyment in each and every day. Struggling with her vision isnt new for Moore. In 1997, she was scheduled to be mistress of ceremonies at the Directors Guild of America awards show in New York, but had to bow out at the last minute. A guild official said she went temporarily blind. Contact Tony Hicks at Facebook.com/BayAreaNewsGroup.TonyHicks or Twitter.com/insertfoot . Continue reading >>

Mary Tyler Moore Dead: 5 Fast Facts You Need Toknow

Mary Tyler Moore Dead: 5 Fast Facts You Need Toknow

Mary Tyler Moore Dead: 5 Fast Facts You Need toKnow One of the most popular actresses in the history of television, Mary Tyler Moore, has died at the age of 80. Fame didnt come easy for the star, who grew up in a home with an alcoholic mother and emotionally distant father. Moore was also candid about her own struggles with alcoholism. But the beauty beat the odds, and in addition to starring in her own show, she rose to stardom with a plethora of other roles. Heres what you need to know about the life and death of a beautiful, adored actress: BREAKING: Actress Mary Tyler Moore is dead at age 80, publicist says. The Associated Press (@AP) January 25, 2017 Moore died at the age of 80 on January 25, 2017, as reported by the Associated Press . TMZ reported that the actress condition was so grim that family members went to the hospital to say goodbye. TMZ also reported that the actress had been on a respirator for more than a week. The news comes after Moore suffered a decades-long battle with Type 1 Diabetes. Moores representative released the following statement to People Magazine: Today, beloved icon, Mary Tyler Moore, passed away at the age of 80 in the company of friends and her loving husband of over 33 years, Dr. S. Robert Levine. A groundbreaking actress, producer, and passionate advocate for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, Mary will be remembered as a fearless visionary who turned the world on with her smile. 2. In Addition to Several Other Roles, the Actress Had Her Own Television Show; The Mary Tyler Moore Show The Mary Tyler Moore Show Temporada 7, Capitulo 1 24Completo pic.twitter.com/exudrT5HKx Polis Polis (@nesveikaz3) January 9, 2017 According to Biography.com , Moore began her career dancing in commercials and in 1959 landed a role in Richard Di Continue reading >>

02 - Mary Tyler Moores Death A Reminder Of The Toll Of Diabetes - University Of Florida News

02 - Mary Tyler Moores Death A Reminder Of The Toll Of Diabetes - University Of Florida News

Mary Tyler Moores death a reminder of the toll of diabetes Desmond Schatz, professor and medical director of the UF Diabetes Institute, observes that diabetes, which kills 69,000 people annually, is an epidemic bound to worsen. Mary Tyler Moore debuted on television in the 1950s, appearing in commercials that aired during a popular show. Her star continued to rise until Moore landed the eponymous sitcom that became a staple of 1970s pop culture. But it was another event that cast her in a new, unfamiliar and lifelong role: a diagnosis of Type 1 diabetes at age 33. Moore, who died Jan. 25 at age 80, did more than just fight her disease. She leveraged her star power to become an advocate for diabetes research. Moores official cause of death , cardiopulmonary arrest, was released Jan. 30. Diabetes was listed as a contributing factor. As a physician who directs a diabetes institute at an academic medical center, I see this moment as a teaching opportunity about her disease. I also hope to show how Moore used her celebrity for good in the fight against diabetes, which kills 69,000 people a year, more than the toll of HIV/AIDS and breast cancer combined. An old problem, with new and growing numbers The prevalence of diagnosed diabetes, in all forms, in the U.S. increased by 382 percent from 1988 to 2014. There are two types, but both involve the build-up of sugar in the blood, which can damage blood vessels and organs and lead to death and disability. Type 1 diabetes arises when the pancreas fails to produce insulin that allows the body to extract energy from food. Sugar builds up in the blood rather than going to cells, where it is used for energy. About 1.25 million people have this type of diabetes, and it is what Mary Tyler Moore suffered from. Type 2 diabetes is much mo Continue reading >>

Mary Tyler Moore’s Death A Reminder Of The Toll Of Diabetes

Mary Tyler Moore’s Death A Reminder Of The Toll Of Diabetes

Mary Tyler Moore debuted on television in the 1950s, appearing in commercials that aired during a popular show. Her star continued to rise until Moore landed the eponymous sitcom that became a staple of 1970s pop culture. But it was another event that cast her in a new, unfamiliar and lifelong role: a diagnosis of Type 1 diabetes at age 33. Moore, who died Jan. 25 at age 80, did more than just fight her disease. She leveraged her star power to become an advocate for diabetes research. Moore’s official cause of death, cardiopulmonary arrest, was released Jan. 30. Diabetes was listed as a contributing factor. As a physician who directs a diabetes institute at an academic medical center, I see this moment as a teaching opportunity about her disease. I also hope to show how Moore used her celebrity for good in the fight against diabetes, which kills 69,000 people a year, more than the toll of HIV/AIDS and breast cancer combined. An old problem, with new and growing numbers The prevalence of diagnosed diabetes, in all forms, in the U.S. increased by 382 percent from 1988 to 2014. There are two types, but both involve the build-up of sugar in the blood, which can damage blood vessels and organs and lead to death and disability. Type 1 diabetes arises when the pancreas fails to produce insulin that allows the body to extract energy from food. Sugar builds up in the blood rather than going to cells, where it is used for energy. About 1.25 million people have this type of diabetes, and it is what Mary Tyler Moore suffered from. Type 2 diabetes is much more common, with about 30 million people suffering from this condition and another estimated 86 million people in the U.S. considered prediabetic. In Type 2 diabetes, the body does not use insulin properly, causing blood sugar l Continue reading >>

Status For Mary Tyler Moore

Status For Mary Tyler Moore

D.D. Family T1 41 years, paradigm 522 began 3/08 Can anyone confirm or disaffirm the tabloid article regarding Mary Tyler Moore and whether she has had an amputation due to diabetic complications? I was diagnosed with Type 1 the same week this tireless advocate was. I hope it's not true. I read an article on the internet about Mary Tyler Moore's life and found the following statement - quote - "In this role, she has used her fame to help raise funds and raise awareness of diabetes mellitus type 1, which she has, almost losing her vision and at least one limb to the disease." So I don't know if that means she almost lost one limb to the disease or she did lose a limb. I sure hope not. D.D. Family Type 1 since 2002, pumper since 2004 I read an article on the internet about Mary Tyler Moore's life and found the following statement - quote - "In this role, she has used her fame to help raise funds and raise awareness of diabetes mellitus type 1, which she has, almost losing her vision and at least one limb to the disease." So I don't know if that means she almost lost one limb to the disease or she did lose a limb. I sure hope not. She was on TV a few months ago and had all her limbs. Certainly it would have made big news if something had happened in the meantime. My Diabetes blog , Personal Blog or my diabetes365 pictures "I did then what I knew how to do. Now that I know better, I do better." I just saw Mary Tyler Moore on television on Sunday evening as she will be starring in Brooke Shields new series this fall as a recurring guest as Brooke's mother, she had all her limbs, I commend her for work with the Diabetes Foundation, and at the age of 71 she still looks very good for a woman of her age. Continue reading >>

Mary Tyler Moore's Death: Was Diabetes A Factor?

Mary Tyler Moore's Death: Was Diabetes A Factor?

Legendary actress Mary Tyler Moore died Wednesday at the age of 80 of pneumonia, a common complication suffered by diabetics who are more vulnerable to the infection, a top expert says. “People with diabetes are more susceptible to infections, and that includes pneumonia,” Dr. Marc Leavey tells Newsmax Health. “When they get pneumonia, it is easy for them to spiral downwards,” adds Leavey, an internist with Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore. Moore was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at the age of 33, and became known not only for her ability to bear the disease with grace but also for her work in raising millions of dollars to fight it. “Diabetes takes a toll on the heart, kidneys, eyes, and the extremities, and the fact that she lived an active life until the age of 80 is remarkable,” says Leavey. “In fact, her ability to live the kind of life she did with it should be viewed as an inspiration.” It’s estimated that between 1.25 and three million Americans have Type 1diabetes, formerly known as “juvenile diabetes.” “Type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune disease in which a person’s pancreas stops producing insulin, the hormone that metabolizes food into energy. Only about 10 percent of the world’s diabetics have Type 1 diabetes – the remaining 90 percent have diabetes Type 2, which causes insulin to become less effective. “Both types of diabetes damage the body, affecting particularly the heart, eyes, kidneys, and the extremities, making it a leading cause of amputations,” says Leavey. Moore was known to suffer vision problems and in May 2011 she underwent elective surgery to remove a benign tumor of the lining tissue of the brain. She was also said to suffer from a variety of other ailments, including heart and kidney problems, news reports say Continue reading >>

Mary Tyler Moore's Battle With Diabetes Her Famous Friends Speak Out - Closer Weekly

Mary Tyler Moore's Battle With Diabetes Her Famous Friends Speak Out - Closer Weekly

By signing up I agree to the Privacy Policy . I also agree to receive periodic emails from Closer Weekly based on my interests. Your life just got exponentially better and more stylish now you've signed up for our newsletter. Fabulousness awaits! Mary Tyler Moore has been out of the spotlight since April 2013, struggling with complications from her long battle with diabetes. Now, facing some of her toughest challenges yet, her friends speak to Closer Weekly, showing their support and offering an update on her condition. "Her eyesight is what the big problem is right now, former Mary Tyler Moore Show co-star Betty White reveals to Closer. MORE: Betty White's Heartbreaking Reaction to Mary Tyler Moore's Death *Moore with White on the "Mary Tyler Moore Show"* Mary, who was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes when she was only 33, is almost beyond the point [of being able to see], Betty says. The illness forces Mary to stick close to home these days, though she stays connected to her longtime friends via frequent calls. I dont see her often, but I talk to her a bunch, Dick Van Dyke, who played her husband on The Dick Van Dyke Show, reveals to Closer. She hasnt been too well. Shes really having a battle with it, Im sorry to say. MORE: Mary Tyler Moore Dead at 80: Listen to 'The Mary Tyler Moore Show' Theme Song to Remember the Late Star *Moore with Van Dyke in a still from "The Dick Van Dyke Show"* Keeping an eye on her at all times is her husband of more than 30 years, Dr. Robert Levine, who is a cardiologist. With his background in medicine, he understands the disease, says Dr. Mark Atkinson, whos worked with Mary and the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) for about 25 years. MORE: Dick Van Dyke Reveals Behind the Scenes Secrets from 'The Dick Van Dyke Show' The doct Continue reading >>

Mary Tyler Moore Proved Living Well With Type 1 Diabetes Is Possible

Mary Tyler Moore Proved Living Well With Type 1 Diabetes Is Possible

Actress and activist Mary Tyler Moore passed away this week at the age of 80. No cause of death was immediately available, but Moore spoke publicly for many years about her struggle with type 1 diabetes, with which she was diagnosed at age 33. In a statement, Moore’s rep referred to her as “a groundbreaking actress, producer, and passionate advocate for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation.” She had served as International Chairman for the foundation, now known as JDRF, since 1984. "Mary Tyler Moore’s legacy is that of a woman who tirelessly committed herself to helping the millions with T1D," said JDRF in a statement. "Over the past 30 years, Moore educated about and increased awareness of T1D around the world and raised millions of dollars for research that will one day lead to a cure. Among her efforts, Moore was actively involved in JDRF Children’s Congress, sitting alongside children diagnosed with T1D to share their stories with elected officials on Capitol Hill and demonstrate the importance of continued T1D research funding." According to the National Institutes of Health’s MedlinePlus magazine, Moore’s frequent lobbying visits to Congress over the years helped increase JDRF’s research budget to more than $1 billion. Moore became active in diabetes advocacy after she was diagnosed with the lifelong disease herself. In 1997, she told the Archive of American Television that her diabetes was discovered when she was in the hospital after suffering a miscarriage. “While normal blood sugar levels are to be somewhere between 70 and 110, mine was 750,” she said. “They were amazed I was still walking around. And to this day they don’t know which came first, the miscarriage or the diabetes—which caused the other’s onset.” Moore later tol Continue reading >>

Mary Tyler Moore Is Nearlyblind

Mary Tyler Moore Is Nearlyblind

How Mary Tyler Moore changed Oprah Winfrey's life Legendary actress Mary Tyler Moore has been left nearly blind from her years-long battle against diabetes, according to friends of the iconic TV star. The 77-year-old Moore was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at age 33, and shes been largely out of public view for the past two years fighting the disease. Her eyesight is what the big problem is right now, long-time pal and Mary Tyler Moore Show co-star Betty White told Closer Weekly magazine . [Moore is now] almost beyond the point [of being able to see]. Despite the illness thats kept her at home for most of the past two years, shes managed to stay in touch with famous friends. I dont see her often, but I talk to her a bunch, said veteran funnyman Dick Van Dyke, who played Moores husband on The Dick Van Dyke Show. She hasnt been too well. Shes really having a battle with it, Im sorry to say. Valerie Harper, a Mary Tyler Moore Show co-star before spinning off into her own successful show, said diabetes has taken a brutal toll on Moore. [The diabetes] does ravage her body, but she stays healthy, said Harper. The Rhoda star called Moore a wonderful friend, who sounded great when they last spoke. Another friend of Moores also said the actress is in remarkably good spirits despite her physical condition. Mary is not a woe-is-me woman, the pal told the mag. She has her bad days emotionally, but she just tries to find enjoyment in each and every day. Family confidante Dr. Mark Atkinson said he keeps in close contact with Moores husband, Dr. Robert Levine, and found that theyre coping the best they can. Weve laughed together, cried together, gotten disappointed together, Atkinson said. Theyve just been the perfect couple. Moore has struggled with her vision for years. Back in 19 Continue reading >>

Mary Tyler Moore - Wikipedia

Mary Tyler Moore - Wikipedia

This article is about the actress. For the 1970s television series, see The Mary Tyler Moore Show . Oak Lawn Cemetery, Fairfield, Connecticut Mary Tyler Moore (December 29, 1936 January 25, 2017) was an American actress, known for her roles in the television sitcoms The Mary Tyler Moore Show (19701977), in which she starred as Mary Richards , a single woman working as a local news producer in Minneapolis , and The Dick Van Dyke Show (19611966), in which she played Laura Petrie , a former dancer turned Westchester homemaker, wife and mother. [1] [2] [3] [4] Her film work includes 1967's Thoroughly Modern Millie and 1980's Ordinary People , in which she played a role that was very different from the television characters she had portrayed, and for which she was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actress . [5] [6] [7] Due to her roles on both The Mary Tyler Moore Show and The Dick Van Dyke Show, in which her characters often broke from stereotypical images of women and pushed gender norms, Moore became a cultural icon and served as an inspiration for many younger actresses, professional women, and feminists. [8] [9] [10] She was later active in charity work and various political causes, particularly the issues of animal rights , vegetarianism [11] and diabetes . She was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes early in the run of The Mary Tyler Moore Show. [12] She also suffered from alcoholism , which she wrote about in her first of two memoirs. She died from cardiopulmonary arrest due to pneumonia at the age of 80 on January 25, 2017. [13] Moore was born in Brooklyn , New York , to George Tyler Moore (19132006), a clerk, and his wife Marjorie Hackett (19161992). [14] [15] Moore was the oldest of three children (her siblings were John and Elizabeth). Moore's family lived on O Continue reading >>

Mary Tyler Moore's Swollen Face Makes Her Unrecognisable From Her Hollywood Heyday | Daily Mail Online

Mary Tyler Moore's Swollen Face Makes Her Unrecognisable From Her Hollywood Heyday | Daily Mail Online

What happened? Mary Tyler Moore's swollen face makes her unrecognisable from her Hollywood heyday She was once one of the most beautiful women in Hollywood, with legions of male fans throughout the world. But, as she stepped out in New York last night, Mary Tyler Moore was virtually unrecognisable from her heyday. The 74-year-old actress sported a swollen, shiny face, which furthered rumours she has had plastic surgery, as she attended the opening night of Broadway show Follies at the Marquis Theatre. What happened? Mary Tyler Moore was virtually unrecognisable as she attended the opening of Broadway show Follies last night What happened? Mary Tyler Moore was virtually unrecognisable as she attended the opening of Broadway show Follies last night While Mary has never publicly admitted to having had plastic surgery, she is rumoured to have had several facelifts, a nose job and a lip augmentation. And despite the skin on her neck looking wrinkly, Mary's face was tight in contrast. However, a source said the reason Mary's face looked so odd was because she had suffered a nasty fall after tripping over her Golden Retriever dog. Mary shot to stardom in the 60s as Dick Van Dyke's wife, Laura Petrie, in The Dick Van Dyke Show. Her popularity later saw Mary land her own sitcom in 1970 as a single woman pursuing her own career in the Mary Tyler Moore Show. The veteran actress was also nominated for an Oscar in 1980 for her role in the movie, Ordinary People, alongside Donald Sutherland. It was also announced last week that Mary will be honoured with the Screen Actors Guild's Life Achievement Award. Shiny: A source said Mary was sporting a swollen face because she had taken a nasty fall by tripping over her dog Shiny: A source said Mary was sporting a swollen face because she ha Continue reading >>

Mary Tyler Moore's Life Offers Hope For People With Type 1 Diabetes

Mary Tyler Moore's Life Offers Hope For People With Type 1 Diabetes

Mary Tyler Moore's death on Wednesday at age 80 may highlight the long-term effects that type 1 diabetes can have on the body. Moore died Jan. 25 after going into cardiopulmonary arrest, which means her heart stopped beating, several news outlets reported, citing Moore's publicist Mara Buxbaum. She had also recently contracted pneumonia. Moore had been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes when she was in her 30s. With new advances in medicine, type 1 diabetes no longer means a certain premature death, but it still has a significant impact on the body over time. [Extending Life: 7 Ways to Live Past 100] "The main way the body is affected is the chronic exposure to high blood sugar. These high blood sugars damage various organs — in particular, the eyes, kidneys and nerves — to increase cardiovascular disease," said Dr. Robert Gabbay, the chief medical officer at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston, a nonprofit research institution affiliated with Harvard Medical School. In people with type 1 diabetes, the pancreas has nearly completely stopped producing insulin, the hormone that allows the body cells to take in glucose and use it for energy. (This is a different condition from type 2 diabetes, which occurs when the body cannot produce enough insulin or use insulin effectively.) In those with type 1 diabetes, glucose instead builds up in the blood stream, and can cause fatigue, weakness, weight loss and excessive urination when untreated. Eventually, the disease can cause complications, including heart attack, strokes, blindness and kidney failure, according to the Joslin Diabetes Center. But is it possible to die from complications of type 1 diabetes? "Unfortunately, very much so," Gabbay told Live Science. "In the absence of insulin treatment, people with diabetes will d Continue reading >>

Leg Amputation: Too Little...too Late! (article) By Jerry Aragon Ph.d (phunny Humor Doctor) On Authorsden

Leg Amputation: Too Little...too Late! (article) By Jerry Aragon Ph.d (phunny Humor Doctor) On Authorsden

I quit smoking in 1970, at the age of 23, and I have not touched any tobacco products since that time. It's always been amazing to me, how some foolish people don't wake up and smell the coffee until it's too late! Case in point... There was a knock on my front door, and it was my neighbor from down the hall. We were just acquaintances...saying hi to each other in the parking lot and so forth. He said to me, "You don't smoke, do you...my doctor told me, that if I didn't quit smoking...they are going to cut my leg off." Boy, what drastic news this man had, so I asked him to come in. This man was about my age at the time (55), but he looked much older. I told the man how I quit smoking long ago, and it took me about a year to do it. He left my apartment, and that was the end of our visit. "Get me well so I can get on televsion and tell people to stop smoking." Nat King Cole (after smoking 3 packs a day, Nat King Cole died from lung cancer at the young age of 43) About a month later, I saw the man in the parking lot, and he was on crutches...minus one leg! This man must have been a diabetic, too, but we didn't talk about diabetes during his visit. Anyway, I didn't know anything about diabetes at the time, until I was diagnosed with diabetes in 2008. (more on this later) About a month after I saw the man on crutches, I was coming home from work, and I noticed an ambulance parked at the front door of the apartments. When I went inside, I saw the ambulance people carrying somebody on a gurney...it was the man whose leg was cut off...and I couldn't tell if he was asleep; unconscous or dead. If the man was a diabetic...he was probably dead. The following week, I noticed his son cleaning out his apartment, so he was probably dead. "Impotence is one of the major hazards of smoki Continue reading >>

Mary Tyler Moore's Battle With Diabetic Vision Loss

Mary Tyler Moore's Battle With Diabetic Vision Loss

Mary Tyler Moore's Battle With Diabetic Vision Loss By Charlotte Libov | Thursday, 29 May 2014 02:21 PM The recent disclosure that TV legend Mary Tyler Moore is struggling with the loss of her eyesight has highlighted a health condition that has become increasingly common amid the nation's diabetes epidemic: diabetic retinopathy. Diabetes afflicts an estimated 26 million Americans, and all of them are at risk for retinopathy, which has left Moore nearly blind. A study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found that one-third of adults with diabetes have some vision issues, and experts say that rate is sharply escalating. A study published in 2012 in Review of Optometry found that the rate of diabetes retinopathy has nearly doubled over the past 10 years. Some 8 million Americans now suffer from the vision-impairing condition. However, along with the dramatic increase have come new treatments that can help prevent blindness, although they apparently are too late to save Moores eyesight, which is nearly gone, her friends say. Her eyesight is the big problem right now, Betty White, a costar on The Mary Tyler Moore Show said in an interview, noting that Moore is almost to the point of being unable to see. Dick Van Dyke, who played Moores TV husband on The Dick Van Dyke Show, said he rarely sees Moore now because her illness has forced her to stay close to home. She really hasnt been too well. Shes really having a battle with it, Im sorry to say, Van Dyke said. Her close friend Valerie Harper, who is waging her own battle against brain cancer, said that Moore remains steadfastly upbeat despite the ravages of diabetes. Another indication of the seriousness of her disease was that last summer Moore, the worlds top celebrity advocate for diabetes research, missed Continue reading >>

How Mary Tyler Moore Helped Me Live With Type 1 Diabetes

How Mary Tyler Moore Helped Me Live With Type 1 Diabetes

When I was 9 years old, suddenly finding out I would have to inject myself with insulin and watch what I ate every day was quite a heavy load. But Mary Tyler Moore gave me hope that I was gonna make it after all. Back then, in 1973, she was the only famous person I knew with Type 1 diabetes. She never looked depressed or unhappy – quite the opposite. Daily shots couldn't be that bad, I reasoned, if Mary can do it and still turn the world on with her smile. Moore, who died Wednesday at the age of 80, was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes at 33, just as The Mary Tyler Moore Show was getting off the ground. She would become a double hero for me, as much for the strong single working-woman character she portrayed on the show as for her real life, lived so fully with Type 1 diabetes. Moore spent decades advocating for diabetes research and for people with diabetes, including testifying in front of Congress and public service campaigns for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, now known as JDRF. (The organization has set up a website for people to post tributes to Moore.) Soon after my diagnosis, I wrote her a letter telling her how much she had helped me accept my diabetes. Weeks later, I received a beautiful autographed photo of her. The autograph was preprinted, but still ... Maybe she'd actually read my letter! In August 1997, I had the chance to meet her when she spoke during a ceremony held at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., to announce three federally-funded projects related to diabetes, including one specifically for Type 1. Then-President Bill Clinton thanked Moore for her "long, tireless and selfless efforts" and was whisked off at the end of the event. But she stayed, chatting with attendees. I shyly approached her and introduced myself as a medical Continue reading >>

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