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10 Subtle Signs Of Bipolar Disorder

10 Subtle Signs Of Bipolar Disorder

Bipolar symptoms When it comes to mental illness, there are plenty of stereotypes. But in reality, mood disorders can be hard to pinpoint—particularly in people with bipolar disorder symptoms. "Chalking it up to moodiness or trouble at work or tiredness is pretty common," says Carrie Bearden, PhD, an associate professor in residence of psychiatry and behavioral sciences and psychology at the David Geffen School of Medical at UCLA. "The disorder varies in severity." Here are 10 signs that mood problems may be due to more than a quirky or difficult personality. Great mood Bipolar disorder is characterized by up-and-down episodes of mania and depression. During a manic phase, some patients can have a total break from reality. But hypomania, which is also a symptom of the disorder, is a high-energy state in which a person feels exuberant but hasn’t lost his or her grip on reality. "Hypomania can be a pretty enjoyable state, really," Dr. Bearden says. A person’s mood can be elevated, they may have a lot of energy and creativity, and they may experience euphoria. This is the "up" side of bipolar disorder that some people with the condition actually enjoy—while it lasts. Inability to complete tasks Having a house full of half-completed projects is a hallmark of bipolar disorder. People who can harness their energy when they are in a hypomanic phase can be really productive. Those who can’t often go from task to task, planning grand, unrealistic projects that are never finished before moving on to something else. "They can be quite distractible and may start a million things and never finish them," says Don Malone, MD, the director of the Center for Behavioral Health and chair of the Department of Psychiatry at Cleveland Clinic, in Ohio. Depression A person who is in Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Mood Swings: Effects On Relationships

Diabetes And Mood Swings: Effects On Relationships

Diabetes is a condition that impacts the way a person's body uses sugar for energy. However, diabetes affects much more than blood sugar. It can impact nearly every body system and have an effect on a person's mood. Stress associated with managing diabetes as well as concerns about potential side effects can all contribute to changes in mood. In addition, the actual highs and lows of blood sugar levels may also cause nervousness, anxiety, and confusion. It is important for people to recognize their own individual symptoms of high or low blood sugar. They must also ensure they seek support for any concerning mental health symptoms they might experience. Watching these mood swings can often be difficult for friends and family to understand. However, learning why a person may experience mood changes related to diabetes and being supportive can help to promote a stronger, healthier relationship. Contents of this article: How do diabetes and mood swings go together? Diabetes can have many effects on a person's mood. For example, managing diabetes can be stressful. A person may be constantly worried about their blood sugar and whether it is too high or too low. Adjustments to their diet and constantly checking their blood sugar can also add to a person's stress and enjoyment of life. As a result, they are more likely to experience feelings of anxiety and depression. Blood sugar swings can cause rapid changes in a person's mood, such as making them sad and irritable. This is especially true during hypoglycemic episodes, where blood sugar levels dip lower than 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). Hyperglycemic episodes where levels spike higher than 250 mg/dL may cause confusion in people with type 1 diabetes, but are much less likely to in those with type 2 diabetes. When a pe Continue reading >>

Schizophrenia, Bipolar Disorders, And Diabetes: Interrelationships And Interventions

Schizophrenia, Bipolar Disorders, And Diabetes: Interrelationships And Interventions

Schizophrenia, Bipolar Disorders, and Diabetes: Interrelationships and Interventions Authors: Moderator: Richard S. Beaser, MD; Faculty: Philip Levy, MD, John W. Newcomer, MD This educational activity has been developed for psychiatrists, psychiatric nurses, pharmacists, and other clinicians who treat patients with severe psychiatric conditions. Upon completion of this activity, participants will be able to: Recognize the signs and symptoms of the metabolic syndrome in people with schizophrenia and bipolar disorders, whether or not related to its treatments. Apply knowledge of the pharmacology of antipsychotic medications to more effectively utilize these treatment tools in people with schizophrenia and bipolar disorders. Describe the interrelationships between conditions and treatments of schizophrenia, bipolar disorders, and the metabolic syndrome. Select antipsychotic treatments that balance psychiatric treatment impact, macrovascular risk considerations, and the potential for development of the metabolic syndrome. Initiate preventive and/or therapeutic interventions, or seek consultative assistance to do so, when manifestations of diabetes or other components of the insulin resistance syndrome or metabolic syndrome are present. Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Medical Executive Director, Professional Education, Joslin Diabetes Center, Boston, MA Disclosure: Consultant: Aventis Pharmaceuticals, Wyeth Pharmaceuticals; Speaker's Bureau: Aventis Pharmaceuticals, Wyeth Pharmaceuticals. Clinical Professor of Medicine, University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, Arizona, Phoenix Endocrinology Clinic Ltd, Phoenix, Arizona Disclosure: Grant/Research Support: Aventis Pharmaceuticals, Merck and Company, Inc., Novo Nordisk Pharmaceutical Continue reading >>

Bipolar Disorder And Diabetes - What Is The Relationship?

Bipolar Disorder And Diabetes - What Is The Relationship?

Diabetes and bipolar disorder is a common pathological conditions. This means that they are often accompanied with a lot of people, both bipolar disorder and diabetes. Research shows that it is more than an unfortunate coincidence. Some bstudies have shown, people with bipolar disorder are three times more likely to have diabetes than the general population members. In addition, there is evidence that people with bipolar disorder and diabetes are more likely to encounter other problems, for example, are more prone to rapid cycling, and more likely to suffer from chronic, rather than the more gentle, mood episodes. There may be other negative effects of lifestyle as well. One Canadian study showed that 81% of people with diabetes received a bipolar disability benefits, compared with 30% of bipolar patients without diabetes. Diabetes, insulin deficiency or because the body's inability to use insulin, sugar and other foods can not be properly metabolized and converted into energy. Simply the accumulation of sugar in the blood and cause various health problems.Diabetic mood swings from excess sugar and carbohydrates in the body is very similar to the mood swings, bipolar disorder experience. A person with diabetes, it may seem, depression, or mania, or both. Is pre-diabetes, some experts believe, the largest U.S. health care epidemic. Also known as Syndrome X or metabolic syndrome, a condition that occurs when a person's blood glucose levels are higher than normal but not high enough to type 2 diabetes diagnosis. From 2009 there are 57 million Americans who have pre-diabetes.To make matters worse, several leading drug used to treat bipolar disorder can cause significant weight gain, insulin resistance and hyperglycemia. Diabetes is usually treated with changes in diet and i Continue reading >>

Bipolar Disorder And Diabetes Mellitus: Evidence For Disease-modifying Effects And Treatment Implications

Bipolar Disorder And Diabetes Mellitus: Evidence For Disease-modifying Effects And Treatment Implications

Go to: Abstract Bipolar disorder refers to a group of chronic psychiatric disorders of mood and energy levels. While dramatic psychiatric symptoms dominate the acute phase of the diseases, the chronic course is often determined by an increasing burden of co-occurring medical conditions. High rates of diabetes mellitus in patients with bipolar disorder are particularly striking, yet unexplained. Treatment and lifestyle factors could play a significant role, and some studies also suggest shared pathophysiology and risk factors. In this systematic literature review, we explored data around the relationship between bipolar disorder and diabetes mellitus in recently published population-based cohort studies with special focus on the elderly. A systematic search in the PubMed database for the combined terms “bipolar disorder” AND “elderly” AND “diabetes” in papers published between January 2009 and December 2015 revealed 117 publications; 7 studies were large cohort studies, and therefore, were included in our review. We found that age- and gender- adjusted risk for diabetes mellitus was increased in patients with bipolar disorder and vice versa (odds ratio range between 1.7 and 3.2). Our results in large population-based cohort studies are consistent with the results of smaller studies and chart reviews. Even though it is likely that heterogeneous risk factors may play a role in diabetes mellitus and in bipolar disorder, growing evidence from cell culture experiments and animal studies suggests shared disease mechanisms. Furthermore, disease-modifying effects of bipolar disorder and diabetes mellitus on each other appear to be substantial, impacting both treatment response and outcomes. The risk of diabetes mellitus in patients with bipolar disorder is increased. Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Bipolar Disorder Takes Its Toll

Diabetes In Bipolar Disorder Takes Its Toll

Many psychiatrists know that neuroimaging studies do not provide consistent data about brain changes in persons with bipolar disorder. Tomas Hajek, MD, PhD, of Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, believes that this might in part be explained by the existence of comorbid conditions. As he described in his recent talk (Insulin Resistance or Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Risk Factors for Brain Alterations in Bipolar Disorders) at APA 2015, comorbidities are “more of a rule than an exception” in bipolar disorder—and diabetes in particular is important to consider. In fact, persons with bipolar disorder have up to a 3-fold elevated risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus, and 53% of bipolar patients have pre- diabetes or diabetes. It comes as no surprise then, that cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in persons with bipolar disorder.1 Those with bipolar disorder and diabetes do not respond as well to bipolar treatment, and their illness tends to be more severe. To make matters even worse, diabetes is also harder to control in these patients than it is in persons without bipolar disorder. Because of the high prevalence of diabetes in patients with bipolar disorder and the difficulties in treatment associated with the two disorders in tandem, screening for glucose abnormalities in those who have bipolar disorder is particularly important. Although often not a focus of treatment, cognitive problems are common in patients with bipolar disorder, and this can be further exacerbated by the coexistence of diabetes. This connection makes sense, noted Hajek, since glucose is the principal source of brain energy, and insulin can act as a brain growth factor. Hajek wanted to further understand whether diabetes is a risk factor for brain changes in patients who hav Continue reading >>

Diabetes Ii Versus Bipolar Ii- The Power Of Stigma

Diabetes Ii Versus Bipolar Ii- The Power Of Stigma

February 5, 2016, 3:49 pm 26 Comments 2559 Views Diabetes II Versus Bipolar II- The Power of Stigma When my husband was diagnosed with diabetes II, doctors, nutritionists, nurses, friends, family members, coworkers everyone was terribly concerned. No one doubted his diagnosis, no one accused him of inventing a condition to receive special treatment. No one suggested that it was just a bad day, that if he went back to the doctor on a different day he wouldnt be diabetic. No one said, We all have sugary days. All oozed support and sympathy. And continued to do so as he adjusted his diet and took the required medicines. Let me make this clear Im not wishing everyone had been hateful to him. I know diabetes II can turn deadly serious. In my husbands case, after we cut bread out of our dinner routine he was soon off meds and back to his former, non-diabetic self. When I began telling friends that I had been evaluated by mental health professionals and diagnosed with bipolar II , most voiced firm denials. Denials of the diseases reality, or denial of me personally having the disease. I had expected everyone to have the aha moment that I had; to think, what took so long to receive such a clearly correct diagnosis. Instead, I heard challenges: You are just bored, that is why you get depressed, and, The more friends vehemently denied that I could have this usually misunderstood disease, the angrier I got. True, few of them knew the extent of mental illness running through my family-of-origins DNA. But many of them had met my Dad, and/or heard some of my family stories. Either of those should have been enough to make the connection to some sort of mental illness not at all surprising. Perhaps it was strange that I didnt take it as a compliment that they thought me incapable of h Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Depression

Diabetes And Depression

Tweet According to NICE, people who are diagnosed with a chronic physical health problem such as diabetes are 3 times more likely to be diagnosed with depression than people without it. Depression can have a serious impact on a person's well being and their ability and motivation to self-manage their condition. Depression is the most common psychiatric disorder witnessed in the diabetes community. People with diabetes suffering from depression are at greater risk of suffering from an episode of diabetic burnout which collectively can have adverse effects on physical health and potentially instigate more long term complications both to do with diabetes and independent from the condition. What exactly is depression? Depression is the term given when an individual experiences a number of symptoms including: Persistent sadness or anxiety, a feeling of hollowness An overriding feeling of hopelessness and negativity Feeling helpless and powerless to change your situation Loss of interest in activities or pleasures Lower energy and increased fatigue Insomnia, oversleeping, awakening early in the morning Concentration problems, memory problems and indecisiveness Dwelling on death or suicide Restlessness Weight change and decreased or increased appetite A diagnosis of depression is made if many of these symptoms are present, continuously, for a minimum of two weeks. For people with diabetes, dealing with a lifelong condition and managing the risk of complications can seem like an overwhelming task, particularly for newly diagnosed patients. Many diabetics struggle to cope with the requirements, feeling overwhelmed and unmotivated. If diabetes is not faced with an attitude of perseverance and defiance, often depression will prevail. Depression is the perception of life situations Continue reading >>

Co-prescription Of Medication For Bipolar Disorder And Diabetes Mellitus: A Nationwide Population-based Study With Focus On Gender Differences

Co-prescription Of Medication For Bipolar Disorder And Diabetes Mellitus: A Nationwide Population-based Study With Focus On Gender Differences

Abstract Studies have shown a correlation between bipolar disorder and diabetes mellitus. It is unclear if this correlation is a part of common pathophysiological pathways, or if medication for bipolar disorder has negative effects on blood sugar regulation. The Norwegian prescription database was analyzed. Prescriptions for lithium, lamotrigine, carbamazepine and valproate were used as proxies for bipolar disorder. Prescriptions for insulin and oral anti-diabetic agents were used as proxies for diabetes mellitus. We explored the association between medication for bipolar disorder and diabetes medication by logistic regression We found a strong association between concomitant use of medication to treat diabetes mellitus and mood stabilizers for the treatment of bipolar disorder. Females had a 30% higher risk compared to men of being treated for both disorders. Persons using oral anti-diabetic agents had higher odds of receiving valproate than either lithium or lamotrigine. Use of insulin as monotherapy seemed to have lower odds than oral anti-diabetic agents of co-prescription of mood stabilizers, compared to the general population. This study showed a strong association between the use of mood stabilizers and anti-diabetic agents. The association was stronger among women than men. Background The comorbidity between diabetes mellitus and bipolar disorder has been explored in several studies, with the estimated prevalence varying from about two to five times higher than in the general population [1–4]. Most studies have had a small number of participants, and a majority have investigated the comorbidity in hospitalized patients, where selection bias may color the results. Few studies have examined whole population samples and no studies, to our knowledge, have looked a Continue reading >>

How Do I Manage Bipolar Disorder And Type 1 Diabetes At The Same Time?

How Do I Manage Bipolar Disorder And Type 1 Diabetes At The Same Time?

If you have both bipolar disorder and diabetes you need to develop care plans for each illness and then keep in mind how one illness can affect the other. The unique considerations focus on weight gain, diet, and exercise. During depressions, people tend to be less active and less energetic. As a consequence they exercise less and sometimes gain weight. Weight is a very bad thing for diabetes because it makes the illness worse. Along these lines, another important consideration is to try and avoid medications for both illnesses that cause weight gain. Many, but not all, of the psychiatric medications can cause weight gain. Keep track of your diet and exercise. Tracking your mood and tracking blood sugars is an important part of the management of each of these illnesses. Type I Diabetes and bipolar disorder are complicated and demanding illnesses. It makes sense that managing both of them at once would be a challenge, but it is possible. Bipolar disorder is a genetic illness that affects a person’s ability to regulate their moods. Type I diabetes is an auto immune illness where the pancreas doesn’t produce enough insulin. Insulin is a hormone that is needed to convert sugar, starches and other food into energy needed for daily life. My friend Deborah DeMoss Smith who writes novels on bipolar and the teenage years (her latest is Light Fixtures) has type I diabetes and bipolar disorder. I’ve watched her successfully manage both illnesses. I asked her how she does it. 1. I understand how the illnesses interact. For example, when you're manic you don’t pay attention to your blood sugar. Mania takes away the adherence to routine. Diabetes demands that you be regimented or you may die, so managing the mania is essential. When you’re depressed, you don’t give a darn Continue reading >>

On The Association Between Diabetes And Mental Disorders In A Community Sample

On The Association Between Diabetes And Mental Disorders In A Community Sample

Results from the German National Health Interview and Examination Survey Abstract OBJECTIVE—To determine the relationship between mental disorders and diabetes in a representative community sample. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—This was a cross-sectional study. Data on diabetes and HbA1c values were obtained by structured questionnaires and by laboratory assessments. Current psychiatric disorders were diagnosed by a modified version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI). RESULTS—People with diabetes (PWD) were not more likely to meet Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Psychiatric Disorders, 4th edition (DSM-IV) criteria for at least one mental disorder than were individuals without diabetes. However, a different diagnostic pattern occurred compared with the general population: odds ratios (ORs) for anxiety disorders in PWD were higher (OR 1.93, 95% CI 1.19–3.14). Although PWD had higher prevalence rates of affective disorders, the relationship between diabetes and affective disorders was not statistically significant after controlling for age, sex, marital status, and socioeconomic status. In contrast, the relationship between diabetes and anxiety disorders remained significant after controlling for these variables. In contrast to individuals without mental disorders, PWD with affective or anxiety disorders more frequently had adequate glycemic control. CONCLUSIONS—Diabetes was associated with an increased likelihood of anxiety disorders. The association between mental disorders, diabetes, and glycemic control should be evaluated carefully in terms of potentially confounding sociodemographic variables, sample characteristics, and definitions of the disorders. During the last years, the comorbidity of mental disorders with chronic health co Continue reading >>

Can Bipolar Disorder Lead To Diabetes?

Can Bipolar Disorder Lead To Diabetes?

People with bipolar disorder struggle with many side effects related to both their mental illness and their treatment therapies. In recent years, diabetes has emerged as one of the more serious health risks for people with bipolar disorder. Diabetes is found in people with bipolar disorder nearly three times more often than in the general population. This has prompted much research into the link between diabetes and bipolar disorder. Studies have found that people with bipolar disorder tend to be overweight or obese, a key risk factor in developing diabetes. Research into potential causes of this weight gain has identified the medications used to treat bipolar disorder as the likely culprits. Bipolar Disorder: The Obesity and Diabetes Chain Reaction Being overweight or obese is a primary risk factor for developing type 2 diabetes. People who carry extra body weight and body fat, particularly around the abdomen, are less able to properly control their blood sugar. That's because extra body fat interferes with the function of insulin, the naturally occurring hormone produced in the pancreas that helps cells convert sugar into energy or store it away as fat. The body is forced to produce more insulin to handle the conversion. If this situation continues without treatment, permanent damage to the pancreas can occur. The percentage of patients with bipolar disorder who are overweight is remarkable: Studies have found that between 54 and 68 percent of bipolar patients are either overweight or obese, with obesity affecting about one-fourth of patients and more women than men. Obesity is one of the criteria for metabolic syndrome, the health condition that includes these serious health risks: High levels of LDL, the “bad” cholesterol High blood pressure Elevated blood gluco Continue reading >>

Bipolar Disorder And Foods To Avoid

Bipolar Disorder And Foods To Avoid

If you or a loved has bipolar disorder, you know how important it is to manage mood episodes with bipolar medications and healthy lifestyle habits. But did you also know that certain foods and dietary supplements might play a role in helping -- or hindering -- people with bipolar disorder? What Is Bipolar Disorder? Bipolar disorder is a complex disorder that's defined by dramatic or unusual mood episodes of highs and lows. The episodes of mania and depression can range from very mild to extreme in their intensity and severity. With bipolar disorder, mood episodes can come on gradually over many days or even weeks. Or they can come on suddenly, occurring over the course of just a few days. To count as episodes, symptoms must occur as a constellation of features that affects not only mood but also sleep, energy, thinking, and behavior and must last for at least several days, representing a change from your usual self. With bipolar disorder, the person may experience episodes of major depression or instead, extreme elation and excessive energy. The elation is called mania. The mood episodes of bipolar disorder are accompanied by disturbances in thinking, distortions of perception, and impairment in social functioning. Bipolar disorder was once thought to affect about 1% of the population. Some experts now believe it's higher, perhaps affecting 3% to 4% of the population. There are no laboratory tests to diagnose bipolar disorder, and its symptoms can overlap with other psychiatric disorders. As a result, it's often misdiagnosed and undertreated. Is There a Diet for Bipolar Disorder? There is no specific bipolar diet. Nevertheless, it is important to make wise dietary choices that will help you maintain a healthy weight and stay well. These choices include: Avoiding the "We Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Depression: Coping With The Two Conditions

Diabetes And Depression: Coping With The Two Conditions

What's the connection between diabetes and depression? How can I cope if I have both? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. If you have diabetes — either type 1 or type 2 — you have an increased risk of developing depression. And if you're depressed, you may have a greater chance of developing type 2 diabetes. The good news is that diabetes and depression can be treated together. And effectively managing one can have a positive effect on the other. How they're related Though the relationship between diabetes and depression isn't fully understood: The rigors of managing diabetes can be stressful and lead to symptoms of depression. Diabetes can cause complications and health problems that may worsen symptoms of depression. Depression can lead to poor lifestyle decisions, such as unhealthy eating, less exercise, smoking and weight gain — all of which are risk factors for diabetes. Depression affects your ability to perform tasks, communicate and think clearly. This can interfere with your ability to successfully manage diabetes. Managing the two conditions together Diabetes self-management programs. Diabetes programs that focus on behavior have been successful in helping people improve their metabolic control, increase fitness levels, and manage weight loss and other cardiovascular disease risk factors. They can also help improve your sense of well-being and quality of life. Psychotherapy. Similarly, participants in psychotherapy, particularly cognitive behavioral therapy, have reported improvements in depression, which has resulted in better diabetes management. Medications and lifestyle changes. Medications — for both diabetes and depression — and lifestyle changes, including different types of therapy coupled with regular exercise, can improve both conditions. C Continue reading >>

Manic-depressive Illness, Diabetes Mellitus, And Lithium Carbonate

Manic-depressive Illness, Diabetes Mellitus, And Lithium Carbonate

Manic-Depressive Illness, Diabetes Mellitus, and Lithium Carbonate OUR interest in the glucose metabolism of manic-depressive patients originated with the discovery of a diabetic condition in a patient whose complaints of polyuria, thirst, fatigue, and spells of profuse perspiration were initially interpreted as toxic manifestations of lithium carbonate therapy. In addition to a diabetic response to the glucose tolerance tests, a review of her hospital record revealed high-fasting blood sugar levels on several previous admissions. Similar findings among other manic-depressive patients formed the rationale of the following studies. Procedures Repeated glucose tolerance tests were performed on 42 manic-depressive patients hospitalized at Norwich Hospital. The diagnoses of these patients were independently agreed upon by the referring hospital and research staff, and confirmed by their past histories as documented in their hospital records. Most of these patients were readmissions and not on medication. Some patients were receiving lithium carbonate.A second glucose tolerance survey was carried out on Continue reading >>

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