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Amazing Benefits Of Mangoes For Diabetes

Amazing Benefits Of Mangoes For Diabetes

Just the thought of mangeos may elicit images of tropical beaches, palm trees, ocean waves gently covering the sandy beach…eating mangeos by the ocean with cool ocean breezes wafting over you… Mangos are the fruit of the mango tree—and it brings images of a tropical island because it is a tropical fruit. Mangos are actually the world’s most popular fruit! Mangos are full of vitamins—particularly Vitamins A and C—where one mango provides about 1/3 of the RDA for Vitamin A and nearly 100% of the RDA for Vitamin C. Mangos also contain significant amounts of Vitamins E, K and B complex vitamins (except for Vitamin B12). Mangos are also high in fiber and contain calcium, potassium and copper. They also contain some omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, though overall, are very low in fat. One ripe mango can contain 31 grams of sugar, but its glycemic load is only 10—the fiber in mango helps limit the rapid absorption of the sugars. One mango also has 135 calories—not so bad![1] Mangos are higher in sugars than many other fruits, but that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t eat mangeos. The Mayo clinic recommends that one serving of fruit should contain 15 grams of carbohydrate—that translates to about ½ cup of mango. If a fruit has lower carbohydrate or sugars, that generally means you can enjoy more of it—but it doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy the higher carbohydrate fruits![2] Just remember to keep track of the total carbohydrates in a day. In fact, studies indicate that eating mangeos can help prevent diabetes complications and may even treat prediabetes and prevent diabetes. Why Would Mangos Be Good For Diabetes? Most nutritional sites contain information like that given above—the level of carbohydrates, proteins, fats, vitamins and minerals. That is great, Continue reading >>

Interview With The Mango Man On Insulin Resistance

Interview With The Mango Man On Insulin Resistance

Interview With The Mango Man on Insulin Resistance Yesterday I had the good fortune to interview Cyrus Khambatta, PhD on how he coaches people with insulin resistance to become sensitive to insulin again. His PhD is in Nutritional Biochemistry. He is able to coach his clients out of type-2 diabetes and pre-diabetes and is able to help those with type-1, to manage their insulin far more effectively than the conventional norm. If you have read my no.1 bestselling book, The Vitality Secret , you will know that insulin resistance and inflammation go hand in hand. You will be inflamed to have insulin resistance and being resistant to insulin makes inflammation worse. When you are inflamed your hormones will be imbalanced. This means that if youre a guy, and youre inflamed, your testosterone levels will be low . If youre a woman with hormonal problems, then inflammation will more than likely, be a leading cause of this. Inflammation is the root of almost every health condition and our Western healthy diet and other factors are causing it. Type-2 diabetes is a result of when your cells become completelyresistant to insulin. This is due to over exposure ofyour hormone insulin (also your fat storing hormone). Insulin is released by your pancreas every time you consume foods high in sugar, or that are high on the glycemic index (high GI). Insulins job is to maintain healthy blood sugar levels. When you take in foods that are high in sugar, and therefore trigger a very sharp blood sugar response, insulin extracts it from your blood, to prevent it from becoming toxic, and it deposits it into either your fat stores, your liver stores or your muscle stores. Since were mostly sedentary these days, its normally your fat stores that are topped up. If youre prone to storing fat, its the Continue reading >>

Does Fruit Cause Insulin To Go Up?

Does Fruit Cause Insulin To Go Up?

Written by Aglaee Jacob; Updated April 09, 2018 All fruits can raise your insulin levels. 4 Do Whole Wheat Carbohydrates Cause Insulin Spikes? Insulin is produced by your pancreas and is required to keep your blood sugar levels under control. However, consistently elevated insulin levels are associated with a higher risk of developing chronic diseases, such as certain types of cancer and type 2 diabetes. The carbohydrate content of the foods you eat is the main factor determining how your insulin levels will respond. Fruits contain carbohydrates, so they can raise your insulin levels. Although the carbohydrates found in fruits are considered healthier because they are packed along with loads of fiber and essential nutrients, all carbohydrates, including those from fruits, are broken down into sugars. The sugar obtained from the digestion of fruits can elevate your blood sugar levels, which in turn push your pancreas to produce insulin. The more carbohydrates you eat at once, the higher your insulin levels are likely to increase. For example, your insulin levels will increase more after having a large banana and orange juice compared to after eating three grapes. Having other carbohydrates at the same time, such as a muffin, a slice of bread or oatmeal, can also further increase your insulin levels. If you want to compare different servings of fruits to determine which will raise your insulin levels the most, you will need to calculate their net carb content. The amount of total carbohydrates found in a serving of fruit include the natural sugars, starches and fiber. Fruits contain varying amounts of fiber that are counted as carbohydrates but cannot be broken down into sugar. Calculating the net carbs by subtracting the fiber from the total carbs gives you a better ide Continue reading >>

Which Fruit Is Given To A Diabetes Patient, Apple Or Mango? - Quora

Which Fruit Is Given To A Diabetes Patient, Apple Or Mango? - Quora

Which fruit is given to a diabetes patient, Apple or Mango? Answered Dec 19, 2017 Author has 2.1k answers and 1.6m answer views OK, here we go. All fruit has carbohydrates. Carbohydrates need insulin so that the energy contained within them can be released and used by the body. The fewer carbohydrates a diabetic eats, the less insulin they will need. The insulin can either come from the remaining abilities of the pancreas or from an injection of insulin. Eating meat or fish or some vegetables requires no insulin. Eating bread, cookies, cakes, some vegetables, sugars, and fruit needs insulin to use the food. Diabetics and those who care for them need to have access to listings of many different foods and their carbohydrate counts. The dose of insulin depend on the carbohydrate value and their personalized correction factor. A professional needs to calculate this factor. It will be something like: 1 unit of insulin for every 10 grams of carbohydrates. Obviously, the fewer carbohydrates the diabetic eats, the better it is for them. Get a paperback book or an app for your phone or computer to give you these values. You will probably quickly memorize the values of foods you eat often. When choosing foods: Limit starchy foods like bread, rice, potatoes, etc. They are very high carbohydrate foods. When choosing fruits, an apple would certainly be better than a mango. A 3-inch medium apple has 25 carbohydrates. A mango has 50 grams. Dried fruit is higher than fresh. It is said that fruit is natures candy. Yes, it is. Eat no more fruit than you would candy. Speaking of candy, there are dietetic types made with artificial sweetener instead of sugar. Sodas, candies, ice cream, baked goods, snacks, all have the potential to mess up diabetic insulin control. Educate yourself. It wi Continue reading >>

Are The Carbs In Mangoes Worth It?

Are The Carbs In Mangoes Worth It?

Learn more about the nutrients in a mango and its health benefits Mangoes are high in sugar; for example, they have three times the sugar content of raspberries. Usually, when a food is high in sugar, it means it is high in carbohydrates. In this case, mangoes are higher in carbs than most other fruits. Mangoes are generally sweet, although the taste and texture of the flesh can vary depending on the type of mango; some have a soft, pulpy texture similar to an overripe plum, while others are firmer, like a cantaloupe or avocado, and some may have a fibrous texture. Mangoes are one of the most popular fruit in the world. They were first grown in India more than 5,000 years ago. It is the national fruit of India, Pakistan, and the Philippines, and the national tree of Bangladesh. Mangoes are in the same family as cashews and pistachios. Classified in theAnacardiaceae family, afamilyofflowering plantscommonly known as the cashew or sumac family, members of the Anacardiaceae can bearfruits that aredrupes or nuts. A mango is a drupe, also known as a "stone fruit," which is a reference to the fruit's large pit. Other common drupes include plums and peaches. Mangoes are available year-round. There are six varieties of mango: honey, Francis, Haden, Keitt, Kent, Tommy Atkins, and Palmer. The Tommy Atkins is the most popular around the world, although the honey variety, or the Alphonso, is probably the favorite for its sweetness level and creamy texture. Looking to start a low-carb diet, but not sure where to start? Sign up to get our free recipe book and enjoy delicious low-carb meals. Carbohydrate and Fiber Counts for Mangoes Since there are many types of mangoes, the nutritional facts listed are for the type most commonly sold in the U.S., the Tommy Atkins variety. 13 grams n Continue reading >>

How Mangoes Might Affect Blood Sugar And Obesity

How Mangoes Might Affect Blood Sugar And Obesity

Originally from South Asia, mangoes are now one of the most cultivated fruits in tropical regions. In recent years, the potential health benefits of mangoes have been widely investigated. There are a number of varieties of mango, all of which belong to the flowering plant family Anacardiaceae. Globally, India grows the most mangoes, producing more than 18 million tons per year. Mangoes contain a variety of vitamins and minerals, such as vitamin C, A, E, K, and a range of B vitamins. Other constituents include polyphenols, triterpene, and lupeol, which can benefit our health by providing antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. In this article, we will discuss some of the recent findings regarding mangoes and their effects on blood sugar, cholesterol, obesity, and diabetes. Contents of this article: Here are some key points about mangoes. More detail and supporting information is in the main article. Some evidence suggests that mango consumption can help regulate blood sugar Mangoes contain a range of vitamins, including B vitamins In South Asia, mangoes have been cultivated for thousands of years Mangoes and cholesterol High cholesterol levels can be dangerous. If it builds up, cholesterol can block the arteries, potentially leading to heart disease, stroke, or heart attack. Currently, an estimated 73.5 million Americans have high cholesterol levels. Because of the huge number of people at risk, any simple dietary changes that might help reduce this figure are likely to be investigated. A study, published in The British Journal of Nutrition in 2011, looked at the effect of mangoes on cholesterol levels in mice. The mice were fed a high-fat diet either with or without the addition of freeze-dried mangoes. The team measured the mice's fat content, blood sugar levels, Continue reading >>

Mango Supplementation Improves Blood Glucose In Obese Individuals

Mango Supplementation Improves Blood Glucose In Obese Individuals

Mango Supplementation Improves Blood Glucose in Obese Individuals 1Department of Nutritional Sciences, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma, USA. 2North Carolina State University Research Campus, Kannapolis, North Carolina, USA. 3Department of Statistics, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma, USA. Received 2014 May 19; Revised 2014 Jun 30; Accepted 2014 Jul 3. Copyright 2014 the author(s), publisher and licensee Libertas Academica Ltd. This is an open access article published under the Creative Commons CC-BY-NC 3.0 License. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. This pilot study examined the effects of freeze-dried mango (Mangifera indica L.) supplementation on anthropometrics, body composition, and biochemical parameters in obese individuals. Twenty obese adults (11 males and 9 females) ages 20- to 50-years old, received 10 g/day of ground freeze-dried mango pulp for 12 weeks. Anthropometrics, biochemical parameters, and body composition were assessed at baseline and final visits of the study. After 12 weeks, mango supplementation significantly reduced blood glucose in both male (4.45 mg/dL, P = 0.018) and female (3.56 mg/dL, P = 0.003) participants. In addition, hip circumference was reduced in male (3.3 cm, P = 0.048) but not in female participants. However, there were no significant changes in body weight or composition in either gender. Our findings indicate that regular consumption of freeze-dried mango by obese individuals does not negatively impact body weight but provides a positive effect on fasting blood glucose. Keywords: mango, glucose, body composition, obesity, diabetes Obesity, defined as excessive adipose tissue and a body mass index (BMI) greater than 30 kg/m2, is a serious worldwide health problem with a complex m Continue reading >>

Stop Fighting Blood Sugar, Start Fixing Insulin Resistance

Stop Fighting Blood Sugar, Start Fixing Insulin Resistance

Insulin resistance is the underlying condition that is present in all forms of diabetes. Most people believe that insulin resistance is only present in prediabetes and type 2 diabetes, however ample research shows that insulin resistance is also present in type 1 diabetes (1-3). It is a common misconception that people with type 1 diabetes do not experience insulin resistance. Even many doctors believe that insulin resistance only affects people with prediabetes and type 2 diabetes, and that by nature of being “skinny” or “normoweight,” people with type 1 diabetes are insulin sensitive. This information cannot be farther from the truth. In my practice, more than 95% of my clients with type 1 diabetes are insulin resistant, and 100% of my clients with prediabetes and type 2 diabetes are insulin resistant. If you’ve been reading this blog for any length of time, you probably have picked up on the fact that I’m a huge fan of maximizing insulin effectiveness over managing blood glucose. The reason for this is actually quite simple: Trying to control blood glucose without addressing insulin resistance is akin to frequently washing your car and never fixing problems under the hood. Addressing the root cause of blood glucose variability – insulin resistance – is the most successful method of controlling blood glucose. Period. The Blood Sugar Rollercoaster Perhaps you’ve been in this situation before: you wake up in the morning, your blood glucose is 50 points over the normal range. You don’t know why. You eat a standard breakfast, bolus the same amount of insulin that you always give yourself for breakfast, and then continue on with your day. Two hours later, when you check your blood glucose, and it is still high. This time it is 150 points above the norma Continue reading >>

Is It Safe For Diabetics To Eat Mangoes? Experts Reveal

Is It Safe For Diabetics To Eat Mangoes? Experts Reveal

Who doesn't love gorging on these juicy summer delights? Just a mere thought of this delicious summer fruit can elicit numerous visuals of the huge variety of mangoes that you can choose from. While most people enjoy binging on this king of fruits, some shun it because of the high amount of sugar present in it. The health benefits of mangoes have always been debatable because of their excessive sugar and calorie content which generally overpower the nutritional value of the fruit. Therefore, diabetics are mostly advised to eat mangoes in moderation. But the jury is still out on whether or not mangoes are good for diabetics. We decided to talk to some leading doctors and nutritionists and get you expert advice. According to the book Healing Foods by DK Publishing, mangoes contain enzymes that aid breakdown and digestion of protein, and also fiber, which keeps the digestive functions working efficiently. Dietary fiber has some long term benefits as well that include lowering the risk of developing colon cancer and heart disease. (Also read:Is Eating Mango Healthy?) As per a study conducted at the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB), eating mangoes every day may control and even lower blood sugar levels, despite their natural sugar content. On the other hand, a study conducted at the Oklahoma University revealed that mango consumption helps lower insulin resistance and improves glucose tolerance in diabetics. The American Diabetes Association also recommends mango in its list of fruits that can be eaten by diabetics. According to them, fruits can be eaten in exchange of other sources of carbohydrates in your meal plan such as starches, grains or dairy products. (Also read: Does Mango Make You Gain Weight?) While many experts agree that mangoes Continue reading >>

The Blood Sugar Level Fix: Eat Fruit

The Blood Sugar Level Fix: Eat Fruit

If your blood sugar levels are too high or prone to wild fluctuations that leave you feeling horrible, then there’s a surprising way to help you get them under control: eat a lot more fruit. Carbohydrates are often avoided or minimized by diabetics and those with blood sugar level fluctuation issues, and the simple sugars in fruit in particular are often demonized. The irony is that all the available research indicates that fruit is very different than most carb-rich foods, and generally lowers blood sugar levels into a healthier range while stabilizing blood sugar fluctuations. Sugar, from the right whole food source, is not necessarily bad for blood sugar control. I’ve previously shown what happens to my blood sugar levels after eating a huge meal of bananas, and I’ve also discussed the big flaws in the glycemic index, which is often how people judge sugar intake. But we haven’t spent much time diving into the special chemical properties of fruits that turn them into blood-sugar stabilizing powerhouses, and that’s what we’re going to do in this article. Fruit Vs Insulin Resistance With 15 grams of sugar per cup , you might imagine that eating blueberries would spike your blood sugar levels a bit. Yet when researchers fed blueberry smoothies to insulin-resistant overweight men and women twice daily for six weeks, their blood sugar levels dropped while their insulin sensitivity improved . But if you’re skeptical – and you should be when it comes to nutritional studies – then there’s an obvious question to ask here. At 15 grams per cup, the sugar content of blueberries is fairly modest as far as fruit goes, and they also have four grams of fiber, which slows sugar absorption and stops it from hitting your blood all at once. So maybe blueberries are ju Continue reading >>

Reverse Insulin Resistance With These 8 Foods

Reverse Insulin Resistance With These 8 Foods

Reverse Insulin Resistance With These 8 Foods Reverse Insulin Resistance With These 8 Foods Over 80 million Americans have insulin resistance that can lead to diabetes. And you could be on the road to diabetes for 10 years or more and never even know it. Heres what happens. The hormone insulin directs your cells to open up and take in glucose from the blood. With insulin resistance, your cells become desensitized to insulin. They ignore the instructions to open up and take in glucose. Your body keeps producing more insulin to try to get the message heard. But it doesnt work. And your insulin levels rise higher and higher. Those chronically high insulin levels cause rapid weight gain, premature aging, high blood pressure, heart disease, and higher cancer risks. Eventually they lead to type 2 diabetes. Herbs, spices and foods are your first line of defense. Here are eight that can help restore and maintain your cells sensitivity to insulin. 1. Turmeric: 100% Effective In Preventing Diabetes A 2009 study found curcumin, an active compound found in turmeric, was 500 to 100,000 times more effective than the prescription drug Metformin at activating glucose uptake. [i] In another study of 240 pre-diabetic adults, patients were given either 250 milligrams of curcumin or a placebo every day. After nine months, NONE of those taking curcumin developed diabetes but 16.4% of the placebo group did. 2. Ginger: Lowers Fasting Blood Glucose by 10.5% In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial 88 diabetics were divided into two groups. Every day one group received a placebo while the other received 3 one-gram capsules of ginger powder. After eight weeks, the ginger group reduced their fasting blood sugar by 10.5%. But the placebo group INCREASED their fasting blood sugar by Continue reading >>

Postprandial Glucose Response To Mango, Banana And Sapota

Postprandial Glucose Response To Mango, Banana And Sapota

Postprandial Glucose Response to Mango, Banana and Sapota Pages with reference to book, From 215 To 216 Zainab Contractor, Fatima Hussain, Abdul Jabbar ( Department of Medicine, The Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi. ) Objective: Mango and Sapota are two fruits indigenous to Indian subcontinent. The objective of this study was to evaluate postprandial blood glucose response to mango and sapota in comparison to banana in patients with diabetes mellitus Type 2. Method: The plasma glucose response to mango, sapota and banana were determined in ten diabetic patients. Blood was tested at 0, 30, 60, 120 and 180 minutes following the ingestion of test meal. Results: The results showed that the blood glucose response to these three fruits was not different in terms of area under the curve and postprandial change in blood glucose from baseline. Conclusion: We conclude that glucose response to mango and sapota (fruits indigenous to Indian subcontinent) is no different from banana (JPMA 49:215, 1999). The blood glucose response to equal amounts of dietary carbohydrates varies considerably as a function of specific food ingested1-4. The most nutritive caloric value in fruits is carbohydrates which is in the form of sugars. There are various kinds of fruits in our region which are different from the fruit of temperate countries. Some people are used to consuming fruits instead of meals. There are not many studies in literature about the blood glucose response to mango and sapota5. Mango (Mangifera indica) and sapota (Mammee apple; Mammey sapota) are the fruits, much liked in Indian Subcontinent. Both are very sweet in taste and difficult for people with diabetes to refrain from. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the postprandial blood glucose response to mango and sapot Continue reading >>

How To Diagnose, Prevent And Treat Insulin Resistance [infographic]

How To Diagnose, Prevent And Treat Insulin Resistance [infographic]

What You Need to Know about Sugar and Insulin Resistance In today’s post our fructose journey comes to a sweet conclusion, with answers to the questions that really matter: How much sugar is safe for you to eat? How much fructose and glucose is in your favorite foods, drinks, and sweeteners? How can you tell if you have insulin resistance (damaged carbohydrate metabolism)? What are some of the common clues? What tests can you ask your doctor to run? What can you do to take control of your health? I’ve included an infographic of 10 simple strategies that go beyond cutting added sugars, to improve your metabolism and prevent/treat common diseases. Earlier in this series we discovered that fructose is not scarier than glucose. In fact, consuming too much glucose is even riskier than consuming too much fructose because glucose is a more powerful trigger for “insulin resistance.” It is excess glucose that raises blood sugar and insulin levels, turns off fat burning, shifts fat and cholesterol production into overdrive, feeds cancer cells, and sets the stage for inflammation throughout the body.1) People with insulin resistance are at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes in the future, so insulin resistance is often referred to as “pre-diabetes.” So, should you focus on reducing the amount of glucose-y food you eat and lean towards fructose-y foods instead? Good luck with that…people talk about fructose as though it’s a separate sugar from glucose, but practically speaking, it’s not. In real foods, fructose never exists alone—wherever fructose is, glucose is right there beside it, so it’s not easy to separate them in your diet. Even the vast majority of manufactured foods and beverages contain a mixture of fructose and glucose, as you’ll see in the Continue reading >>

Mango Good For Diabetes And Pre Diabetes

Mango Good For Diabetes And Pre Diabetes

Mango was recently identified as a particularly useful food when it comes to the fight against diabetes, and a new study conducted in Australia concretes this. Furthermore, mango could also have a role to play in the treatment of metabolic disorders, although research is at an early stage. Eating a mango every day could protect people against high cholesterol as well as diabetes. The study, conducted by PhD student Ashley Wilkinson at the University of Queensland, indicates that components within mango operate in a similar manner to some diabetes and cholesterol drugs. Miss Wilkinson said: "There's been a lot of research looking at nutritional bioactives but it's focused on more temperate fruit like broccoli and grapes. And there hasn't been any research looking at tropical fruit in the context of looking at modulating cellular processes." A doctor of the school of pharmacy at UQ agreed: "We don't know yet how the whole thing's going to play out but we know some of the individual components activate these receptors or even inhibit them. That could end up with positive nutritional health benefits for diabetes and high cholesterol." High cholesterol is a major indicator of metabolic syndrome, a by-word for pre-diabetes in many cases. Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body: Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or Being unable to produce enough insulin Type 2 diabetes is characterised by the body being unable to metabolise glucose (a simple sugar). This leads to high levels of blood glucose which over time may damage the organs of the body. From this, it can be understood that for someone with diabetes something that is food for o Continue reading >>

Healthy Fruit Options That Won't Spike Insulin

Healthy Fruit Options That Won't Spike Insulin

Healthy Fruit Options That Won't Spike Insulin Grapefruit is a low-glycemic-index fruit. 4 Does Fruit Make Your Blood Sugar Go Up? Consuming fruits that are low on the glycemic index is beneficial in managing Type 2 diabetes and may lower your risk for heart disease and high blood pressure, according to a study published in "Diabetologia" in February 2011. Most fruits won't spike your blood glucose and insulin levels if you eat them in the recommended serving size, which provides 15 grams of carbohydrates. The glycemic index measures how much different carbohydrate-containing foods increase blood sugar levels, so foods that are low on the glycemic index cause the lowest increases in blood sugar. When you eat carbohydrate-containing foods, your body turns the carbohydrates into a sugar called glucose during digestion. Spikes in blood glucose levels cause your body to release a hormone called insulin to get your blood glucose levels back to normal. Foods with a glycemic index of 55 or below are low GI foods. The fruits with the lowest GI include cherries, with an average GI of 22; grapefruit, with an average GI of 25; dried apricots, with an average GI of 31; apples and pears, with an average GI of 38; and plums, with an average GI of 39. Other low GI fruits include strawberries, with an average GI of 40; oranges and peaches with an average GI of 42; grapes, with an average GI of 46; mango, with an average GI of 51; bananas, with an average GI of 52; and kiwi, with an average GI of 53. Riper fruits will have higher GI values than fruits that are less ripe. Processing and cooking can also affect GI values, as anything that makes a fruit easier to digest will increase the speed with which fruits are turned into glucose during digestion. Some varieties of fruits may have hi Continue reading >>

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