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Managing Diabetes In College

Tips For College Students Managing Type Diabetes | Diabetic Connect

Tips For College Students Managing Type Diabetes | Diabetic Connect

Going away to college is an exciting time in life, but for students managing Type 1 diabetes, it can be a challenging transition. Check out these tips for maintaining your diabetes care while you are away at school: It is a good idea to figure out where your campus health services facility is and to pay it a visit soon after you move into school. The Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation notes that since you will probably be away from your normal doctor, you should introduce yourself and explain your condition to the medical workers at your college. Ask if there is a nutritionist on staff, or a doctor or nurse practitioner you can contact with questions or emergency concerns. Put the office's phone number on your cell phone so its always available in case you need help. 2. Figure out where the closest pharmacy is Before move-in day, it is a good idea to locate the closest pharmacy and have your prescriptions transferred there. The JDRF notes that while many large campuses have pharmacies on school grounds, they may not be open on nights or weekends, so it is a good idea to find one that is close by with flexible hours. Map how far away it is from your dorm - if it seems a little too far for frequent walks, consider bringing a car or bike when you move to the campus, or look into public transportation ahead of time. Diabetes Self-Management recommends chatting with your roommates before you arrive at school, but saving the conversation about your Type 1 diabetes until you meet them in person. This way, you can tell them facts about your condition, teach them how you deal with it, and answer their questions instead of leaving them searching the Internet and finding false information. Try organizing a roommate meeting the first night in your dorm. Show them cartridges, vi Continue reading >>

Going Off To College And Have Diabetes? Learn Before You Go – Powered By College Diabetes Network

Going Off To College And Have Diabetes? Learn Before You Go – Powered By College Diabetes Network

College Diabetes Network’s free “Off to College” booklets on overcoming diabetes challenges during the college transition ​ As the summer comes to a close, thousands of young people with diabetes are packing their bags and preparing to head off to college for their freshman year. For many families, this exciting time is tinged with anxiety, stress, and fear about navigating diabetes in the college setting. To guide young people and their families through this transition, the College Diabetes Network (CDN) recently published two fantastic “Off to College” booklets – one for students with diabetes and one for their parents – that are available online for free. The booklets discuss common challenges to expect when arriving on campus as a new student with diabetes (e.g., dining halls, erratic schedules, stress), as well as strategies for communicating with parents, preparing to move into dorms, finding a new doctor, registering for accommodations, managing sick days, sharing diabetes with friends and roommates, dealing with burnout, drinking alcohol with diabetes, entering the working world, and more. As a recent college graduate with type 1 myself, I think these booklets offer an excellent foundation for college preparation and a much-needed framework for discussing college and diabetes among family members. While they are directed at new college students and their parents, they can also provide useful guidance for other life transitions, such as leaving home for boarding school, time abroad, or a new job. See below for five of my favorite tips from the CDN booklets, and please remember to check with your healthcare provider before making changes to your diabetes regimen (neither I nor the authors of the booklet are healthcare providers, though the booklets Continue reading >>

Diabetes In College: How To Survive

Diabetes In College: How To Survive

For me, the studying aspect of college was fairly easy. I have always been a good student. I never really struggled with classes except for a few subjects like Calculus. But I had a much bigger issue looming in the college scene- chronic health conditions. My health matters were, and still are, a constant job in themselves. Even beyond the daily management of diabetes, which is a full-time job, I have issues with insurance payments, finding the right doctor, keeping up with prescriptions, and all those extras that come with diabetes and health issues. When I left for college it was especially important for me to quickly get into a good health routine where diabetes came first. More than studying and attending classes, my college life at first was about managing and coping with this disease. After all, if youre not on top of diabetes, your academic performance will suffer. The ideal situation is, of course, to manage diabetes without it consuming your college life. The start of the new school year is around the corner, and its time to start preparing. Below are a few more tips to help you get ready for college. For more tips see part 1 and part 2 in the series, Lindseys Guide to Surviving College With The Big D. -If you dont take any other tip away from this series, be sure you get this one: develop a system. Study habits are important. So are logbooks, eating schedules, and staying sane. Manage, cope, prioritize. -Dont let your diabetes care slip just because you are in college, but at the same time you have to remember to enjoy the college experience. Have fun and also keep your doctors appointments up to date (endo, eye, and dentist). Stay on top of your A1c. Remember that most diabetics experience their worst A1cs during this time because of the stress, the schedule Continue reading >>

Diabetic College Students Juggle Glucose Levels And Class

Diabetic College Students Juggle Glucose Levels And Class

I woke up startled in the middle of the night, sweating and trembling. Stumbling out of bed, weak and tired, I grasped the air searching for a small black kit. As I unzipped it, I knew the feeling right away: hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar. A small drop of blood and a quick test confirmed it. A double take — my blood sugar was lower than it had ever been. I was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes in November 2008, and waking up in the middle of the night with low blood sugar is something for which I’m typically prepared. But my blood glucose level was able to get so low on that October night during my freshman year of college because my body did not alert me, which it usually does. Even prior to coming to college, I had known that alcohol consumption is quite dangerous for a diabetic, because it has the capacity to rapidly lower blood sugar. It also reduces the body’s senses, meaning that you’d be less likely to wake up from hypoglycemic symptoms. Yet earlier that evening, I had done the typical freshman college Saturday night out, though with far less alcohol than the average partier. That night, I had consumed less than two alcoholic drinks. Any number below 70 milligrams per deciliter is considered low blood sugar. That night, my number dropped to 27. Welcome to college. Life with diabetes Northwestern freshman and diabetic Aileen McGraw wakes up almost every morning at 7 a.m., even if she doesn’t have class. She sticks to a regimented schedule, timing out meals and snacks to ensure that her blood sugar levels do not drop too low or rise too high. McGraw uses an insulin pump, which stays attached to her body and delivers insulin periodically throughout the day and mostly during meals. She also sticks to a regimented diet designed to prevent undesirable blood s Continue reading >>

College/university With Type 1 Diabetes

College/university With Type 1 Diabetes

So youre making the huge transition from high school to college congratulations! College is awesome, but whether youve been recently diagnosed or have had diabetes for years, navigating college life with T1D will require extra precautions. As in grade school, your college is legally responsible for accommodating your T1D needs, but its your responsibility to make your T1D known and to request the assistance you deserve. Contact your schools Office of Disability Services As a student with T1D, you have a right to accommodations . As soon as you make your decision, contact your colleges Office of Disability Services to see what services they offer. Many colleges require that you provide a letter from your doctor that includesyour T1D diagnosis and a request for specific accommodations. Examples of special accommodations include: On campus housing and in-room accommodations, like refrigerators for insulin and snacks Campus meal plan, including nutritional information and access to dorms with cafeterias or accessibility to those near by Early class registration to ensure optimal schedule Notification to teaching staff of your T1D status Breaks during class and exams for self-care Ability to reschedule exams in cases of hypo/hyperglycemia Changes to classroom attendance policies to accommodate the potential for sudden hypo/hyperglycemia or diabetes-related illnesses Find more information on your rights as a college student with T1D HERE . FERPA (The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act) gives parents certain rights with respect to their childrens education and medical records. These rights transfer to the student when he or she reaches the age of 18. If you want your parents to assist in any way with your medical care while you are at college, be sure to authorize acce Continue reading >>

The Comprehensive Guide To Dorm And Campus Life With Diabetes

The Comprehensive Guide To Dorm And Campus Life With Diabetes

By Elisabeth Almekinder RN, BA, CDE 2 Comments Are you going off to college to get your first taste of independence and semi-adulting? Perhaps you have already been at college for a month or so. How are you managing your diabetes? Are/were you equipped for all of the challenges that come with leaving home and starting a new chapter of your life? Did you know there would be so many parties? Each year, about 2.3 million freshmen enroll in institutes of higher education in the U.S. About 7,700 of these freshmen, based on the current prevalence, have Type 1 diabetes1. These students, in addition to adjusting to dorm and campus life, do not have the support of their parents and/or someone that can remind them when they need to self-manage their diabetes. They are faced with many choices, some of which may be dangerous for them. There are extra challenges and responsibilities to think of as a college student with diabetes. Sofias concern, when she contacted the diabetes council, was exactly this. As a college freshman at the University of Maryland, she was having trouble managing her diabetes, along with her hectic schedule. She wanted to get some help learning how to manage life in college with diabetes. She wanted to be successful in college, so that she could pursue a career in the medical field. Being the parent of a college student with diabetes I am currently the parent of a rising sophomore at Appalachian State University. It was not so long ago when we drove her up the mountain, two cars loaded down, headed for Boone, NC with the beautiful Blue Ridge Mountains as the backdrop. Tensions were high. Excitement was high too. She and I were venturing high up the mountain diving into the unknown. I had a whole list of worries back then. I still have a long list of things t Continue reading >>

How I Survived Going To College With Type 1 Diabetes

How I Survived Going To College With Type 1 Diabetes

How I Survived Going to College with Type 1 Diabetes A college student talks of how she kept from floundering in a new environment. As I started my first year of college, I knew there would be challenges. After all, I was going to be living on my own for the first time, doing so in a different province, contending with the academic demands of my program while working part-time, and managing my Type 1 diabetes. I thought that managing my diabetes after moving away from home might be a little bit different without my family and my former medical team at my side, but I didnt anticipate how it would define my life during that first year of school. With high school, I spent the same eight hours each weekday in the classroom; my time spent exercising, socializing, and going to extra-curricular activities fell into a fairly predictable routine. The steady schedule made it easier to have a glucose management routine. Also, I had my family, my long-time medical team, and my friends to rely on for support with my diabetes. I felt organized and in control. At college, a new, fast-paced, and variable schedule of classes, work, and errands threw my careful diabetes management into disarray. Meanwhile, the social events, spontaneous outings, and late nights that are part of nearly everyones university experience made things even more complicated. I also struggled to navigate another provinces health care system, track down specialists, follow up on medical referrals, and build a relationship with a new medical team. Eventually, I started to take steps to stabilize. One of the first things I did was to enlist a network of people to support me; I regularly emailed and called my parents and I stayed in touch with my previous medical team in my hometown as I assembled my own medical tea Continue reading >>

Preparing Students With Diabetes For Life At College

Preparing Students With Diabetes For Life At College

Before matriculation Ideally, students with diabetes should meet with their primary care provider or endocrinologist before matriculating at an institute of higher education. Such a meeting enables the clinician to review all aspects of the student’s medical care (3) and to educate the student about some issues that they may not have already considered. Before leaving the prematriculation visit, the student should have a clear understanding of what relationship they will maintain with their home clinician’s office and should ask for copies of their medical records to take with them. Ideally, the student and the clinician should contact the college’s health facility to set up an introductory appointment for the student once they arrive on campus. Direct contact with the student health facility will also provide information regarding the level of service that can be provided so the student’s health care status is optimized. Before leaving for college, students need to ensure that they have all of the supplies needed to manage their diabetes while at school. Although most remember to take their blood glucose meter, monitoring strips, alcohol wipes, insulin syringes (or pump), and insulin, many will forget items that they can easily find at home (e.g., sharps container) or may not have considered (e.g., urine ketone test strips). Other items to pack include ready sources of glucose (such as small cans of juice and glucose tablets), glucose gel, Medic Alert identification, a copy of important contact phone numbers, and their insurance card. In addition, it is a good idea to assemble a medicine kit for use during times of illness. Such a kit should include a thermometer, nonperishable bland foods and liquids (such as Jell-O, Saltines, broth-based soups, juice, and sug Continue reading >>

College Student With Type 1 Diabetes: What I Fear The Most

College Student With Type 1 Diabetes: What I Fear The Most

This is not my first rodeo. Three years ago I dropped my older son off at college with a mix of excitement and sadness. It took a while to get used to him not parked on the living room sofa, listening to his music while he simultaneously played video games and kept up with Facebook and Snapchat. This should have prepared me for round two, but it didn’t. In a few days, my younger son will move into his freshman dorm. Once again I struggle with all those wild emotions that rage through parental hearts as they send their children off into the world: pride, hope, hesitation, fear. He will adjust to his new life and I will adjust to mine, except that this time there is a wrinkle. It is not that he is my last child, though that has its own set of heartaches. It’s not that he’s going far (he will only be 75 miles away). This time, in addition to gathering all the essential necessities for dorm living, hoping he will like his roommates, lecturing him about making time to study – this time I also pray he will stay alive. My son has Type 1 Diabetes. Don't Miss Out Because of the wonders of modern medicine, he is able to manage this once fatal disease. However, for the first time in his life, he will not be doing it under my roof, where I can gently remind him to check his blood sugar or help him figure out the carbs for his dinner or ask if he took his Lantus (long acting insulin). He does much of this now with a great degree of independence, but I am able to watch him for unusual behavior due to low or high sugars, or worse, not waking up because his blood sugar dropped during the night. And that’s what gets to me. All Type 1 Diabetics live with the reality that their blood sugar can go dangerously low while they sleep and they may never wake up. When my son’s number Continue reading >>

College And Diabetes: On Campus And On Course

College And Diabetes: On Campus And On Course

Michael Levy sampled all that college life has to offer in his first year at Virginia Tech. In addition to taking six courses a semester, the engineering major and music minor marched on the VT drum line, rushed a fraternity, and took a ski trip with friends in the winter. Levy, now 19 and a rising sophomore, was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in sixth grade. He says he's always strived to fit diabetes into his life rather than fit his life around diabetes. Still, he admits, the transition to college was a bigger adjustment than he expected. "It's a lot more work," he says. "The toughest change is not being on a rigorous schedule that you follow every day. If I want to, I can stay up until 4 o'clock in the morning playing video games." Since his daily routine is unpredictableit could end in a late-night study session or a party any night of the weekLevy has become more vigilant about keeping his blood glucose in a healthy range throughout the day. "I check about four or five times a day and correct often," he says. And he never leaves his dorm without a bag that contains his test kit, three juices, and an insulin pen. "Even if I go to a party, I have that bag with me," he says. "People joke with me about it, but I say, 'It's my man purse.' Just having it gives me that sense of security that if something does go wrong, I'm ready to handle it." Figuring out how to survive and thrive at college is a big job for any student who's living away from home for the first time, but it's particularly complicated for those with diabetes. Not only do they have to learn how to use the coin-operated washing machine and get along with eccentric roommates, but they also have to calculate carbs in cafeteria specials they've never seen before (what's in Tofu Surprise, anyway?), monitor ho Continue reading >>

Tips For Living With Diabetes As A College Student - Hope Pa

Tips For Living With Diabetes As A College Student - Hope Pa

(AUGUST 2013) For most young adults, college is the first taste of freedom away from parental control. Most students live in a dormitory on campus or an apartment off campus, but either way, mommy and daddy aren't be there to cook, clean or take care of you. Most students consider these four years a gift - not having to abide by the rules that they previously did while living under their parents' roofs. Others suffering from diabetes, however, may feel differently. Since diabetes is a complicated disease, many young adults have help from their parents to maintain and control their blood sugar levels. The thought may be frightening, but living on your own as a diabetic college student can be much easier if planned well. By making a schedule, you can devote time to exercise, test your blood sugar levels and prepare healthy, well-balanced meals. Looking inside most dormitories, you will find cases of Coke, empty Cheetos bags and leftover cookie crumbs scattered around the room. The eating habits of a college student are different, to say the least. With a limited amount of time throughout the day, most students find it easier to grab a processed snack on their way to the library than to cook a four-course meal in the community kitchen. Although not a healthy lifestyle in the least bit, many young adults are able to eat this way without suffering from diseases such as diabetes due to high metabolism. Diabetics, however, cannot. By organizing your prescriptions and food items in your dorm or apartment, maintaining a healthy lifestyle will come much more naturally. Make sure to clearly identify and label an emergency contact list where your roommate can see, stock up on essential prescriptions and medications and have a designated spot to store all diabetic supplies. If you' Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes In School: From Pre-school To College

Managing Diabetes In School: From Pre-school To College

Home Education and Information Managing Diabetes In School: From Pre-School To College Managing Diabetes In School: From Pre-School To College Posted by Editorial Team On August 11, 2015 In Education and Information Starting a new school year often involves gathering school supplies and picking out a first-day-of-school outfit, but for parents of children with diabetes, theres a lot more to it than that. Whether your child has had diabetes for years, is beginning a new school with diabetes, or youre balancing school and diabetes for the first time, theres a lot to keep track of. D-Mom x2 Jen Loving provides insights into preparing her children with diabetes for school throughout the years, from pre-school to college. In the winter of 2004, I started looking into a half day preschool for my then 4-year-old daughter, Nora. Even though she was my second born, there is a certain thrill yet anxious feeling you get when its time to sign your baby up for school. As a mom, you worry if she will find friends, if she will learn easily, and if she will behave. Never did I even think to worry about type 1 diabetes (T1D) and preschool. But there we were in the summer of 2004 with a T1D diagnosis and an impending preschool start date. I was petrified. How was I going to send her to preschool for 2.5 hours without me?! We are a very active family and I remember when we were released from the hospital after a week stay learning about how to keep our daughter alive with insulin, log books, test strips, blood glucose (BG) meters, syringes, and a Calorie King book, and just wanting to stay inside our house forever. I forced myself and the rest of my family to accept our new normal and live our lives as we had before diabetes. I never wanted my daughter to feel different or for us to trea Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes In College | Joslin Diabetes Center

Managing Diabetes In College | Joslin Diabetes Center

College-bound: Preparing to Take your Diabetes Away From Home Preparing to go away to college can be hard enough, but moving away to college with diabetes can be an extra burden. Its important to realize that although youll be on your own, you still need safety nets in place. Diabetes is not a do it yourself disease at any age, says Lori Laffel, M.D., Joslins Chief of the Pediatric, Adolescent and Young Adult Section. Its important to begin preparations for your diabetes care ahead of time in order to make the transition into college as smooth as possible. College in itself is a big change, so its a good idea to keep the same health care team, Dr. Laffel says. You should also establish relationships with student health services and even a local provider, if you feel it necessary. Make sure you have enough diabetes supplies ordered in advance to last you for one to three months. You may also want to consider having a local back-up pharmacy, in case you inadvertently begin running out. In addition, its important to have an extra blood glucose meter and set of batteries, and glucagon kit. There are a number of people who should know about your diabetes, such as: Give them a brief overview of what diabetes is and let them know the types of supplies you will be storing in your room. Informing them about the symptoms of low blood glucose and how to use a glucagon kit are also extremely important, so they can help if youre experiencing a severe hypoglycemic reaction. Making the right preparations for diabetes management in college will not only ensure a smooth transition, but will also make it easier to live life like any other college student. Continue reading >>

Tips For Going To College With Type 1

Tips For Going To College With Type 1

School will soon be back in session, which means that colleges nationwide will be welcoming new freshman into their ranks. Along with all the typical questions of someone just starting college, students with Type 1 diabetes will have a unique set of concerns. If you or your child is wondering how to manage diabetes while away at school, then youll want to read a recent post on the Web site of Texas Childrens Hospital . Written by a student at Texas Christian University in Fort Worth who has Type 1, the piece gives tips on matters ranging from how to store diabetes supplies in your dorm room to ways to meet other students with diabetes. When youre done with that, check out Helpful Tips for Incoming College Freshman, by Maryam Elarbi, for more useful advice. And to all of the soon-to-be freshman out there, best of luck in college! This blog entry was written by Web Editor Diane Fennell. Disclaimer of Medical Advice: You understand that the blog posts and comments to such blog posts (whether posted by us, our agents or bloggers, or by users) do not constitute medical advice or recommendation of any kind, and you should not rely on any information contained in such posts or comments to replace consultations with your qualified health care professionals to meet your individual needs. The opinions and other information contained in the blog posts and comments do not reflect the opinions or positions of the Site Proprietor. All comments are moderated and there may be a delay in the publication of your comment. Please be on-topic and appropriate. Do not disclose personal information. Be respectful of other posters. Only post information that is correct and true to your knowledge. When referencing information that is not based on personal experience, please provide links to you Continue reading >>

5 Steps For Managing Diabetes On Campus

5 Steps For Managing Diabetes On Campus

Tips for making college a safe and healthy home away from home Well before you get to college, find a diabetes care team near campus. Your current pediatrician or endocrinologist may know of nearby doctors, nurses, and diabetes educators. Or reach out to your local American Diabetes Association office for referrals, says Paul Madden, MEd, the Associations director of type1 and type2 diabetes programs. Plan to get to know the folks at your campus health centerand make sure they get to know you, Madden says. Students, not their parents, should call ahead of their move to introduce themselves as someone with diabetes. Then, within a couple days of school starting, visit the health center and share information about your diabetes, such as medication and insulin dosages, and perhaps bring backup insulin vials or pens to store there. This serves two purposes, Madden says: If you run low on insulin in your dorm room, it may be easier to walk to the health center than get to a pharmacy. It also makes you a familiar face with your care team on campus. The people you live withroommates, resident advisers, and resident directorsshould know you have diabetes, says Christina Roth, CEO and founder of the College Diabetes Network, an online and in-person network of college students and alumni with diabetes. Its wise to teach your roommates to administer glucagon in an emergency. Alternatively, Madden suggests telling them, If I cant safely drink something sweetnot alcohol!please call the health center or 911. Help them understand (and remember) by printing and distributing diabetes information sheets and medical emergency cards . College might be a time for getting to know people romantically. For safetys sake, you should be able to talk to your potential partner about diabetes and w Continue reading >>

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