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Macular Degeneration And Diabetes

Cataract Treatment | Age-related Macular Degeneration Treatment | Diabetic And Hypertensive Retinopathy Treatment | Valdosta

Cataract Treatment | Age-related Macular Degeneration Treatment | Diabetic And Hypertensive Retinopathy Treatment | Valdosta

Age-related Macular Degeneration Treatment Age-related macular degeneration, commonly referred to as AMD or ARMD, is an eye disorder that causes deterioration of the central vision area of the eye, called the macula. It is currently the leading cause of vision loss and blindness in Americans over the age of 65. As its name suggests, it is more prevalent with age, but other risk factors for macular degeneration include smoking, high blood pressure, light eye color, obesity, prolonged exposure to ultraviolet (UV) rays, and having a family member with ARMD. There is currently no cure for ARMD, but there are several treatments that can slow or even stop its progression. These treatments range from nutritional supplements to doctor administered injections, depending on the stage of the disease. Also, like most health problems, early detection is the key; a complete eye exam every year will help your doctor notice any ARMD-type changes. A cataract is a clouding of the lens that is located inside of the eye just behind the iris, the colored part of the eye. This clouding is primarily due to age; however, it can be accelerated by external factors, such as exposure to ultra violet light and smoking. Cataracts can also form more quickly in people with certain health conditions, like diabetes, and as a side effect from some medications such as steroids. Once a cataract begins to affect the vision, the cloudy lens can be surgically replaced with an artificial intraocular lens, thus restoring vision to its pre-cataract level. You can be fit with a regular intraocular lens, a special lens for astigmatism, or lens with a bifocal. Your doctor will help you best choose the intraocular lens for your lifestyle. Diabetes and hypertension, or high blood pressure, are two of the most common Continue reading >>

Diabetes Complications: Wet Macular Degeneration

Diabetes Complications: Wet Macular Degeneration

As diabetics, we need to stay on top of our health period, but one of the most important is our eye health. The eyes contain hundreds of tiny blood vessels that effect our vision and the overall health of our eyes. Wet macular degeneration is a chronic eye disease that causes vision loss in the center of your field of vision. Wet macular degeneration is generally caused by abnormal blood vessels that leak fluid or blood into the region of the macula (MAK-u-luh). The macula is in the center of the retina (the layer of tissue on the inside back wall of your eyeball). Wet macular degeneration is one of two types of age-related degeneration’s. The other type — dry macular degeneration — is more common and less severe. Wet macular degeneration almost always begins as dry macular degeneration. It’s not clear what causes wet macular degeneration. Symptoms of Wet Macular Degeneration: Wet macular degeneration symptoms usually appear and progress rapidly. Symptoms may include: Visual distortions, such as straight lines appearing wavy or crooked, a doorway or street sign looking lopsided, or objects appearing smaller or farther away than they really are Decreased central vision Decreased intensity or brightness of colors Well-defined blurry spot or blind spot in your field of vision Abrupt onset Rapid worsening Hallucinations of geometric shapes, animals or people, in cases of advanced degeneration Treatment of Wet Macular Degeneration: There are several courses of treatment available for wet macular degeneration, but the goals are to slow progression of the disease. The treatments are not cures and in most instances cannot reverse the damages that have already occurred. Laser therapy is a possible treatment, where a high-powered laser is used to destroy the abnormal, lea Continue reading >>

Nearly Every Diabetic Will Develop This Eye Disease

Nearly Every Diabetic Will Develop This Eye Disease

Diabetic eye disease is a group of eye conditions that can affect people with diabetes. Diabetic retinopathy affects blood vessels in the light-sensitive tissue called the retina that lines the back of the eye. It is the most common cause of vision loss among people with diabetes and the leading cause of vision impairment and blindness among working-age adults. Diabetic macular edema (DME). A consequence of diabetic retinopathy, DME is swelling in an area of the retina called the macula. Diabetic eye disease also includes cataract and glaucoma: Cataract is a clouding of the eye’s lens. Adults with diabetes are 2-5 times more likely than those without diabetes to develop cataract. Cataract also tends to develop at an earlier age in people with diabetes. Glaucoma is a group of diseases that damage the eye’s optic nerve—the bundle of nerve fibers that connects the eye to the brain. Some types of glaucoma are associated with elevated pressure inside the eye. In adults, diabetes nearly doubles the risk of glaucoma. All forms of diabetic eye disease have the potential to cause severe vision loss and blindness.-National Eye Institute(NEI) Arkansas and Louisiana rank among the Top 10 for highest diabetes rate in the nation. This Friday AmeriHealth Caritas Louisiana is hosting free diabetic screenings at their new wellness center. Steve Bender recently spoke to an ophthalmologist about the most common diabetic eye condition that many overlook. Dr. Michael Cooney: “Pretty much a 100 percent of people with diabetes will develop diabetic retinopathy.” Steve, “This condition is the number one cause of vision loss for those working in America. Retinopathy occurs when diabetes affects your retina, which is the part of the eye that’s like a film of a camera which produces Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy Vs. Macular Degeneration (part 1 Of 2)

Diabetic Retinopathy Vs. Macular Degeneration (part 1 Of 2)

Happy Monday! Today’s post starts a comparison between macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy. Both diseases have the possibility of causing severe vision loss, but MOST PATIENTS WITH EITHER DISEASE MAINTAIN GOOD USEFUL VISION THROUGH THEIR LIFETIME! If you remember anything about this post, remember this. Neither disease is necessarily an impairment or disability. 1. The NO. 1 Cause of Blindness I can never remember which is the leading and which is the runner-up. It doesn’t matter; both are the leading causes of blindness in the civilized world. In underdeveloped countries, cataracts may be a contender, but cataracts are “fixable,” while macular degeneration and diabetic retinopathy can cause permanent, “non-fixable” blindness. In the western world, we are really talking about causing “legal” blindness, and this is why there is some slight confusion. Read below. The World Health Organization lists macular degeneration as causing more “blindness” than diabetic retinopathy. 2. Blindness and Legal Blindness, Absence of Light Perception Diabetic retinopathy can cause complete blindness – can’t see the broad side of a barn and can’t see light. Everything black………..all the time, glasses or no glasses. Complete blindness may also be termed absence of light perception. Diabetic retinopathy can also cause legal blindness. Macular degeneration does NOT cause complete blindness, but often causes legal blindness. Central reading vision is lost, and, by definition, is worse than 20/200. Legal blindness is that threshold of vision where we can not safely navigate around the house, read and perform the activities of daily living. The peripheral vision is usually intact. 3. Age of Onset Diabetic retinopathy can strike at any age. In most cases, Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy | Dry Eye Treatment | Macular Degeneration | Bronx | Scarsdale

Diabetic Retinopathy | Dry Eye Treatment | Macular Degeneration | Bronx | Scarsdale

Diabetic Retinopathy Patients with diabetes are at an increased risk of developing eye diseases that can cause vision loss and blindness, such as diabetic retinopathy, cataracts and glaucoma. These and other serious conditions often develop without vision loss or pain, so significant damage may be done to the eyes by the time the patient notices any symptoms. For this reason it is very important for diabetic patients to have their eyes examined once a year. The eye is examined through a dilated pupil, and our ophthalmologists look for signs of developing problems in the eye’s structures and blood vessels. Diagnosing and treating eye disease early can prevent vision loss. It is also important to maintain a steady blood-sugar level, take prescribed medications, follow a healthy diet, exercise regularly and avoid smoking. Dry eye occurs when the eyes aren't sufficiently moisturized, leading to itching, redness and pain. The eyes may become dry and irritated because the tear ducts don't produce enough tears, or because the tears themselves have a chemical imbalance. People usually begin experiencing dry eye symptoms as they age, but the condition can also result from certain medications, conditions or injuries. Dry eye is not only painful, it can also damage the eye's tissues and impair vision. Fortunately, many treatment options are available. Non-surgical treatments for dry eye include blinking exercises, increasing humidity at home or work, and use of artificial tears or moisturizing ointment. If these methods fail, small punctal plugs may be inserted in the corners of the eyes to limit tear drainage, or the drainage tubes in the eyes may be surgically closed. Macular Degeneration The macula is a part of the retina in the back of the eye that ensures that our central v Continue reading >>

Macular Gegeneration And Diabetes

Macular Gegeneration And Diabetes

Diabetes and the eyes are closely related. Those who have diabetes have to regularly screen their eyes in order to make sure they don’t start to suffer from a range of diabetes-related conditions. One of these conditions is macular degeneration. About Diabetes When your body is not able to create sufficient insulin, an important hormone, or when insulin no longer has the desired effect, diabetes occurs. Insulin is vital to ensure our body can properly handle carbohydrates and sugars. Sometimes, children are born with diabetes, but it is much more common for it to develop later in life, particularly as a result of obesity. There are four main types of diabetes, as explained in the table below. Type of Diabetes Characteristics Type 1 This usually happens before people turn 30 and happens when your body no longer produces any (or not much) insulin. Usually, people with type 1 diabetes have to take insulin injections, which is why type 1 is also known as ‘insulin dependent diabetes’. Type 2 This usually happens after people turn 40. The body still produces insulin, but it either doesn’t produce enough or it simply doesn’t work as it should. Usually, tablets, exercise and diet are used to control this. South Asian Communities Interestingly, people from South Asian communities, and particularly Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, Pakistan and India, are 25% more likely to develop type 2 diabetes after they turn 50. It is not known why, but although this is technically classified as type 2 diabetes, it is now almost recognized as a type in its own right. Gestational diabetes This is a type of diabetes that some women get when they become pregnant. It usually goes away after they have given birth, although the chance of developing type 1 or type 2 later in life is increased. How t Continue reading >>

Diabetic Macular Edema

Diabetic Macular Edema

When you have diabetes, you have a lot to manage. High blood sugar can lead to other conditions, like eye problems. The most common one is diabetic macular edema. It's serious and can rob you of your vision. That's a scary possibility, but knowing what to look out for and getting the right treatment can help protect your sight. Even if you don't notice problems, when you have diabetes, it's important you get your eyes checked every year. If you do have a problem, see an ophthalmologist right away. This type of doctor treats eye diseases. If you catch it early, there's a chance you can stop long-term damage. High blood sugar weakens the blood vessels in your eyes. That can make them leak or grow out of control in your retina, the light-sensitive area at the back of your eye. This is called diabetic retinopathy. When fluid seeps into your retina, it can cause diabetic macular edema. The leaking makes your retina swell, which hampers the work of your macula, the special, sensitive part that gives you sharp vision. Diabetic macular edema doesn’t always cause symptoms. But you may: Have images directly in front of you appear blurry or wavy See colors that seem “washed out” If this happens to you, see your doctor right away. Before any testing, your doctor may ask you questions: Have you noticed changes in your vision? If so, what kind? Have you been diagnosed with diabetes? If so, when? Does anyone in your family have it? How have your blood sugar and A1c levels been lately? Do you have any other medical conditions? You will need a thorough eye exam, which usually includes: A visual acuity test. It checks how well you see at different distances. A dilated eye exam. Your doctor will use drops to widen your pupils and look at the inside of your eyes. He'll look for signs Continue reading >>

New, Inexpensive Treatment For Retinopathy And Macular Degeneration May Be On The Horizon

New, Inexpensive Treatment For Retinopathy And Macular Degeneration May Be On The Horizon

Researchers are finding that two related drugs can stop and even reverse vision loss caused by diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration (also called AMD), the two leading causes of blindness in America. The two drugs, Lucentis and its chemically similar cousin, a cancer drug called Avastin, are produced by San Francisco-based pharmaceutical Genentech. But one of them—Avastin—is much less expensive. Genentech’s two drugs, Lucentis and Avastin, work by stopping the growth of new blood vessels. Both are injected directly into the eye, which is a lot less painful than it sounds. Both drugs target wet AMD and proliferative diabetic retinopathy—the forms of the diseases that lead to severe loss of vision, eventually leading to total blindness. Both diseases occur when lots of tiny blood vessels begin growing uncontrollably around the retina, which contains the light-sensitive cells essential to vision. By stopping the growth of new blood vessels and sometimes even destroying some of the excess blood vessels, Lucentis and Avastin can stop wet AMD and proliferative diabetic retinopathy in their tracks. Lucentis Offers Dramatic Success Only one of the drugs, Lucentis, is approved by the FDA for use in treating AMD. Approved for use last June, Lucentis has already become the treatment of choice for wet AMD. Lucentis not only stops AMD in many patients, it also reverses the damage, dramatically improving vision in most cases. Although the FDA has not yet approved Lucentis for treating proliferative diabetic retinopathy, the drug is proving extremely effective in clinical studies. Recently researchers at the Johns Hopkins Wilmer Eye Institute began treating 10 patients, all with early stages of proliferative diabetic retinopathy, with Lucentis injections. A Continue reading >>

Dme Information | Lucentis (ranibizumab Injection)

Dme Information | Lucentis (ranibizumab Injection)

What important safety information should I know about LUCENTIS? You should not use LUCENTIS if you have an infection in or around the eye or are allergic to LUCENTIS or any of its ingredients. LUCENTIS is a prescription medication given by injection into the eye, and it has side effects. LUCENTIS is not for everyone. Some LUCENTIS patients have had detached retinas and serious eye infections. If your eye becomes red, sensitive to light, or painful, or if you have a change in vision, call or visit your eye doctor right away. Some patients have had increased eye pressure before and within 1 hour of an injection. Your eye doctor should check your eye pressure and eye health before and after your LUCENTIS injection. Uncommonly, LUCENTIS patients have had serious, sometimes fatal, problems related to blood clots, such as heart attacks or strokes. Fatal events were seen more often in patients with DME and DR with LUCENTIS compared with patients who did not receive LUCENTIS. Although there were only few fatal events which included causes of death typical of patients with advanced diabetic complications, these events may be caused by LUCENTIS. Some LUCENTIS patients have serious side effects related to the injection. These include serious infections inside the eye, detached retinas, and cataracts. The most common eye-related side effects are increased redness in the white of the eye, eye pain, small specks in vision, and increased eye pressure. The most common noneye-related side effects are nose and throat infections, anemia, nausea and cough. You may report side effects to the FDA at (800) FDA-1088 or www.fda.gov/medwatch . You may also report side effects to Genentech at (888) 835-2555. For additional safety information, please talk to your doctor and see the LUCENTIS full Continue reading >>

Retinopathy | Macular Degeneration | Natural Treatments

Retinopathy | Macular Degeneration | Natural Treatments

Author Sidebar: When I was in the hospital during the coma episode, my vision became blurred because my blood sugar was too high. The doctors and nurses assured me that my vision would return to normal once my blood glucose stabilized. And, they were right -- a few weeks after I got home from the hospital, my blurred vision subsided. Up until then, I had taken my eyesight for granted. I never realized how important my eyesight was until I struggled with reading the newspaper and my computer. Even though this was years ago, I still remember what it was like not being able to read clearly, especially when I was using my computer to do some research about diabetes and nutrition. After I published my book and ended up in the newspaper, during various health fairs, church talks and other community events, I met quite a few people who were struggling with their eyesight. Even though some of them still bought my book, they asked me if I would think about creating an audio book or writing a new book with larger text. Eventually, I created a larger version of my 6" x9" paperback book -- an 8½" x 11" Death to Diabetes spiral-bound booklet. Naturally, people with vision problems loved the new book. However, I discovered that people who didn't have vision problems loved the new book also! Why? Because the spiral-bound booklet was easier to read because it lay flat. Plus, there was a lot of "white space" on each page so that they could write their own notes. Later on, I created a Death to Diabetes "audio book", which consists of MP3 files of my book chapters. These files can be downloaded to your computer, laptop, tablet, or smartphone. Health Tip: Most people are aware that herbs such as bilberry help to strengthen the fragile blood vessels in the retina. However, what you may not Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus And Early Age-related Macular Degeneration

Diabetes Mellitus And Early Age-related Macular Degeneration

Objective To examine the association of diabetes mellitus and early age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in Korean adults 50 years and older. Methods This study included 3008 participants aged 50 to 87 years. Early AMD was assessed from retinal photographs based on a modified Wisconsin AMD grading system. Diabetes mellitus was defined as a fasting glucose level of 126 mg/dL or greater or the use of antidiabetic medications. Logistic regression was used to examine the association between diabetes mellitus and early AMD. Results There were 88 subjects with early AMD and 315 subjects with diabetes mellitus. After adjusting for age, sex, current smoking, obesity, and hypertension, significant association was found between diabetes mellitus and early AMD. Subjects with diabetes mellitus were more likely to have early AMD (odds ratio, 1.87; 95% confidence interval, 1.07-3.28) than were those without diabetes mellitus. Conclusion There is a relationship between diabetes mellitus and early AMD in Korean adults 50 years and older. The underlying biological processes remain to be determined. In the population 50 years and older, age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the primary cause of visual impairment in developed countries, and it is the third leading cause of visual impairment worldwide.1,2 The burden of AMD on public health and the economy is expected to rise as a result of the progressive increase in the life expectancy and the proportion of elderly people in the population.3- 5 The identification and modification of risk factors related to AMD may improve knowledge regarding its pathogenesis, facilitating prevention, and subsequently reduce the morbidity associated with AMD. Knowledge about modifiable cardiovascular risk factors related to AMD, including cigarette s Continue reading >>

Treatment Of Neovascular Age-related Macular Degeneration In Patients With Diabetes

Treatment Of Neovascular Age-related Macular Degeneration In Patients With Diabetes

Treatment of neovascular age-related macular degeneration in patients with diabetes 2 Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital of Coimbra, Centre of Ophthalmology, Institute of Biomedical Research on Light and Image, Faculty of Medicine, University of Coimbra, and Association for Innovation and Biomedical Research on Light and Image, Coimbra, Portugal 1 Academic Department of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Queen Alexandra Hospital, Portsmouth, UK 2 Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital of Coimbra, Centre of Ophthalmology, Institute of Biomedical Research on Light and Image, Faculty of Medicine, University of Coimbra, and Association for Innovation and Biomedical Research on Light and Image, Coimbra, Portugal Correspondence: Jos Cunha-Vaz, Azinhaga Santa Comba, Celas, 3000-548, Coimbra, Portugal, Tel +35 1 239480100, Fax +35 1 239480117, Email [email protected] Copyright 2008 Dove Medical Press Limited. All rights reserved This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. The number of patients with type 2 diabetes continues to rise; an anticipated 300 million people will be affected by 2025. The immense social and economic burden of the condition is exacerbated by the initial asymptomatic nature of type 2 diabetes, resulting in a high prevalence of micro-and macrovascular complications at presentation. Diabetic retinopathy, one of the potential microvascular complications associated with diabetes, and neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) are the two most frequent retinal degenerative diseases, and are responsible for the majority of blindness due to retinal disease. Both conditions predominantly affect the central macula, and are associated with the presence of retinal edema and an aggressive inflammatory repair process that accelerat Continue reading >>

Patient Education

Patient Education

Macular Degeneration Macular degeneration is a deterioration or breakdown of the macula. The macula is a small area in the retina at the back of the eye that allows you to see clearly. When the macula is not functioning correctly, your central vision can be affected by blurriness, distortion or dark areas. Macular degeneration is the leading cause of severe vision loss in the United States in people 65 years or older. Many older people develop macular degeneration as part of the body's natural aging process. The most common form of macular degeneration is age-related macular degeneration (AMD). There are two common types of AMD. Most people (about 90%) have a form of AMD called "atrophic" or "dry" AMD, which develops when the tissues of the macula grow thin with age. Dry AMD usually causes a slow loss of vision. A second smaller group of people (about 10%) have a more serious condition called "exudative" or "wet" AMD. Wet AMD occurs when abnormal blood vessels grow underneath the retina. These unhealthy vessels leak blood and fluid, which can scar the macula. For patients with wet AMD, vision loss may be rapid and severe. Some symptoms of macular degeneration may be: A dark or empty area appears in the center of vision Blurred vision Distortion of lines and shapes Dry AMD cannot be treated with medication or surgery, but many patients can function well with magnifying lenses. Treatment for wet AMD can include one or a combination of the following: Thermal Laser Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) Anti-VEGF Injections Diabetic Retinopathy If you have Diabetes your body does not utilize sugar properly, and when sugar levels rise, damage to the blood vessels in the retina may occur. This damage is known as diabetic retinopathy and is currently a leading cause of blindness in adults Continue reading >>

Common Eye Diseases: Symptoms, Prevention & Treatment | Lenscrafters

Common Eye Diseases: Symptoms, Prevention & Treatment | Lenscrafters

DETECTING, PREVENTING & TREATING COMMON EYE DISEASES An estimated 60 million American adults are at high risk for vision loss, according to the AOA. Preserve your sight against the most common vision-affecting eye diseases like glaucoma or diabetes by scheduling an annual eye exam. Diabetes affects a huge portion of the population, making it one of the biggest culprits of vision loss. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) places the number at 20.8 million, with a third of the sufferers unaware they have it. The American Optometric Association (AOA) cites diabetes as the leading cause of new onset blindness in working-age people, with diabetics 25% more likely to lose their vision than the rest of the population. The reason? Sugar buildup in the bloodstream associated with diabetes can break down the capillaries that lead to the retina. Continuing damage to the retinal tissue, called diabetic retinopathy, can end in compromised vision or even blindness. An eye exam can work in two significant ways when it comes to detecting diseases, including diabetes: diagnosis and treatment . Your optometrist may see fluid or other signs that suggest the need for testing. Once diagnosed, the diabetic eye exam is a crucial step in limiting associated vision loss. With any diabetes diagnosis, your doctor should refer you to an optometrist for a dilated eye exam at least once a year. With early treatment, the AOA has found that 95% of people with significant diabetic retinopathy can avoid substantial vision loss. With early treatment, 95% of individuals with significant diabetic retinopathy can avoid substantial vision loss. WHAT IS GLAUCOMA AND HOW CAN IT BE TREATED? Glaucoma is a group of related eye issues that, if left untreated, can result in blindness. The disease damages the op Continue reading >>

Questions / Comments: Please Include Non-medical Questions And Correspondence Only.

Questions / Comments: Please Include Non-medical Questions And Correspondence Only.

A healthy retina is essential to maintaining clear vision and overall eye functioning. A retinal exam may be recommended by your doctor if any potential retinal abnormalities were detected during a general eye exam, or for patients at a higher risk of developing retinal conditions such as glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy, macular degeneration, retinal detachment and more. During a retinal exam and consultation, your doctor will perform series of diagnostic procedures in order to evaluate the retina for any signs of disease or abnormalities. These tests may include visual field test, fluorescein angiography, fundus photography and more. Your doctor will take the time to discuss the results of your exams, as well as any potential risks of retinal disease with you. Patient education and understanding is a top priority of our practice, as it often help patients achieve the most effective treatment as they know how to care for their condition. Diabetic retinopathy is a complication of diabetes that weakens the blood vessels that supply nourishment to the retina (the light-sensitive lining in the back of the eye where vision is focused). These weak vessels can leak, swell or develop thin branches, causing a loss of vision. Changes to your vision may not be noticeable at first. But in its advanced stages, the disease can cause blurred or cloudy vision, floaters and blind spots – and, eventually, blindness. This damage is irreversible. Diabetic retinopathy is the most common diabetic eye complication and a leading cause of blindness in American adults. Macular edema, which is leaking fluid that causes blurred vision, often occurs with diabetic retinopathy. Fortunately, diabetic retinopathy is preventable. People with diabetes are most susceptible to developing it, but your risk Continue reading >>

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