diabetestalk.net

Macros For Diabetic

The Ultimate Muscle Building Diet Plan For Men With Diabetes | Calories, Macros, Nutrient Timing, And Supplements

The Ultimate Muscle Building Diet Plan For Men With Diabetes | Calories, Macros, Nutrient Timing, And Supplements

Everyone who goes to the gym with the goal of getting stronger and leaner is technically bodybuilding whether you like it or not. Competitive bodybuilding is fat loss taken that little bit further. The best diabetes bodybuilding diet plan is the one you can stick to the longest. Bodybuilding involves set periods of eating a calorie surplus and deficit. Bodybuilding is more challenging for people with diabetes. There are many important nutrition considerations. 99% of people looking to lose weight or gain muscle mass prioritse the wrong things when it comes to diet. If you don’t assess your diet you won’t reach your true potential. You need fewer supplements than you think. Both whey and creatine are valid options for people with diabetes. What you’re in for? 3,500 Words Reading Time ~ 20 minutes If you live with diabetes and love bodybuilding, this article is for you. I’m all for building muscle and shredding fat as fast as possible. However, to achieve this, your diet MUST be set up correctly. There is a fine line between… Eating too much Vs. Eating too little. Taking too much insulin Vs. Taking too little. Training too much Vs. Training too little. Overlook one detail and you run the risk of burning out, losing muscle, gaining body fat and looking the same (or worse) from year to year Sound familiar? Bodybuilding with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, is more challenging than you think. That’s why so many people living with diabetes fail to look and perform their best in the gym. It’s taken me ten years of academic learning, 1000s of blood glucose tests, 1000s of hours in the gym and over 700 clients later to develop, The Ultimate Bodybuilding Cutting and Mass Building Diet Plan for people living with diabetes. BEFORE WE BEGIN: WHAT IS BODYBUILDING? When you h Continue reading >>

A Diabetic's Guide To Counting Macros - Nick Cheadle

A Diabetic's Guide To Counting Macros - Nick Cheadle

Overview Guide to Counting Macros for Diabetics Counting macros and figuring out your numbers is a simple process. So many people fret over the calculations, or think that they need some kind of magic, complex formula, or that theres one method thats right and will give them the perfect diet plan. Macro calculators are great for getting a base point to start with, and from there you adjust depending on progress. Want to calculate your own macros right now? [INSERT MACROS FOR CUTTING/ BULKING ARTICLES] Typically, almost everyone can use exactly the same macro template, and simply track to achieve their goals. You dont need to worry too much over meal timings, the glycemic index, food choices (provided you get enough fibre) or even workout nutrition. Provided you hit your numbers, youre fine. One exception to this rule though, is diabetics. Diabetes is a metabolic disease that comes in two forms. Type I diabetes occurs when your body stops producing insulin (the hormone thats responsible for dealing with carbohydrate) and so you have to start injecting insulin. Forget to take your insulin, and you can go hyperglycaemic. In extreme cases, this can be life threatening. Type I diabetes often develops during childhood or adolescence. This is typically more lifestyle related, and being overweight, inactive and sedentary are contributing factors. Type II diabetics still produce some insulin, but not enough, meaning theyre what are known as insulin resistant. This can often be managed through diet and exercise, as blood sugar levels can be brought down by following a sensible eating plan and starting to train. Before following any style of diet as a diabetic, you should consult your doctor. While the tips in this article all work in theory, you cant be too careful, so take a vi Continue reading >>

Figuring Out Your Macros Low Carb Rn (cde)

Figuring Out Your Macros Low Carb Rn (cde)

So many people who are just starting out on a low carb diet want to know the answer to the ultimate question. What percentage of macronutrients should I have and how does that translate into serving sizes? Well, I am here to say that the answer is not so easy, as the right balance is different for every person. For instance, for those that are growing or physically active, a higher percentage of protein may be needed. For those that are not as active, those that are overweight, pre-diabetic or have Type 2 diabetes, a lower percentage of protein may be needed, with a higher percentage dedicated to fat. And remember, when we say fat, we dont just mean dietary fat. If we are very overweight, we also need to burn some of that percentage of fat from body fat stores. (see my post Dont Force the Fat HERE ). So I want to say up front that Im not a HUGE fan of tracking macros all of the time because I think it sometimes forces people to eat up to these macros instead of listening to their bodies. I think tracking macros, or just tracking food choices in general, is helpful when you reach as stall in weight loss, or your blood sugars are creeping up and you need to investigate a cause or to help you be accountable or get back on track. Otherwise, I think getting overly concerned with eating up to some magical, one-size-fits-all macro percentage is not helpful. There is no one magical percentage for all people. Here are some helpful graphics from Dr. Theodore Naiman, of www.burnfatnotsugar.com . These are helpful general guidelines to give you an idea of where to start. (When he says unlimited fiber he is referring to plant fiber, NOT fiber from processed foods or grains. (See my article Low Carb Mistakes Net Carbs Fiber HERE .) Those who are sensitive to fiber or those wanting t Continue reading >>

Macros To Reverse Insulin Resistance - Prediabetes

Macros To Reverse Insulin Resistance - Prediabetes

Macros to reverse Insulin Resistance - Prediabetes Macros to reverse Insulin Resistance - Prediabetes Doc told me that I was "Prediabetic" and that I need to get my diet under control. His only real advise was to switch from 2% milk to fat free, eat more whole grains and steady cardio 3-4 times/wk. However from what I've read so far there seems to be a lot of information out there that does not coincide with my doc's sentiment. I really want to get healthly, drop my excess fat (315lbs ~35%bf) and get my blood glucose/insulin sensitivity under control. I see such a wide range on dietary strategies that picking a place to start is tough.... I've seen it range from 40carbs/40protein/20fat to 40carbs/30protein/30fat to 65fat/30protein/5carbs and others like Paleo where the macros are less important than the types of food eaten. Is there a good place to start specifically for people with Insulin Resistance given the same amount of calories? Doc told me that I was "Prediabetic" and that I need to get my diet under control. His only real advise was to switch from 2% milk to fat free, eat more whole grains and steady cardio 3-4 times/wk. However from what I've read so far there seems to be a lot of information out there that does not coincide with my doc's sentiment. I really want to get healthly, drop my excess fat (315lbs ~35%bf) and get my blood glucose/insulin sensitivity under control. I see such a wide range on dietary strategies that picking a place to start is tough.... I've seen it range from 40carbs/40protein/20fat to 40carbs/30protein/30fat to 65fat/30protein/5carbs and others like Paleo where the macros are less important than the types of food eaten. Is there a good place to start specifically for people with Insulin Resistance given the same amount of calories? Y Continue reading >>

Myfitnesspal Macros - The Blood Sugar Diet By Michael Mosley

Myfitnesspal Macros - The Blood Sugar Diet By Michael Mosley

You are here: Home Forums Fast 800 MyFitnessPal macros Hi. Im on my 3rd day of BSD and logging all food on mfp so good so far. Does anyone know what are the ideal macros for protein/fat/carbs? Id like to update the percentage split in my app so I can see if Im getting the right balance. Perhaps someone whos a few weeks down the line and getting successful results could share their stats. Thanks folks. Ive set mine st 30% carbs and 35% for each of fat and protein. Cant remember now how I came to this conclusion! Id like to friend you on MFP great youre interested in those sort of details! Hi Penny. Happy to link up on MFP. So far Im not much different from your suggested stats so Ill use those for now. Day 5 and not doing too badly but nearer 900 average than 800. Need to be good at the weekend! Hi Penny. Im 4lbs down after week one. Hoping I can maintain this going forwards. Motivated for week 2! Hi, Im having the same issues with working out my macros. Im not sure how low the carbs should be! Its nice to find other geeks who are bothered by this! This is my first day of BSD but I have experimented with MFP in the past. Today Ive had an apple with pure peanut butter (WAY too much because I didnt realise my scales were on the ounces setting, not grams, until too late: facepalm and no lunch) and Im about to make the aubergine, lamb and pomegranate dinner from the book. This all works out at just under 800 cals, 67% fat, 22% protein and 11% carbs. Do you reckon this is way off what it should be? I did a sort of trial day last week and the macros were pretty similar- feels like too much fat. How are you guys achieving such an even balance? Where are you getting your carbs? Hey sounds like you guys are doing great! I have my macros set to Carbs 25%, Protein 30% and Fats 45% Continue reading >>

Joslin’s New Nutrition Guidelines For Diabetes And Pre-diabetes

Joslin’s New Nutrition Guidelines For Diabetes And Pre-diabetes

40-30-30 formula and 3 hours of activity a week + 50Gms Fiber can equal a modest weight loss of one pound every one to two weeks. As Americans’ waistlines continue to expand, contributing to a burgeoning epidemic of type 2 diabetes, the scientific jury is in and the verdict is clear: weight loss and increased physical activity is directly related to improved diabetes control. To help Americans fight the dramatic increase in type 2 diabetes, Joslin diabetes Center has crafted new nutrition and physical activity guidelines for overweight and obese individuals with type 2 diabetes and those at risk for developing diabetes (pre- diabetes). "Since obesity doesn’t seem to be slowing down and the complications of diabetes are so serious, we were especially alarmed about the health of the American public. We felt the best way to impact the largest number of people was to strengthen our nutrition guidelines," said James L. Rosenzweig, M.D, head of Joslin’s clinical guidelines committee. The team of physicians, dietitians, exercise physiologists and educators spent months reviewing the scientific literature to draw up new guidelines. "The search was on for guidelines that would improve insulin sensitivity, cardiovascular health and reduce body fat. And most importantly, we wanted to deliver a plan that makes clear what people need to do to achieve their goals," said Dr. Rosenzweig, who also is Director of Joslin’s Disease Management Program and Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. The new guidelines recommend approximately 40 percent of a person’s daily calories come from carbohydrates; 20 to 30 percent from protein (unless the person has kidney disease); 30-35 percent come from fat, (mostly mono- and polyunsaturated fats); and at least 20-35 grams Continue reading >>

Diabetes Macronutrient Calculator

Diabetes Macronutrient Calculator

Carbohydrates, proteins, and fats are the primary sources of nutrient providing energy for our body. Proportion of this macronutrient requirement varies between individuals, specifically for diabetes to control their blood glucose level. Macronutrients are nutrients providing energy. Nutrients are substances require for the growth, metabolism, repair, and for other bodily functions. Since macro means large, macronutrients are nutrients requiring in large quantities. There are three primary macronutrients; they are carbohydrate, protein, and fat. Carbohydrate is the main energy source of energy and thus comprises the main bulk of the average human diet. It is require for proper functioning of your tissues, cells, brain, heart and nervous system, a constant supply of carbohydrate is require. Carbohydrate is necessary for intestinal health and waste elimination. One gram of carbohydrate provides four calories of energy. You need carbohydrate in large quantities as a major source of energy to cover 55% to 75% of calories requirement of every meal. Healthy source of carbohydrates are whole grains, vegetables, fruits and beans. Unhealthy carbohydrate sources are white bread, pastries, sodas, and other refined or processed foods. We need protein for growth (particularly for children, pregnant women, and sports persons), tissue repair, hormones & enzymes production, immune function, maintaining lean muscle mass, and provide energy when carbohydrates are not available. One gram of protein provides four calories of energy. We need protein as a source to cover 10% to 15% of calories requirement of every meal. Healthy protein sources are milk, cheese, yogurt, beans, soy, eggs, seafood, white-meat poultry, lean beef, etc. We need fat for normal growth & development, help absorb fat Continue reading >>

Nutritional Recommendations For Individuals With Diabetes

Nutritional Recommendations For Individuals With Diabetes

Go to: INTRODUCTION This chapter will summarize current information on nutritional recommendations for persons with diabetes for health care practitioners who treat them. The key take home message is that the 1800 calorie ADA diet is dead! The modern diet for the individual with diabetes is based on concepts from clinical research, portion control, and individualized lifestyle changes. It cannot simply be delivered by giving a patient a diet sheet in a one-size-fits-all approach. The lifestyle modification guidance and support needed requires a team effort, best led by an expert in this area; a registered dietitian (RD), or a referral to a diabetes self-management education (DSME) program that includes instruction on nutrition therapy. Dietary recommendations need to be individualized for and accepted by the given patient. It’s important to note that the nutrition goals for diabetes are similar to those that healthy individuals should strive to incorporate into their lifestyle. Leading authorities and professional organizations have concluded that proper nutrition is an important part of the foundation for the treatment of diabetes. However, appropriate nutritional treatment, implementation, and ultimate compliance with the plan remain some of the most vexing problems in diabetic management for three major reasons: First, there are some differences in the dietary structure to consider, depending on the type of diabetes. Second, a plethora of dietary information is available from many sources to the patient and healthcare provider. Nutritional science is constantly evolving, so that what may be considered true today may be outdated in the near future. Different types of diabetes require some specialized nutritional intervention; however, many of the basic dietary princ Continue reading >>

The Ratio Of Fats, Carbohydrates & Protein For Diabetics

The Ratio Of Fats, Carbohydrates & Protein For Diabetics

If you have been diagnosed with diabetes, then you understand the importance of eating a healthy diet. Diabetes is a condition where your body does not produce or use insulin correctly. Without proper insulin function your body is not able to regulate your blood sugar levels, leading to serious problems with your nerves, kidneys and heart. A proper diabetes diet is balanced and based on healthy foods. The diet uses portion control and scheduling to help manage glucose levels throughout the day. Video of the Day Generally speaking you should limit your daily fat intake to about 20 to 35 percent of your total calories, according to MedlinePlus. The three types of fats include saturated fat, trans fat and unsaturated fat. If you have diabetes avoid foods that contain a lot of saturated or trans fat. This includes meat and other animal products, as well as processed foods like margarine. It is recommended that you avoid trans fat all together and in order to do so, you will need to read the nutrition labels on food to find out which foods contain trans fat. Unsaturated fats are healthy forms of fat and you should include them in your diet. According to the Harvard School of Public Health, strict guidelines have not been published regarding the amount of unsaturated fat that you should eat, instead it recommends that a good rule of thumb is to choose unsaturated fats over saturated whenever possible. Good sources of healthy forms of fat include fish, nuts, vegetable oils, lean meats and beans. Protein is an essential nutrient for health. According to the Harvard School of Public Health, adults get about 15 percent of their calories from protein. It further states that the American Diabetes Association recommends limiting protein intake to around 10 percent of daily caloric i Continue reading >>

New Diabetes Nutrition Recommendations: Macronutrients And More

New Diabetes Nutrition Recommendations: Macronutrients And More

New Diabetes Nutrition Recommendations: Macronutrients and More Last week I touched upon some of the updated nutrition recommendations that were recently released by the American Diabetes Association. I appreciate all of the comments, and I can understand why guidelines can seem vague and, yes, occasionally frustrating. Its interesting to learn about different viewpoints regarding eating with diabetes, and doing so further affirms, at least for me, that guidelines are just that they serve as a basis or a guide from which to draw upon. But by no means are they a mandate or an ultimatum that tells people exactly what to eat. So, back to some of the highlights of these recommendations. Protein. Guess what? For people with diabetes who dont have kidney disease, theres no ideal amount of protein that helps to improve glycemic control or helps lower the risk for heart disease . Now, several studies have shown that higher protein intakes (28% to 40% of calories) have favorable effects on blood glucose and A1C levels. But different studies have shown otherwise. And some studies have shown improved LDL cholesterol and triglyceride levels with a higher protein intake. But again, other studies did not show improvement. When there isnt consistent evidence, its hard to recommend a specific amount. The good news is that people who have kidney disease dont need to follow a very-low-protein diet. Too little protein can lead to malnourishment and doesnt seem to affect the rate of progression of kidney disease. Fat. You might be surprised to hear that no ideal amount of fat exists for people with diabetes. However, the Institute of Medicine suggests a fat intake of between 20% and 35% of calories for the general population. Whats more important is the type of fat that you consume. Monou Continue reading >>

Treatment Of Diabetes: The Diabetic Diet

Treatment Of Diabetes: The Diabetic Diet

The mainstays of diabetes treatment are: Working towards obtaining ideal body weight Following a diabetic diet Regular exercise Diabetic medication if needed Note: Type 1 diabetes must be treated with insulin; if you have type 2 diabetes, you may not need to take insulin. This involves injecting insulin under the skin for it to work. Insulin cannot be taken as a pill because the digestive juices in the stomach would destroy the insulin before it could work. Scientists are looking for new ways to give insulin. But today, shots are the only method. There are, however, new methods to give the shots. Insulin pumps are now being widely used and many people are having great results. In this Article Working towards obtaining ideal body weight An estimate of ideal body weight can be calculated using this formula: For women: Start with 100 pounds for 5 feet tall. Add 5 pounds for every inch over 5 feet. If you are under 5 feet, subtract 5 pounds for each inch under 5 feet. This will give you your ideal weight. If you have a large frame, add 10%. If you have a small frame, subtract 10%. A good way to decide your frame size is to look at your wrist size compared to other women's. Example: A woman who is 5' 4" tall and has a large frame 100 pounds + 20 pounds (4 inches times 5 pounds per inch) = 120 pounds. Add 10% for large frame (in this case 10% of 120 pounds is 12 pounds). 120 pounds + 12 pounds = 132 pounds ideal body weight. For men: Start with 106 pounds for a height of 5 foot. Add 6 pounds for every inch above 5 foot. For a large frame, add 10%. For a small frame, subtract 10%. (See above for further details.) Learn More about Treating Type 2 Diabetes The Diabetic Diet Diet is very important in diabetes. There are differing philosophies on what is the best diet but below is Continue reading >>

7 Ways To Better Manage Diabetes With Myfitnesspal

7 Ways To Better Manage Diabetes With Myfitnesspal

7 Ways to Better Manage Diabetes with MyFitnessPal Managing diabetes can be complicated and maybe even overwhelming for some.In our last diabetes-related post we mentioned 25 important facts about the disease.This time lets talk about seven ways that you can better manage diabetes using MyFitnessPal. 1. Set your macronutrient goals. One great feature of MyFitnessPal is being able to customize your individual nutrientgoals. The American Diabetes Association recommends diabetics get around 45% of their calories from carbohydrate, which is slightly less than the MyFitnessPal guided goals that are automatically calculated when you sign up. Once you check in with a medical professional and determine what percentage of calories from carbohydrates you should be eating, check out this post to learn how to set your personal macronutrient goals. You can then use our Reports feature to see just how your daily intake aligns with your adjusted goals. 2. Track carbs at each meal. Those with diabetes are encouraged to take in aconsistent amount of carbs at each meal throughout the day to avoid spikes and falls in blood sugar. An easy way to track carbohydrate intake throughout the day is by looking at the distribution of carbs from foods logged at each meal. If youre trying to control your blood sugar, aim for 3 balanced meals and 2 small snacks that fall within the following carbohydrate ranges: Women:30-45 grams carbs per meal (3 times per day) Men: 45-60 grams of carbohydrate at each meal Now that you know roughly how many carbs you should be eating at each meal and snack, you need to start tracking them! If youre under at a particular meal, eat something small that can bump you up to your goal. If youre over, look at the distribution of carbs in the foods you just ate and eat les Continue reading >>

Basics Of The Diabetic Diet

Basics Of The Diabetic Diet

With so many confusing fad diets and advice, it is not always easy to figure out an eating plan that is safe, healthy, and effective. A basic diet designed for diabetics, or those at risk for diabetes, is a healthy plan that teaches good nutrition habits you can follow for life. This easy plan takes the guesswork out of figuring out what and how much to eat. Doctors at the Joslin Diabetes Center (the Joslin) recommend a basic diabetic diet for type 2 diabetics, as well as those who are at risk. Based on years of research on diabetes and nutrition, this is not a diet of deprivation because there is a long list of healthy foods you can choose from. Teaching the basic principles of healthy eating that apply to everyone Managing daily calories to meet weight and health goals Managing macro-nutrients to maintain blood sugar and other essential functions The basic diabetic diet balances the three important macro-nutrients to ensure adequate intake: Carbohydrates: The primary source of energy and blood sugar Proteins: Need adequate intake and exercise to maintain muscle mass Fats: Controlled to manage weight, blood cholesterol, and other disease risks This basic Joslin diabetic diet plan divides your total daily calories between the three nutrient groups as follows. Fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains, legumes (beans and peas), and non-fat milk Refined grains and sugar, white bread potato, pasta, cakes, candy, sweetened drinks, and alcohol Fish, skinless chicken or turkey, nonfat or low-fat dairy products, tofu and legumes (beans and peas) Nuts and seeds (Although healthy and protein-dense, they are loaded with calories from fats and carbs.) Mono and polyunsaturated fats, such as olive oil, canola oil, peanut, safflower, sesame seed oils, and fatty fish such as salmon a Continue reading >>

Macro Calculator

Macro Calculator

Each of the foods we eat are made up of three macros (macronutrients). These macros are carbohydrate (carbs), protein, and fat. Chicken is high in the protein macro, but has no carbs. Rice is high in carbs, but very little fat or protein. This calculator tells you the best ratio of macros that you should eat to achieve your goals. From there, you need to determine the macros of all the foods you eat. By counting them each day, you can reach a target that leads to fat loss. Macro counting is extremely successful , and can free you from the good food, bad food mindset. You dont need to make radical shifts in your diet, nor deprive yourself from your favorite foods. Just make sure you are within your macro counts for each day, and youre good to go! If you need help, we publish some extensive guides here . This macro calculator gives you the ability to adjust your macros at 4 different goal settings. Lose puts you in a 20% calorie deficit which promotes safe, steady weight loss. Lose 10% puts you in a 10% calorie deficit and is intended for those with less than 10 pounds to lose and who also wish to build muscle at the same time. Maintain allows you to eat at macro levels that will keep you at your current weight. Gain puts you in a 20% calorie surplus and is designed for people who are wanting to build muscle fast in conjunction with a comprehensive weight training program. It can also be used by people who are underweight. Protein ratio is set at .825 grams per pound of bodyweight. Fats are set at 25% of daily energy expenditure. Carbohydrate grams come from the remainder. Daily energy expenditure is calculated from your age, gender, height, weight, and exercise output. See the full guide to macro ratios here . The default (normal) formula is fine for most people. Howeve Continue reading >>

Nutrition In Type-2 Diabetes Prevention And Management

Nutrition In Type-2 Diabetes Prevention And Management

Nutrition in the Prevention and Management of Type-2 Diabetes (Always consult your physician before starting a new diet. This includes using the recommendations from our macro calculator .) In the epidemic of non-communicable diet and lifestyle disease, type-2 diabetes [diabetes] has emerged as a particular scourge: the leading cause of death under 60-years of age, and an annual cost of 263-billion dollars in North America in 2013 (1). The population-based research showing a significant rise in diabetes prevalence over the past 50-years mirrors environmental changes in nutrition habits, food availability, diet composition, and population activity levels (2). The clear environmental determinants of diabetes risk and prevalence in turn point to the potential for diet and lifestyle interventions to be effective in diabetes prevention or remission. The Relationship Between Bodyweight and Risk for Diabetes There is a clear association between Body Mass Index [BMI] and risk for diabetes, but the risk is not exclusively linear: BMI varies greatly at time of diagnosis, which indicates that the risk is associated with underlying metabolic complications, including insulin resistance and decreased pancreatic beta-cell [which secrete insulin] function (3). For example, in metabolically healthy subjects who had the same BMI at baseline, those who progressed to diagnosis 13-years later displayed higher fasting blood glucose [FPG], postprandial glucose tolerance [OGT], and decreased insulin sensitivity at baseline (4). While this demonstrates that the underlying metabolic dysfunction is a primary issue, the risk is not wholly inseparable from weight, and overweight [BMI 25.0 kg/m2] and obesity [BMI 30.0 kg/m2] increase risk of diabetes by 3-fold and 7-fold, respectively (5). In paral Continue reading >>

More in diabetes