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Lyme, Insulin Resistance

Betterhealthguy.com - A Site Dedicated To Lyme Disease And Mold Illness

Betterhealthguy.com - A Site Dedicated To Lyme Disease And Mold Illness

BetterHealthGuy.com - A Site Dedicated to Lyme Disease and Mold Illness Dr. Dietrich Klinghardt MD, PhD and the Klinghardt Academy hosted "A Deep Look Beyond Lyme" May 6-8, 2011 in Redmond, WA. As has always been the case, this event was simply superb and enlightening. Dr. Klinghardt was joined by speakers such as Dr. Simon Yu MD, Dr. Stephen Fry MD, Tami Duncan, and others. I learned a great deal from this exciting weekend and will attempt to share some portions of it with you here. The notes below were largely those I captured during the event, but they do not begin to cover all of the points made or even all of the speakers that presented at this event. I highly recommend the DVDs and binders from this conference if you would like to learn more. Note: As this information may be updated as any errors are found, I kindly request that you link to this single source of information rather than copying the content below. If any updates or corrections are made, this will help to ensure that anyone reading this is getting the most current and accurate information. Dr. Dietrich Klinghardt - What Makes Us Sick? What Helps Us Heal? It is rarely, or never, the microbe that makes us sick. It is the immune response to the microbe that creates the majority of symptoms. Transplant patients often live longer as their immune-system is suppressed in order to avoid organ rejection. The immune reaction is blunted which keeps the body in a calm state.Treatment focus should be on immune modulation. Classical homeopathy rarely works anymore. Amalgam and root canal removal is still beneficial. Cavitation surgery can still be big but is no longer a miracle. Simple things that worked 30 years ago no longer work well. Parasite treatment is still a big benefit. Treating Lyme, balancing the bite Continue reading >>

Stress: Cortisol And Insulin Resistance

Stress: Cortisol And Insulin Resistance

Stress and busy lifestyles are an integral part of our culture that few escape. Your body reacts regardless of whether stress is consciously acknowledged, and it may be impacting you more than you realize. For instance, there may be a concern regarding your thyroid, blood sugar, or cholesterol levels. Maybe you just attribute low energy, excess weight and fading memory to old age. These are all early signs of chronic illnesses, yet has anyone considered stress, cortisol and insulin resistance? It’s understood that a good diet and regular exercise are important ingredients for good health. However, stress management is also an essential component of the good health equation. Stress impacts blood sugar regulation in a way that often leads to insulin resistance which is a precursor to diabetes and a myriad of chronic conditions i.e. cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer’s, hypothyroidism, obesity and cancer. This is why researchers are particularly focused on the impact stress has on weight and insulin resistance in addition to nutrition and physical activity. Understanding how stress and the subsequent release of hormones contribute to disease progression is a big step towards prevention. Cortisol and the “Fight or Flight” Stress Response Cortisol is one of the hormones released from the adrenal glands in response to any type of psychological, environmental or physical trigger (i.e. infection). Many people associate cortisol with the “fight or flight” mechanism. Cortisol is also part of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) –axis that impacts sex hormones and thyroid function. Research has demonstrated that it isn’t necessarily the stress that is significant but rather how it is “perceived” that is important. When cortisol is released in response to a s Continue reading >>

Lyme Disease In The Insulin Resistant Horse

Lyme Disease In The Insulin Resistant Horse

Lyme Disease in the Insulin Resistant Horse A. Several studies in human and animal medicine show that bacterial components can trigger Insulin Resistance temporarily in normal individuals. Most horses exposed to Lyme/showing disease/being treated do not get Laminitis because most are not already Insulin Resistant before infection. Normal (non Insulin Resistant) horses get an Insulin surge from bacteria but the level is not enough to trigger Laminitis. B. Another reason horses being treated for Lyme usually avoid Laminitis is due to Tetracycline antibiotics (Doxycycline tabs, Minocycline Powder, Oxytetracycline IV) have an anti-inflammatory effect on top of their antibiotic effect. This two-for-one bonus helps avoid problems. C. The Big Problem: Horses with already-in-place Insulin Resistance being exposed to the Lyme bacteria causing a horse with already high Insulin to go sky high and trigger Laminitis. The double teaming of bacteria and the Insulin surge take a horse already on the edge and push them off the cliff. D. If you have an Insulin Resistance horse or a probable one (body type, Laminitis history), it is a good idea to test the Insulin level if diagnosed with Lyme. Continue reading >>

Causes Of And Solutions For Blood Sugar Imbalance In Lyme Disease

Causes Of And Solutions For Blood Sugar Imbalance In Lyme Disease

Other reasons for low blood sugar in those with Lyme disease include: 1) Low levels of Vitamin B6. This vitamin is strongly involved in gluconeogenesis, or the creation of glucose from proteins. While many people with Lyme disease have vitamin deficiencies, these are exacerbated by long-term use of antibiotics. These drugs are especially good at depleting the body of B-vitamins, so ensuring an adequate intake of nutrients is important while taking certain antibiotic medications. 2) Not having enough intracellular magnesium in the cells. Insulin, the hormone that unlocks the cell door so that it can receive glucose, works more effectively when the cells have sufficient magnesium. Taking magnesium glycinate or another readily absorbable form of magnesium may help to balance blood sugar levels, as the cells are made more sensitive to insulin, and therefore, to receiving the sugar they need. But avoid taking too much calcium, as this can exacerbate the problem. 3) Having kidneys that are stressed by disease or too many medications. The kidneys release hormones that are also involved in blood sugar regulation, so taking care of the kidneys, by drinking lots of water, and taking herbal teas or homeopathic remedies to keep them functioning well while on antibiotics may have a beneficial impact upon blood sugar levels. 4) pH imbalances. When the body is too acidic or too alkaline, blood sugar levels are negatively impacted. Taking steps to restore pH levels to normal, by making smart dietary choices, may also be helpful. 5) Taking Mepron or certain types of anti-depressants. Mepron causes "abnormally low blood sugar" in 11% of those who take it (My experience has been that drug companies tend to underestimate the percentage of people who experience side effects from medication Continue reading >>

Treating Insulin Resistance In Chronic Illness

Treating Insulin Resistance In Chronic Illness

Most Lyme disease sufferers know that avoiding the ingestion of sugar is important for recovery, because sugar causes inflammation in the body and tends to feed borrelia, candida and other critters. Table sugar (sucrose) is especially harmful, as it also suppresses the production of lymphocytes and other immune cells, and you need those immune cells to fight the bugs! But there is another reason why you should avoid sugar in Lyme disease, that is no less important than any of those mentioned above. Most people with Lyme disease suffer from HPA-dysfunction, which causes disturbances in the production of cortisol and other hormones. Cortisol, a hormone produced by the adrenal glands, is involved in blood-sugar regulation, along with insulin and other hormones such as glucagon. When adrenal hormone production goes askew, so does blood-sugar regulation. This can put the Lyme disease sufferer at risk for insulin resistance and/or diabetes. It's like this. Cells need glucose (obtained from food) in order to function properly, and insulin is the hormone that brings glucose into the cells. The function of cortisol, in a broad sense, is the opposite to that of insulin. It inhibits glucose transport into cells in order to prevent too much glucose from flooding the cells, and it also stimulates the release of glucose from cells so that it can be utilized by the body for energy. In addition to cortisol, the adrenals produce norepinephrine, another hormone that is involved in blood-sugar regulation. Norepinephrine aids in the release of glycogen from the liver. Glycogen is used by the body for energy whenever glucose levels in the blood get too low. In adrenal fatigue (and Lyme disease), when cortisol and blood sugar levels are low, the body often reverts to releasing norepinenephri Continue reading >>

Why Bartonella Is The New Lyme Disease

Why Bartonella Is The New Lyme Disease

I was recently interviewed on Lyme Talk Radio about Bartonella. In case you missed it, here is a transcript of our discussion on why Bartonella is the new Lyme Disease. Q: Our research is now indicating that Lyme disease is deadly. Even when people may suspect they have Lyme symptoms, they will not get anything further than the typical CDC test. What is happening? Dr. Dempsey: There is a fear factor and people dont want to know. They have seen family members and friends suffer and for them to get the diagnosis, they think it is a death sentence. The second reason is from the medical world. The thought is if they test the patient for Lyme disease and it is CDC negative thats the end of the workup. The problem is that even if patients are lucky enough that their doctor is thinking about Lyme and they are willing to get tested, if the Lyme is negative, the hunt stops there. The medical world is not thinking about the other vector born infections that are coming from ticks or other insects. They need to think about the other diseases. Dr. Dempsey: The common co-infections that we think about are Anaplasma, Babesia, and Bartonella. Those are the common ones that Lyme disease doctors are treating, but they arent really co-infections, in my opinion. Each of them cause significant illness all on their own. I have patients that do not have Lyme disease, for example, but they still test positive for those other infections. Q: Can you tell me about Lyme disease and the tick born infections that are now associated with it? Dr. Dempsey: These infections, particularly Bartonella, can affect every organ in the body. You are going to see symptoms that overlap so many other diseases that people are being diagnosed with and thats why it is confusing. These patients are chronically ill, Continue reading >>

Dr Klinghardts Treatment Of Lyme Disease

Dr Klinghardts Treatment Of Lyme Disease

Dr. Klinghardt's Treatment of Lyme Disease Read about Dr. Dietrich Klinghardts Lyme disease treatment protocol in this excerpted writing. Lyme disease was first recognized in the United States in 1975, after a mysterious outbreak of arthritis near Lyme, Connecticut. It wasn't until 1982 that the spirochete that causes Lyme was identified. It was subsequently named Borrelia burgdorferi (Bb), in honor of pioneer researcher Willy Burgdorfer, Ph.D. Lyme disease has an elusive nature -- studies show that less than a week after being infected, the Lyme spirochete can be deeply embedded inside your tendons, muscle, heart, and brain. It invades tissue, replicates, and then destroys its host cell as it emerges. Traditionally, the signs and symptoms of this disease include a skin rash, fever, and headache, but there are numerous other symptoms not traditionally considered signs of Lyme disease -- everything from sciatica to chronic TMJ problems, adrenal fatigue, GERD, and other seemingly unrelated symptoms. Drugs are problematic in this case, and there are gentler, safer, non-toxic alternatives you can explore. Excerpted From the Writings of Dietrich Klinghardt, MD, Ph.D., edited by Eve Greenberg, LPC, CN, Explore Staff Reporter and Director of the Klinghardt Academy of Neurobiology In the last decade, the majority of outcome-oriented physicians observed a major shift: we realized that it was neither the lack of vitamins or growth hormone that made our patients ill. We discovered that toxicity and chronic infections were most often at the core of the client's suffering. We watched the discussion, which infection may be the primary one: mycoplasma, stealth viruses, HHV-6, trichomonas, Chlamydia pneumoniae, leptospirosis, mutated strep, or what else? The new kid on the block is Bo Continue reading >>

Just How Reliable Are Lyme Disease Lab Tests?

Just How Reliable Are Lyme Disease Lab Tests?

An Introduction to Lab Testing Labs are important, but it’s also important not to get too hung up on the results. The problem of chronic Lyme disease, something I know from personal experience, cannot be solved exclusively by looking at lab results. In fact, becoming overly obsessed with lab results can hinder the recovery process. The human body is an immensely complex biological machine with millions of different biochemical functions happening simultaneously. Lab tests provide an ever so small glimpse at certain key functions. From those indicators, determinations can be made about how well the body is functioning and whether illness is present. Laboratory assessment, however, is far from absolute. Because the human body is so complex, the ability of lab testing to predict a specific chronic illness is often limited. All labs are subject to variability and different interpretations. There are literally thousands of different lab tests that can be performed, but only a fraction of them are well understood. Many should be left for research purposes only. Problems arise when doctors order obscure tests that are still poorly understood. Before you have labs drawn, ask your doctor to explain the purpose of each test. The information provided by labs is only valuable if it is put to good use. Millions of dollars are wasted every year on labs, with the resulting information never used. Before you have labs drawn, ask yourself and your doctor: “Will the information from this lab (or any other diagnostic test) influence my approach to getting well?” If the answer is no, then you may want to reconsider having that particular test performed. For chronic illnesses like chronic Lyme disease and fibromyalgia, general lab evaluations are usually unremarkable. The greatest val Continue reading >>

Lymenet Flash: Insulin Resistance - Weight Gain And Lyme Disease

Lymenet Flash: Insulin Resistance - Weight Gain And Lyme Disease

One of the most irritating things about Lyme disease for me is the weight gain. I was fit as a fiddle until I became ill with Lyme disease. Gradually over the years I gained 50lbs. Finally when I topped the scales at 200 lbs 3 weeks ago - I am 5'10 - and 200 pounds was just too much - I decided to really investigate why I couldn't lose weight. I think it has to do with Syndrome X - insulin resistance. Evidently infections can trigger it and Lyme disease is obviously one of the those infections. I started a low-glycemic diet and began walking (25 minutes a day) plus going to the gym 2 to 3 times a week about 20 days ago. Before when I had gone to the gym I could NOT budge the weight. This time I have lost 10 lbs in 3 weeks. Obviously some of it is water retention but the water retention was also driving me crazy. What low-glycemic means in a nutshell is no foods that are high on the glycemic index such as potatos, rice, bread, sugar, pretzels etc. There is a heavy emphasis on healthy proteins, complex carbohydrates and well balanced meals. If you do need to have a sweet have it after a meal of a fillet of salmon and some steamed broccoli for example. I have gout, sigh, so I have to be very careful with protein, so most of my meals are now vegetable and fruit based - no starchy veggies though. You can have dairy - I just can't because I am allergic to dairy. It is a challenging diet but it is worth it. I feel better not only psychologically but also physically. I also realize to keep the weight off that I will likely have to eat this way for the rest of my life or until I lick Lyme disease. Continue reading >>

The Link Between Lyme Disease And Cancer

The Link Between Lyme Disease And Cancer

Note; This article was originally published on ProHealth.com. One of the unfortunate realities of Lyme disease is that it can lead to other chronic health conditions. For instance, some researchers and Lyme-literate doctors believe that people with Lyme are at an increased risk for cancer. As it is, one in two men and one and three women in the United States will get cancer at some point during their lifetime, due to the plethora of toxins in the environment, which are responsible for over 75% of all cancers, according to American Medical Research LLC (AMR), a widely regarded medical research company. [i] People with Lyme disease may be at an even greater risk, because Lyme disease damages cells, causes inflammation, influences hormone levels and creates increased levels of toxicity in the body, among other biochemical problems. These issues can lead to DNA and mitochondrial damage that are associated with cancer. In addition to my work as a Lyme disease researcher, I have helped to write two cancer books involving 15 integrative doctors, and have interviewed over 50 integrative cancer doctors for a podcast series that I host for the Alternative Cancer Research Institute . My work with many doctors has taught me that in todays toxic world, everybody is susceptible to cancer, but perhaps especially those of us who are already battling chronic disease, so it makes good sense to take steps to prevent it. The good news is that it can often be prevented. Many integrative oncologists, such as Robert Eslinger, DO, in my book, Defeat Cancer: 15 Doctors of Integrative and Naturopathic Medicine Tell You How contend that the following three conditions in the body can increase cancer risk. Dr. Eslinger calls them the three Is. [ii] They are: Inflammation, Infections and Insulin (o Continue reading >>

Metabolism For Lyme: How Metabolism Affects Your Health

Metabolism For Lyme: How Metabolism Affects Your Health

Metabolism for Lyme: How Metabolism Affects Your Health Metabolism for Lyme: How Metabolism Affects Your Health Today, lets talk about why metabolism is important for Lymies. Metabolism is what helps your body turn food, water, air, vitamins, and minerals into energy. Your metabolic rate is the rate that you produce energy in your cells. High metabolisms manifest in many ways, such as a moderate to high pulse rate, an abundance of fidgety energy, or a high body temperature. Think toddlers on sugar. Your metabolic rate is greatly affected by Chronic Lyme Disease (CLD). Increasing your metabolism lowers cortisol, and the inverseis also true. CLD is a chronic stressor, and chronically elevated cortisol affects leptin (important tothyroid function). Do you have a low body temperature? Is sleep unsatisfying? Tired? Constipated? No sex drive? Pee a lot? You may have the metabolism of an 80 year old, as I did. It kind of goes hand in hand with chronic infections. A low metabolic rate CLD or not correlates with just about every illness. In Matt Stones words metabolism works like this: When metabolism falls, your sex hormone production falls (infertility, loss of sex drive, loss of period, erectile dysfunction, PMS). When metabolism falls, your youth hormone (growth hormone) falls, and you lose your ability to build muscle tissue, perform athletically, and you lose muscle tissue. When metabolism falls your rate of fat burning decreases and your body starts to manufacture more fat out of the food you eat. This causes a rise in triglycerides in your blood leading to insulin resistance (the precursor to metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes), increased appetite, increased storage of the food you eat into fat cells, and so forth. When metabolism falls you produce more estrogen (bo Continue reading >>

How These Treatments Help People With Lyme Disease To Drop The Weight They Cant Lose

How These Treatments Help People With Lyme Disease To Drop The Weight They Cant Lose

How These Treatments Help People with Lyme Disease to Drop the Weight They Cant Lose For people who cannot control their Lyme disease weight loss or gain On a hot summer day, I was driving a hybrid car on the Massachusetts Turnpike when it overheated. The computer display on the dashboard turned white and the engine shut off. Fortunately, I was able to coast to the shoulder. Every time I tried restarting the car, I got the white screen which showed that the computer was too hot. After a few hours of waiting for roadside assistance, the computer cooled down enough and I was able to drive to my next destination. How is an overheated car computer similar to a Lyme disease patient that cant lose excess weight? Similar to how a computer controls your car, the body has a system for regulating weight The body uses chemical signals that tell it to use calories or to store them. If the signals indicate to store the calories, people accumulate more fat stores which results in weight gain. One of the signaling chemicals in your system is a hormone called leptin. Leptin plays a key role in regulating energy intake and expenditure, including appetite and hunger, metabolism, and behavior. Unfortunately, toxins from Lyme disease and co-infections can throw these signals out of whack. Biotoxins from Lyme disease, Babesia, and mold can block how leptin regulates weight1 According to the Biotoxin Pathway, biotoxins from Lyme disease, babesia, and mold stimulate cells to produce inflammatory cytokines. These cytokines bind to the leptin receptor in the hypothalamus. This blockage disrupts how leptin is able to regulate weight. Patients with elevated toxins often have difficultly losing weight. However, there are a subset of patients that have the opposite problem of not being able to gai Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance With Lyme & Co?

Insulin Resistance With Lyme & Co?

Do any of you know facts or have experienced insulin resistance issues due to tick borne illness? I listened to a lecture by Dr. Klinghart and it was the first time I had heard of this issue. I have a friend who has 5 autoimmune issues and has been bitten multiple times and has had Rocky Mountain Spotted fever. Any information will be appreciated VIP Member | 12 years on site | 45889 posts in future, this subject would be better in MEDICINE/TREATMENT FORUM. support is for moral support, a shoulder to cry on or vent ok I had borderline high blood sugar/pre-diabetes which I believe is from Lyme or a co-infection. I have no risk factors for diabetes due to diet, weight, family history etc. When I first started feeling sick, I checked my blood sugar just to make sure it was normal. I had fasting readings which were well over 120 and after eating I had readings of 180 to 265. The BG levels would not respond to changes in diet, exercise etc. The only thing that lowered them was being on antibiotics which I didn't connect until later on. When I was on antibiotics, the numbers went down automatically to 60 fasting, 80's after meals. My A1C has been normal. I don't have much info on it. My LLMD thinks it will return to normal when Lyme and co-infections are controlled. Continue reading >>

Beyond The Wall Of Lyme Diagnosis

Beyond The Wall Of Lyme Diagnosis

It was years before the 38-year-old mother from New Hampshire realized she was infected with the very spirochete she dealt with every day. Andrea Caesar worked in a naturopaths office that commonly dealt with Lyme disease, but it was only when symptoms she had dealt with became debilitating that she realized she couldnt keep silencing her pain. Andrea Caesar was not diagnosed with Lyme disease, an infection caused by a tick-borne bacteria called Borrelia burgdorferi, until 2012. It had been a long journey since her symptoms began in 1986, as a young girl. She had been suffering with arthritis, chronic fatigue and a variety of mood issues she called Lyme rage. Sometimes, it feels like its mono, Caesar said, but the symptoms also came in the form of migraines and even seizures. She kept her sanity by chronicling her story via blog, now a book, A Twist of Lyme . Andrea Caesar kept track of her journey of diagnosis and treatment and shared her highs and lows with her blog readers. (Photo: twistoflymebook.com) A coast away, Jenny Bilodeau, a flight attendant in Los Angeles, suffered a similar fate. She spent more than six months in 2012 completely drained and shuttled from doctor to doctor before she was diagnosed with Lyme. I didnt fit into the box of this or that illness with my symptoms, she said. Today, the problem of diagnosing Lyme can be summed up in a phrase: we caught it too early, or we caught it too late. Because of the complexity of diagnosing Lyme disease, many people like Caesar and Bilodeau suffer infections for months or years before being diagnosed, and progress to late-stage Lyme symptoms, including debilitating fatigue and neurological symptoms. Often times, they are not fully cured even after a two- to four-week dose of antibiotics. And their stories rin Continue reading >>

Metabolic Syndrome: What Is It, And What Can You Do About It?

Metabolic Syndrome: What Is It, And What Can You Do About It?

Blood pressure greater than or equal to 130/85 Fasting glucose greater than or equal to 100 mg/dL Epigenetics is now considered an important mechanism in the evolution of metabolic syndrome. One theory among many regarding the possible genetics behind insulin resistance was The Thrifty Gene proposed by geneticist James Neel in 1962. Thrifty genes are genes which enable individuals to efficiently collect and process food to deposit fat during periods of food abundance. Those carrying the thrifty gene survived when food was scarce. The Thrifty Gene historically was advantageous in times of famine, but has become detrimental in the modern world. The exact epigenetic explanation of insulin resistance is unclear, but what is clear is that genetics play a key role. Research shows that those with a genetic predisposition have a slowed metabolic rate. The mitochondria in people with metabolic syndrome produces up to 70% less ATP, or energy, than controls. Ethnic groups where metabolic syndrome runs rampant are; African Americans (50%), Pima Indians (nearly 100%), Polynesians, and Mexican Americans (50%) To better understand metabolic syndrome, one must understand the basics of glucose metabolism. When food is eaten, carbohydrates are broken down to the end product of glucose. This stimulates the release of insulin which the body needs to absorb glucose into fat, heart, liver and muscle cells. Over time, if insulin is secreted in high amounts due to high carbohydrate intake, the cells begin to ignore the insulin messenger. When that signal is ignored, the bodys insulin producersbeta cells of the pancreashave to work harder and harder, overproducing insulin to get the job done, causing insulin resistance. In addition, insulin promotes the conversion of glucose to fat for storage Continue reading >>

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