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Lyme Disease And High Glucose

Touched By Lyme: When It's Time To Look Beyond Lyme Disease

Touched By Lyme: When It's Time To Look Beyond Lyme Disease

TOUCHED BY LYME: When it's time to look beyond Lyme disease (book review) Beyond Lyme disease: Healing the underlying cause of chronic illness in people with Borreliosis and co-infections. Author Connie Strasheim has written five books about Lyme disease and other chronic illnesses. Shes come to believe there are two groups of people with Lyme disease: 1. Those whose main health problems are caused by Lyme and other tick-borne infections 2. Those who have a whole lot of complicated health problems, of which Lyme and coinfections are only a small part. She wrote her most recent book, Beyond Lyme Disease, for the second group. She maintains that other conditionsnot Lyme alonemay actually be the primary cause of their woes. Chapter One is devoted to adrenal insufficiency, which can be both a cause and an effect of chronic illness. The adrenal glands are involved in immune function and the bodys stress response. They regulate blood sugar levels, blood pressure and inflammation, among other things. Problems with the adrenals can lead to hypothyroidism. Alas, treating hypothyroidism without addressing its underlying cause can make the situation worse. Strasheim asserts that properly addressing adrenal fatigue and related hyperthyroidism may be central to a patients ability to recover. Next, she looks at nutrient deficiencies and other food-related issues. The nutritional content of food in the United States has changed vastly in the last 60 years. A case in point: in 1951, three spears of broccoli contained 130 mgs of calcium and 3500 IU of Vitamin A. By 1999, the nutritional content of an equal serving of broccoli had fallen to 48.3 mgs of calcium and 1542 IU of Vitamin A. Today, those numbers would be even lower. This is just one example of how hard it can be for people to Continue reading >>

"lyme Disease And Blood Sugar": Diabetes Community - Support Group

Flutetooter, I have photography and hiking friends that "always" make light of the fact I "worry" about ticks. I just spray my pant legs and jacket if I'm in a high tick area. I have friends check me over. I know someone who got very sick from a tick bite, so I'm extra careful. Thanks for sharing your story. It makes me know that I'm doing the right thing for myself. Laurie Anderson, MSN, RNP, CDOE responded: Hi, glad you found the answer! This doesn't surpise me a bit, because of the stress physiologically on your body. Any infection will do this, and this is especially true if you have a fever, which is typical of the tick illnesses. These include Lyme, Babesisia, and Anaplasma (Erlichia). You are absolutely right on to watch for ticks after any outdoor activities! Take care, Laurie DoloresClaesson replied to Laurie Anderson, MSN, RNP, CDOE 's response: 'Lymies...I would get all these tests...Western Blot for Borrelia, also test for Borrelia hermsii, and Babesia duncani and microti and Quest can test for duncani, Bartonella henselae and quintana, Brucella, Tularemia, Coxiella burnetti or Q fever, many rickettsias ie Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, Typhus, Ehrlichia, Anaplasma phagocytophilum, EBV, CMV, all Coxsackie viruses, and now Powassan virus and its cousin Deer Tick Virus, HSV 1 and 2, HHV 1-8 if available. Parvovirus B -19 papillomaviruses, Toxoplasmosis, Chlamydias and Mycoplasmas and get genetic tests for hypercoagulation like Mthfr and Factor V leiden, and test all your IgG subclasses 1-4, and CD 57 and C3a and C4a and CBS mutations and HPU/KPU and mold testing since so many of us have issues with mold. ECP or eoisonophil cationic protein seems to suggest to docs that you have babesia. Also transfer growth factor b-1 and Beta Strep. High CD 57 counts may be a Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar Reading?

High Blood Sugar Reading?

HealthBoards > Infectious Diseases > Lyme Disease > High blood sugar reading? i was wondering if anyone has experienced high sugar levels with lyme disease. i would greatly appreciate any and all responses to this posting! Last edited by lumpy740; 03-15-2009 at 07:32 AM. Reason: want to add to title My daughter has experienced high readings for months steadily. And when I say high, I mean 500's plus. Her endo could not figure it out and would send her to numerous docs. I was pretty sure she had lyme or something since it all started out of no where. Before all of this she had perfect glucose control. I found her a doc and he immediately tested her for bartonella and she has two strains. Since being on meds she is doing SO MUCH BETTER She was put on zithro a month and a half ago and went into DKA two days later from the herx. Then she continued to stay high again. Several weeks ago she was put on Biaxim and one week later she had a herx and ended up in ICU. Since then she has only been high once (311), other than that she is getting her control back. She had ran very low for several weeks straight. Her doc took her off insulin pump and put her back on regular injections and now she is down to around 25 units a day and that is long lasting and covering meals. She was using over a 100 a day before due to the infection. Her doc said that was enough for a 300 lb man. You can read some of my postings for more detail. Continue reading >>

10 Surprising Things That Can Spike Your Blood Sugar

10 Surprising Things That Can Spike Your Blood Sugar

When you first found out you had diabetes, you tested your blood sugar often to understand how food, activity, stress, and illness could affect your blood sugar levels. By now, you’ve got it figured out for the most part. But then—bam! Something makes your blood sugar zoom up. You try to adjust it with food or activity or insulin, and it dips really low. You’re on a rollercoaster no one with diabetes wants to ride. Knowledge is power! Look out for these surprising triggers that can send your blood sugar soaring: Sunburn—the pain causes stress, and stress increases blood sugar levels. Artificial sweeteners—more research needs to be done, but some studies show they can raise blood sugar. Coffee—even without sweetener. Some people’s blood sugar is extra-sensitive to caffeine. Losing sleep—even just one night of too little sleep can make your body use insulin less efficiently. Skipping breakfast—going without that morning meal can increase blood sugar after both lunch and dinner. Time of day—blood sugar can be harder to control the later it gets. Dawn phenomenon—people have a surge in hormones early in the morning whether they have diabetes or not. For people with diabetes, blood sugar can spike. Dehydration—less water in your body means a higher blood sugar concentration. Nose spray—some have chemicals that trigger your liver to make more blood sugar. Gum disease—it’s both a complication of diabetes and a blood sugar spiker. Watch out for other triggers that can make your blood sugar fall. For example, extreme heat can cause blood vessels to dilate, which makes insulin absorb more quickly and could lead to low blood sugar. If an activity or food or situation is new, be sure to check your blood sugar levels before and after to see how you respo Continue reading >>

Diabetes Update: A Lesson From People With Lyme Disease

Diabetes Update: A Lesson From People With Lyme Disease

There was an interesting story in the news last week about how people with Lyme Disease organized and brought so much legal pressure on the Infections Disease Society--the organization that provides treatment guidelines for infectious disease--that the IDS was forced to agree to reconsider the recommendations it puts out for the diagnosis and treatment of Lyme Disease. You can read about it here: Doctors to Reassess Antibiotics for 'Chronic Lyme Disease' . The background on this story is that the doctors who make up the IDS have continued to deny that there is such a thing as Chronic Lyme Disease or that it should be treated with aggressive antibiotic campaigns despite the experience of many sufferers from Lyme Disease who have developed long term disease syndromes that responded dramatically to the antibiotic treatment. Because the official treatment guidelines claim that chronic Lyme Disease does not exist and discourage antibiotic treatment for it, people with Lyme Disease cannot get insurance coverage for their treatments, to say nothing of being unable to get their doctors to prescribe the drugs that other people with Lyme Disease have found so helpful. Does this remind you of anything we people with diabetes go through? Like, perhaps, the way that the American Diabetes Association--a wholly owned subsidiary of Big Pharma and the large junk food companies--has taken to itself the role of defining not only the diagnostic criteria for diabetes but also the blood sugar targets doctors are told to recommend as well as what the drugs and dietary approaches those doctors should prescribe? The ADA's criteria and treatment recommendations hurt every single person with diabetes, but because they are the official treatment standards, no doctor can be sued for following them Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Lyme Disease.

Diabetes And Lyme Disease.

Can Lyme disease raise blood sugar? since the rash my blood sugar has been very high and seems to coincide with the tick bite. I was just diagnosed with Lyme today (the bulls eye rash started 2 weeks ago) and am also looking for an answer to your question. Since the rash my blood sugar levels have been higher then normal. Has any other diabetics out there noticed the same problem. Also how does bs react with the antibiotic? Hope we hear from someone. I can't answer your question but I hope someone here can. If not keep asking your Dr. Is he lyme literate? Denise, Thanks for the welcome. I'm not sure how much he knows about lyme disease but as soon as he saw the bullseye rash he jumped right on it. He put me on a 30 day course of doxycycline 100 mg. Sent blood work (and advised me that it might be negative for lyme which I already knew). I don't have the results yet. He will call today. I haven't had any symptoms (well the rash) except for a vague feeling that something was wrong. More tired, irritable, unenthusiastic. Might have nothing to do with lyme but I was interested in rags post about higher blood surgar levels because I have been experiencing the same. I hope to hear from someone who knows. Thanks again. Donna I'm sorry I can't contribute to this conversation either. In all of my readings, I have never seen anything about lyme causing increased blood sugars. Who knows? I hope someone will come along and help you. Keep researching and reading and if I run across anything , I will remember you. I know I am responding 6 months later but thought I would throw in my 2 cents on Lyme and raising blood sugars in diabetics.... Its does. I was diagnosed this past April with Lyme, Bartonella and Babesia and Ive been a Type 1 diabetic for 24 years. Before I was diagnosed m Continue reading >>

Five Things You Need To Know About Lyme Disease

Five Things You Need To Know About Lyme Disease

We're sorry, an error occurred. We are unable to collect your feedback at this time. However, your feedback is important to us. Please try again later. I know, I know, this is a diabetes blog. But those of you who follow me regularly are probably aware that a new chronic illness has entered our lives Lyme disease. My husband was diagnosed shortly after we returned from Germany last summer, and it's turning out to be a much more formidable opponent than we originally thought. 1. The disease is named after the village of Lyme, Connecticut, where a bunch unusual arthritis cases were reported in 1975. The cause of the disease was not known until 1982 (!), when a researcher named Willy Burgdorfer identified that it was carried by ticks and involved at least three species of bacteria. 2. So it's a pretty "young" disease in the medical world, and also a very nebulous one. To this day it appears to be chronically ignored and misdiagnosed (four doctors told my husband he didn't have it, until we found a specialist who confirmed that we had a "classic case" on our hands). 3. Even with lots and lots of antibiotics (believe me, there are many and you need to take them for months on end), the challenge is to kill off the various co-infections that are also carried by ticks and very often infect people who get Lyme. Our doctor tells us that these other bacterial and parasitic {insert gagging noise} infections "serve to protect the Lyme, making it harder to kill off the core infection." 4. Untreated, at least a first, it makes you feel like you have a horrible ongoing case of jet lag like it's always 3am and you just can't "get your head together" for days on end. Or at least that's how my husband described it. Even weeks after starting the meds, he had trouble concentrating, and sle Continue reading >>

Lyme, Weight, And Blood Glucose

Lyme, Weight, And Blood Glucose

Hi folks! So for my entire life, I've been stick thin, and spent many of my early years very sick. Fortunately I seemed to get reasonably healthy in my late teens and 20's, other than some arthritis that spontaneously traveled from joint to joint (which I was unaware is a symptom of chronic Lyme, and I had enough tick bites as a child). My temperature has always been low (96's and 97's), but it didn't stop me from feeling like a furnace. I also had a bout of thyroiditis in my mid-teens, but thyroid function fully returned. Also had Shingles when I was 12. From 16 or so on, other than a few sinus infections, I've been healthy. So starting last year I started feeling chilled during times I had never been cold before, and my weight was dropping without a change in diet. I've been around 150 lbs. for the last decade at 5'10", but my weight dropped under 140. I actually tried a bit of Peating, using more milk, oj, and coconut oil just to get more calories. I developed a wonderful case of SIBO that took me some 6 months to work my way out of. I visited the doctor, blood tests were normal (cholesterol was 202 or something, slightly high), he said I was fine. Around three months ago I started daily gentle walks, sometimes I'd hike for an hour on some nice trails I'd found, or go for a bike ride. Nothing too strenuous. The gassy SIBO feelings had gone, but I was 135 lbs. and still concerned. Then last Monday I started feeling like I had the flu. By Thursday I had a very visible Erythema Migrans rash (looks like a bullseye) that is the calling card of Lyme. I've been on Doxyclycline since then, a two week course. My weight's down to about 131 now and my energy is non-existent. I really need calories to fight this, but I don't know where to get them. My blood sugar has been givin Continue reading >>

I'm Relatively Fit And Active, Got Lyme And Now Pre-diabetes.

I'm Relatively Fit And Active, Got Lyme And Now Pre-diabetes.

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I'm relatively fit and active, got Lyme and now pre-diabetes. Hi, I've been very low on energy for many years and have always forced myself to remain as fit and active as possible. 2 years ago I was barely able to function as a living/working person and was diagnosed with Lyme Disease. I've been on intensive treatment for the last couple of years and many of my Lyme symptoms have improved (but not all). I had a blood screen last week for my fatigue, which at the time was so severe I could barely stand up, talk (I really struggled with my work as a teacher). I was told that I have pre-diabetes and that I had to eat less sugar and exercise more. In was very surprised to hear this because I eat virtually no sugar anyway (It brings out my Lyme), I virtually never eat anything with white flour, white rice or white pasta, and in fact, minimise my intake of brown rice, pasta and bread. I eat a reasonable amount of fruit, but not lots, I cut down on this as a known source of sugar when I started fighting the Lyme. I am reasonably fit, 5'11" and 76kg and exercise as much as I can, probably more than average for my age despite my illness. I drink virtually nothing, a little drink once a month or so. This makes me think... many symptoms of Lyme and diabetes overlap, many of my symptoms of Lyme have virtually gone, such as the painful joints, nerve pain, terrible headaches etc, but I still feel very run-down and sometimes quite miserable. As I've been diagnosed with pre-diabetes WHILST already severely restricting sugar and unhealthy lifestyle, how bad would it be if I were eating sugar, sat around and drinking? Is it possible that I have full diabetes, but it on Continue reading >>

Does Lyme Affect Your Blood Sugar? Could It Cause It To Be High

Does Lyme Affect Your Blood Sugar? Could It Cause It To Be High

Does Lyme affect your blood sugar? Could it cause it to be high HealingWell.com Forum > Diseases & Conditions > Lyme Disease > Does Lyme affect your blood sugar? Could it cause it to be high even on a strict Palio Lyme diet could Lyme cause your blood sugar to be high Yes, because the Paleo diet is only part of what can be done to help the effects of high blood sugar. You can check the symptoms list in the "New to Lyme?" thread to see that high blood sugar can be part of your symptoms. Lyme can affect any organ, including the pancreas. "Diabetes is a disorder of metabolismthe way the body uses digested food for energy. The digestive tract breaks down carbohydratessugars and starches found in many foodsinto glucose, a form of sugar that enters the bloodstream. With the help of the hormone insulin, cells throughout the body absorb glucose and use it for energy. Diabetes develops when the body doesnt make enough insulin or is not able to use insulin effectively, or both. Insulin is made in the pancreas, an organ located behind the stomach. The pancreas contains clusters of cells called islets. Beta cells within the islets make insulin and release it into the blood." My 12 year old was just diagnosed with diabetes 6 days ago. We are still waiting for the results if it's type one or type two. They are leaning towards type one. I brought him in due to headaches neck pain being tired flushed and several red circles on his body. We asked the doctor to blood test for whatever xcould possibly be wrong. We left and waited for results, 2 hrs later she called and said to bring him to the e.r immediately. His blood sugar was at 602. He spent the night in the hospital and was stabilized with an i.v and insulin. Meanwhile waiting for the Lyme test results. Today they confirmed positiv Continue reading >>

Full Spectrum Health Lyme Disease - Full Spectrum Health

Full Spectrum Health Lyme Disease - Full Spectrum Health

e. Heal the blood brain barrier, brain inflammation, and reduce neurologic effects of Lyme disease In my work as director of a hyperbaric oxygen therapy center, I developed the Lyme Synergy Healing Protocol . Its only available at Full Spectrum Health. It means less treatment for shorter periods of time with better effects. Find out if you suffer from Lyme Disease and dont suffer any longer. Call us today for a consultation. Question and Answers about Lyme therapies Q: What is this Lyme Synergy Healing Approach that you mentioned in your discussion of Lyme disease? A: The Lyme Synergy Healing Approach is a method I developed from my work with patients with Lyme disease. It is based on trusting the natural healing potential of your body, and using the endobiogeny approach to healing to understand the specific therapies that are most likely to benefit YOU. The base of the healing synergy pyramid is the endobiogeny approach to healing: strengthen your bodys natural healing mechanisms with natural plant extracts and diet and gentle detoxification. The next level is hyperbaric oxygen to bolster the healing process started by the herbal approach. The third level is to use a special combination of vitamins with vitamin C that dramatically increases the kill rate of infections within the body. IV therapy is times using a special protocol that I have developed along with hyperbaric oxygen. In this way, we can use lower concentrations of nutrients and oxygen, increase the healing effects and reduce the risk of side effects. At the top of the pyramid is the least desirable treatment: antibiotics. If they are needed, well use them for the shortest amount of time necessary. Q: Antibiotics: You seem to be against the use of antibiotics. Dont you have to treat an infection with an an Continue reading >>

Stop The Lyme Lies Blog - Stop The Lyme Lies

Stop The Lyme Lies Blog - Stop The Lyme Lies

Starchy vegetables (e.g. potatoes, peas, corn, dried beans/peas) Grains and grain products (e.g. anything made with grain flour bread, pasta, cereal, rice, wheat etc.) Prepackaged foods, meals, condiments are FULL of sugars. The best way to eat is fresh and avoiding the above. This is why Dr. Cowden & other LLMDs say eat a 'white free' diet. Some of the substitutes that I use are: Stevia, Xylitol (biofilm buster), Quinoa (in place of rice - it's a seed) and Buckwheat (also a seed - no wheat). Takes some getting used to but it can be done. Sanchez, A, et al. Role of Sugars in Human Neutrophilic Phagocytosis. Am J Clin Nutr. Nov 1973; 261: 1180-1184. Bernstein, L et al. Depression of Lymphocyte Transformation Following Oral Glucose Ingestion. Am J Clin Nutr. 1997; 30: 613. Schauss, A. Diet, Crime and Delinquency. (Berkley, CA: Parker House, 1981). Bayol, S.A Evidence that a Maternal Junk Food Diet during Pregnancy and Lactation Can Reduce Muscle Force in Offspring. Eur J Nutr. Dec 19, 2008. Rajeshwari, R, et al. Secular Trends in Childrens Sweetened-beverage Consumption (1973 to 1994): The Bogalusa Heart Study. J Am Diet Assoc. Feb 2005; 105(2): 208-214. Behall, K. Influence of Estrogen Content of Oral Contraceptives and Consumption of Sucrose on Blood Parameters. Disease Abstracts International.1982; 431-437. POPLINE Document Number: 013114. Mohanty, P., et al. Glucose Challenge Stimulates Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) Generation by Leucocytes. J Clin Endocrin Metab. Aug 2000; 85(8): 2970-2973. Couzy, F., et al. Nutritional Implications of the Interaction Minerals.Progressive Food & Nutrition Science. 1933; 17: 65-87. Goldman, L et al. Behavioral Effects of Sucrose on Preschool Children. J Abnorm Child Psy. 1986; 14(4): 565-577. Scanto, S. and Yudkin, J. The Effect of D Continue reading >>

Stabilizing Blood Sugar During A Season Of Sweets

Stabilizing Blood Sugar During A Season Of Sweets

Hypoglycemia and Lyme Disease The first symptom of tick-borne illness that I experienced was one I’d never heard of: hypoglycemia. I was working as a summer camp counselor in the woods of Maine and had just finished a morning teaching water sports in the hot sun. As I walked into the dining hall for lunch, I suddenly felt the room was spinning. The chatting campers morphed into a blur of color. I sensed the blood draining from my face and grabbed onto a bench before my legs gave out. Friends held my arms and got me to an adjacent counselors’ room, where I lay down on a couch. “You must be dehydrated,” one said. I shook my head and said, “I’ve been drinking water all morning.” Despite lying down, I still felt like I might faint. My palms were sweaty and my heart raced. One counselor put her hand on my foot as a gesture of reassurance. I panicked. “I can’t feel your hand,” I cried as my whole body started to shake. “My feet are numb!” What I could feel, however, was a plastic spoon that had suddenly been placed in my mouth. I tasted the sweet syrup of blueberry pie. “Eat this,” I heard the camp nurse say. Dutifully, I swallowed spoonful after spoonful. Within minutes, my body calmed down. Sensation returned to my extremities. I stopped sweating, and my heart stopped racing. My cheeks flushed, and the blurry faces came back into view. The nurse held my hand and said soothingly, “You had a low blood sugar reaction. You need to get checked for diabetes.” Tests showed that I was not diabetic, but I was hypoglycemic, a condition I’d never heard of before. I learned that after a meal is consumed, food breaks down into glucose, releasing insulin from the pancreas to give a person energy. For most people, when their supply of energy is low, gluca Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia Impairs Neutrophil-mediated Bacterial Clearance In Mice Infected With The Lyme Disease Pathogen

Hyperglycemia Impairs Neutrophil-mediated Bacterial Clearance In Mice Infected With The Lyme Disease Pathogen

Hyperglycemia Impairs Neutrophil-Mediated Bacterial Clearance in Mice Infected with the Lyme Disease Pathogen Ashkan Javid ,1 Nataliya Zlotnikov ,1 Helena Ptroov ,1 Tian Tian Tang ,1 Yang Zhang ,1 Anil K. Bansal ,1 Rhodaba Ebady ,1 Maitry Parikh ,1 Mijhgan Ahmed ,1 Chunxiang Sun ,1 Susan Newbigging ,2 Yae Ram Kim ,1 Marianna Santana Sosa ,1 Michael Glogauer ,1 and Tara J. Moriarty 1,* 1Matrix Dynamics Group, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Fitzgerald Building, Room 241, 150 College Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3E2, Canada 1Matrix Dynamics Group, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Fitzgerald Building, Room 241, 150 College Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3E2, Canada 1Matrix Dynamics Group, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Fitzgerald Building, Room 241, 150 College Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3E2, Canada 1Matrix Dynamics Group, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Fitzgerald Building, Room 241, 150 College Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3E2, Canada 1Matrix Dynamics Group, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Fitzgerald Building, Room 241, 150 College Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3E2, Canada 1Matrix Dynamics Group, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Fitzgerald Building, Room 241, 150 College Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3E2, Canada 1Matrix Dynamics Group, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Fitzgerald Building, Room 241, 150 College Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3E2, Canada 1Matrix Dynamics Group, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Fitzgerald Building, Room 241, 150 College Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3E2, Canada 1Matrix Dynamics Group, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Toronto, Fitzgerald Building, Room 241, 150 College Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3E2, Canada 1Matrix Dynamics Group, F Continue reading >>

Treating Insulin Resistance In Chronic Illness

Treating Insulin Resistance In Chronic Illness

Most Lyme disease sufferers know that avoiding the ingestion of sugar is important for recovery, because sugar causes inflammation in the body and tends to feed borrelia, candida and other critters. Table sugar (sucrose) is especially harmful, as it also suppresses the production of lymphocytes and other immune cells, and you need those immune cells to fight the bugs! But there is another reason why you should avoid sugar in Lyme disease, that is no less important than any of those mentioned above. Most people with Lyme disease suffer from HPA-dysfunction, which causes disturbances in the production of cortisol and other hormones. Cortisol, a hormone produced by the adrenal glands, is involved in blood-sugar regulation, along with insulin and other hormones such as glucagon. When adrenal hormone production goes askew, so does blood-sugar regulation. This can put the Lyme disease sufferer at risk for insulin resistance and/or diabetes. It's like this. Cells need glucose (obtained from food) in order to function properly, and insulin is the hormone that brings glucose into the cells. The function of cortisol, in a broad sense, is the opposite to that of insulin. It inhibits glucose transport into cells in order to prevent too much glucose from flooding the cells, and it also stimulates the release of glucose from cells so that it can be utilized by the body for energy. In addition to cortisol, the adrenals produce norepinephrine, another hormone that is involved in blood-sugar regulation. Norepinephrine aids in the release of glycogen from the liver. Glycogen is used by the body for energy whenever glucose levels in the blood get too low. In adrenal fatigue (and Lyme disease), when cortisol and blood sugar levels are low, the body often reverts to releasing norepinenephri Continue reading >>

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