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Diabetes Mellitus Complicating Systemic Lupus Erythematosus - Analysis Of The Ucllupus Cohort And Review Of The Literature.

Diabetes Mellitus Complicating Systemic Lupus Erythematosus - Analysis Of The Ucllupus Cohort And Review Of The Literature.

1. Lupus. 2008 Nov;17(11):977-80. doi: 10.1177/0961203308091539. Diabetes mellitus complicating systemic lupus erythematosus - analysis of the UCLlupus cohort and review of the literature. Cortes S(1), Chambers S, Jernimo A, Isenberg D. (1)Department of Rheumatology, Portuguese Institute of Rheumatology, Lisbon, Portugal. [email protected] Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) often coexists with other diseases. Diabetesmellitus (DM) is an example and patients with overlap SLE-DM can present withclinical features common to both disorders. In this review, we describe thepatients with overlap SLE-DM, focussing on the clinical features common to bothdiseases that these patients can present, and on the challenges of managing such complications. A detailed review of the patients' notes (n = 485) was performed. At every outpatient appointment the patients' urine was tested for glucose,protein and blood. Patients with persistent glycosuria were investigated withfasting blood glucose and a glucose tolerance test to help make the diagnosis of DM. Particular note was made of those patients whose symptoms could be due toSLE, DM or both. Nine patients with DM were identified. Three had type 1 DM, fourhad type 2 DM and two were considered to have steroid-induced DM. Among thesepatients, three had renal involvement (two with WHO class IV lupus nephritis);two had peripheral neuropathy (one had a mixed sensory and motor neuropathy, one had a sensory peripheral neuropathy); two patients had retinopathy and cataracts and one had angina. The combination of SLE and DM is uncommon but thepredisposition to renal, peripheral neuropathy and retinal disease means thatgreat care must be taken when deciding which clinical feature is due to whichdisease, because active SLE requires additional i Continue reading >>

Celebrities With Chronic Illnesses: Selena Gomez Lupus, Tom Hanks Diabetes, Charlie Sheen Hiv, Michael J. Fox Parkinson’s Disease

Celebrities With Chronic Illnesses: Selena Gomez Lupus, Tom Hanks Diabetes, Charlie Sheen Hiv, Michael J. Fox Parkinson’s Disease

Photo Credit: Splash News Did you know there are many celebrities with chronic illnesses? Selena Gomez, Tom Hanks, Charlie Sheen, Michael J Fox, Lena Dunham, Pink, George Clooney, Kim Kardashian, Jack Osbourne, Venus Williams, Halle Berry, and even rapper Lil Wayne are all sufferers of known chronic illnesses like diabetes, lupus, multiple sclerosis, and HIV, among others. What’s it like for these celebrities to cope with their conditions while living highly public and stressful lives? Read on to find out. 12 Celebrities with Chronic Illnesses Selena Gomez, Lupus Selena Gomez is one of the biggest pop stars in the world, but life is not always glamorous, even for her. The former Disney star and “Kill Em with Kindness” singer battles the autoimmune disease known as lupus, undergoing chemotherapy to help treat it. Although her condition was kept private for years, Gomez decided to take a break from music in 2013 and checked into a rehab facility in 2014 to spend some time on herself. Taking care of oneself is very important when dealing with lupus, as it is a lifelong condition that can attack and damage any part of the body, including the skin, joints, and organs. Healthy tissue is destroyed, leading to inflammation and pain, because the body cannot distinguish between the healthy tissue and foreign invaders like viruses and bacteria. 90% of the 1.5 million Americans suffering with lupus are women aged 15 to 45. Despite Selena Gomez’s lupus diagnosis, the good news is that she is doing great now. With her new album, Revival, Gomez proves she can rise above her disease. Tom Hanks, Diabetes Tom Hanks is known for being an impressive actor and a wonderfully charming man, but he also describes himself as an “idiot.” Why is that? The actor ignored the warnings he Continue reading >>

Risk Of Diabetes Mellitus In Patients With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Can Be Reduced With The Use Of Hydroxychloroquine

Risk Of Diabetes Mellitus In Patients With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Can Be Reduced With The Use Of Hydroxychloroquine

Risk of Diabetes Mellitus in Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Can be Reduced with the Use of Hydroxychloroquine Click Here to receive Lupus News via e-mail A recent study conducted by a team of researchers from Taiwan found that patients with Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) who are treated with a specific dose of an antimalarial drug UCQ) are less prone to develop diabetes mellitus. However, those SLE patients that are threated with high-dose glucocorticoids are at higher risk of diabetes. Still, according the findings, this risk can be decreased if glucocorticoids are given in combination with HCQ. The study entitled Hydroxychloroquine reduces risk of incident diabetes mellitus in lupus patients in a dose-dependent manner: a population-based cohort study , was recently published in journal Rheumatology . Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is associated with early atherosclerosis and cardiovascular diseases. Moreover, chronic inflammation contributes to insulin resistance, which commonly precedes the development of diabetes mellitus, with evidence showing that patients with SLE are at a higher risk of this condition. Common therapeutics for SLE include high-dose glucocorticoids that may worsen glucose homoeostasis, thus complicating diabetes. However, Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) can reduce diabetes risk in Rheumatoid Arthritis. In this regard, Der-Yuan Chen from the Division of Allergy, Immunology and Rheumatology, Department of Internal Medicine in Taiwan and colleagues tested the association of HCQ use and diabetes mellitus risk in SLE patients. The team of researchers conducted a population-based study with 8,628 SLE patients. Data was retrieved from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database from 2001 to 10. To determine the incidence of diabe Continue reading >>

Autoimmune Diseases (ad) | Natural Remedies & Treatments

Autoimmune Diseases (ad) | Natural Remedies & Treatments

Autoimmune Diseases (AD) Symptoms of AD Why Diagnosing AD Difficult Risk Factors of AD Root Causes of AD The Vaccine Issue Inflammation Connection Autoimmunity Pathogenesis Systemic Lupus Pathogenesis Guillain-Barré Pathogenesis Sjögren's Syndrome Pathogenesis AD and Type 2 Diabetes AD Wellness Program: 10 Steps AIP & AD Nutritional Program AIP & AD Nutritional Strategies AIP & AD Super Meal Plate AIP & AD Supplementation AD Lifestyle Changes Do you feel tired all the time? Are you struggling with losing weight no matter what you try to do? Or, are you losing unwanted weight? Do you feel bloated or constipated a lot of the time? Do you have any digestive problems? Do you have skin rashes or dry skin? Do you have cold hands or feet? Are you struggling with your blood sugar even when you eat right? Is your hair or skin thinning out too quickly? Are you taking thyroid medication? Do your joints or muscles ache? Do you have brain fog or problems with concentrating? Do you have any numbness or tingling in your hands or feet? Do you have any allergies or frequent colds or flu? Do you have any problems sleeping or waking up feeling dead-tired? If you answered "yes" to 3 or more of the questions, you may want to consider getting a complete physical exam that includes a full hormone panel and antibody tests -- to make sure that you're not in the early stages of an autoimmune dysfunction. If you've already has a complete physical and your doctor can't come up with a clear diagnosis, then, you may still be in the early stages of an autoimmune dysfunction. I know that may sound a little far-fetched, but, autoimmune disorders are on the rise and have exploded over the past 7-10 years, affecting everyone from babies to children, teens, young adults, older adults, and especially wom Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drug Shows Promise Treating Lupus - U.s. Researchers

Diabetes Drug Shows Promise Treating Lupus - U.s. Researchers

Diabetes drug shows promise treating lupus - U.S. researchers Pricey tech stocks hog global market spotlight February 11, 2015 / 7:01 PM / 3 years ago Diabetes drug shows promise treating lupus - U.S. researchers ORLANDO, Fla., Feb 11 (Reuters) - A common diabetes drug could be part of a two-pronged treatment to reverse the effects of lupus, a chronic autoimmune disease harmful to body tissue that often causes pain and extreme fatigue, researchers reported on Wednesday. University of Florida researchers reported findings from a two-year study using the diabetes drug metformin in mice and human blood cells in a laboratory setting in the journal Science Translational Medicine. The findings could become a new treatment option for lupus, for which there is no cure, according to a news release from the University of Florida. More than 16,000 new cases are diagnosed in the United States each year, according to the Lupus Foundation of America, which says 5 million people worldwide are believed to suffer from the disease. Women during their child-bearing years are most affected, although men can develop the disease too. In lupus, a persons antibodies, which normally fight against bacteria and viruses, instead attack healthy tissue. The white blood cells secreting the antibodies feed mostly on blood sugars called glucose, said lead researcher Laurence Morel, a pathology and immunology specialist at the University of Florida medical school. Her tests found that treatment with the first-line type 2 diabetes drug metformin - in combination with a glucose inhibitor - slowed the metabolism of the white blood cells. They returned them to normal functioning, Morel said. The testing used white blood cells from patients with lupus, as well as mice, Morel said. Morel said she got the ide Continue reading >>

Plaquenil Cuts Diabetes Risk In Lupus

Plaquenil Cuts Diabetes Risk In Lupus

by Nancy Walsh Nancy Walsh, Senior Staff Writer, MedPage Today This article is a collaboration between MedPage Today and: Note that this large, retrospective cohort study found an association between hydroxychloroquine use and a lower rate of incident type 2 diabetes among individuals with systemic lupus erythematosus. Be aware that the mechanism of this relationship is unclear, and may be the result of confounding by other disease factors. Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) who are treated with hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil) have a dose-dependent decrease in risk for developing diabetes, Taiwanese researchers found. In a population-based study, lupus patients who had taken a cumulative dose of the antimalarial of 129 g or more -- 200 mg per day for 1.8 years -- had a 74% lower risk of diabetes (HR 0.26, 95% CI 0.18-0.37, P<0.001), according to Der-Yuan Chen, MD, of National Yang-Ming University in Taipei, and colleagues. But the protective effect was lost if the cumulative dose was less than 129 g (HR 1.13, 95% CI 0.81-1.59, P=0.423), the researchers reported online in Rheumatology. Patients with SLE are at high risk for hypertension , insulin resistance , and diabetes, and if they develop diabetes, their likelihood of complications including neuropathy and renal insufficiency also rises and can make disease management much more difficult. "Therefore, it is essential to reduce the risk of incident diabetes mellitus in SLE patients," Chen and colleagues stated. Corticosteroids are a mainstay of treatment for systemic lupus erythematosus, but these drugs can interfere with glucose metabolism and are associated with high rates of diabetes. Hydroxychloroquine is also widely used and has been shown to be associated with improved glucose control in diabetic pa Continue reading >>

Lupus Symptoms - What Is Lupus | Lupus Research Alliance

Lupus Symptoms - What Is Lupus | Lupus Research Alliance

The most common systems of lupus are extreme fatigue, malar rash, joint swelling and unexplained fevers. 50-90% of people with lupus identify fatigue as one of their primary symptoms. The severe fatigue of lupus seems to be caused by many factors includingdisease activity, anxiety disorders, sleep disturbances, vitamin D deficiency, and low levels of exercise. Scientists differ on whether there is also a relationship between fatigue and the disease itself or the treatments used to manage lupus. No matter the cause, its clear that fatigue can significantly impact patients quality of life, including lessening the ability to function at home and at work. Two studies conducted through a clinical trial network established by the Lupus Research Alliance, are looking at how to better measure fatigue objectively. About half of people with lupus experience a characteristic red malar rash or color change that may appear across the cheeks and bridge of the nose in the shape of a butterfly. The rash can last from days to weeks and is sometimes painful or itchy. Rashes may also occur on the face and ears, upper arms, shoulders, chest, & hands and other areas exposed to the sun. Because many people with lupus are sensitive to sunlight (called photosensitivity), skin rashes often first develop or worsen after being out in the sun. Some people find that the appearance of the butterfly rash is a sign of an oncoming disease flare. Up to 90 percent of people with lupus will have arthritis which is defined as inflammation or swelling of the joint lining. The most common symptoms of arthritis are stiffness and aching, most often in the hands and wrists. Symptoms of arthritis can come and go and move from one joint to another. Pain and stiffness tend to be worse in the morning and improve a Continue reading >>

How Does Age At Onset Influence The Outcome Of Autoimmune Diseases?

How Does Age At Onset Influence The Outcome Of Autoimmune Diseases?

Copyright © 2012 Manuel J. Amador-Patarroyo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Abstract The age at onset refers to the time period at which an individual experiences the first symptoms of a disease. In autoimmune diseases (ADs), these symptoms can be subtle but are very relevant for diagnosis. They can appear during childhood, adulthood or late in life and may vary depending on the age at onset. Variables like mortality and morbidity and the role of genes will be reviewed with a focus on the major autoimmune disorders, namely, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), multiple sclerosis (MS), type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D), Sjögren's syndrome, and autoimmune thyroiditis (AITD). Early age at onset is a worst prognostic factor for some ADs (i.e., SLE and T1D), while for others it does not have a significant influence on the course of disease (i.e., SS) or no unanimous consensus exists (i.e., RA and MS). 1. Introduction Autoimmune diseases (ADs) affect approximately 5% of the world population [1, 2]. The age at onset varies widely depending on the disease. For example, sixty-five percent of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) start manifesting their symptoms between ages 16 and 55 [3]. Another 20 percent manifest them before age 16 and the remaining 15 percent after age 55 [4]. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) can begin at any age but has its peak between ages 30 and 55 [5]. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a term used to describe the autoimmune, inflammatory joint condition that develops in children. Another prevalent AD is Sjögren’s syndrome (SS) whi Continue reading >>

Prednisone And Diabetes

Prednisone And Diabetes

Cortisone and its analogues are "stress hormones" that prime the body for times of challenge. Thus, the rise in sugar in the body is a natural byproduct of a preparation for stress in tissues of the muscles, brain, and heart for example. This is why an increase in the stress hormone results in an increase of the body's stores of glucose. Long-term prednisone use can cause diabetes in someone who has a tendency to be diabetic. Moreover, the higher the dose of prednisone, the greater the likelihood that the blood glucose (sugar) level will rise. Obesity and a genetic background that includes diabetes also gives a person a greater chance of developing diabetes. Continue reading >>

Lupus Nephritis In A Child With Type I Diabetes Mellitus

Lupus Nephritis In A Child With Type I Diabetes Mellitus

Introduction Renal disease in type 1 diabetes (T1D) can be seen as diabetic nephropathy or non-diabetic renal disease. Diabetic nephropathy is a well-known renal disease in T1D. Renal involvement due to membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, immune complex glomerulonephritis and Goodpasture’s disease have been reported in T1D [1–3]. The association of T1D with other organ-specific autoimmune disorders is well documented [4] but association with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is infrequently reported in the literature [5–7]. One adult case of lupus nephritis with T1D is described in the literature [6]. We describe a child with T1D who developed lupus nephritis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of lupus nephritis in a pediatric patient with T1D. A 15-year-old girl with an 11-year history of T1D was admitted with facial swelling which had persisted for 4 days. Her height was 1.43 m (<3rd percentile), weight 37.5 kg (<3rd percentile), heart rate 92/min and blood pressure 140/80 mmHg. Physical examination revealed oedema of pretibial, periorbital and the dorsum of the hands, wrist joint pain and limited joint movements. The remaining examination was unremarkable. Fundoscopic examination showed diabetic retinopathy. Urinalysis showed marked proteinuria (86.5 mg m−2 h−1). Laboratory findings revealed hemoglobin 8.4 g dl−1, platelets 244 000/mm3, white cell count 6470/mm3, blood urea nitrogen 19 mg dl−1, creatinine 0.8 mg dl−1, total serum protein 6.2 g dl−1, albumin 1.5 g dl−1, triglyceride 228 mg dl−1, total cholesterol 229 mg dl−1, blood glucose 255 g dl−1, HbA1C 8.9% (normal: 3.5–6.5%). Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) by creatinine clearance was 74 ml min−1 1.73m−2. Electromyography was normal. Echocardiography d Continue reading >>

Top 30 Doctor Insights On: Is There Any Relation Between Lupus And Diabetes

Top 30 Doctor Insights On: Is There Any Relation Between Lupus And Diabetes

1 Not likely: Why worry about 3 disorders, as you likely possess one unifying diagnosis to explain your problems. A good place to start is with an endocrinologist to deal with diabetes and the complications secondary to this. Focus on these issues, and later, if things seem peculiar look into co-morbities. Lastly, if you possess diabetes and lupus, doubt you ...Read more 3 "Used to"?: Hi. I'm unclear...did your central DI spontaneously resolve? We don't expect to see that, and it makes me question the original diagnosis of DI in the first place. There appears to be an autoimmune cause of at least a subset of idiopathic central DI, and this is more likely in the setting of other autoimmune diseases (SLE, Sjögren's), but it doesn't ...Read more 5 SLE and Diabetes: With appropriate medical care, medication compliance and excellent follow up with your diabetologist and rheumatologist, there is no reason that your mother can not lead a healthy, happy and productive life. ...Read more 7 8 9 10 11 12 15 16 17 18 I am 27 years old. Recently became overweight. I got a blood test done showing I have a tryglceride level of 209 and total cholesterol level of 267. I am afraid because my father has diabetes and mother has lupus. My glucose was 83, in range. I also have 21 23 24 Continue reading >>

What Is Lupus? Symptoms, Treatment, Rash, Pictures & Diagnosis

What Is Lupus? Symptoms, Treatment, Rash, Pictures & Diagnosis

Up to 10% of people with lupus isolated to the skin will develop the systemic form of lupus (SLE). Eleven criteria help health care professionals to diagnose SLE. Treatment of SLE is directed toward decreasing inflammation and/or the level of autoimmune activity with anti-inflammatory medications for those with mild symptoms and corticosteroids and/or cytotoxic drugs (chemotherapy) for those with more severe lupus . People with SLE can prevent "flares" of disease by avoiding sun exposure, not abruptly discontinuing medications, and monitoring their condition with their doctor. What is systemic lupus erythematosus? What are the different types of lupus? Lupus is an autoimmune disease characterized by acute and chronic inflammation of various tissues of the body. Autoimmune diseases are illnesses that occur when the body's tissues are attacked by its own immune system. The immune system is a complex system within the body that is designed to fight infectious agents, such as bacteria and other foreign microbes. One of the ways that the immune system fights infections is by producing antibodies that bind to the microbes. People with lupus produce abnormal antibodies in their blood that target tissues within their own body rather than foreign infectious agents. These antibodies are referred to as autoantibodies. Because the antibodies and accompanying cells of inflammation can affect tissues anywhere in the body, lupus has the potential to affect a variety of areas. Sometimes lupus can cause disease of the skin, heart, lungs , kidneys, joints, and/or nervous system. When only the skin is involved by rash , the condition is called lupus dermatitis or cutaneous lupus erythematosus. A form of lupus dermatitis that can be isolated to the skin, without internal disease, is calle Continue reading >>

Dr. Christie Bartels And Dr. Matthew Merrins Awarded Funding For Lupus, Diabetes Research

Dr. Christie Bartels And Dr. Matthew Merrins Awarded Funding For Lupus, Diabetes Research

Dr. Christie Bartels and Dr. Matthew Merrins Awarded Funding for Lupus, Diabetes Research The Teaching Masters Course: Cultivating Medical Education Prowess Two Department of Medicine faculty members have been awarded funding by the Wisconsin Partnership Program at the UW School of Medicine and Public Health through its New Investigator Program. The program supports early-career investigators who are taking innovative approaches to address a diverse range of public health issues in Wisconsin. Christie Bartels, MD, MS (pictured at upper right), assistant professor, Rheumatology, has been awarded $100,000 over two years for a proposal entitled "Investigating Retention in Care to Address Healthcare Disparities in Lupus: A Wisconsin Lupus Cohort." Lupus is one of the most common autoimmune connective tissue diseases and it disproportionately affects minority patients and women, with three black patients diagnosed for every white patient, and nine women are diagnosed for every man. Wisconsin is the only state in the nation with a growing mortality gap for black women. Poor lupus outcomes, especially in black women with less severe initial disease, suggest that a difference in follow-up of disease in black patients might be to blame. Although clinical care can reduce many risks, little is known regarding what predicts who stays in care or how to improve lupus care delivery and health outcomes. Dr. Bartels' project aims to confirm diagnoses in an urban group of lupus patients at Medical College of Wisconsin. Using electronic medical record data, the study will assess patterns among patients that do or do not not remain in rheumatology care, and investigate the impact of race and other predictors of attaining continual rheumatology care. Successful completion of this project w Continue reading >>

15 Diseases Doctors Often Get Wrong

15 Diseases Doctors Often Get Wrong

Updated 10:35 AM ET, Wed September 3, 2014 Chat with us in Facebook Messenger. Find out what's happening in the world as it unfolds. Lack of specific tests and variable symptoms can make some diseases hard to diagnose. Some conditions are difficult to diagnose because there is no real test to prove their existence Body aches, menstrual and gastrointestinal problems can be difficult to pinpoint When you experience strange pains, mysterious digestive issues, or other unexplained symptoms, you'd hope a trip to the doctor would solve your health woes. But sometimes, doctors have just as much trouble identifying certain disorders and conditions as their patients. "A lot of symptoms are nonspecific and variable, depending on the person," says Dr. David Fleming, president of the American College of Physicians and a professor of medicine at the University of Missouri. "On top of that, many diagnostic tests are expensive and aren't done routinely, and even then they don't always give us a black and white answer." The following 15 conditions are notoriously difficult to pin down. Gupta: 'Time out' could help save lives 01:29 Some conditions are difficult to diagnose because there is no real test to prove their existence; rather, they require a "diagnosis of elimination," says Fleming, as doctors rule out all other possibilities. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) -- a chronic condition that affects the large intestine and causes abdominal pain, cramping, bloating, diarrhea, and/or constipation -- is one of these cases. According to diagnostic criteria, a patient should have symptoms for at least six months before first being seen for a formal evaluation, and discomfort should be present at least three days a month in the last three months before being diagnosed with IBS. So much con Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus, Celiac Disease, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus And Systemic Scleroderma In A 15-year-old Girl

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus, Celiac Disease, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus And Systemic Scleroderma In A 15-year-old Girl

, Volume 30, Issue6 , pp 793795 | Cite as Type 1 diabetes mellitus, celiac disease, systemic lupus erythematosus and systemic scleroderma in a 15-year-old girl We report a case of an association of four autoimmune diseases in a 15-year-old girl and we discuss the etiopathogenic of this association and difficulties of treatment. Autoimmune diseasesDiabetes mellitusCeliac diseaseSystemic lupus erythematosusSystemic sclerodermaAdolescent This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access Hansen D, Bennedboek FN, Hansen LK et al (2001) High prevalence of celiac disease in Danish children with type I diabetes mellitus. Acta Paediatr 90:12381243. doi: 10.1080/080352501317130254 CrossRef PubMed Google Scholar Sumnik Z, Kolouskova S, Cinek O, Kotalova R, Varrinec J, Snajderova M (2000) HLA-DQA1*05-DQB1*0201 positivity predisposes to celiac disease in Czech diabetic children. Acta Paediatr 89:426430 Google Scholar Ventura A, Magazzu G, Greco L (1999) Duration of exposure to gluten and risk for autoimmune disorders in patients with celiac disease. Gatroenterology 117:297303. doi: 10.1053/gast.1999.0029900297 CrossRef Google Scholar Continue reading >>

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