diabetestalk.net

Low Sugar Diet Benefits

What Are The Benefits Of Lowering Your Sugar Intake?

What Are The Benefits Of Lowering Your Sugar Intake?

What Are the Benefits of Lowering Your Sugar Intake? Cutting back on sugar could affect your energy levels, weight, blood lipids, teeth and skin. Damaging Effects of Too Much Sugar in the Diet Nutrition and medical experts agree that Americans eat too much sugar, and the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend cutting back on the sweet stuff. If you reduce the amount of sugar you eat, you may have more energy, lose weight or stay at a healthy weight more easily, see your triglycerides drop, have fewer dental cavities and even look younger. Reactive hypoglycemia is the crash -- sleepiness, hunger, anxiety and other symptoms -- that some people experience one to three hours after eating a meal. Avoiding sugary foods, especially on an empty stomach, can help stave off these dips in blood sugar, according to the Mayo Clinic. So can eating smaller, more frequent meals, and eating more protein and high-fiber foods instead of simple sugars. Sugar contributes to weight gain in one obvious way -- sugar-laden treats tend to be high in calories and often high in fat, and low in fiber and other nutrients. But evolving research also supports the idea that sugars and refined carbs may independently contribute to obesity and metabolic syndrome, a precursor to diabetes, regardless of how many calories you eat, says "The New York Times" science writer Gary Taubes. Unlike glucose, fructose is processed mostly by the liver. Animal studies have shown that the liver will turn an overabundance of fructose into fat. The two sweeteners most commonly added to foods, table sugar and high-fructose corn syrup, are roughly half fructose and half glucose. Eating too much sugar can raise the level of triglycerides, or fats, in your blood, according to the Mayo Clinic. Higher triglyceride lev Continue reading >>

6 Really Good Things That Happen To Your Body When You Quit Sugar

6 Really Good Things That Happen To Your Body When You Quit Sugar

From more energy to younger-looking skin, you'll be amazed by how cutting out the sweet stuff can boost your health. Kicking the sugar habit is no easy task. But if you’re considering giving it a try, here’s some inspiration to help you succeed: it’ll have profound effects on your short- and long-term health. A little of the sweet stuff is okay; the American Heart Association recommends consuming no more than 6 teaspoons of added sugar a day for women and 9 teaspoons daily for men. (Quick comparison: a 12-ounce can of cola has approximately 8 teaspoons.) And you can keep eating unprocessed foods that contain natural sugar, like fruits and vegetables. Unlike added sugar, natural sugar hasn’t been stripped of the vitamins, minerals, and fiber Mother Nature packaged them in. But if you can dial your intake of added sugar way back, you’ll start to rack up some amazing body benefits, like these. Your skin will look younger Think less sag and fewer wrinkles. Studies suggest that the amount of sugar in the blood (which is affected by how much sugar you eat) sets up a molecular domino effect called glycation, which ultimately leaves skin less firm and elastic. Already bothered by premature lines? Cutting your sugar intake can reduce visible signs of aging, research shows. You’ll have less belly fat This is the visceral or “deep” fat that builds up around vital organs like your liver, pancreas, and intestines. Stubborn and hard to get rid of, it’s also dangerous; visceral fat is a known risk factor for heart disease and diabetes. In 2016, data from more than 1,000 people who are part of the ongoing Framingham Heart Study showed that the more sugar-sweetened beverages they consumed, the higher their level of visceral fat. You’ll feel more energized Added sugar Continue reading >>

What Does Cutting Sugar Out From Your Diet Do?

What Does Cutting Sugar Out From Your Diet Do?

What Does Cutting Sugar Out From Your Diet Do? Natalie Stein specializes in weight loss and sports nutrition. She is based in Los Angeles and is an assistant professor with the Program for Public Health at Michigan State University. Stein holds a master of science degree in nutrition and a master of public health degree from Michigan State University. A box of glazed doughnuts.Photo Credit: alessandro0770/iStock/Getty Images Sugars can be natural or added to foods. It is impossible to cut sugar out of your diet completely because sugars are naturally in foods such as fruits, vegetables and dairy products. However, you may benefit from reducing or cutting out added sugars from your diet as long as you eat plenty of nutrient-dense foods and do not replace sugars with other unhealthy components, such as saturated fats. Sugars are carbohydrates with 4 calories per gram, and cutting added sugars out of your diet can help you lose weight or prevent weight gain by reducing the total number of calories that you eat. Many of the top sources of calories in the typical American diet are foods with added sugars, such as ice cream, baked goods, including cakes, cookies, pies and doughnuts, candies and sugar-sweetened soft drinks and energy drinks, according to the 2010 Dietary Guidelines from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. You may have better control over your blood sugar levels when you avoid added sugars because of their high glycemic index, according to the Linus Pauling Institute Micronutrient Information Center. The glycemic index of foods with carbohydrates indicates their potential effect on your blood sugar levels, and high-glycemic foods can lead to sharp spikes in your blood sugar after you eat them. A high-glycemic diet, which be high in sugars, may in Continue reading >>

No-sugar Diet: 8 Tips And Health Benefits

No-sugar Diet: 8 Tips And Health Benefits

Reducing the amount of sugar in the diet can help reduce the risks for these conditions. Replacing sugary foods with healthful ones can help a person get all of their essential vitamins and minerals. It may also help a person lose weight. Here are eight simple tips a person can use to cut sugar out of their diet: One of the most important things to consider when changing the diet is to do so gradually. Going from a diet full of sugar to one containing no sugar should be a slow process. It may help to start by eliminating the most obvious sources of sugar. Baked goods, such as cakes, muffins, and brownies, can easily be avoided. Eliminating candy and sugary beverages is an excellent place to start. A person can also try reducing the amount of sugar and cream they put in their coffee or tea, gradually omitting it completely. Working up to a no-sugar diet can help retrain the palate, so a person does not crave the missing sugar. Once a person has managed to cut out the most obvious sugar from their diet, they can turn their attention to other products that contain sugar. Reading labels can help identify types of sugars to avoid. Sugar has many names and is in many different syrups and concentrates. There are at least 61 different names for sugar on food labels. The most common ones include: Reading product labels and nutritional information can help a person make better decisions about what they eat. Sugars hide in many different foods in the supermarket, so reading the label is an absolute must for those wnting to follow a no-sugar diet. Products such as salad dressing and condiments, pasta sauce, breakfast cereals, milk, and granola bars often have sugar in their ingredients list. Many no-sugar diets also recommend that people avoid simple carbohydrates . Simple carbs i Continue reading >>

The Surprising Benefits Of Cutting Back On Sugar

The Surprising Benefits Of Cutting Back On Sugar

The Surprising Benefits of Cutting Back on Sugar Dont be alarmedbut somethings hiding in your food. From the cereal you had for breakfast to the dressing on your salad to the ketchup on your fries, an addictive substance is lurking in many foods that youd never suspect. Far more loathed than fat or cholesterol these days, sugar has become public enemy No. 1 when it comes to the health of America. In fact, in our effort to listen to doctors orders (and government guidelines ) to consume less fat and less cholesterol, Americans turned to healthy low-fat foods that were actually loaded with sugar. In its recent report, the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee cited sugar as one of our biggest health concerns and recommended that sugar make up 10 percent or fewer of our daily calorie intake. The American Heart Association recommends that no more than half of your daily discretionary calories comes from added sugars (about 6 teaspoons or 100 calories for women, and 9 teaspoons or 150 calories for men). But were eating way more of the sweet stuff than that: The CDC reports that the average American eats between 13 and 20 teaspoons of added sugar a day (around 230 calories for women, and 335 for men). In its natural state, sugar is a relatively harmlesseven necessarycarbohydrate that our bodies need to function. Its found in fruits, vegetables, and dairy as a compound known as fructose or lactose. The problem comes when sugar is added to foods during processing for added flavor, texture, or color. This is more common than you may realizeyou dont have to be in the candy aisle to be surrounded by added sugar. Eating too many of these empty calories has many health effects, the most obvious being major weight gain. Added sugar drives your insulin levels up, messes with your met Continue reading >>

What Are The Benefits Of Lowering Your Sugar Intake?

What Are The Benefits Of Lowering Your Sugar Intake?

What Are the Benefits of Lowering Your Sugar Intake? Cutting back on sugar could affect your energy levels, weight, blood lipids, teeth and skin. Damaging Effects of Too Much Sugar in the Diet Nutrition and medical experts agree that Americans eat too much sugar, and the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend cutting back on the sweet stuff. If you reduce the amount of sugar you eat, you may have more energy, lose weight or stay at a healthy weight more easily, see your triglycerides drop, have fewer dental cavities and even look younger. Reactive hypoglycemia is the crash -- sleepiness, hunger, anxiety and other symptoms -- that some people experience one to three hours after eating a meal. Avoiding sugary foods, especially on an empty stomach, can help stave off these dips in blood sugar, according to the Mayo Clinic. So can eating smaller, more frequent meals, and eating more protein and high-fiber foods instead of simple sugars. Sugar contributes to weight gain in one obvious way -- sugar-laden treats tend to be high in calories and often high in fat, and low in fiber and other nutrients. But evolving research also supports the idea that sugars and refined carbs may independently contribute to obesity and metabolic syndrome, a precursor to diabetes, regardless of how many calories you eat, says "The New York Times" science writer Gary Taubes. Unlike glucose, fructose is processed mostly by the liver. Animal studies have shown that the liver will turn an overabundance of fructose into fat. The two sweeteners most commonly added to foods, table sugar and high-fructose corn syrup, are roughly half fructose and half glucose. Eating too much sugar can raise the level of triglycerides, or fats, in your blood, according to the Mayo Clinic. Higher triglyceride lev Continue reading >>

Sugar-free Diet Plan, Benefits & Best Foods

Sugar-free Diet Plan, Benefits & Best Foods

According to research done by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, although Americans appear to be consuming less sugar today than in the previous couple of decades, average sugar consumption in America is still around 94 grams per day, or 358 calories. (1) That’s a lot of sugar, but it doesn’t have to be this way. In fact, you can even follow a sugar-free diet to help lower this number greatly. A great deal of research has shown that removing sources of excess sugar from your diet not only helps with weight loss, but can also reduce your risk for common health problems like type 2 diabetes, digestive problems, autoimmune conditions and more. What can you eat that has no sugar in it but is still satisfying? Proteins — like grass-fed meat, eggs or fish, for example — lots of veggies, healthy fats, nuts, seeds and other detoxifying foods are where you’ll get the bulk of your calories when eating a low-sugar or sugar-free diet. While the transition away from eating lots of sugar might seem hard at first, provoking cravings and even other symptoms that can mimic a “withdrawal,” within a few weeks you’ll likely see your efforts start to pay off. High sugar consumption can increase inflammation, mess with hormone production, rob you of energy, and even interfere with your mood and sleep. That’s why kicking your sugar addiction, replacing “empty”calories with nutrient-dense ones, will noticeably change you how you feel, both mentally and physically, in many ways. What Is a Sugar-Free Diet? A sugar-free diet is one that typically limits all sources of added sugar (like soda, snack bars and desserts, for example) and hidden sugar foods, and it sometimes also encourages a reduction in high-carbohydrate foods (like grains or fruits) that can still be healthy b Continue reading >>

6 Amazing Things That Happen When You Eat Less Sugar

6 Amazing Things That Happen When You Eat Less Sugar

Yes, sugar is delicious and tempting and even comforting. But eating too much can lead to all kinds of problems. Many Americans still eat up to five times the amount of sugar that’s recommended by the American Heart Association. This means women are eating up to 30 teaspoons of sugar per day, while men eat up to 45 teaspoons! Of course, they’re probably not sitting down eating spoon after spoon of white sugar, but in today’s society, hidden sugar is lurking everywhere. In fact, it’s found in 75% of packaged foods purchased in the United States. But when you read on and discover these seven things that happen when you moderate your sugar intake, I’m sure you’ll agree with me that it’s totally worth it. Slow Down The Aging Process In a process known as glycation, excess sugar attaches to the collagen in our skin and other parts of the body. This causes inflammation and reduces the effectiveness of both collagen and elastin, the proteins in our skin that help it stay youthful. When these don’t work so well, your skin no longer looks supple and youthful. While glycation can’t be completely stopped, it can be slowed down. This problem is largely exacerbated by high blood sugar levels, which can result when you consistently eat to much sugar and are overweight. You don’t have to take my word for it, a study of 600 men and women found that those with higher blood sugar levels consistently looked older than those with lower blood sugar. Diabetics – whose blood sugar level had been raised over a long period of time – looked older than their peers who did not have diabetes. You’ll Probably Lose Weight Basically, too many sugary foods over an extended period of time can cause resistance to the hormone insulin, which can predispose you to fat gain. Once th Continue reading >>

The Benefits Of A Low Carb / Low Sugar Diet

The Benefits Of A Low Carb / Low Sugar Diet

While the debate continues regarding the effectiveness of a low carb low sugar diet, it remains clear that it works very well for many people. By helping maintain steadier levels of insulin in the bloodstream, preventing a "sugar rush" and keeping energy levels steady, a low carb, low sugar diet has proven to be a helpful tool in the war against obesity. There are several popular low carb diet plans. Some, such as the Atkins Diet, are centered around keeping track of total carb intake. Others, such as the South Beach diet, focus on glycemic index of various foods. In general, low carb diets limit intake of fruits, grains, bread, cereal and sugar. Some are more lenient about fruit than others--for example, the Atkins Diet allows no fruit at all during Phase I, while the South Beach diet limits fruit to low glycemic index, high fiber items like strawberries and blueberries in the early stages. The theory behind this severe limitation on carbohydrates is based on the way the body reacts to this major food group. Ingesting carbohydrates increases blood sugar levels, which triggers the body to create insulin in order to properly digest the carbs, transforming them into energy. Low carb, low sugar diet proponents state that if carbohydrates are withheld, the body will then rely on fat stores to create energy, thus leading to weight loss. In addition, the reduction in carbohydrate intake also eliminates the rapid changes in blood sugar levels and dumping of insulin into the system, which is linked to sugar rush, the ensuing sugar crash and binge eating. Most low carb diets allow nearly unlimited vegetables such as lettuce, peppers, and other vegetables that are high on nutrition, but low in carbs. Higher carb veggies, like carrots and peas, are more limited. Proteins and fats Continue reading >>

21 Good Reasons To Eat Less Sugar That Have Nothing To Do With Weight Loss

21 Good Reasons To Eat Less Sugar That Have Nothing To Do With Weight Loss

Don’t be alarmed—but something’s hiding in your food. From the cereal you had for breakfast to the dressing on your salad to the ketchup on your fries, an addictive substance is lurking in many foods that you'd never suspect. Far more loathed than fat or cholesterol these days, sugar has become public enemy No. 1 when it comes to the health of America. In fact, in our effort to listen to doctors' orders (and government guidelines) to consume less fat and less cholesterol, Americans turned to “healthy” low-fat foods that were actually loaded with sugar. In its recent report, the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee cited sugar as one of our biggest health concerns and recommended that sugar make up 10 percent or fewer of our daily calorie intake. The American Heart Association recommends that no more than half of your daily discretionary calories comes from added sugars (about 6 teaspoons or 100 calories for women, and 9 teaspoons or 150 calories for men). But we're eating way more of the sweet stuff than that: The CDC reports that the average American eats between 13 and 20 teaspoons of added sugar a day (around 230 calories for women, and 335 for men). In its natural state, sugar is a relatively harmless—even necessary—carbohydrate that our bodies need to function. It's found in fruits, vegetables, and dairy as a compound known as fructose or lactose. The problem comes when sugar is added to foods during processing for added flavor, texture, or color. This is more common than you may realize—you don't have to be in the candy aisle to be surrounded by added sugar. Eating too many of these empty calories has many health effects, the most obvious being major weight gain. Added sugar drives your insulin levels up, messes with your metabolism, and causes th Continue reading >>

Top 9 Reasons To Avoid Sugar

Top 9 Reasons To Avoid Sugar

Written by Kris Gunnars, BSc on March 11, 2013 The harmful effects of sugar go way beyond empty calories. Added sugar is so unhealthy that it is probably the single worst ingredient in the modern diet. Here are the top 9 reasons to avoid sugar. 1. Added Sugar Supplies a Large Amount of Fructose The reason added sugar (and its evil twin... High Fructose Corn Syrup) is bad for you, is that it supplies a very large amount of fructose . Sugar (and HFCS) are half glucose, half fructose. Glucose is essential and can be metabolized by pretty much every cell in the body. If we don't get it from the diet, our bodies make it from proteins and fat. Fructose, however, is not essential to our functioning in any way. The only organ that can metabolize fructose is the liver, because only the liver has a transporter for it ( 1 ). When large amounts of fructose enter the liver and it is already full of glycogen, most of the fructose gets turned into fat ( 2 ). This process is probably one of the leading causes of the epidemics of many chronic, Western diseases. I'd like to point out that this does NOT apply to fruit, which are a real food with vitamins, minerals, fiber, lots of water and are very difficult to overeat on. Bottom Line: The only organ that can metabolize fructose is the liver. When we eat a lot of fructose, many things in the body start to go wrong. Sugar IS empty calories. No doubt about that. Most high-sugar foods like pastries, sodas and candy bars contain very little essential nutrients. People who eat them instead of other more nutritious foods will probably become deficient in many important nutrients. Bottom Line: Most products with added sugars in them contain very little nutrients and can therefore be classified as "empty" calories. 3. Sugar Causes Deposition of Continue reading >>

10 Things You Should Know Before Giving Up Sugar

10 Things You Should Know Before Giving Up Sugar

It seems like everyone is trying to cut down on the sweet stuff - but is it really as simple as it seems? Chocolate fiend and Good Food guinea pig Caroline Hire quit sugar for eight weeks and learnt a few lessons along the way... A friend showed up at my house this summer looking nothing short of fabulous. She’s always been healthy, a runner and health-food nut, but somehow something had taken her to a whole new level of loveliness. I quizzed her to discover she’d done Sarah Wilson’s 8-week ‘I Quit Sugar’ programme. This was something I had to try. However, it soon became clear it was not for the faint-hearted. Quitting sugar, Sarah-style, involved giving up all fruit, all sweeteners (natural and artificial) and most alcohols. Still, I thought I knew what I was getting into. Apparently I didn’t. Here are ten things I wish I’d known before giving up the sweet stuff… 1. Cravings can be conquered Everyone has a weakness. Mine is chocolate. I absolutely adore it but the addiction has always been a source of irritation. I’ve lost count of the number of times I’ve tried to give it up (and failed). I knew this craving wasn’t going down without a fight. My olfactory system (sense of smell) went into overdrive and I could sniff out chocolate from a superhuman distance. Within a week (a week!), the mental battle had dissipated. 2. Deprivation tastes better with friends If you’re going to give up sugar, it’s definitely worth bringing in reinforcements. Knowing that I’d have to fess up to a friend if I’d fallen off the wagon was a great motivator. It was helpful to be able to share sugar-swap discoveries, gloat over righteous food choices and commiserate together through the detox symptoms. 3. Strange side effects Not everyone experiences the same reac Continue reading >>

Ten Surprising Benefits Of Quitting Sugar

Ten Surprising Benefits Of Quitting Sugar

Ten surprising benefits of quitting sugar THINKING about quitting sugar, or at least reducing how much you eat? There are more benefits than you think. FOUR weeks ago I started a sugar-quitting experiment where I cut back on all sugar to detox my body and rid myself of the dreaded sugar cravings. Id had some moments where the need for sugar almost drove me crazy, and at one point I even fell off the bandwagon and ate a piece of cake. But Ive kept on going, because Im curious to find out how a heavily reduced sugar intake will improve my well being, energy levels and foster increased happiness and contentment. The reality is, I couldnt have predicted sheer range of positive benefits quitting sugar has had for me in the last four weeks. Heres what Ive observed so far, and keep in mind that everyone responds to the sugar-free detox differently. Quitting sugar has had a very positive effect on my hip pocket. Before this eight week detox, I would often find myself spending any spare change on a range of sweet treats: doughnuts at the station, banana bread for morning tea (which I absurdly justified as healthy because its bread. Newsflash: Its actually cake!) and French macarons for an afternoon pick-me-up. Now I bring snacks (almonds, granola, fruit) with me and find that Im not buying impulsive sugary treats when Im out. That goes for takeaway too. My husband and I have stopped ordering Thai and pizza, which often comes loaded with sugar. Were saving heaps of money by choosing to cook at home, or eat before we go out. This seems an obvious benefit, but surprisingly losing weight wasnt my main motivation for quitting sugar. Even so, Id put on a few extra kilos over winter and when my jeans started cutting into my waist, I knew that losing a few kilos couldnt hurt. Since qui Continue reading >>

7 Things That Happen When You Stop Eating Sugar

7 Things That Happen When You Stop Eating Sugar

The big takeaway from that UNC report: Most of us could stand to cut back on sugar. The American Heart Association suggests women stick to 6 teaspoons or less of added sugar daily. That's roughly 25 grams, or 100 calories' worth, if you're checking food labels. (Lose up to 15 pounds WITHOUT dieting with Eat Clean to Get Lean, our 21-day clean-eating meal plan.) Exactly what you'll experience when you ditch the sweet stuff will depend on the size of your sugar habit; people on the high end of the sugar-consumption spectrum show addict-like withdrawal symptoms, including anxiety, restlessness, and even depression, research has shown. But assuming you're like the average American, you can expect to a few things to happen once you wrestle your sugar habit back into its cage. 1. Your heart will do a happy dance. Your risk of dying from ticker-related trouble will plummet threefold, according to research from James J. DiNicolantonio, PharmD, a cardiovascular research scientist at St. Luke's Mid-Atlantic Heart Institute in Kansas City, MO. Why? "Added sugar chronically raises insulin levels, which activates the sympathetic nervous system, increasing blood pressure and heart rate," DiNicolantonio explains. "Within a few weeks' time, you might expect to see a 10% decrease in LDL cholesterol and a 20 to 30% decrease in triglycerides." Your BP would head in the right direction, too, he says. MORE: 9 Proven Ways To Lose Stubborn Belly Fat 2. You won't have to borrow your teen's acne cream. Good-bye, midlife zits! Systemic inflammation is a known acne trigger. And sugar—wouldn't you know it?—is inflammatory. One study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that when non-soda-drinkers consumed one 12-ounce can a day for 3 weeks, their inflammation levels increased by Continue reading >>

8 Benefits Of Reducing Sugar Intake | Live Better | Medibank | Live Better

8 Benefits Of Reducing Sugar Intake | Live Better | Medibank | Live Better

Whether youre giving up sugarfor FebFast, or you just want to cut back to improve your overall health and nutrition, focusing on the benefits is the best way to keep you committed to your plan. Here are some of the benefits reducing your sugar intake can provide you. Cutting back on sugar may help you to lose weight. Food and drinks high in sugar tend to be high in calories without the nutritional benefits that fill you up and give your body fuel it can use. Experts say sugar or more specifically, fructose can encourage fat storage. Sugary foods can also make you hungrier more quickly, due to the changes in blood glucose, so if youre snacking on chocolate youre likely to end up eating more throughout the day overall. Instead of reaching for junk food when youre hungry, focus on consuming fibre, protein and low GI complex carbohydrates to help your body get the nourishment it needs, and keep you feeling full and energised. Reducing sugar can create a stable mood and energy levels Sugar sends your energy levels on a rollercoaster. When you eat something sugary, your blood sugar levels spike rapidly, giving you that boost in mood and alertness then fall shortly after insulin is released into your cells. This big, sudden drop in blood sugar can make you shaky, weak, hungry and moody. By focusing on more wholesome, nutritious food evenly spaced out throughout the day, you can give yourself more stable energy levels that leave you feeling overall much more bright and vital. If you like having bright and shiny pearly whites, cutting back on sugar is an excellent idea. The naturally-occurring bacteria in your mouth thrives on sugar. When sugar from food and drink ends up on the surface of your tooth, the bacteria uses the sugar as energy to grow. Over time plaque can build, wh Continue reading >>

More in diabetes