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Low Blood Sugar And Glaucoma

Diabetic Eye Disease

Diabetic Eye Disease

What is diabetic eye disease? Diabetic eye disease is a group of eye problems that can affect people with diabetes. These conditions include diabetic retinopathy, diabetic macular edema, cataracts, and glaucoma. Over time, diabetes can cause damage to your eyes that can lead to poor vision or even blindness. But you can take steps to prevent diabetic eye disease, or keep it from getting worse, by taking care of your diabetes. The best ways to manage your diabetes and keep your eyes healthy are to Often, there are no warning signs of diabetic eye disease or vision loss when damage first develops. A full, dilated eye exam helps your doctor find and treat eye problems early—often before much vision loss can occur. How does diabetes affect my eyes? Diabetes affects your eyes when your blood glucose, also called blood sugar, is too high. In the short term, you are not likely to have vision loss from high blood glucose. People sometimes have blurry vision for a few days or weeks when they’re changing their diabetes care plan or medicines. High glucose can change fluid levels or cause swelling in the tissues of your eyes that help you to focus, causing blurred vision. This type of blurry vision is temporary and goes away when your glucose level gets closer to normal. If your blood glucose stays high over time, it can damage the tiny blood vessels in the back of your eyes. This damage can begin during prediabetes, when blood glucose is higher than normal, but not high enough for you to be diagnosed with diabetes. Damaged blood vessels may leak fluid and cause swelling. New, weak blood vessels may also begin to grow. These blood vessels can bleed into the middle part of the eye, lead to scarring, or cause dangerously high pressure inside your eye. Most serious diabetic eye d Continue reading >>

Could Glaucoma Actually Be

Could Glaucoma Actually Be "diabetes Of The Brain"? A New Hypothesis Says Maybe

A group of medical researchers from India is proposing the radical new hypothesis that glaucoma may indeed be diabetes of the brain. The research, entitled Glaucoma – Diabetes of the brain: A radical hypothesis about its nature and pathogenesis [i.e., the mechanisms that cause it], has been published in the May 2014 issue of Medical Hypotheses. Published by Elsevier Inc., Medical Hypotheses is a forum for ideas in medicine and related biomedical sciences, publishing "interesting and important theoretical papers that foster the diversity and debate upon which the scientific process thrives." The authors are Muneeb A. Faiq; Rima Dada; Daman Saluja; and Tanuj Dada, who represent the following institutions: All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Delhi India; and the University of Delhi, India. [Editor's note: In science, a hypothesis is an idea or explanation that is then tested through structured study and experimentation. It is more than a guess, but less than a well-established theory. A scientific hypothesis that survives experimental testing then becomes a scientific theory.] What Is Glaucoma? The term "glaucoma" describes a group of eye diseases that can lead to blindness by damaging the optic nerve. It is one of the leading causes of vision loss and blindness. The human eye continuously produces a fluid, called the aqueous, that must drain from the eye to maintain healthy eye pressure. In primary open-angle glaucoma, the most common type of glaucoma, the eye's drainage canals become blocked, and the fluid accumulation causes pressure to build within the eye. This pressure can cause damage to the optic nerve, which transmits information from the eye to the brain. Normal-tension glaucoma, also called low-tension glaucoma, is a type of glaucoma in which individuals Continue reading >>

Presence And Risk Factors For Glaucoma In Patients With Diabetes

Presence And Risk Factors For Glaucoma In Patients With Diabetes

Go to: INTRODUCTION Diabetes mellitus represents a significant public health issue which has become increasingly prevalent due to changes and trends in diet, lifestyle, and consequently, the rate of obesity [1]. Since 1980, the worldwide prevalence of diabetes has nearly quadrupled to an estimated 422 million affected persons in 2014 [2]. As a result, global health care expenditures for diabetes are expected to total as much as 490 billion United States dollars by the year 2030, comprising an estimated 12% of total health care costs [3]. The burden of diabetes on the health care system is manifest in many different ways. Diabetic patients require more outpatient visits, chronic medications, and are at risk for a number of systemic microvascular complications that result in end organ damage and associated complications: renal disease, cardiovascular disease, amputations, vision loss, and premature death [3]. In particular, vision loss from diabetic retinopathy (DR) represents one of the most devastating complications on quality of life and is the leading cause of blindness in working age and economically active adults [4–7]. An older survey among diabetic patients in the United States reported a prevalence of self-rated visual impairment as high as 24.8% [8]. Current estimates of the prevalence of DR have been estimated as 34.6% among all patients with diabetes (both type 1 and type 2) and as a result, the implications of diabetic eye disease are far-reaching [9]. In addition to retinopathy, diabetes has been associated with a number of other potentially vision-threatening ocular complications including cataract, uveitis, and glaucoma [10–13]. Glaucoma represents the leading cause of worldwide irreversible blindness, as defined by best-corrected central visual acuity Continue reading >>

Eating Too Much Sugar? Why Your Vision Suffers

Eating Too Much Sugar? Why Your Vision Suffers

Eating Too Much Sugar? Why Your Vision Suffers Halloween brings the feeling of fall across the country, with kids dressing up in their best costumes and trick-or-treating among neighbors. Often, they bring back a lot of candy - some of which they inhale immediately, and some of which parents sneak away to hide (or to eat!) But what happens when you overload sugar? A bounty of problems! Diabetes:According to the American Diabetes Association, it's a myth that eating too much sugar can cause diabetes, but research has shown links between sugar andtype 2 diabetes. The American Diabetes Association recommends avoiding excess sugar regardless, in an attempt to regulate blood glucose. Nearly 30 million Americans have diabetes and 8.1 million cases are undiagnosed. Diabetes makes it difficult for your body to produce or use the hormone insulin. Consuming too much sugar causes your body to produce insulin to help your body use and remove this sugar (glucose) from your blood. Otherwise, the sugar builds up in your blood, causing a host of ailments, including vision problems , such as Diabetic retinopathy. Retinopathy:Diabetic retinopathy is the most common cause of eye damage of people with diabetes. The retina is a group of cells in the back of the eye that transmits visual information from the optic nerve to the brain for processing. In individuals with diabetic retinopathy, elevated and uncontrolled blood sugar levels cause irreversible damages to the delicate blood vessels in the retina, causing visual impairment or blindness, says the American Academy of Ophthalmology . Cataracts:The lens within your eye allows your eye to focus light and images on your retina and transmits them to your brain. Cataracts cause a clouding of the usually clear lens, making it difficult for yo Continue reading >>

Glaucoma And Diabetes

Glaucoma And Diabetes

Glaucoma is caused by excess fluid pressing on the nerve at the back of the eye Glaucoma may occur amongst people with and without diabetes, and can be a complication of diabetes if retinopathy develops. Glaucoma is caused by an excess amount of fluid pressing on the nerve at the back of the eye. The eye produces a small amount of fluid like water in its middle chamber, which flows around the lens of the eye into the front chamber. The fluid leaves the eye using a drainage network and then enters the bloodstream. Commonly, glaucoma causes the drainage system to become blocked, and fluid becomes trapped in the eye. This causes pressure to build up in the eye and pass to the nerve at the rear of the eye . This nerve may become damaged by glaucoma. People with diabetic retinopathy have an increased risk of glaucoma. This can happen if abnormal blood vessel growth, which can occur as a result of retinopathy, blocks the natural drainage of the eye. Glaucoma has very few symptoms in its early stage, so people may be unaware that something is wrong with them. As someone with diabetes, an optometrist or another eye specialist should test you for glaucoma at least once each year. Glaucoma may be diagnosed by an optometrist by measuring your eye pressure, checking the eye at the optic nerve, and testing the field of your vision. A common test these days is a noncontact tonometry test (NCT test) in which a brief puff of air will be directed into the front of your eye. The machine you sit in front of measures the resistance of your eye to the puff of air without needing to make contact with your eye. The puff of air is noticeable but is not painful. Experts will quickly be able to determine if you have glaucoma. Glaucoma will usually be treated with eye drops to relieve pressure i Continue reading >>

Eye Problems And Diabetes

Eye Problems And Diabetes

Eye problems and diabetes introduction If you have diabetes, regular visits to your ophthalmologist for eye exams are important to avoid eye problems. High blood sugar (glucose) increases the risk of diabetes eye problems. In fact, diabetes is the leading cause of blindness in adults age 20 to 74. If you have eye problems and diabetes, don't buy a new pair of glasses as soon as you notice you have blurred vision. It could just be a temporary eye problem that develops rapidly with diabetes and is caused by high blood sugar levels. High blood sugar in diabetes causes the lens of the eye to swell, which changes your ability to see. To correct this kind of eye problem, you need to get your blood sugar back into the target range (90-130 milligrams per deciliter or mg/dL before meals, and less than 180 mg/dL one to two hours after a meal). It may take as long as three months after your blood sugar is well controlled for your vision to fully get back to normal. Blurred vision can also be a symptom of more serious eye problem with diabetes. The three major eye problems that people with diabetes may develop and should be aware of are cataracts, glaucoma, and retinopathy. A cataract is a clouding or fogging of the normally clear lens of the eye. The lens is what allows us to see and focus on an image just like a camera. Although anyone can get cataracts, people with diabetes get these eye problems at an earlier age than most and the condition progresses more rapidly than in people without diabetes. If you have a cataract, there is a cloudy area in the lens of your eye that results in the inability to focus light, and your vision is impaired. Symptoms of this eye problem in diabetes include blurred or glared vision. During cataract surgery, the cloudy lens is removed or cleaned ou Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia And Vision Loss Are Linked

Hypoglycemia And Vision Loss Are Linked

Lab mice demonstrate eye cell damage after sustained hypoglycemia A study conducted by State University of New York Upstate Medical University, demonstrated that chronic hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) can lead to vision loss. The retina is the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye. It is part of the eye that can be affected by diabetes. The study, conducted on lab mice that were genetically predisposed to hypoglycemia, proved that chronic low blood sugar led to loss of retinal function and also retinal cell death. The study, which was published in the Proceeding of National Academy of Sciences, is the first to demonstrate the stresses on an animal’s eye caused by chronic low blood sugar. When researchers restored blood sugar to normal levels in the test mice, vision loss was delayed by several months. These conclusions seem to validate the belief that good blood sugar control can reduce retinal deterioration caused by diabetic retinopathy. This is especially important to diabetics who are susceptible to hypoglycemia due to ongoing insulin treatment. Diabetic eye disease may include: Diabetic retinopathy – damage to the blood vessels in the retina; Cataract–clouding of the eye’s lens; Glaucoma–increase in fluid pressure inside the eye that leads to optic nerve damage and loss of vision. Cataract and glaucoma also affect many people who do not have diabetes. ref: Retina Today Continue reading >>

Association Between Glucose Levels And Intraocular Pressure: Pre- And Postprandial Analysis In Diabetic And Nondiabetic Patients

Association Between Glucose Levels And Intraocular Pressure: Pre- And Postprandial Analysis In Diabetic And Nondiabetic Patients

Journal of Ophthalmology Volume 2015 (2015), Article ID 832058, 5 pages 1Department of Ophthalmology, Federal University of São Paulo, 04021-001 Vila Mariana, SP, Brazil 2Glaucoma Unit, Hospital Medicina dos Olhos, 06018-180 Osasco, SP, Brazil Academic Editor: Francis Carbonaro Copyright © 2015 Luis Guilherme Milesi Pimentel et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Abstract The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between glucose levels and intraocular pressure (IOP) fluctuation in diabetic and nondiabetic patients. Seventeen nondiabetic and 20 diabetic subjects underwent a complete ophthalmic examination, capillary glucose testing, and applanation tonometry in two distinct situations: first, fasting for at least 8 hours and, second, postprandial measurements. Baseline glucose levels were higher in diabetic patients (). Postprandial IOP was significantly higher than baseline IOP in diabetic () and nondiabetic patients (). Postprandial glucose levels were significantly higher than baseline measurements in both diabetic () and nondiabetic patients (). There was a significant association between glucose levels variation and IOP change in both diabetic patients (; ) and nondiabetic individuals (; ). There is also a significant association between the baseline glucose levels and IOP change in diabetic group (; ). In a multivariable model, the magnitude of glucose level change remained significantly associated with IOP variation even including age, baseline IOP, ancestry, and gender as a confounding factor (). We concluded that there is a significant association between blood glu Continue reading >>

Glaucoma And Diabetes

Glaucoma And Diabetes

People with diabetes are at risk for several types of glaucoma. This article provides helpful information on prevention strategies and treatment options. Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma Type 2 diabetes is a risk factor for primary open-angle glaucoma. This has been demonstrated by large epidemiologic studies including the Los Angeles Latino Eye Study and the Blue Mountains eye study in Australia. If you have type 2 diabetes, you should have been referred to an ophthalmologist at the time of diagnosis to look for signs of diabetic retinopathy, a disease in which high blood sugar damages the retina’s blood vessels. A diabetic patient should also have a yearly dilated exam so that any signs of glaucoma can also be identified. In diabetic patients who have primary open-angle glaucoma, the glaucoma is treated the same way as for non-diabetic patients with open-angle glaucoma by lowering the eye pressure with medications, laser, and surgery if needed. Neovascular Glaucoma Neovascular glaucoma is another type of glaucoma for which diabetic patients are at higher risk. In this type of glaucoma, patients usually have a severe form of diabetic retinopathy, in which new vessels exhibit abnormal growth. These new vessels grow on the iris and over the drainage angle, causing scar formation and a form of angle-closure glaucoma. The treatment plan includes treating the diabetic retinopathy, typically by a laser applied to the retina and/or injections of medications. Both treatments are intended to stop these abnormal new vessels from growing. However, even if these vessels “regress,” the drainage angle may be so compromised that the eye pressure is uncontrolled even with eye drops. Patients will sometimes require surgery to manage the neovascular glaucoma. Most ophthalmologists will Continue reading >>

Doctor, I Have A Question.? What Is The Relationship Between Diabetes And Glaucoma? Written By Louis R. Pasquale, Md, Farvo

Doctor, I Have A Question.? What Is The Relationship Between Diabetes And Glaucoma? Written By Louis R. Pasquale, Md, Farvo

Assoc. Professor of Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School Director, Glaucoma Service, Massachusetts Eye & Ear The relationship between diabetes and glaucoma can be controversial and confusing. First we must understand that there are two types of diabetes. In type 1 diabetes (T1D), there is a complete loss of the pancreatic beta cells that make insulin. The profound inability to make insulin in T1D necessitates that nearly all patients with this condition be treated with insulin replacement therapy. In type 2 diabetes (T2D), the cells that make insulin are not destroyed. In fact, T2D patients can typically make more insulin than patients without diabetes. When blood sugar levels are high, the secreted insulin is ineffective at lowering blood glucose levels, producing a state of insulin resistance. The treatment of T2D is often directed at lifestyle measures that reduce insulin resistance like diet and exercise, although some of these patients also require medications to lower blood sugar. Second, we must understand that there are many different types of glaucoma so we must both specify the type of diabetes (T1D or T2D) and the type of glaucoma we are referring to when we examine the relation between diabetes and glaucoma. One thing is clear: uncontrolled T1D or T2D for a long enough period will lead to the development of diabetic retinopathy, consisting of leaking blood vessels and poor retinal blood supply that disrupts retinal function. Left unchecked the retina becomes starved for oxygen and develops new blood vessels and the stimulus for new blood vessel formation can travel to the anterior segment of the eye. This triggers new blood vessel formation in the ocular anterior segment and interferes with the normal internal drainage system of the eye leading to elevated Continue reading >>

The High Blood Sugar Connection To Eye Diseases

The High Blood Sugar Connection To Eye Diseases

Before starting with Nutritional Weight & Wellness, I never would have guessed my morning bowl of Kashi cereal with skim milk and a banana could lead me down a road towards cataracts, glaucoma or macular degeneration. But now I know that these "healthy" foods were actually setting me up for a blood sugar rollercoaster. Each of these foods (cereal, skim milk and even the banana) is high in carbohydrates, which break down into sugar in the bloodstream. When carbohydrates are eaten in the right amounts and come from unprocessed foods (fruits, veggies and beans), just the right amount of insulin is released. However, when too much carbohydrate or sugar is consumed, the body releases too much insulin. Excess sugar and insulin cause inflammation and are very damaging to blood vessels—including the tiny blood vessels in our eyes. Read on to learn more about the high blood sugar connection to eye diseases. Cataracts A cataract is a clouding of the lens in the eye. The lens is normally clear and used to bring objects into focus by changing their shape from very flat to round. There are several different types of cataracts, but the most common is age related. Just like hair and nails, the lens of the eye continually breaks down and regenerates, and over time its ability to do so diminishes. High blood sugars can lead to swelling within the lens, creating bubble-like pockets known as vacuoles. Imagine trying to look through a pair of binoculars with water spots on it; you will never be able to focus enough to see clearly. Surgery is often the go-to solution for people with advanced cataracts. However, according to Dr. Richard Bernstein, author of Dr. Bernstein’s Diabetes Solution, many of his diabetic clients with cataracts have improved their eyesight simply by eating a low-c Continue reading >>

5 Ways Diabetes Can Affect Your Eyes & Vision

5 Ways Diabetes Can Affect Your Eyes & Vision

Treatment can include medicine and special eye drops. Surgery and laser treatments can help with drainage. If you have diabetes, youre also more likely to get a rare condition called neovascular glaucoma. This makes new blood vessels grow on the iris, the colored part of your eye. They block the normal flow of fluid and raise eye pressure. It's difficult to treat. Your doctor might try laser surgery to cut back on the vessels. Or he could use implants to help drain the fluid. The retina is a group of cells on the back of your eye that take in light. They turn it into images that the optic nerve sends to your brain . Damage to small blood vessels in your retina causes diabetic retinopathy . It's related to high blood sugar levels . If you dont find and treat it early, you could go blind. The longer you have diabetes, the more likely you are to get it. If you keep your blood sugar under control, you lower your chances. People with type 1 diabetes rarely develop the condition before puberty . In adults, it's rare to see unless you've had type 1 diabetes for at least 5 years. If you keep tight control of your blood sugar with either an insulin pump or multiple daily insulin injections, youre far less likely to get this condition. If you have type 2 diabetes, you may have signs of eye problems when youre diagnosed. Control your blood sugar, blood pressure , and cholesterol to slow or prevent the disease. If you smoke, try to quit. Itll improve your eyes and your overall health. Background retinopathy. Your blood vessels are damaged, but you can still see OK. It can get worse if you don't manage your diabetes well. Maculopathy. This is damage to the macula, a critical area of your retina. It can greatly affect your vision. Proliferative retinopathy. It happens when cells at Continue reading >>

The Connection Between Sugar And Glaucoma

The Connection Between Sugar And Glaucoma

Is there are connection between sugar and glaucoma? The relationship between glaucoma and sugar diseases such as diabetes is confusing and controversial. The first thing to realize is that there is type 1 and type 2 diabetes as well as many different types of glaucoma. In the first type of diabetes, the beta cells in the pancreas no longer make diabetes. In the second type of diabetes, insulin-making cells are not destroyed. Patients with this type make more insulin than non-diabetics. However, the high blood sugar is not lowered by the increase in insulin due to insulin resistance. In type 1 diabetes, insulin replacement therapy is the treatment. On the other hand, lifestyle measures are taken to deal with type 2 as well as medications. Various Glaucoma Types Since there are various types of glaucoma as well, there needs to be a determination of the type of diabetes there is as well as the type of glaucoma in order to determine the relationship. One thing that is certain is that a long period of uncontrolled diabetes of both types will lead to poor blood supply to the retina and leaking blood vessels. The retina starves for oxygen. A Word About Open-Angle Glaucoma and Diabetes For years, researchers have been intrigued by the most common glaucoma type called open-angle glaucoma and diabetes. Compared to people with no diabetes, those with the disease have twice the likelihood of developing glaucoma in comparison. In the same way, there is a higher chance of someone with open-angle glaucoma compared to someone who does not have the disease. Diabetic Eye Disease For diabetics, diabetic eye disease is a common complication. This term refers to eye problems that a group of people with diabetics develops. One of them is glaucoma. Diabetic eye disease also includes cataracts Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Your Eyesight

Diabetes And Your Eyesight

Diabetes is a complex disease resulting from the inability of the body to produce insulin, a hormone that takes sugar out of the blood and into cells where it can be used for energy. Without enough insulin, there is too much sugar in your blood. It’s like having a car full of gas but no key; you have the fuel you need, but can’t start using it. Diabetes affects more than 29 million Americans. The most common form of diabetes is adult-onset diabetes. Adult-onset diabetes typically strikes those who are over 40, overweight and have a sedentary lifestyle. Other risk factors include those with a family history of diabetes and those belonging to certain ethnic groups. Persons of African, Native American, Japanese, Latino or Polynesian descent are more at risk. Diabetic Eye Disease A common complication of diabetes is diabetic eye disease. Diabetic eye disease refers to a group of sight-threatening eye problems that people with diabetes may develop. Glaucoma is one of these diseases. Diabetic eye disease also includes diabetic retinopathy and cataracts. Diabetic retinopathy, a disease which damages the tiny blood vessels in the retina (the light-sensitive tissue that lines the back of the eye) is the most common diabetic eye disease. Diabetic retinopathy affects nearly 7.7 million Americans age 40 and older. A cataract is a clouding of the eye’s lens that results in blurring of normal vision. People with diabetes are nearly twice as likely to develop cataracts as other adults. Cataracts also tend to develop at an earlier age. Diabetes and Glaucoma The relationship between diabetes and open-angle glaucoma (the most common type of glaucoma), has intrigued researchers for years. People with diabetes are twice as likely to develop glaucoma as are non-diabetics, although som Continue reading >>

Facts About Diabetic Eye Disease

Facts About Diabetic Eye Disease

Points to Remember Diabetic eye disease comprises a group of eye conditions that affect people with diabetes. These conditions include diabetic retinopathy, diabetic macular edema (DME), cataract, and glaucoma. All forms of diabetic eye disease have the potential to cause severe vision loss and blindness. Diabetic retinopathy involves changes to retinal blood vessels that can cause them to bleed or leak fluid, distorting vision. Diabetic retinopathy is the most common cause of vision loss among people with diabetes and a leading cause of blindness among working-age adults. DME is a consequence of diabetic retinopathy that causes swelling in the area of the retina called the macula. Controlling diabetes—by taking medications as prescribed, staying physically active, and maintaining a healthy diet—can prevent or delay vision loss. Because diabetic retinopathy often goes unnoticed until vision loss occurs, people with diabetes should get a comprehensive dilated eye exam at least once a year. Early detection, timely treatment, and appropriate follow-up care of diabetic eye disease can protect against vision loss. Diabetic retinopathy can be treated with several therapies, used alone or in combination. NEI supports research to develop new therapies for diabetic retinopathy, and to compare the effectiveness of existing therapies for different patient groups. What is diabetic eye disease? Diabetic eye disease can affect many parts of the eye, including the retina, macula, lens and the optic nerve. Diabetic eye disease is a group of eye conditions that can affect people with diabetes. Diabetic retinopathy affects blood vessels in the light-sensitive tissue called the retina that lines the back of the eye. It is the most common cause of vision loss among people with diabetes Continue reading >>

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