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Lost Weight But A1c Went Up

Study: The Best Exercise For Diabetes

Study: The Best Exercise For Diabetes

It's no secret that exercise is key to controlling type 2 diabetes — and many doctors already urge their diabetic patients to get active. But it's a vague directive: How much exercise is enough? How often? And what kind? The simple answer is that any is better than none — in sum, that's what a new study published in the Sept. 18 issue of the journal Annals of Internal Medicine found. But it also found that not all exercise is created equal and that the combination of aerobic exercise and weight training is significantly better for controlling blood sugar than either alone. The elegantly designed study, led by researchers at the University of Calgary and the University of Ottawa, involved 251 patients aged 39 to 70, with type 2 diabetes. The patients, none of whom were regular exercisers, were randomized to one of four groups: aerobic exercise, resistance training, a combination of both, or none. For 22 weeks, the aerobic group worked out for 45 minutes three times a week on the treadmill or stationary bicycle; the resistance-training group spent an equal amount of time on weight machines. The combination group was at the gym twice as long as the other two exercise groups, doing the full aerobic plus weight-training regimens. "We built up gradually to 45 minutes, but it's certainly vigorous," says Dr. Ronald Sigal, lead author of the study and associate professor of medicine and cardiac sciences at the University of Calgary. "It's not sprinting or maximal exercise like a marathon trainer would do, but for someone who's middle-aged and older and very overweight, it's fairly strenuous." Overall, researchers saw improvements in blood-sugar control in all the patients who worked out. Compared with controls, patients in the aerobic group had a reduction of .51% in their h Continue reading >>

The Dilemma Of Weight Loss In Diabetes

The Dilemma Of Weight Loss In Diabetes

People with diabetes receive mixed messages about weight loss from magazines, newspapers, friends, family, and, yes, even health professionals. Few subjects have accumulated as much misleading and potentially dangerous folklore as the subject of obesity. A common message is that losing weight is just a matter of willpower, and if you have been losing weight and reach a plateau, it's because you've lost your willpower and are no longer following your diet. Furthermore, for people with type 2 diabetes, the message often is that weight loss is the answer to improving glucose control: “If you just lose 20 lb, you won't need insulin.” What does research tell us about these issues, and what should our messages as health professionals be to people with diabetes? Obesity is a serious worldwide problem and is associated with the risk of developing diabetes. Today, more than 1.1 billion adults worldwide are overweight, and 312 million of them are obese.1 In the past 20 years, the rates of obesity have tripled in developing countries that have adopted a Western lifestyle, with the Middle East, Pacific Islands, Southeast Asia, India, and China facing the greatest increase. Consequently, the number of people with diabetes in these countries is expected to increase from 84 million in 2000 to 228 million by 2030. Thus, preventing obesity is a high priority for the prevention of diabetes and other chronic diseases. According to some obesity researchers, it may not be possible to decrease the current numbers of overweight and obese people in the United States, but we need to try to slow or prevent the increase that has been occurring at an alarming rate.2 The hope is that slowing the rising prevalence of obesity will also slow the diabetes epidemic. Can this be accomplished? Thus fa Continue reading >>

After An A1c Reading Of 8.5, I Have Lost 27 Lbs, Exercise 3-4 Times Per Week, Drink A Minimum Of 64 Oz. Of Water Daily And Cut Out All Processed Sugar. My A1c Went Up To 8.8! Explanation?

After An A1c Reading Of 8.5, I Have Lost 27 Lbs, Exercise 3-4 Times Per Week, Drink A Minimum Of 64 Oz. Of Water Daily And Cut Out All Processed Sugar. My A1c Went Up To 8.8! Explanation?

A: First, congratulations on your weight loss, your exercise regimen and the changes that you’ve made in your eating plan! No doubt you’ve been working very hard to make these changes. I don’t have an exact explanation as to why your A1C has increased, but I can venture a few guesses. You didn’t mention how long you’ve had diabetes, nor did you indicate if you are taking any medication to help manage your diabetes. I’m assuming that you have type 2 diabetes, and it’s important to understand that type 2 diabetes changes over time. When you first develop type 2 diabetes, your pancreas still produces insulin, but it either does not make enough for your glucose to stay under control, and/or your body isn’t able to use it efficiently. In the early stages of type 2 diabetes, weight loss, healthy eating and regular physical activity may be enough to control glucose levels. Some people need to start on medication right at diagnosis, though. And over time, even if one is controlling his or her weight, eating healthfully and staying active, the pancreas just can’t keep up with the body’s demand for insulin. So, A1C levels start to increase. Most people with type 2 diabetes need to take diabetes pills, often starting with one type, and gradually needing two or three types. Injectable medications, such as exenatide or liraglutide may be added. Eventually, almost half of people with type 2 diabetes will need to take insulin. This is not a reflection of anything that the person is or isn’t doing; it’s simply the natural course of diabetes. It may be that your diabetes has changed and that you need to discuss your medication with your healthcare provider. Another possibility is that you’re consuming more carbohydrate than your body can easily handle. Processe Continue reading >>

A1c Increased With Weight Loss

A1c Increased With Weight Loss

It's great that you have lost weight and are exercising. Diet plays a critical role with controlling your blood glucose level. Have you lowered your carbs ? the A1C represents the average blood sugar over the last month or so, so the implication is you've been running higher blood sugar levels for some reason. Exercise should tend to reduce them, eating more carbs especially higher GI ones will increase them. Your diary isn't open. Your A1c is an average of your last 3 months of blood sugars. You should check your blood sugar daily -- first thing in the AM and before and after random meals to see how the foods you are eating are affecting your blood sugars. Lower your carbs, stay away from processed foods and simple carbs (cookies, cakes, white rice pasta, etc.) and try and have a bit of protein and fat with your carbs at every meal and snack. Exercise is key, but make sure if you are exercising outside that you have some sort of snack with you in case your blood sugars drop too fast. You are doing well. Don't get discouraged. Your weight loss and exercise is definitely improving your health and slowing the progression of your diabetes despite similar/higher A1C levels. A lot of how much control you can get with just diet and exercise is genetics. My husband was diagnosed with diabetes in his early thirties and was overweight but not obese and normal weight most of his life whereas I have been really obese off and on my whole life and have been lucky enough (so far) not to have blood sugar problems. You may need to be more careful with your carbohydrate intake. How often are you getting monitored by your doctor and are you on any medication? I think your A1C should be around 7 to be considered well controlled diabetes. Keep working at it. You are doing great:flowerfory Continue reading >>

Keeping The Pounds On: Causes Of Unexplained Weight Loss

Keeping The Pounds On: Causes Of Unexplained Weight Loss

Our society is obsessed with weight, if you haven’t noticed. More than two thirds of US adults are overweight or obese, there are more diet books published than we can count, and, of course, we have the privilege of watching shows like The Biggest Loser to help keep us in line. And according to government statistics, more than 85% of people with Type 2 diabetes are overweight. So it stands to reason that much of the focus of managing Type 2 diabetes is based on reaching and staying at a healthy weight. It’s important to note that thin people can get diabetes too, and not just Type 1 diabetes. In a 2008 study published in the journal Diabetes Care, adults age 60 to 79 years old with a body-mass index (BMI) of less than 18.5 (which is considered to be underweight) were 30% more likely to get Type 2 diabetes than adults with a “normal” BMI of 18.5 to 24.9. In a society where being thin equates with beauty, youth, intelligence, and success, there is often little sympathy or patience for people who are too thin and who desperately want to gain weight. If you’ve struggled with losing weight and keeping it off, you know all too well how challenging that can be. People who want to gain weight often face the same kind of battle. And to have diabetes on top of that can make it doubly difficult. First things first: identify the cause If you have diabetes, are underweight, and would like to gain weight, it’s helpful to first have a talk with your doctor. Make sure there are no health or medical reasons for you being underweight (especially if you’ve recently lost weight without trying) such as having an overactive thyroid, a digestive disorder (such as Crohn disease), or cancer, for example. A physical exam, blood work, and other tests may be needed to rule out certai Continue reading >>

Hba1c And Weight Loss

Hba1c And Weight Loss

It’s long been established — based on both research studies and real-world clinical experience — that in many people with Type 2 diabetes, losing weight can help control blood glucose levels. In fact, one of the very first posts here at Diabetes Flashpoints was a personal account of losing weight and reaching a lower HbA1c level (a measure of long-term blood glucose control) on a low-carb diet. But different studies over the years have focused on different populations of people with Type 2 diabetes, some of whom had higher HbA1c levels or were more overweight or obese than others. So in a study published last month in the journal Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism, researchers sought to combine the results of several studies to find out whether there’s an overall pattern to how much HbA1c levels can be reduced by losing weight. They found 58 studies that met their criteria, conducted between 1990 and 2012, in which overweight or obese people with Type 2 diabetes lost weight through reduced-calorie diets, weight-loss drugs, or bariatric surgery. In these studies, a total of 17,204 people were followed for between 3 and 24 months after beginning their weight-loss intervention. As noted in an article on the study at Physician’s Briefing, the researchers found that overall, there was a linear relationship between weight loss and HbA1c reduction. Specifically, the average person saw their HbA1c drop by 0.1% for each kilogram (about 2.2 pounds) of body weight lost — regardless of whether it was the first or last kilogram of weight loss over the course of the study. But that’s doesn’t mean this average applied to everyone — in fact, people with a higher starting HbA1c level saw a bigger drop in HbA1c for each kilogram of body weight lost, compared with those wh Continue reading >>

Why Hemoglobin A1c Is Not A Reliable Marker

Why Hemoglobin A1c Is Not A Reliable Marker

i was recently tested for Hemoglobin A1c because i presented to an endocrinologist with extremely low blood glucose on lab test and some scary symptoms, not the ordinary hypoglycemia symptoms. My A1c was 4.7 which registered as low (L) on the lab print out–it was only slightly low. Does a low score on this suggest a possibility of short-lived RBCs? Does it have any relationship with extremely low blood glucose? my result at the lab, fasting, was 32mg/dL. Not long after that i got a home glucometer and i get the same kind of results on that as the lab got, in the 20s and 30s first thing in the morning, every day. did not know i had hypoglycemia until i had that lab test, though i had had one episode where i woke up with ataxia, i fell while walking to the bathroom first thing in the morning, i got up and immediately fell again. I soon found that i had very impaired coordination. i did not know why and i was very worried. Eventually i wanted to have breakfast but had great difficulty holding the measuring cup under the faucet, to get some water to heat, to make instant oatmeal, i lacked the coordination to get the water into the cup. I persisted and did make the instant oatmeal (pour hot water onto flakes and it’s done), and i got my lap top and was eating the oatmeal and i suddenly was aware that the symptoms were going away. Previously i had been unable to type. While eating the small amount of oatmeal, i realized i could type. That was about a month before the lab test. Since it only happened that once, i put it out of my mind. About 5 days after the lab test, i had the second episode, worse than the first, i woke falling out of bed to the floor, couldn’t use my arm to break the fall, i didn’t have the coordination. i sat on the floor, i could not get up and wa Continue reading >>

Can You Lower Your A1c With Diet And Exercise?

Can You Lower Your A1c With Diet And Exercise?

This post may contain affiliate links. Purchasing through them helps support this website. This post may also contain items sent to A Girl's Gotta Spa! for consideration. Can You Lower Your A1C with Diet and Exercise? If you just received test results back from your doctor and he/she has indicated that you have an elevated HbA1C (or A1c for short), you may be wondering what that means and just what you can do to lower it to within normal range. Back in December I decided I wanted to be a Living Kidney Donor . Im at a point in my life where Im no longer satisfied with just living a basic life. I want to do more, see more and touch more lives before my time is up. To become a candidate for living kidney donation you have to go through a battery of tests over the course of several months. The very first round of bloodwork includes testing your HbA1C level to determine if you have diabetes or are considered pre-diabetic. Obviously you dont have to be looking to donate a kidney to have this test done, as its something your doctor will do when you have blood sugar issues. Mine was in the pre-diabetic range (5.8%) and it left me trying to figure it out what I needed to do to lower it. Dr. Manisha Ghei of Praana Integrative Medicine & Holistic Health Center, PLLC told me that, HbA1C is a test of hemoglobin glycation and hemoglobin is present inside our Red Blood Cells (RBCs). Our RBCs regenerate every 120 days so it will take A1C approximately 3 months to change. A1c is a test of average long-term blood sugar control over the three months prior to the date of the blood test. Think about what you eat over the course of 3 months. Do you have a few bad days where you emotionally eat or go on a chocolate and fried food binge? No? Just me? Well for those of you not in the big fat l Continue reading >>

Why Is My A1c Rising?

Why Is My A1c Rising?

I am a 36-year-old man diagnosed with type 2 diabetes two years ago. Until six months ago, my A1C was 5.4 percent, but now it's creeping back to 7. I am a vegetarian, teetotaler, and nonsmoker, and I take oral medication. My diet and lifestyle are unchanged. Why are my blood glucose levels going up? Would eating many small meals help my control? Continue reading >>

6 Ways To Lower Your A1c Level

6 Ways To Lower Your A1c Level

Diabetes is a serious, chronic disease that can lead to many complications. When managed properly, diabetes does not have to control your life or ruin your health. Getting tested, especially if you are at risk for developing type 2 diabetes, is a proactive measure you can take for yourself and your future. In the early stages of diabetes, there are no symptoms. An early diagnosis helps you get treatment before complications occur. The A1C test is a blood test that checks for type 2 diabetes. It is also used to see how well you are managing your diabetes if you have already been diagnosed. The test provides information about a person’s average levels of blood sugar over a two- to three-month period. The number is reported in the form of a percentage. The higher the percentage, the higher your average blood glucose levels are, and the higher your risk for either diabetes or related complications. A1C is one of the primary tests used for diabetes diagnosis and management. It can test for type 1 and type 2 diabetes, but it can’t test for gestational diabetes. It can also be used to predict the likelihood that someone will get diabetes. The A1C test measures how much glucose, or sugar, is attached to hemoglobin, the protein in red blood cells. The more glucose attached, the higher the A1C. This test is groundbreaking, as it 1) doesn’t require fasting, 2) gives a picture of blood sugar levels over a period of days and weeks instead of at just one point in time like fasting sugars, and 3) can be done at any time of day. This makes it easier to administer and easier to make accurate diagnoses. According to the National Institutes of Health, a normal A1C is below 5.7 percent. If your score is between 5.7 and 6.4 percent, the diagnosis is prediabetes. Having prediabetes put Continue reading >>

The Effects Of Weight Loss On The A1c

The Effects Of Weight Loss On The A1c

An A1C test is commonly used to diagnose diabetes. It measures your blood sugar levels over a 3-month period by showing the amount of glucose that is attached to your red blood cells. The glucose sticks to the cells until they die which is typically two to three months, reports Utah.gov. Having too much blood sugar can cause an excess amount of glucose to attach to the cells which will give you a higher A1C and increase your risk of diabetes. Lower your A1C and your risk of diabetes by losing weight. Video of the Day Lower A1C Losing weight is the first step to lowering your A1C. Your A1C should be below 120 mg/dL, or between 4 to 6 percent. Having two separate tests showing an A1C 120 mg/dL to 140 mg/dL, or 6 to 6.5 percent, may determine that you have pre-diabetes, reports MayoClinic.com. If your A1C is above 150 mg/dL, or 7 percent, your doctor may diagnose you with diabetes. In some cases, your doctor may also suggest medications to help lower your A1C if weight loss is not enough. Reduced Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Your doctor will use the A1C results to diagnose or treat your diabetes. The more fatty tissue you have in your body, the more resiliant you become to insulin. Your body uses insulin to regulate the movement of sugar into cells. The higher your A1C, the greater your risk of developing type 2 diabetes and having diabetes complications, according to MayoClinic.com. There is no cure for type 2 diabetes, but you can reduce your risk and lessen the complications. Eat a healthy diet full of whole grains, vegetables, fruits and lean meats. Also, increase your physical activity to lose weight and help lower your A1C. Having a high A1C puts a tremendous strain on your body. Losing weight and lowering your A1C can reduce your risk of a heart attack and other cardiova Continue reading >>

Five Things You Should Know About Prediabetes

Five Things You Should Know About Prediabetes

After announcing the expansion of Diabetes Stops Here and asking you which topics you’d like covered, we received a specific request for more information about prediabetes. A staggering 79 million Americans deal with this condition, and while it can lead to crippling health consequences, it can be avoided. Here are five things you should know about prediabetes: 1. What is prediabetes? Before people develop type 2 diabetes, they almost always have prediabetes, a health condition where your blood glucose is higher than normal but not as high as if you had diabetes. 2. How can I find out if I have it? Your doctor can give you a blood test to tell if you have prediabetes (the same test that’s used to test for diabetes). At your next doctor visit, ask if you should be tested for prediabetes. 3. What can I do if I have prediabetes? If you have prediabetes, there are important steps you can, and should, take. Early intervention can turn back the clock and return elevated blood glucose levels to the normal range. Losing weight is an important step for most people with prediabetes, and the amount doesn’t have to be huge to make a difference. A weight loss of just 10 to 15 pounds can really stack the odds in your favor. Coupled with 30 minutes of exercise each day and healthy food choices, you’ll be on your way. Talk with your doctor and visit our website to learn more about other ways you can prevent or reverse the condition. 4. Does this mean I’m going to develop type 2 diabetes? Prediabetes can lead to type 2 diabetes…but it doesn’t have to. Scientific studies show taking the above steps can often halt or at least slow down the progression of prediabetes so it doesn’t take a turn for the worse. 5. Where can I find help? You are not alone. It’s never too late Continue reading >>

6 Ways Weight Loss Can Help Control Diabetes

6 Ways Weight Loss Can Help Control Diabetes

Losing 5 to 10 percent of your body weight might help you better manage your type 2 diabetes and keep blood sugar levels under control. Here’s how. Thinkstock Maintaining a healthy weight has its obvious health benefits — but it can also help you better manage your type 2 diabetes. In fact, losing weight can bolster your blood sugar control and lower your risk for diabetes complications like high blood pressure and plaque buildup in the arteries. Nudging down the number on the scale by just 5 to 10 percent has also been shown to help some people reduce the amount of diabetes medication they need, according to an article published in Diabetes Care in June 2015. “Weight loss is very high on the priority list,” says Joanne Rinker, RD, CDE, LDN, senior director for community health improvement at Population Health Improvement Partners in Morrisville, North Carolina, and a spokeswoman for the American Association of Diabetes Educators. Rinker admits that dropping pounds isn’t easy, but when you succeed, you’ll reap a host of health benefits, such as: Improved insulin resistance. With type 2 diabetes, your body doesn’t properly respond to the insulin produced by the pancreas, and your blood glucose levels go up. That’s called insulin resistance, and it’s linked to excess weight. When you drop the extra pounds, your body becomes more efficient and can use the insulin more easily, Rinker explains. As a result, insulin resistance goes down, which is a good thing for diabetes management. Better A1C results. Since insulin sensitivity improves with weight loss, you’ll see better results when your doctor does an A1C test, which provides a picture of your blood glucose levels over the previous three months. “This is why lifestyle change through diet and exercise Continue reading >>

50 Lb Weight Loss But Fbg Worse, A1c Unchanged

50 Lb Weight Loss But Fbg Worse, A1c Unchanged

50 lb weight loss but FBG worse, A1c unchanged Member Child of a type 2, sibling of a type 2 50 lb weight loss but FBG worse, A1c unchanged I'm newly diagnosed Pre-D and have lost 50 lbs... but it didn't lower my FBG at all, and my recent A1C is still sitting at 5.7 even after two doses of Trulicity (two weeks). I was switched to Metformin, which doesn't seem to be doing much but giving me gastric troubles and making me hungry. I would think after losing 50 lbs (gained over about 4 years with 50 in 3 months from prednisone, which gave me Cushings Syndrome.. now resolved). I'm rather confused that I've lost that much and no change in FBG or A1C. It's been about 10 months since I came off prednisone, so my doc says that's not a factor at all. And I was started on Trulicity (.75) about 3 weeks ago, took for 2 weeks, then she switched me to Metformin (500mg once daily because I have issues with chronic diarrhea). Metformin has given me diarrhea, and I'm hungry and have cravings. On the Metformin I've had FBG ONCE that was 98, but I didn't eat much the day before due to nausea etc. The other day my FBG was 119. So, 50 lb weight loss didn't seem to change anything, even with the meds so far. The Trulicity did actually work better to keep my FBG at either below 100 or, at it's highest on it.. 110. And I'm tired. Tired tired tired. Trulicity didn't do that to me, and when I asked my doc if I could stay on it she just said she wanted me off of it. My weight... I am very overweight right now, very. I spent my life thin, healthy, active.. but it all changed, and I gained a ton over the past 4 years, around the middle (insulin was tested and is high), couldn't lose weight to save my life. I was 128 lbs 4 years ago, 5ft 5 1/2 ins tall... and people told me I looked way too thin. Fa Continue reading >>

Diabetes Experts Share Ways To Lower Your A1c Levels

Diabetes Experts Share Ways To Lower Your A1c Levels

Diabetes management at home is an important way of controlling your blood sugar levels without the help of an expert. In that sense, you are in control of your diabetes on a daily basis. However, the American Diabetes Associations’ recommends that a person with diabetes should get their A1C tested by a doctor at least two times a year. The test will give you a picture of your journey with diabetes as a whole. Now, once you do get the numbers, what do you do with that information? If you are on the right track, you will continue doing whatever it is that has been working so far. you feel encouraged! However, if the numbers are not what you and your health care provider were expecting, it is imperative that you embark on the path to lowering them so you can avoid any diabetes related complications in the future. The task can be daunting and overwhelming. We have rounded up 37 experts to share tips and ways that will help you in lowering your A1C levels and keeping them that way. The wisdom they share with us today will help you take those little steps towards a healthier lifestyle. 1. Sharon Castillo In a recent study published by the University of Toronto, it was shown that cinnamon has properties which can reduce blood pressure, especially for those who have prediabetes or type 2-diabetes. Hypertension or high blood pressure is common among those who have prediabetes and type-2 diabetics. High blood glucose levels create oxidative radicals which can damage the arteries. I recommend reading the following articles: The damage to the arteries can result into the scarring of the blood vessels. The scarring builds up plaque which reduces the size of the blood vessel. The reduction in the size of the diameter increases blood pressure. While not all of cinnamon’s mechanism Continue reading >>

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