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Long Term Side Effects Of Metformin For Pcos

New Metformin Warning: Mandatory Supplementation With Vitamin B12

New Metformin Warning: Mandatory Supplementation With Vitamin B12

The most common medication used in women with PCOS is the insulin-sensitizer metformin. Research is strongly showing that long-term use of metformin and at high doses (1.5mg or higher daily) can deplete levels of vitamin B12. A deficiency of vitamin B12 can cause permanent neurological and nerve damage as well as mood changes and decreased energy. Here’s what you need to know to avoid a vitamin B12 deficiency if you take metformin. About Metformin Metformin is a medication that became available in the U.S. in 1995 for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Metformin is the most widely used medication used to lower insulin levels in those with polycystic ovary syndrome. Other names for metformin include glucophage, glucophage XR, glumetza, and fortamet. Metformin lowers blood glucose levels in three ways: It suppresses the liver’s production of glucose. It increases the sensitivity of your liver, muscle, fat, and cells to the insulin your body makes. It slows the absorption of carbohydrates you consume Metformin use may affect the absorption of vitamin B12 possibly through alterations in intestinal mobility, increased bacterial overgrowth, or alterations of the vitamin B12-intrinsic factor complex. Metformin can cause a malabsorption in B12 due to digestive changes, which leads to the binding of B12-intrinsic factor complex (intrinsic factor is needed to absorb B12 in the gut) and a reduction of B12 absorption. Vitamin B12 Deficiency in Metformin Users The largest study thus far to examine the link between metformin and vitamin B12 is the Diabetes Prevention Program Outcomes Study (DDPOS). This study looked at B12 levels of individuals with prediabetes who took 850 mg Metformin 2x/day and compared them to those taking a placebo. At 5 years, 4.3% of the metformin users had Continue reading >>

Long-term Metformin In Pcos Benefits Women Of All Weights

Long-term Metformin In Pcos Benefits Women Of All Weights

Long-term Metformin in PCOS Benefits Women of All Weights Metformin improves menstrual cycle regularity and lowers body mass index (BMI), testosterone, and luteinizing hormone (LH) within 6 months of treatment in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) who are normal weight or overweight, new results show. The study is one of the few to examine the long-term effects of metformin, which was given daily for 2 years, although researchers found that most benefits emerged after 6 months, with over 40% of patients achieving normal menstruation by this point. The trial is also the first to evaluate metformin in all subgroups of women with PCOS, as most prior studies have looked at patients who are obese and/or hyperandrogenic (androgen excess), say the authors led by Po-Kai Yang, MD, from the National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei City. The study was published online January 9 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. They found that there are differences in treatment response to metformin between different BMI/testosterone subgroups of which there were four which could help in patient selection for treatment. For menstrual regularity the primary endpoint the normal weight, excess testosterone subgroup had the most significant sevenfold improvement from baseline, whereas the overweight, normal testosterone subgroup had the longest duration of improvement and the highest rate of normal menses after treatment (achieved by > 60% vs baseline). The reason for the difference in menstrual response between BMI/testosterone phenotypes is unknown, "but probably relates to the different pathophysiological mechanisms displayed over the spectrum of clinical manifestations in PCOS," the researchers say. New Look at Metformin Effects in All Women With PCOS The authors Continue reading >>

Is It Safe To Use Metformin During Pregnancy?

Is It Safe To Use Metformin During Pregnancy?

Metformin is a commonly used drug for managing type 2 diabetes. It is considered an effective treatment option for many people with diabetes, but is it safe for pregnant women? Metformin is a drug that helps to lower blood sugar. It is considered one of the best first line treatments for type 2 diabetes. A review posted to Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome notes that metformin helps to lower blood sugar levels, strengthens the endocrine system, improves insulin resistance, and reduces fat distribution in the body. Before taking any drugs, including metformin, a pregnant woman has to be absolutely sure that the drugs will not affect her or her baby. Effects of metformin use during and after pregnancy Some people are concerned about using metformin during and after pregnancy because it crosses the placenta. This means that when a pregnant woman takes metformin, so does her baby. However, the results of the few studies that have been carried out so far into the effects of taking metformin during pregnancy have been positive. A 2014 review posted to Human Reproduction Update found that the drug did not cause birth defects, complications, or diseases. The researchers did note, however, that larger studies should be carried out to make this evidence more conclusive. Metformin and gestational diabetes A separate review posted to Human Reproduction Update noted that women who took metformin to treat gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy) gained less weight than women who took insulin. A 2-year follow-up study found that babies born to the women treated with metformin had less fat around their organs, which could make them less prone to insulin resistance later in life. This could mean that children who are exposed to metformin at a young age could gain long-term benefi Continue reading >>

What Is Metformin?

What Is Metformin?

MORE Metformin is a prescription drug used primarily in the treatment of Type II diabetes. It can be used on its own or combined with other medications. In the United States, it is sold under the brand names Fortamet, Glucophage, Glumetza and Riomet. "Metformin is very often prescribed as the first step in a diabetic's regime," said Ken Sternfeld, a New York-based pharmacist. How it works "When you're diabetic you lose the ability to use the insulin you need to offset the food," Sternfeld explained. "If you eat a carb or sugar that can't be metabolized or offset by the insulin you produce, your sugar levels will be higher. Metformin and drugs in that category will help your body better metabolize that food so that insulin levels will be able to stay more in line." Metformin aims to decrease glucose production in the liver, consequently lowering the levels of glucose in the bloodstream. It also changes the way that your blood cells react to insulin. "It makes them more sensitive to insulin," said Dr. Stephen Neabore, a primary care doctor at the Barnard Medical Center in Washington, D.C. "It makes the same amount of insulin work better. It transports the insulin to the cells in a more effective way." Metformin may have a preventive health role, as well. New research presented at the American Diabetes Association 2017 Scientific Sessions showed that long-term use of metformin is particularly useful in preventing the onset of type II diabetes in women who have suffered from gestational diabetes. Because metformin changes the way the body uses insulin, it is not used to treat Type I diabetes, a condition in which the body does not produce insulin at all. Metformin & PCOS Metformin is sometimes prescribed to treat polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), according to Neabore. "I Continue reading >>

Pcos Treatment: Metformin

Pcos Treatment: Metformin

We've been discussing Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) and its impact on the health of women of size. Today, let's discuss the use of metformin in the treatment of PCOS. So far we've talked about the definition and symptoms of PCOS, how it presents, its testing and diagnosis, and its possible causes. Now we are discussing common treatment protocols for the metabolic issues of PCOS, and the pros and cons of each treatment option. (Fertility treatment will be covered in a different set of posts.) Today, we discuss metformin (Glucophage). Disclaimer: While the following information is based on my best understanding of the research, I am not a medical health-care professional and no medical advice should be inferred. Always do your own research and consult your healthcare provider. Trigger Warning: Remember that the purpose of these posts is to provide a basic introduction to PCOS with a size acceptance approach that is rare on PCOS websites. However, there will be some occasional mention of weight loss in some posts because this is part of the traditional approach to treating PCOS and fair coverage demands exploring the pros and cons of all treatments. This approach has been approved by the fatosphere monitors. In this post, there is a brief mention of the weight loss properties associated with metformin in some people. Insulin-Sensitizing Agent Overview Because insulin resistance (IR) is a strong part of the PCOS profile, because IR may be an integral part of its mechanism, and because decompensation of glucose tolerance due to IR is a big part of the long-term health impact of PCOS, treatment with insulin-sensitizing agents is considered a vitally important part of PCOS treatment by most clinicians. Insulin-sensitizing agents help the body to use its own insulin more e Continue reading >>

What Will Happen If I Stop Taking Metformin For Pcos?

What Will Happen If I Stop Taking Metformin For Pcos?

Metformin helps you manage the symptoms of the disease. There is no no doubt that it works. But it does not offer a cure. You can discontinue metformin on only one condition - you should exercise more and cut out all refined sugars and processed foods or just look around to what other diabetics do for insulin resistance. I cannot emphasize home-cooked food enough. Home cooked-food without those processed sauces and canned ingredients. Try it for a short time after you are on an exercise regimen for atleast a month.Keep checking your sugar from time to time. You will know that you need to get back on your metformin if the cravings and the bluesy moods come back. If the cravings don’t come back well and good, but if it does, you should get back on metformin. What I can assure you is that there is no harm in trying - PCOS is a lifelong thing - so nothing that you do can kill or cure you in a day or week. Whatever works will work over months. So give exercise and no sugar a try for two -three months. In the first month continue with the metformin with the exercise and in the next, reduce use by either reducing dosage or eating one every two days. And then if things look positive stop completely. Losing weight also helps reduce metformin dependence. While you are at it one basic advice I can give you is - don’t get into tiring exercise regimes (walking for an hour is also good), don’t get into diets unless your gynaecologist/endocrinologist has recommended one (even then don’t get into anything punishing because sustaining it will be stressful) and do everything it takes to keep a healthy mind - remove or modify habits from your life that induce stress - be it your job, family or friends. Identify them and pull the plug. Be nice to yourself. Please note that if you a Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects For Pcos

Metformin Side Effects For Pcos

Metformin side effects for PCOS need to be understood as potential side effects of metformin may impact a woman’s chances of getting pregnant. What kind of metformin side effects can I expect to see if I have PCOS? When sufferers of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome endeavor to rebel against the disease that has greatly compromised their reproductive potential, many turn to metformin for PCOS. While Metformin was originally conceived to help diabetes patients better manage their blood sugar levels, the properties that help these people also do a number on the destructive capabilities of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (a). Metformin decreases the destructive effects that androgen and insulin has on the ovaries of PCOS patients by reducing the production of the former and increasing the body’s sensitivity to the latter (1). It accomplishes this by reducing the production of glucose in the liver via gluconeogenesis, thereby reducing the aggressive insulin response in the bodies of PCOS patients that then gives rise to androgen production (b). With any compound that has been shown to work well against any given medical condition, it is always important to keep in mind the potential side effects, which are factors that are often swept by the wayside when folks clamor over the latest wonder drug. Similarly, those using metformin for PCOS need to be armed with the knowledge of the symptoms that mark the potential side effects that they might experience, which ones are relatively harmless, and most important of all, the ones that denote a life-threatening reaction that requires immediate medical attention. While incidents of this magnitude are typically rare, it is vital that you are aware nonetheless, as it is better to switch to a PCOS treatment that is more suitable for you than Continue reading >>

How Much Do You Know About Metformin?

How Much Do You Know About Metformin?

Metformin is a drug commonly used in the treatment of Type 2 diabetes. It is sold as a generic and under several brand names, including Glucophage, Glumetza, Riomet, and Fortamet. Both the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) recommend metformin as a cornerstone of therapy for Type 2 diabetes when exercise and dietary changes aren’t enough to keep blood glucose levels in target range. The low cost of the generic forms along with a long history of use make it a good choice for many individuals with Type 2 diabetes. Although metformin has helped many people lower their blood glucose levels, it does have some potential side effects that are worth knowing about. Understanding the risks and benefits of metformin is key to using it successfully. Take this quiz to test your knowledge of this popular diabetes medicine. (You can find the answers later in the article.) Q 1. How does metformin work to lower blood glucose levels? A. It stimulates the pancreas to make more insulin. B. It decreases the amount of glucose produced by the liver and makes it easier for cells to accept glucose from the bloodstream. C. It slows the digestive system’s breakdown of carbohydrates into glucose, allowing more time for insulin to work. D. It suppresses appetite, slows stomach emptying, and inhibits the release of glucagon (a hormone that raises blood glucose levels). 2. In addition to lowering blood glucose, metformin sometimes causes moderate weight loss. TRUE FALSE 3. In research studies, metformin use was associated with which of the following benefits in people with Type 2 diabetes? A. Reduced risk of morning high blood glucose. B. Reduced neuropathy (nerve damage). C. Reduced retinopathy (damage to the retina, a membrane in Continue reading >>

Metformin And Pcos: Everything You Need To Know

Metformin And Pcos: Everything You Need To Know

Metformin is a type of medication used to treat Type 2 Diabetes. Because there is a strong link between diabetes and PCOS, metformin is now commonly proscribed to treat PCOS. But should it be? What is the real relationship between metformin and PCOS? Can Metformin used for PCOS help lessen PCOS symptoms? Metformin used for PCOS: The Science PCOS is an infertility condition that often causes acne, facial hair growth, balding, low sex drive, weight gain, difficulty with weight loss, and mental health disturbances such as depression and anxiety in approximately 15% of women. It is also associated with a myriad of health conditions, spanning from diabetes to hypothyroidism and to heart disease. PCOS is, in short, not a condition to sneeze at. PCOS is a condition of hormone imbalance. With PCOS, male sex hormones such as testosterone and DHEA-S rise relative to the female sex hormones estrogen and progesterone. (…Roughly speaking – it’s complicated. For a full-blown account of the science of PCOS and how it affects you, see here.) Elevated testosterone is very often the primary culprit in causing PCOS. (But not always! For one of my most thorough accounts of other things that can cause PCOS, see here.) Insulin causes testosterone levels to rise because insulin tells the ovaries to produce testosterone. Basically, elevated insulin causes elevated testosterone, which causes PCOS. This is where metformin comes into play. Metformin lowers blood sugar levels below what they would otherwise be after a meal. This is because it intervenes with the liver’s interaction with and production of glucose. Insulin is the body’s way of dealing with blood sugar. If blood sugar is lower, then insulin will be lower, and thus testosterone will be lower. Metformin decreases blood sugar, Continue reading >>

Long-term Effect Of Metformin On Metabolic Parameters In The Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Long-term Effect Of Metformin On Metabolic Parameters In The Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Go to: Insulin resistance is a central feature of the polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and may increase cardiovascular risk. Due to insulin resistance, the metabolic syndrome is more prevalent in PCOS women compared to normal women. Metformin improves the metabolic profile in PCOS in short-term studies. In this study, we evaluated the long-term effect of metformin on metabolic parameters in PCOS women during routine care without a controlled diet. We performed a retrospective medical chart review of 70 women with PCOS receiving metformin from an academic endocrine clinic. Metabolic risk factors were compared before and after metformin treatment. Time trends of these metabolic parameters were also analyzed. After a mean follow-up of 36.1 months with metformin treatment, improvements were observed for BMI (−1.09±3.48 kg/m2, p=0.0117), diastolic blood pressure (−2.69±10.35 mmHg, p=0.0378), and HDL cholesterol (+5.82±11.02 mg/dL, p<0.0001). The prevalence of metabolic syndrome decreased from 34.3% at baseline to 21.4% (p=0.0495). The course of BMI reduction during metformin treatment was significantly more pronounced in PCOS women with metabolic syndrome at baseline, compared with those without the metabolic syndrome (p=0.0369 for interaction). In conclusion, metformin improved the metabolic profile of PCOS women over 36.1 months, particularly in HDL cholesterol, diastolic blood pressure and BMI. Keywords: Polycystic ovary syndrome, metformin, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular risk factors Continue reading >>

6 Reasons Why Metformin Might Not Be Safe For Pcos

6 Reasons Why Metformin Might Not Be Safe For Pcos

Have you been prescribed metformin for PCOS and are wondering what the side affects are? Metformin is often described as a ‘safe’ drug, but read on to find out why this might not be the case. When I was diagnosed with PCOS, the first thing I asked my GP was what I could take to ‘fix’ it. She gently explained that there was no pill or surgery that could cure my condition. However, there was a drug that could help with the elevated insulin levels caused by it. Metformin, she claimed, was a safe drug with no major side effects that would help with insulin resistance and weight loss. Sign me up. At first, I thought metformin was the wonder drug. I lost about 5kg in 4 months, more than I had ever been able to lose previously. I was ecstatic. I had a quick look online to see whether there were any side effects and initially found that diarrhea, loose stools, fatigue, and muscle soreness were commonly experienced. But I thought that it was small price to pay for finally being able to lose some weight. However, when I investigated further I found that that there are some much more sinister side effects of metformin that aren’t so widely publicised. These include: – Depleting our bodies of essential nutrients. – Increasing the risk of having a baby with a neural tube defect by up to 9 times. – Reducing energy levels by almost 50%. – Killing beneficial gut bacteria. This article is not intended to be a case against metformin for PCOS. There is no doubt that metformin helps to reduce weight, lowers blood glucose levels, and promotes ovulation. My concern is the lack of studies about the safety of long-term use of metformin for PCOS, especially in utero. Drugs can help with the associated symptoms of a disease, but they cannot fix the root cause of it. Metformin i Continue reading >>

Effect Of Long-term Treatment With Metformin Added To Hypocaloric Diet On Body Composition, Fat Distribution, And Androgen And Insulin Levels In Abdominally Obese Women With And Without The Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Effect Of Long-term Treatment With Metformin Added To Hypocaloric Diet On Body Composition, Fat Distribution, And Androgen And Insulin Levels In Abdominally Obese Women With And Without The Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism Effect of Long-Term Treatment with Metformin Added to Hypocaloric Diet on Body Composition, Fat Distribution, and Androgen and Insulin Levels in Abdominally Obese Women with and without the Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Endocrine Unit (R.P., A.G., D.B., V.V., L.G., D.C., S.F., A.M.M.-L.), Department of Internal Medicine and Gastroenterology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital Search for other works by this author on: Endocrine Unit (R.P., A.G., D.B., V.V., L.G., D.C., S.F., A.M.M.-L.), Department of Internal Medicine and Gastroenterology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital Search for other works by this author on: Endocrine Unit (R.P., A.G., D.B., V.V., L.G., D.C., S.F., A.M.M.-L.), Department of Internal Medicine and Gastroenterology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital Search for other works by this author on: Endocrine Unit (R.P., A.G., D.B., V.V., L.G., D.C., S.F., A.M.M.-L.), Department of Internal Medicine and Gastroenterology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital Search for other works by this author on: Endocrine Unit (R.P., A.G., D.B., V.V., L.G., D.C., S.F., A.M.M.-L.), Department of Internal Medicine and Gastroenterology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital Search for other works by this author on: Endocrine Unit (R.P., A.G., D.B., V.V., L.G., D.C., S.F., A.M.M.-L.), Department of Internal Medicine and Gastroenterology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital Search for other works by this author on: Endocrine Unit (R.P., A.G., D.B., V.V., L.G., D.C., S.F., A.M.M.-L.), Department of Internal Medicine and Gastroenterology, S. Orsola-Malpighi Hospital Search for other works by this author on: Department of Obstetric and Gynecology, Reproductive Endocrinology Center (G.E.C., M.F.), University of Bologna, 40138 Bologna, Italy Search for other works by this author on Continue reading >>

Side Effects Of Metformin Are More Serious Than You Think

Side Effects Of Metformin Are More Serious Than You Think

The Side Effects of Metformin can range from not so serious, to deadly, are the risks of Metformin and Glucophage side effects worth it? This page will give you information that might be able to help you decide that for yourself. Also known as Glucophage, this is an antidiabetic medicine most often used in those with Type 2 Diabetes who are also overweight. It’s also used extensively in women with Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome, a condition known as PCOS, which is often accompanied by higher blood sugar readings which often benefit from the blood sugar lowering effects of Metformin. While at first glance it seems that Side Effects of Metformin are rare, a closer look and a little math show that there are some serious problems that can occur when taking this drug, and others that can and should be prevented easily, but are usually not due to a medical community that simply does not use nutritional supplements in the prevention of even well-known, easily preventable Glucophage side effects. Vitamin B12 Deficiency Vitamin B12 and Folic Acid Deficiency are well-known and well-studied side effects of Metformin. Despite the fact that there have been many studies confirming this problem over and over again in the medical literature, just like the Side Effects of Nitrous Oxide, few doctors warn their patients of this or recommend that they take simple, cheap over the counter Vitamin B12 Supplements in order to avoid this potentially devastating nutritional deficiency. In addition, the long term use of the ‘antacid’ drugs known as H2 receptor antagonist or proton pump inhibitors like Famotidine or Omeprazole, some of the most widely prescribed drugs, can increase this risk, as is mentioned in the Omeprazole Side Effects page. The Vitamin B12 Deficiency Symptoms range anywhere Continue reading >>

Side Effects Of Metformin

Side Effects Of Metformin

Metformin ("Glucophage") has a broad array of possible side effects and implications for your health. Has your doctor discussed with you all of the possible problems associated with metformin? Malaise Did you know that 10%- 25% of women who take Glucophage just don't feel well? They experience a general malaise, fatigue and occasional achiness that lasts for varying lengths of time. Malaise a warning signal for your doctor to closely monitor your body systems, including liver, kidneys, and GI tract. GI Disturbance About one third of women on metformin experience gastrointestinal disturbances, including nausea, occasional vomiting and loose, more frequent bowel movements, or diarrhea. This problem occurs more often after meals rich in fats or sugars, so eating a healthier diet will help. The symptoms lessen over time, so if you can tolerate the GI upset for a few weeks, it may go away. Some women have found it helps to start with a very low dose and gradually increase it. Vitamin B12 Malabsorption Most people think that aside from possible gastrointestinal upset, there are no side effects from taking metformin, and thus you can take it for a very long time. This is not true! The sneakiest side effect of all is a vitamin B12 insufficiency. A substance formed in the stomach called "intrinsic factor" combines with B12 so that it can be transferred into the blood. Metformin interferes with the ability of your cells to absorb this intrinsic factor-vitamin B12 complex.(12) Over the long term, vitamin B12 insufficiency is a significant health risk. B12 is essential to the proper growth and function of every cell in your body. It's required for synthesis of DNA and for many crucial biochemical functions. There is also a link between B12 insufficiency and cardiovascular disease. Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects For Pcos: 6 Things You Need To Know

Metformin Side Effects For Pcos: 6 Things You Need To Know

Insulin resistance is seen in the majority of women with PCOS. Doctors prescribe metformin for PCOS because it is an effective insulin sensitizer. However, the drug comes with its share of side effects. Let’s look at Metformin side effects for PCOS in detail. Metformin Side Effects For PCOS 1. Malaise Or Physical Discomfort As many as 1 in every 4 women on metformin just does not feel well. There is a feeling of fatigue even without much physical exertion. Sometimes, this fatigue is accompanied with aches that can last for a varying degree of time. While this may not sound too severe, it is one of the most common Metformin side effect for PCOS. 2. Gastrointestinal Distress Gastrointestinal problems is another common Metformin side effect for PCOS (experienced by nearly a third of women taking the drug.) These problems include abdominal pain, nausea, occasional vomiting, loose motions, irregular bowel movements or diarrhea. Bloating and flatulence can be a major source of embarrassment. Anorexia and a sharp metallic taste can play havoc with appetite, especially because eating a healthy diet at the right times is critical for PCOS patients. Heartburn and headaches add to the suffering caused by PCOS symptoms. 3. Anemia Another Metformin side effect for PCOS is a decrease in Vitamin B12 levels because the drug affects the absorption of this vitamin. Vitamin B12 is vital for red blood cell formation. When levels of vitamin B12 go down, you can suffer from anemia. Common symptoms of anemia include tiredness, lightheadedness, and dizziness. Vitamin B12 also plays an important role in many bodily processes. For example, there is evidence of a relationship between low levels of vitamin B12 and an increased risk of heart diseases. 4. Accumulation Of Homocysteine Long-term use Continue reading >>

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