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Lobster And Diabetes

Diabetes: Healthy Eating

Diabetes: Healthy Eating

What Can I Eat? Many people think that having diabetes requires a special diet. The diabetes diet, however, is a healthy, enjoyable one, and suitable for the entire family. Learning what you can eat and how different foods affect your body is important. Although food is not the only factor that raises glucose, your food choices have a significant impact on your glucose, cholesterol, blood pressure and, of course, your overall health. This page covers the basic principles of good nutrition. For a tailored plan, consult a dietitian-certified diabetes educator, or call the Center for Diabetes Services at (415) 600-0506. Back to top What Foods Turn Into Glucose? Carbohydrate turns into glucose. Sugars and starches are the carbohydrates in our diet. These foods are our main source of energy. Too much carbohydrate in the diet can raise your blood glucose levels too high. It is important have consistent carbohydrate intake at each meal and to not cut out carbohydrates from your diet. What are Some Examples of Foods that Contain Carbohydrate? Rice, Fruits, Pretzels/Popcorn, Lentils, Fruit juices, Pasta/Noodles, Dried beans, Sugar/honey, Crackers, Milk, Desserts, Yogurt, Sodas, Cereals, Bread,*Yams, *Potato,*Peas, Corn*, *Lima beans. Note: *These vegetables are starchy and raise blood glucose: potato, yams, peas, corn, lima beans. Note: High fiber food choices are encouraged (for example, whole grain breads and cereals; fresh fruits and vegetables; beans and legumes). Back to top General Nutrition Recommendations Include carbohydrate in every meal and snack. Be sure to spread your carbohydrate intake evenly throughout the day. Use the Sample Meal Plan as your portion guide. Do not skip meals. Even distribution of food helps prevent high and low blood glucose. Eat 3 meals a day, Continue reading >>

Lobster And Cholesterol Control

Lobster And Cholesterol Control

The idea of lobster for dinner sounds romantic and self-indulgent for most of us, but does that mean lobster’s bad for you? Not necessarily. In fact, lobster is healthy for most diets, providing a good source of essential nutrients and protein. Lobster is a good source of phosphorous, which supports kidney function. It also provides more than 10 percent of your daily requirement for magnesium in a 3-ounce serving. That sized serving of lobster has about 100 fewer calories than 3 ounces of steak, while providing the same amount of protein (about 27 grams). Lobster also contains very little fat and actually supplies some calcium for healthy bones. But does lobster contain cholesterol? It does — about 124 mg in a 3-ounce serving. Healthy people with normal cholesterol levels and no history of heart disease should limit dietary cholesterol to 300 mg a day. Anyone with heart disease or diabetes should not eat more than 200 mg of cholesterol daily. Keep in mind that cholesterol-containing foods do not contribute as much cholesterol to your bloodstream as foods containing saturated fats, which cause your liver to produce more cholesterol. Despite its rich reputation, lobster is low in saturated fats, clocking in at a total of 0.2 grams in a 3-ounce serving compared to the same sized serving of steak, which contains 4.7 grams. Lobster does serve up a high dose of sodium, however — nearly half of the recommended daily amount for healthy diners. That can be dangerous if you have high blood pressure. To enjoy lobster at its most healthful, boil or roast it. Resist the temptation to add buckets of melted butter, and definitely don’t deep-fry it. Add vegetables to your meal plan for a boost of fiber. Fiber reduces the amount of cholesterol your bloodstream absorbs. According Continue reading >>

8 Foods To Eat To Beat Diabetes (and 5 To Avoid!)

8 Foods To Eat To Beat Diabetes (and 5 To Avoid!)

Carnivores, rejoice: These foods (poultry without the skin) are fair game in a diabetes-friendly diet. Why? Because they're high in protein (result: full stomach) but typically low in fat (result: better weight management). Fatty fish also contains omega-3 fatty acids, which cut down on cardiovascular problems that can accompany diabetes. Continue reading >>

Lobster Festival Donates To Walk For Diabetes

Lobster Festival Donates To Walk For Diabetes

Rockland — At its August Board of Directors meeting, the Maine Lobster Festival donated $750 to Color Me Cured, a three-mile walk to benefit Type 1 diabetes research. All proceeds from the walk will go to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, a global organization that funds research into Type 1 diabetes. Approximately 1.25 million Americans have Type 1 diabetes, and 40,000 are diagnosed every year. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that causes the pancreas to stop producing insulin, a hormone that enables people to get energy from food. The Color Me Cured Walk will take place at 9:30 a.m. Saturday, Sept. 9. The walk will start at the former Lura Libby School in Thomaston. Continue reading >>

Lobster, Corn And Zucchini Salad

Lobster, Corn And Zucchini Salad

(makes 16 servings) 2 zucchini, about 1 pound (480 g), diced 1 cup (150 g) fresh corn, cut from 2 medium ears 8 pounds (3,849 g) lobster tails 1/3 cup (67 g) fat free mayonnaise 1/3 cup (15 g) fresh basil, sliced Boston lettuce leaves 12 cherry tomatoes, quartered Place the zucchini and corn in simmering water and cook for 2 minutes. Drain and cool. Have your fish monger steam the lobster tails. When cool, remove from the shells and cut into 1/4-inch slices In a small bowl, combine the mayonnaise, basil. and lemon juice. Toss the lobster and vegetables with dressing. (This can be prepared up to 8 hours in advance and refrigerated.) Before serving, place the lettuce leaves on a platter, mound the salad on the lettuce and surround with quartered cherry tomatoes. Decorate with basil leaves. Per 1/2-cup serving: 154 calories (6% calories from fat), 30 g protein, 1 g total fat (0 saturated fat), 6 g carbohydrates, 1 g dietary fiber, 101 mg cholesterol, 579 mg sodium Diabetic exchanges: 4 very lean protein, 1/2 carbohydrate (1 vegetable) Welcome to the Type 2 Diabetes Center! This is your launching pad for living better with type 2 diabetes. We’ve gathered all the latest type 2 diabetes information, research updates, and advances in devices and medications. And because diabetes impacts every facet of your life, you’ll also find practical advice from leading experts and other people living with type 2 diabetes featured here. That includes mouth-watering, healthy recipes; money-saving tips; advice to help navigate social, professional, and relationship issues; and inspiring personal stories from people just like you. Explore the resources here and be sure to subscribe to our newsletter to be alerted to new additions. Continue reading >>

Which Is Healthier: Filet Mignon Or Lobster Tail?

Which Is Healthier: Filet Mignon Or Lobster Tail?

There's nothing fishy about lobster's triumph. "Ounce for ounce, it has fewer calories and less fat than even a lean filet of beef," says Stephanie Middleberg, RD, founder of Middleberg Nutrition in New York City. It's especially a good order if you're a member of the Clean Plate Club—finishing the whole thing does zero damage to your diet. "A lobster tail, at 170 calories, is nature's perfectly packaged portion," Middleberg notes. And while a tail boasting 8 ounces of meat has less protein than a comparably sized slab of steak, you're still getting close to your full recommended daily allowance. The caveat: That cup of melted butter (300 calories and 21 grams of saturated fat in about 3 tablespoons) will drown out your best intentions. Instead, squeeze on a lemon wedge, then dip your fork in the butter before skewering a piece. More steakhouse strategies Go surf or turf Otherwise you're basically eating two meals. (Steak-and-seafood combos can run upwards of 1,000 cals!) Be smart about shrimp Popcorn shrimp are tiny but deep-fried and caloric, as are coconut shrimp. Order a shrimp cocktail to save as many as 400 cals. Lean up your steak Ask the server to have it prepared without butter. Most restaurants use a pat (or more) but don't mention so on the menu. Make it a Manhattan Clam chowder, that is. At about 90 calories a cup, it's at least 100 calories per cup lighter than the creamy and fatty New England variety. Continue reading >>

Cauliflower “mac” And Cheese With Lobster

Cauliflower “mac” And Cheese With Lobster

This Recipe Serves 8 Ingredients Nonstick cooking spray 1 head cauliflower, trimmed into florets (8 cups florets) 5 cups water 2 4-oz frozen lobster tails or 1 cup chopped imitation lobster meat 1 Tbsp olive oil 2 Tbsp flour 2 cups fat-free milk 1/16 tsp (pinch) nutmeg 1/2 tsp salt 1/4 tsp ground black pepper 1/4 tsp hot sauce 3 oz reduced-fat Colby-Jack cheese 4 oz fat-free cream cheese 1/2 cup whole-wheat panko bread crumbs Instructions Preheat oven to 350° F. Coat a 9x13-inch glass baking dish with cooking spray. Set aside. Place cauliflower florets in a large microwave-safe dish. Pour 1 cup of water over the cauliflower and cover. Microwave for 12 minutes or until cauliflower is tender. Drain and then keep warm. While cauliflower is microwaving: If using lobster tails, bring 4 cups of water to a boil and then reduce until water is just barely simmering. Add the lobster tails to the water and poach for 7 minutes. Remove the tails from the water to cool slightly. Cut the lobster tails, remove the meat from the tails and chop. Makes about a cup of lobster meat. Add olive oil to a saucepan over medium heat. Add the flour and cook, stirring constantly, for 2 minutes. Add the milk while whisking. Add the nutmeg, salt, pepper and hot sauce. Bring to a boil, then reduce to a simmer for 3 minutes. Add the Colby-Jack and cream cheeses and stir until melted. Add the cauliflower to the baking dish. Use a fork to break up the florets into 1-inch or smaller pieces. Pour the cheese sauce over the cauliflower and stir to coat. Sprinkle the lobster over the cauliflower and stir to coat. Sprinkle the panko bread crumbs evenly over the top of the casserole and then spray the top of the panko with cooking spray. Bake for 30 minutes. Chef Tip: When poaching lobster tails, the water sho Continue reading >>

Eat What You Love With Diabetes

Eat What You Love With Diabetes

What can diabetics eat? Why are carbohydrates an integral part of every healthy diet? They impact blood sugars, or glucose, more than fats and protein. So, diabetics who count their carbs at each meal and snack have good success keeping their blood glucose in a healthy range. When you're diagnosed with diabetes and meet with a registered dietitian (RD) or certified diabetes educator (CDE), you're usually given a carbohydrate prescription for each meal. This prescription will work with the medicine or insulin you're taking to help keep your blood sugar normal. What is a carbohydrate serving size? 15g of carbohydrates = 1 carbohydrate serving To determine your serving size, check the nutrition facts label for the number of carbohydrate grams (g). If the total carbohydrate count is equal to 15g, then check the top of the food label for the serving size for one serving. If the carbohydrate total is more than 15g, then divide the total by 15. For example, a food with 30g of carbs contains 2 carb servings, because 30 divided by 15 = 2. If the carbohydrate total is less than 15g, then multiply the serving size so that your serving will have 15g carbs. List of foods with 1 carb serving The food list below shows the approximate size of 1 carbohydrate serving. Because products vary, check the nutrition facts information to get an accurate carbohydrate count. Apple = 1 small (4 oz.) Bagel = 1/4 large (1 oz.) Banana = 1 small (4 oz.) Beans, Pinto = 1/2 cup Beans, Kidney = 1/2 cup Bread = 1 oz. slice Cake = 2" square (unfrosted) Cereal = 3/4 cup or 1 oz. (ready-to-eat) Cereal = 1/2 cup (cooked) Cookies = 2 small Corn = 1/2 cup Crackers = 6 (Saltines) Fruit, Canned = 1/2 cup (unsweetened) Hamburger Bun = 1/2 bun Ice Cream = 1/2 cup (light) Jam or Jelly = 1 tablespoon Milk = 1 cup Ora Continue reading >>

Diabetic Diet: Meat Choices

Diabetic Diet: Meat Choices

Meat (1 ounce = 7 grams of protein, 0 grams of carbohydrate, fat varies) One ounce of meat is about the size of your thumb; 3 ounces is the size of a deck of cards. No more thant 3 ounces of protein at a meal is recommended. (Try to eat meats from this page only; unfortunately, this means nothing fried.) Very Lean Meat Choices (0-1g fat/ounce and 35 calories) Poultry: Chicken or turkey (white meat, no skin), Cornish hen (no skin). Fish: Fresh or frozen cod, flounder, haddock, halibut, trout, lox, tuna fresh or canned in water. Shellfish: Clams, crab, lobster, scallops, shrimp. Game: Duck or pheasant (no skin), venison, buffalo, ostrich. Cheese: Fat-free (less than 1 gram of fat/ounce), low fat cottage cheese. Other: Processed sandwich meats with less than 1 gram fat or less/ounce, such as: deli thin, shaved meats chipped beef, turkey ham egg whites (2) egg substitutes, plain hot dogs, fat free sausage, fat free or less than 1 gram fat/ounce Lean Meat Choices (3g fat/ounce and 55 calories) Beef: USDA Select or Choice grades trimmed of fat such as round, sirloin, flank steak, tenderloin, roast (rib, chuck, rump); steak (T-bone, porter house, cubed); ground round. Pork: Lean pork such as fresh ham, canned, cured, or boiled ham, Canadian bacon, tenderloin, center loin chop. Lamb: Roast, chop or leg. Veal: Leap chop, roast. Poultry: Chicken, turkey (dark meat, no skin), chicken (white meat, with skin), domestic duck or goose (well-drained of fat, no skin). Fish: Herring (uncreamed or smoked), Oysters, Salmon (fresh or canned), catfish, Sardines (canned), tuna (canned in oil, drained). Game: Goose (no skin, rabbit). Cheese: 4.5% fat cottage cheese, grated parmesan, cheeses with 3 grams of fat or less/ounce. Other: Hot dogs with 3 grams of fat or less per ounce. Processed sand Continue reading >>

Diabetes-friendly Soups & Stews

Diabetes-friendly Soups & Stews

Whether you're the chicken noodle type or a beef stew fan, these flavorful diabetic soup and stew recipes will hit the spot -- without adding extra carbs and calories to your diabetes meal plan. Whether you're the chicken noodle type or a beef stew fan, these flavorful diabetic soup and stew recipes will hit the spot -- without adding extra carbs and calories to your diabetes meal plan. Whether you're the chicken noodle type or a beef stew fan, these flavorful diabetic soup and stew recipes will hit the spot -- without adding extra carbs and calories to your diabetes meal plan. Whether you're the chicken noodle type or a beef stew fan, these flavorful diabetic soup and stew recipes will hit the spot -- without adding extra carbs and calories to your diabetes meal plan. Continue reading >>

Fake Foods To Avoid

Fake Foods To Avoid

Some of the tastiest foods are actually masquerading around as the real thing. People with diabetes need to be aware of fake foods that resemble their wholesome counterparts. Consider the 5 fake foods that contain elements you should try to avoid. Imitation seafood salad looks and smells like the real thing but it’s not. Often people buy imitation crab without realizing it. Read the package carefully and ask questions at the deli counter when you buy seafood salad. Imitation seafood contains some real fish but it also has a mix of fillers that usually have a large amount of carbohydrates. One half cup of imitation crab product has 14 grams of carbohydrates. Pre-made seafood salad may contain heavy amounts of dressing or mayonnaise which will increase the saturated fat content as well. Mix your low carb pasta with real crab meat instead. It only has a trace of carbohydrate, less fat and a lot more flavor. Processed cheese is another pretender lurking in your dairy or deli department. Often processed cheese is labeled as “American cheese” and has an alluring yellow hue. Don’t let it fool you. While it might melt well, it has forms of milk product concentrates and milk products that triple the carbohydrate content. Cheddar is another processed cheese product. One of these popular products has 3 grams of carbohydrates per ounce while an ounce of real cheddar cheese has a trace amount of carbohydrate. Processed cheese might also state on the label “pasteurized prepared cheese product” so you can figure out it’s not the real deal. It tends to be shinier than real cheese products and has far less flavor. There’s nothing like the real thing. Stay aware from squirt-able cheese in a can. Processed meats such as sausages, bologna, salami and hot dogs are other fake Continue reading >>

Red Lobster

Red Lobster

Just Tell Me What to Eat! Timothy S. Harlan, MD, FACP has counseled thousands of his patients on healthy, sustainable weight loss. Now he's compiled his best tips and recipes into a six-week plan for you to learn how to eat great food that just happens to be great for you - and if losing weight is your goal, you can do that, too. Get the prescription for better health as well as healthy weight loss, including: What to eat How to cook it When to eat it What to eat at a restaurant What to eat if you're in a hurry and best of all.... Why eating great food is the best health decision you'll ever make. I will admit that I wasn't looking forward to going to Red Lobster. I haven't been in one for years, because the last time I went the food was so terrible. I was, however, heartened by my experience at Ruby Tuesday. My expectations were fully met. The odor is that of frying fish. It doesn't smell terrible, just greasy. Even so, it is a clean restaurant and the staff is friendly although the service is pretty terrible. Eat The best dish by far is the Garlic-Grilled Jumbo Shrimp. The dish is about a dozen large (not jumbo) shrimp on skewers that have been grilled. The seasoning is good and the shrimp aren't greasy. It comes with Wild Rice Pilaf that's OK at best but instead you can order a baked potato that's pretty good. Couple these choices with their seasoned broccoli and you have a pretty good meal at 402 calories and only 8 grams of fat. Almost any of the grilled or broiled fish with the rice pilaf or a baked potato are good choices. There's salmon (of course), flounder, tilapia, rainbow trout and blackened catfish. If you like crab legs, these are going to be lower in calories and a good choice as well. The side salad is good and can be chosen as an alternative to having t Continue reading >>

Is Lobster Good For Diabetics?

Is Lobster Good For Diabetics?

There are definitely certain foods which diabetics will want to get lots of in their diet, including lobster along with other types of shellfish. You will find that staying away from foods that are high in sugar and saturated fat is extremely important for diabetics and lobster does not contain a significant amount of either of those things. Lobster also has omega-3 fats in it which is extremely good for the brain and body. Certain studies have shown that those who eat a significant amount of lobster on a regular basis can actually avoid developing problems with high HDL which is the bad type of cholesterol that you do not want to have issues with. It is however important for diabetics to avoid eating butter which is typically served with lobster. Continue reading >>

The Best Seafood For People With Diabetes

The Best Seafood For People With Diabetes

1 / 10 Fish Is an Excellent Choice for Type 2 Diabetes Diabetes experts recommend eating fish for cardiovascular health, but if your only experience with fish has been the fried variety or fish sticks, you might be wondering how and why to include fish in your strategy for eating well with diabetes. “It’s a great protein choice, a source of healthy fat, and it contains important vitamins and minerals,” says Cassandra Rico, MPH, RD, associate director of nutrition and medical affairs for the American Diabetes Association. And the best part of all is that "you don’t have to do a whole lot to seafood to make it taste good," she says. "You can add just a few herbs and bake it in the oven. It’s a lot easier to prepare than I think people perceive.” So get to know your local seafood purveyor and make seafood part of your type 2 diabetes diet. Continue reading >>

How Having Diabetes Can Affect Your Eating Habits

How Having Diabetes Can Affect Your Eating Habits

So you’ve gotten the diagnosis from your doctor. You’ve started your treatment plan with multiple daily blood glucose checks. Maybe you’re even a few or more years into this journey. No matter where you are in your journey, let’s talk about the one thing that so many people are focused on when they hear you have diabetes. FOOD! The one question that is always on people’s mind or out of their mouth when they find out you have Diabetes is: “Can you eat that?” I’m here to let you know that just because you have diabetes doesn’t mean you have to deprive yourself of things you love. Having diabetes just means you have to balance out the types of food you have while monitoring your blood glucose levels and properly taking your medication, whether this is oral medication or insulin injections. Let’s take a look at the basics of eating with diabetes. Understanding Carbs In order to learn how to effectively manage your blood glucose levels, you must understand everything you can about carbohydrates. Learning to count carbs and the different types of carbs are all vital to managing diabetes. That delicate balance between the amount of insulin in your body and how many carbs you consume all help make a difference when it comes to blood glucose levels. I recommend reading the following articles: Types of Carbohydrates Did you realize that there are three different main types of carbohydrates in your food? They include: Sugars Starches (complex carbs) Fiber You may also be familiar with terms such as natural sugar, low-calorie sweeteners, refined grains, complex carbs, processed grains and more. So it’s not unusual to find out that knowing the types and how many carbs you should eat may be tricky for some people. It’s important to learn to read nutrition labe Continue reading >>

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