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Living With Type 2 Diabetes

Understanding Type 2 Diabetes

Understanding Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic medical condition in which sugar, or glucose, levels build up in your bloodstream. The hormone insulin helps move the sugar from your blood into your cells, which are where the sugar is used for energy. In type 2 diabetes, your body’s cells aren’t able to respond to insulin as well as they should. In later stages of the disease your body may also not produce enough insulin. Uncontrolled type 2 diabetes can lead to chronically high blood sugar levels, causing several symptoms and potentially leading to serious complications. In type 2 diabetes your body isn’t able to effectively use insulin to bring glucose into your cells. This causes your body to rely on alternative energy sources in your tissues, muscles, and organs. This is a chain reaction that can cause a variety of symptoms. Type 2 diabetes can develop slowly. The symptoms may be mild and easy to dismiss at first. The early symptoms may include: constant hunger a lack of energy fatigue weight loss excessive thirst frequent urination dry mouth itchy skin blurry vision As the disease progresses, the symptoms become more severe and potentially dangerous. If your blood sugar levels have been high for a long time, the symptoms can include: yeast infections slow-healing cuts or sores dark patches on your skin foot pain feelings of numbness in your extremities, or neuropathy If you have two or more of these symptoms, you should see your doctor. Without treatment, diabetes can become life-threatening. Diabetes has a powerful effect on your heart. Women with diabetes are twice as likely to have another heart attack after the first one. They’re at quadruple the risk of heart failure when compared to women without diabetes. Diabetes can also lead to complications during pregnancy. Diet is an imp Continue reading >>

Living With Type 2 Diabetes: 20 Inspirational Blogs

Living With Type 2 Diabetes: 20 Inspirational Blogs

When thinking of diabetes what is the first thing that comes to your mind? Insulin? Injections? Of course, these things are very important – for type 1 diabetics. However, almost 90% of all diabetics have type 2 and mostly don’t need to inject insulin. But nevertheless, having type 2 diabetes can change your life completely and you need to take good care of your health. In the UK there are more than 135 and in the US more than 1400 diabetes-related amputations – every week. But the good news is: it doesn’t need to get that far. With the right treatment and responsible behavior, you can do a lot to prevent the progress of your diabetes. And you’re not alone: There are a lot of bloggers providing insight into their lives with type 2 diabetes, sharing their experience and motivation. How do I keep my blood glucose levels stable? What is the right diet for me? And is there an app that supports me with my diabetes? We’ve collected 20 of the most inspiring blogs about type 2 diabetes that you need to read: Are you missing one of your favorite blogs? Please write us in the comment section below. Diabetes Ramblings Sue writes about her personal experiences with type 2 diabetes and how she is dealing with her life as a mom of five. She says about herself: “I may have type 2 diabetes but it doesn't have me!” diabetesramblings.com Diabetes Stops Here On this blog, run by the American Diabetes Association, people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes share their stories about “what it means to live with diabetes, from frustrations and fears to friendships and triumphs”. diabetesstopshere.org Bob’s Blog, UK Bob writes about how he is living well with type 2 diabetes and how he is managing his condition with the right diet, exercise, and oral medication. fractis.net D Continue reading >>

What It’s Like To Live With Type 2 Diabetes

What It’s Like To Live With Type 2 Diabetes

Keeping tabs on your blood sugar If you’re not taking insulin, should you be testing your blood glucose during your day? The short answer is yes. You may not be using the results to adjust an insulin dose or the dinner menu, but it’s still important for people with Type 2 diabetes to be aware of their levels. “If there’s no testing, your sugars can be out of whack,” says Tabitha Palmer, a dietitian and certified diabetes educator working in Endocrinology Research at Capital Health in Halifax. “You can feel just fine with high blood sugar, but unfortunately they can still be causing all sorts of problems inside.” You certainly don’t need to test as often as someone with Type 1 diabetes would. But it may be a good idea to check your blood glucose level once or twice during the day. Taking medication Not everyone with Type 2 diabetes takes medication. But if you do, part of your day involves taking your pills or administering your injections. The medication may be prescribed to lower blood sugar, help your body produce insulin or provide the insulin your body can’t produce. About a quarter of people with Type 2 diabetes will eventually need to have insulin injections. “It’s not something that’s considered a failure or your fault. It’s just a natural progression of the disease,” says Palmer. These days, people are being diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes at a much younger age, which means they could be living with the disease for decades. Watching your diet If you have Type 2 diabetes, your daily routine should always include three healthy meals. It’s important to put some planning into what goes on your plate. Because you’re at a high risk for cardiovascular problems, such as heart disease and stroke, your focus should be on low-fat foods. There Continue reading >>

Living With Type 2 Diabetes

Living With Type 2 Diabetes

Learn about the symptoms, causes, and treatments of type 2 diabetes. Diet & Fitness Maintaining a healthy diet is important for everyone, but it is especially important for people with diabetes. Four key things to focus on are carbs, fiber, fat, and salt. Here's what you should know about each of them. Black coffee leads off our slideshow of surprising reasons for blood sugar upswings and dips. Innocent foods, spices, yard work, and even your boss can make levels go up or down. Eating for blood sugar control? See how to avoid carb-crazy meals and find better combinations that retain all the foods and flavors you love. See 13 versions of your favorite classic drinks you can enjoy when you're living with type 2 diabetes. If you have type 2 diabetes and are getting started with exercise, learn what you should know before you start working out. Exercise is very important in managing type 2 diabetes. Combining diet, exercise, and medicine (when prescribed) can help control your weight and blood sugar level. Wellness & Support Guilt, self-blame, fatigue, boredom -- all of these can creep in as you take care of type 2 diabetes day after day. Learn how to be kind to yourself and stay positive. It will help your health in the long run. Understanding the emotional impact of diabetes is crucial to staying well. Learn how to keep your emotions balanced with lifestyle choices, social support, and mental health counseling. As with any chronic illness, dealing with diabetes can be stressful. But you can learn to cope with the help of your health care team, family, friends, therapist, and support groups and organizations. Continue reading >>

Living With Type 2 Diabetes: Under Control Without Meds For 25 Years

Living With Type 2 Diabetes: Under Control Without Meds For 25 Years

When Bonny Damocles was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, he asked his doctor if he could try diet and exercise before starting the recommended medications. Granted a reprieve, he immediately began the most grueling workout he could think of: running stairs. Because his export business allowed him to work from his Midland, Michigan home where he served as the primary caregiver for a son with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, he broke his workouts up into segments totaling two hours per day. He quit eating sugar and most processed foods. When he reported back to his doctor ten days later, his blood sugar had dropped from 468 to readings in the 130s and 140s. “Continue what you are doing,” his doctor told him. “These are very encouraging results.” Twenty-five years later, the 80-year-old still runs stairs and watches his diet rather than using medication to control his diabetes. His a1c tests typically range from 5.2 to 6.3 percent; his most recent result was 5.8. He reports no diabetes complications and considers himself in excellent health. But he knows he hasn’t conquered diabetes. About 3½ years after his diagnosis, after a long streak of excellent blood sugar readings, a friend suggested he was cured. Damocles believed him. “So I drastically reduced my stair-running time to practically none on some days and started eating the wrong foods for me: steaks, fried chicken, pork chops, and other high-fat foods.” Then one day, out of curiosity, he tested his blood sugar. “It was 486 mg/dl. I nearly fainted.” These days, Damocles does his stairs exercise in four 25-minute increments, primarily before meals. He knows better than to let up. “I know, as all type 2 diabetics know, that once a diabetic, always a diabetic. I will never get rid of this disease.” Too Continue reading >>

New Report Provides A Plan For Living With Type 2 Diabetes

New Report Provides A Plan For Living With Type 2 Diabetes

These days, when I must give one of my patients the bad news that he or she has type 2 diabetes, the response is sometimes along the lines of “Well, I figured it was just a matter of time before that happened.” Many people suspect they are on a collision course with type 2 diabetes, but don’t know how to steer clear of it. Many others have diabetes but don’t know how to control it. Before going any farther, let me clarify that I am talking about type 2 diabetes, what used to be called adult-onset and non-insulin-dependent diabetes. It begins when muscle cells have trouble responding to insulin, a hormone that ushers glucose (blood sugar) into cells. Type 1 diabetes (formerly called juvenile-onset and insulin-dependent diabetes) is a different story. It occurs when the body’s immune system mistakenly attacks and damages insulin-making cells in the pancreas. Type 2 diabetes accounts for about 90% of all cases of diabetes. It is also on the rise. Fifty years ago, about 1.6 million Americans had type 2 diabetes. Today, nearly 20 million have been diagnosed with it, and almost half again as many have type 2 diabetes but don’t know it. Living with a chronic condition like type 2 diabetes can be confusing. We have created Diabetes: A plan you can live with to provide a clear road map for people with this condition. This updated Special Health Report from Harvard Health Publications covers the basics of living with type 2 diabetes, from monitoring blood sugar and managing medications to losing weight and working with health-care providers. A separate report, Healthy Eating for Type 2 Diabetes, covers strategies for eating well with type 2 diabetes, and offers 40 recipes that follow the healthy eating guidelines the report describes. As my colleague Dr. David M. Nath Continue reading >>

How To Learn To Live With Type 2 Diabetes

How To Learn To Live With Type 2 Diabetes

It takes more than medicine to cope with diabetes every day.(RADE PAVLOVIC/ISTOCKPHOTO) Type 2 diabetes is serious business, but it's not a death sentence. With proper management, people can live relatively normal lives. "I think sometimes people still understand diabetes as being the disease where you get your legs cut off and go blind," says Thomas Blevins, MD, an endocrinologist and founder of Texas Diabetes and Endocrinology, a private practice in Austin. Diabetes management has come a long way in recent years thanks to a flurry of research, more drug options, advances in home glucose monitoring, and in many cases earlier diagnosis. While diabetes has become more manageable, it isn't necessarily easier. Learning how to cope You'll need to cope with added health costs, diabetes burnout (a point when the daily grind of finger pricking, food monitoring, and exercise may get you down), social functions like the office holiday party, and family members who may be less than supportiveor overzealous in their support. Frustration I did everything and my sugar was high Watch videoMore about coping with diabetes Turning down a second piece of cake is no piece of cake. But you may need to cope with temptation as well as well-meaning family and friends who morph into the "food police," interrogating your every food choice. Diabetes education Your first ally in learning how to live with diabetes will most likely be a diabetes educator, a health professional who teaches the finer points of living with diabetes. Penny, a 67-year-old who lives in New York City, took a five-week course in diabetic self-management at the Montefiore Medical Center. It was the best thing to ever happen to her, she says. She gained a much deeper understanding of the anatomy and physiology of diabetes; l Continue reading >>

Tips For Living Well With Type 2 Diabetes

Tips For Living Well With Type 2 Diabetes

Tips for living well with Type 2 diabetes It can come as a shock to be diagnosed with a long-term illness. It is easy to feel overwhelmed and helpless, but its important to know how to manage those feelings and learn how to cope with the daily stress of living with Type 2 diabetes . Many communities offer diabetes classes or groups that can help you to manage your disease. Read these tips from the Healthy Living with Diabetes class: Its a stressful feeling to be diagnosed with an illness that will affect your lifestyle long-term. Here are a few ideas to get your feet on the ground: Take small steps. Find small, weekly goals that are attainable and easier to accomplish. Long-term goals are great, but when you can accomplish something in a matter of days, you are more likely to continue to reach and set more goals for yourself. Get physical activity. If you are one who rarely engages in physical activity, start by getting outside and going for a short, 5-minute walk. Once you start, its easier to continue on, so start small if you need to. Take time for yourself. It is OK to feel overwhelmed. In fact, its normal. Take a few minutes of your day to do something that you enjoy to get you back on track to feeling like yourself. Eat healthy . Whatever that may mean for you give it a try. Even if its smaller portions than you normally eat, just start there. Think positively. Positive thinking can truly affect your ability to overcome emotions you may feel you have no control over. Turn negative thoughts, such as Im too tired into If Im tired today, I probably got a lot done yesterday. Practice gratitude. There are many things in life to be thankful for. Choose to think about the good over the bad. Attend a diabetes-related class or support group. These offerings allow you to s Continue reading >>

Diabetes Life Expectancy

Diabetes Life Expectancy

Tweet After diabetes diagnosis, many type 1 and type 2 diabetics worry about their life expectancy. Death is never a pleasant subject but it's human nature to want to know 'how long can I expect to live'. There is no hard and fast answer to the question of ‘how long can I expect to live’ as a number of factors influence one’s life expectancy. How soon diabetes was diagnosed, the progress of diabetic complications and whether one has other existing conditions will all contribute to one’s life expectancy - regardless of whether the person in question has type 1 or type 2 diabetes. How long can people with diabetes expect to live? Diabetes UK estimates in its report, Diabetes in the UK 2010: Key Statistics on Diabetes[5], that the life expectancy of someone with type 2 diabetes is likely to be reduced, as a result of the condition, by up to 10 years. People with type 1 diabetes have traditionally lived shorter lives, with life expectancy having been quoted as being reduced by over 20 years. However, improvement in diabetes care in recent decades indicates that people with type 1 diabetes are now living significantly longer. Results of a 30 year study by the University of Pittsburgh, published in 2012, noted that people with type 1 diabetes born after 1965 had a life expectancy of 69 years.[76] How does diabetic life expectancy compare with people in general? The Office for National Statistics estimates life expectancy amongst new births to be: 77 years for males 81 years for females. Amongst those who are currently 65 years old, the average man can expect to live until 83 years old and the average woman to live until 85 years old. What causes a shorter life expectancy in diabetics? Higher blood sugars over a period of time allow diabetic complications to set in, su Continue reading >>

What It's Like To Live With Type 2 Diabetes

What It's Like To Live With Type 2 Diabetes

Adapting to a healthier diet A type 2 diabetes patient needs to shift from an unhealthy diet and adapt to a much healthier diet. The recommended diet for type 2 diabetes patients includes three healthy daily meals. A type 2 diabetes patient is at risk of developing cardiovascular problems, so the diet must avoid high-fat foods. Avoiding high-fat foods will also help you reduce a few pounds, which is healthy as losing weight may lessen your medical needs. Type 2 diabetes patients also need to remember the following: Unsaturated fats are healthier than saturated fats. Avoid foods with high trans fat. Eat less sodium. Limit alcohol intake as it can significantly affect blood sugar levels. It can also trigger problems in nerve damage, cholesterol, blood pressure and weight. Adult women with type 2 diabetes should limit their alcohol intake to 1 glass of alcohol per day with a meal. Adult men with type 2 diabetes should limit their alcohol intake to 2 glasses of alcohol per day with a meal. Women with type 2 diabetes who are pregnant must not drink alcohol at all. (All pregnant women should not drink alcohol.) Living an active lifestyle Like a healthy diet, a healthy and active lifestyle that includes regular exercise will help reduce cardiovascular risks and will help manage a person's weight and blood sugar levels. A person with type 2 diabetes must include at least one light physical activity in his or her routine on a daily basis. The exercise does not necessarily have to be heavy and strenuous. A light physical activity, such as stretching or aerobic exercise, will do. Even simple day-to-day activities such as walking, going up and down the stairs, or even vacuuming can make a significant difference. It is not necessary to develop an intense weight lifting regimen and g Continue reading >>

10 Brilliant Type 2 Diabetes Blogs: 2018 Edition

10 Brilliant Type 2 Diabetes Blogs: 2018 Edition

A diagnosis of type 2 diabetes can come as a shock and will likely entail many questions. While your doctor will be on hand to answer many of these, support, advice, and insight is readily available online, largely from those living type 2 diabetes themselves. Such blogs are also part of a wonderful online community, where you can interact with people around the world and share wisdom with one-another. While there is an abundance of such resources available, we have narrowed it down to 10 of the very best all of which are active, engaging, and brimming with information and advice. Diabetes.co.uk is a wonderful resource for anyone living with diabetes, be it type 1 or 2, with a community of over one quarter of a million people. The blog is a particularly fascinating and eclectic part of the site, featuring fascinating stories that you may not find elsewhere. It is also chock-full of practical advice for people living with diabetes, making it one of the most comprehensive blogs on the web. Sue Rericha was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes a decade ago, and has faithfully written her blog for almost as long. The mother of five had gestational diabetes throughout each of her pregnancies, and her blog gives readers an insight into many facets of her life. Sue is a prominent figure in online diabetes advocacy, and her blog provides a wonderful insight into her daily life from the fun to the frustrating and everything in between. For those looking for expert view on diabetes, and the latest news in the research world, the Diabetes Self-Management blog is one to bookmark. Penned by a range of authors including nutritionists, nurses, people living with diabetes, and other experts the blog is frequently updated with news, information, and advice. With its origins in print media in Continue reading >>

Living With Type 2 Diabetes: A Family Perspective.

Living With Type 2 Diabetes: A Family Perspective.

1. Diabet Med. 2007 Jul;24(7):796-801. Epub 2007 Apr 19. Living with Type 2 diabetes: a family perspective. (1)Department of Public Health & Primary Care, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland. [email protected] AIM: To explore the beliefs, attitudes and perceptions of adults with Type 2diabetes and their family members.METHODS: Focus groups were conducted with: (i) people with good diabetes control (HbA1c < 7.0%); (ii) their family members; (iii) people with poor diabetescontrol (HbA1c > 8.5%); and (iv) their family members.RESULTS: There were no discernible differences between those with good and poordiabetes control or between the family members of each group. Overall, familymembers perceived diabetes to be more serious and as having a greater impact ondaily life than those with the illness. Those with diabetes were unaware of this heightened concern and had a more relaxed approach to living with diabetes. Thelack of information and perceived knowledge about diabetes impacted uponparticipants' causal attributions about the illness and its perceived severity.CONCLUSIONS: Diabetes is an illness that affects both individuals and families.There is a need for further investigation into the impact that family membershave on the management of diabetes. Continue reading >>

A Day In The Life With Type 2 Diabetes

A Day In The Life With Type 2 Diabetes

My day with type 2 diabetes looks like many other people’s day, at least on the surface. Unlike someone who uses insulin, I don’t have many tasks during my day that make it obvious that I have diabetes. That left me wondering what I would write about to show the world what living with type 2 diabetes is like. This post contains a lot of my thoughts; what’s going on in my head as I make my way through my day. I hope that I’m able to show how living with type 2 diabetes is anything but easy. I wake up. This is a good thing! I swallow my thyroid pill before I even put on my slippers. Shuffle to the bathroom and wash my hands. Shuffle to my office where I check my fasting glucose. 142. Darn. Shuffle to the coffee pot for my first cup of the day. (Note: Thyroid medication is supposed to be taken on an empty stomach and you’re supposed to wait an hour before eating. I negotiated with my doctor to allow coffee first thing in the morning. My thyroid levels are fine and the world is a safer place when I’ve had my coffee. Also, less shuffling from now on.) Breakfast. “What was my fasting number again? 142. I sure wish I could figure out how to bring those morning numbers down. Now, what to eat that won’t make that number worse.” My food plan is one that contains very little processed foods, including breads. I have learned over the years that my blood glucose doesn’t stay happy if I eat bread, cereal, pasta, potatoes and most fruit. Before my diagnosis of type 2 diabetes, my breakfasts often included cereal and toast. Hash browns were a treat. I rarely eat those things now so breakfast is often eggs of some variety, and turkey sausage along with my oral medication. I also make muffins and pancakes using almond flour. This makes a very dense product but it work Continue reading >>

Living Well With Type 2

Living Well With Type 2

People of all shapes and backgrounds can develop type 2 diabetesand still flourish Managing diabetes is about walking the walk After dropping 125 pounds and picking up cycling, one man is showing his friends and family what healthy looks like Camaraderie is the key to one woman's successful diabetes management Like our Facebook page ( facebook.com/AmericanDiabetesAssociation ) and join our active community of people living with diabetes. Interested in participating in Tour de Cure? Learn about rides in your area at tour.diabetes.org or by calling your local ADA office. If cycling isnt your activity of choice, you can sign up for your local Step Out: Walk to Stop Diabetes event at stepout.diabetes.org . If you take an oral medication for diabetes and are experiencing side effects, talk to your doctor about your treatment plan. Medications can be adjusted to suit your needs. Interested in more information about healthy living with diabetes? Click here to subscribe to Diabetes Forecast magazine. Continue reading >>

Dr. Phil Opens Up About Living With Type 2 Diabetes For 25 Years

Dr. Phil Opens Up About Living With Type 2 Diabetes For 25 Years

More than 25 years ago, Dr. Phil went to his doctor for a thorough physical — and came back with life-changing news. “I was having a lot of energy fluctuations. Everybody bonks, when you just run out of gas, but it was happening to me a lot. I thought, this is just not right,” he recalls. The doctor, Dr. Phil says, came back with both good news and bad news: “Bad news is you’ve got a disease, type 2 diabetes. The good news is that it’s manageable. You can’t cure it, but it’s manageable.” Dr. Phil, 65, has been successfully managing it ever since, and has now partnered with AstraZeneca in hopes of helping the more than 28 million Americans who are living with type 2 diabetes get educated and feel empowered to take control of the disease by making necessary changes to their lifestyle. Another 86 million people in America are at risk for developing type 2 diabetes. “This is one of those diseases that has a stigma. There are a lot of people that feel guilty if they have type 2 diabetes. There’s a lot of shame that goes with it, because people think if you’ve got the disease it’s because you’ve been lazy, you haven’t eaten right,” Dr. Phil explains. “Some of those factors can aggravate the condition if you have the disease, but you’re genetically predisposed to this. The truth is that the stigma is really grounded in a lack of information.” When Dr. Phil got the diagnosis in his 40s, the first thought he had was “Let’s get on it.” He wanted to immediately be proactive by getting educated, changing his lifestyle with diet and exercise, and managing his stress levels and sleep. More than 25 years later, those words still hold true as he helps bring awareness to AstraZeneca’s “On It” Movement, a campaign that begins with Dr. Phi Continue reading >>

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