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Lipitor Hypoglycemia

Many Prescription Meds Can Cause Hypoglycemia

Many Prescription Meds Can Cause Hypoglycemia

Something I’ve discovered through my own research into hypoglycemia is that many common prescription medications – like painkillers, antibiotics, sleeping pills (particularly bad) anti-inflammatories etc – can have major affects on your blood sugar. So, if you are regularly taking any medications, there’s a strong chance they could be causing or contributing to your hypoglycemia. This is important to understand because the hypoglycemic affect of some common medications is far stronger than eating sugar! The list of medications that cause hypoglycemia is far too long to include here but generally it includes most painkillers, anti-inflammatories, anti-coagulants, cortico-steroids, sleeping pills and even supplements like calcium gluconate. I outline this in my book ‘Revealed: The Hidden Truth About Hypoglycemia‘. Talking of drugs, alcohol of course is a drug and can also have serious affects on your blood sugar. I don’t want to be a total killjoy and say you can never drink any alcohol – but just remember, if you do, only have one glass, and always drink it with a meal, which will slow down the absorption of the alcohol and minimize and adverse effect. The good news is, hypoglycemia can be completely controlled through the correct diet (and it’s a very easy diet that won’t drive you crazy trying to follow). Find out more in ‘Revealed The Hidden Truth About Hypoglycemia‘. Continue reading >>

Lipitor And Hypoglycemia - From Fda Reports

Lipitor And Hypoglycemia - From Fda Reports

Hypoglycemia is found among people who take Lipitor, especially for people who are male, 60+ old , have been taking the drug for 1 - 6 months, also take medication Aspirin, and have Type 2 diabetes. This review analyzes which people have Hypoglycemia with Lipitor. It is created by eHealthMe based on reports of 185,636 people who have side effects when taking Lipitor from FDA , and is updated regularly. What to expect? If you take Lipitor and have Hypoglycemia, find out what symptoms you could have in 1 year or longer. You are not alone! Join a support group for people who take Lipitor and have Hypoglycemia Personalized health information On eHealthMe you can find out what patients like me (same gender, age) reported their drugs and conditions on FDA since 1977. Our tools are simple to use, anonymous and free. Start now >>> Number of reports submitted per year: < 1 month: 11.29 % 1 - 6 months: 30.65 % 6 - 12 months: 24.19 % 1 - 2 years: 6.45 % 2 - 5 years: 16.13 % 5 - 10 years: 9.68 % 10+ years: 1.61 % Gender of people who have Hypoglycemia when taking Lipitor *: female: 49.44 % male: 50.56 % Age of people who have Hypoglycemia when taking Lipitor *: 0-1: 0.0 % 2-9: 0.0 % 10-19: 0.12 % 20-29: 0.49 % 30-39: 5.34 % 40-49: 12.86 % 50-59: 20.51 % 60+: 60.68 % Top conditions involved for these people *: Type 2 Diabetes (186 people, 18.54%) Diabetes (164 people, 16.35%) Hyperlipidaemia (87 people, 8.67%) Depression (79 people, 7.88%) Stress And Anxiety (54 people, 5.38%) Top co-used drugs for these people *: Aspirin (226 people, 22.53%) Lantus (184 people, 18.34%) Lasix (165 people, 16.45%) Actos (115 people, 11.47%) Humalog (114 people, 11.37%) Top other side effects for these people *: Weakness (129 people, 12.86%) Nausea (121 people, 12.06%) Fatigue (121 people, 12.06%) Blo Continue reading >>

Study Uncovers Why Statins Increase Diabetes Risk And Offers Solution

Study Uncovers Why Statins Increase Diabetes Risk And Offers Solution

Statins are drugs that lower cholesterol in the body by interfering with the production of cholesterol in the liver. Though they lower bad cholesterol and raise good cholesterol, one side effect is that they increase risk of diabetes. Now, researchers have discovered why and offer a way to suppress this side effect. One of the world's most widely used drugs, statins have been hailed by the medical community for their ability to prevent heart disease. Still, the researchers, who have published their findings in the journal Diabetes, were confused as to why diabetes was linked to statin use. "Recently, an increased risk of diabetes has been added to the warning label for statin use," says lead author Jonathan Schertzer, assistant professor of Biochemistry and Biomedical Sciences, and Canadian Diabetes Association Scholar. "This was perplexing to us," he continues, "because if you are improving your metabolic profile with statins you should actually be decreasing the incidence of diabetes with these drugs, yet, the opposite happened." According to the team, around 13 million people could be prescribed a statin drug at some point in their lives. In January of this year, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) released a Consumer Update outlining some of the risks associated with taking statins, which included an increased risk of raised blood sugar levels and the development of type 2 diabetes. At that time, Dr. Amy G. Egan, deputy director for safety in the FDA's Division of Metabolism and Endocrinology Products, said: Clearly we think that the heart benefits of statins outweighs this small increased risk. But what this means for patients taking statins and the health care professionals prescribing them is that blood-sugar levels may need to be assessed after instituting st Continue reading >>

Can Statins Lower My Blood Sugar?

Can Statins Lower My Blood Sugar?

Question: I just started taking Zocor for my cholesterol and I been having trouble with my blood sugar dropping low. Is this just a side effect and will it go away eventually? Dr. Hibberd’s answer: Hypoglycemia like yours must be corrected. Zocor is not usually associated with hypoglycemia; reports of it are very rare with the drug. So I recommend you see your doctor for re-evaluation without delay. Sometimes pre-diabetes is heralded by hypoglycemia, as are other metabolic disorders, such as hypothyroidism and Addison's disease. The effects of Zocor are seen over weeks and months, so discontinuing Zocor for several weeks is usually a safe way to see if it makes a difference, in consultation with your physician, of course. It might wise to change to a newer anti-cholesterol agent such as Crestor or Lipitor, but I would not wait to see if your hypoglycemia goes away by itself. © 2018 NewsmaxHealth. All rights reserved. Continue reading >>

Atorvastatin Causes Insulin Resistance And Increases Ambient Glycemia In Hypercholesterolemic Patients

Atorvastatin Causes Insulin Resistance And Increases Ambient Glycemia In Hypercholesterolemic Patients

Go to: Abstract We investigated whether atorvastatin might decrease insulin sensitivity and increase ambient glycemia in hypercholesterolemic patients. Clinical trials suggest that some statin treatments might increase the incidence of diabetes despite reductions in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and improvement in endothelial dysfunction. A randomized, single-blind, placebo-controlled parallel study was conducted in 44 patients taking placebo and in 42, 44, 43, and 40 patients given daily atorvastatin 10, 20, 40, and 80 mg, respectively, during a 2-month treatment period. Atorvastatin 10, 20, 40, and 80 mg significantly reduced LDL cholesterol (39%, 47%, 52%, and 56%, respectively) and apolipoprotein B levels (33%, 37%, 42%, and 46%, respectively) after 2 months of therapy when compared with either baseline (all p < 0.001 by paired t test) or placebo (p < 0.001 by analysis of variance [ANOVA]). Atorvastatin 10, 20, 40, and 80 mg significantly increased fasting plasma insulin (mean changes: 25%, 42%, 31%, and 45%, respectively) and glycated hemoglobin levels (2%, 5%, 5%, and 5%, respectively) when compared with either baseline (all p < 0.05 by paired t test) or placebo (p = 0.009 for insulin and p = 0.008 for glycated hemoglobin by ANOVA). Atorvastatin 10, 20, 40, and 80 mg decreased insulin sensitivity (1%, 3%, 3%, and 4%, respectively) when compared with either baseline (p = 0.312, p = 0.008, p < 0.001, and p = 0.008, respectively, by paired t test) or placebo (p = 0.033 by ANOVA). Despite beneficial reductions in LDL cholesterol and apolipoprotein B, atorvastatin treatment resulted in significant increases in fasting insulin and glycated hemoglobin levels consistent with insulin resistance and increased ambient glycemia in hypercholesterolemic patients. (E Continue reading >>

Lipitor Side Effects,

Lipitor Side Effects,

Lipitor side effects, safety, toxicity and benefit of medication, are there natural alternatives to atorvastatin? Lipitor, atorvastatin, is in a class of medications called HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins). It works by slowing the production of cholesterol in the body but there are many natural and safer ways to lower cholesterol in the blood. Buildup of cholesterol and fats along the walls of the blood vessels (a process known as atherosclerosis) decreases blood flow and, therefore, the oxygen supply to the heart, brain, and other parts of the body. Lowering blood levels of cholesterol and fats may help to prevent heart disease, angina (chest pain), strokes, and heart attacks. Lipitor is used with diet changes (restriction of cholesterol and fat intake) to reduce the amount of cholesterol and certain fatty substances in the blood. Lipitor is made by Pfizer. Lipitor is the world's biggest-selling medicine but it loses U.S. patent protection in 2011. Lipitor had $13 billion in 2006 sales. There is no doubt that Lipitor medication use lowers cholesterol levels. What is in question is whether the use of Lipitor decreases mortality or increases longevity. Sometimes a drug can be shown to lower cholesterol and lower the risk of stroke and heart attack, but the overall mortality rate could be the same or even higher on the drug, hence why take the drug, in this case Lipitor, in the first place. Plus, Lipitor is very expensive and many people have side effects. Lipitor does not reduce cardiovascular risk in those with diabetes Efficacy and safety of Lipitor in the prevention of cardiovascular end points in subjects with type 2 diabetes: the Lipitor Study for Prevention of Coronary Heart Disease Endpoints in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (ASPEN). Diabetes Care. Continue reading >>

Lipitor Side Effects

Lipitor Side Effects

What are the possible side effects of LIPITOR? LIPITOR can cause serious side effects These side effects have happened only to a small number of people. Your doctor can monitor you for them. These side effects usually go away if your dose is lowered or if LIPITOR is stopped. These serious side effects include: Muscle problems. LIPITOR can cause serious muscle problems that can lead to kidney problems, including kidney failure. You have a higher chance for muscle problems if you are taking certain other medicines with LIPITOR. Liver problems. Your doctor should do blood tests to check your liver before you start taking LIPITOR and if you have symptoms of liver problems while you take LIPITOR. Call your doctor right away if you have the following symptoms of liver problems: Feel tired or weak Loss of appetite Upper belly pain Dark, amber-colored urine Yellowing of your skin or the whites of your eyes Call your doctor right away if: You have muscle problems like weakness, tenderness, or pain that happens without a good reason, especially if you also have a fever or feel more tired than usual. You have muscle problems that do not go away even after your doctor has advised you to stop taking LIPITOR. Your doctor may do further tests to diagnose the cause of your muscle problems. You have allergic reactions including swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and/or throat that may cause difficulty in breathing or swallowing, which may require treatment right away. You experience nausea and vomiting. You pass brown or dark-colored urine. You feel more tired than usual. Your skin and whites of your eyes get yellow. You have stomach pain. You have an allergic skin reaction. In clinical studies, patients reported the following common side effects while taking LIPITOR: Diarrhea Upset st Continue reading >>

Lipitor Side Effects By Likelihood And Severity

Lipitor Side Effects By Likelihood And Severity

COMMON side effects If experienced, these tend to have a Severe expression Joint Pain If experienced, these tend to have a Less Severe expression Diarrhea Indigestion Pain Throat Irritation Urinary Tract Infection INFREQUENT side effects If experienced, these tend to have a Severe expression Muscle Pain Muscle Spasm If experienced, these tend to have a Less Severe expression Chronic Trouble Sleeping Dizzy Feel Like Throwing Up Muscle Or Bone Pain Rash RARE side effects If experienced, these tend to have a Severe expression Abnormal Liver Function Tests Blockage Of Normal Bile Flow Erythema Multiforme Giant Hives Hepatitis Life Threatening Allergic Reaction Liver Failure Lung Tissue Problems Muscle Damage Due To Auotimmunity Muscle Inflammation Muscle Problems Pancreatitis Peripheral Neuropathy Rhabdomyolysis Rupture Of A Tendon Stevens-Johnson Syndrome Stiff Neck Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis If experienced, these tend to have a Less Severe expression Blurred Vision Burping Confused Depression Dry Eye Fever Gas High Blood Sugar Hives Intense Abdominal Pain Joint Stiffness Loss Of Memory Low Energy Muscle Weakness Nightmares Nosebleed Not Feeling Well Ringing In The Ears White Blood Cells In Urine Not From Infection Continue reading >>

Lipitor Overview

Lipitor Overview

Lipitor, a cholesterol-lowering drug made by Pfizer, is prescribed to people who are at risk for heart disease or stroke. It helps to prevent heart attacks, strokes, and heart surgery. Lipitor has been a huge seller for Pfizer, netting them billions of dollars in revenue. And while it may have saved lives in people at risk for heart disease and stroke, there are some serious risks too, including the development of type 2 diabetes while taking it. Lawsuits have been filed against Pfizer by people who developed diabetes while taking Lipitor. They claim that the drug company failed to communicate the risk of developing high blood sugar until six years after Lipitor was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). If you have diabetes from taking Lipitor, or have suffered other serious side effects, you may be able to join a class act lawsuit or start one of your own in order to get compensation. What is Lipitor? The generic name for Lipitor is atorvastatin calcium. It was approved by the FDA in 1996 and proved so successful and popular that it became the biggest selling prescription drug of all time. It also belongs to the most prescribed class of drugs in the world, statins. Statins are drugs that lower cholesterol and are prescribed to people at risk of dying from heart disease or a stroke. Although Pfizer’s patent on Lipitor has expired, by 2003 it had netted the company more than any drug in history. In 2008 alone Pfizer sold $12.4 billion worth of Lipitor. Now that there are generics on the market, there are several statins available, including generic atorvastatin. How it Works Statins like Lipitor are supposed to be prescribed to people to be used in conjunction with healthy lifestyle changes like a healthy diet, exercise, and weight loss. It is prescr Continue reading >>

10 Components In Direction Of Do If You鎶甧 Residing With Lipitor Diabetic Issues Facet Repercussions

10 Components In Direction Of Do If You鎶甧 Residing With Lipitor Diabetic Issues Facet Repercussions

If by yourself include been identified with style 2 diabetic issues immediately after getting the cholesterol drug Lipitor, it’s essential in the direction of comprehend how the ailment will have an effect on your lifetime. It’s probably in the direction of include a primary have an affect on upon your everyday schedule and negatively impact your prolonged-expression fitness. Countless numbers of ladies who comprise experienced the misfortune of agony Lipitor diabetic issues aspect repercussions at this time combat with the ailment upon a each day foundation. Lipitor is developed by means of Pfizer. Research relationship back again toward 1994 consist of related its seek the services of in direction of fresh new-onset diabetic issues. Pfizer didn’t divulge the probability right up until 2012, Even though the U.S. Foods and Drug Management compelled it towards upgrade its security label. The business’s deficiency of disclosure revealed a great number of women of all ages in direction of a severe visit more information ailment for which there is no recognized procedure. Here鎶?a listing of 10 elements on your own really should be undertaking, if you鎶甧 dwelling with Lipitor diabetic issues facet repercussions: 1. Continuous Have to have in the direction of Check Your Blood Glucose Amounts When oneself’ve been identified with the sickness, your self’ll will need toward check out your blood glucose amounts in the course of the working day. This is a single of the keys towards working your problem. Preserve a log and post heavy spikes and drops in direction of your medical doctor. 2. Demanding Adherence in the direction of A Lipitor And Diabetic issues-Welcoming Eating plan It’s sizeable towards software your food stuff close to nutritious, dietary food ite Continue reading >>

Ten Medication Interactions The Internist Should Consider

Ten Medication Interactions The Internist Should Consider

BOSTON ─ Clinicians should be on the lookout for dangerous drug interactions, particularly those involving trimethroprim/sulfamethoxazole, tramadol and clarithromycin, according to Douglas S. Paauw, MD, MACP. Here at the ACP Internal Medicine Meeting, Paauw, who is professor of medicine and Rathmann Family Foundation Endowed Chair for Patient-Centered Clinical Education, department of medicine at the University of Washington School of Medicine in Seattle, presented a series of case presentations to test the audience on important medication errors and provide tips on how to avoid them. 1. Be aware that statin-associated rhabdomyolysis and myalgia is the most feared and life threatening side effect associated with statins, and statin-related myalgias are possibly the most common drug side effect seen in clinical practice. According to Paauw, among the side effects associated with statins ─ including hepatotoxicity, liver failure, myalgias and possibly cataracts ─ though rare, rhabdomyolysis is the most feared and life threatening. Moreover, certain drugs have been shown in the literature to increase the risk for statin toxicity, including fibrates, azole antifungals, amiodarone, erythromycin/clarithromycin, protease inhibitors and verapamil/diltiazem. Among patients prescribed statins who present with myalgia — one of the most common drug side effects observed in clinical practice — Paauw recommends assessing creatine kinase and thyroid stimulating hormone levels, discontinuing statin use and reinitiating a new or lower-dose statin once symptoms resolve. Among patients whose symptoms fail to resolve, Paauw suggests high-dose fluvastatin; low-dose, twice-weekly atorvastatin; or rosuvastatin every other day or weekly. He recommends ezetimibe in patients whose symp Continue reading >>

Lipitor

Lipitor

What is Lipitor? Lipitor is a prescription drug manufactured by pharmaceutical giant Pfizer and used to control high cholesterol levels. By lowering cholesterol, the drug aims to prevent dangerous blockages in blood flow and thereby reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Lipitor in 1996. The drug’s active ingredient is atorvastatin calcium. This class of medications is generally well-tolerated; however, it has been associated with multiple risks, including: Lipitor belongs to a popular class of cholesterol-lowering drugs called statins, which represent the most widely prescribed class of drugs in the U.S. Lipitor is the most popular of all statins. Patients take statins to lower levels of cholesterol and other fatty substances in the blood that, if left unchecked, can increase the risk for heart attack, stroke and other related health complications. The liver makes most of the cholesterol found in blood. Statins reduce the amount of cholesterol made by the liver and help the liver remove cholesterol that’s already in the blood. How Lipitor Works Cholesterol plays a crucial role in several bodily processes that are essential to our health, but unhealthy levels of cholesterol can lead to buildup (plaque) on the walls of arteries. This can block blood flow to the brain and heart and put people at higher risk for stroke and heart disease. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women in the U.S. Lipitor prevents heart attack and stroke by lowering cholesterol in the blood. It slows the production of cholesterol in the body therefore decreasing the amount of plaque buildup that may block the flow of blood to the heart and brain. Stat Continue reading >>

Statins

Statins

Tweet Diabetes and statins have a complex relationship and are the focus of intense patient and healthcare debate. Statins are cholesterol-lowering drugs. Statins are cholesterol-lowering drugs that are frequently used as part of diabetes care due to the knowledge that people with diabetes face a greater likelihood of heart attack and stroke. When used alongside good blood glucose control and other medication, the case for statins argues that they cut cholesterol levels and lower the risk of a cardiovascular event. Type 2 diabetes in particular is commonly linked with higher levels of cholesterol. How can I lower my risk of cardiovascular problems without taking statins? There are other ways to lower your cholesterol and reduce your risk of stroke and heart attacks. These methods include stopping smoking, reducing your alcohol intake, taking regular physical activity and ensuring your diet is not over-reliant on processed foods. In some people, a change in lifestyle can make enough of a difference to cholesterol levels for you to not require cholesterol lowering treatment such as statins. If, however, your cholesterol levels remain above the target cholesterol levels and factors such as age and family history of heart disease and stroke show you to be at a high risk of heart disease, your doctor will likely advise statin treatment. What do statins do for people with diabetes? Statins affect the way the liver manufactures cholesterol, lowering levels of LDL cholesterol (the so called ‘bad’ cholesterol) and raising levels of HDL cholesterol (the so called ‘good’ cholesterol). The terms good and bad cholesterol are used because, whilst we do need both types of cholesterol, having too high levels LDl cholesterol is linked with higher risks of heart disease whereas h Continue reading >>

What You Don’t Know About Statins And Exercise Can Hurt You

What You Don’t Know About Statins And Exercise Can Hurt You

by Dr. Sheri Colberg, Ph.D., FACSM I recently received an email from a person with type 1 diabetes living in Denmark (Guido) whose physician believes in prescribing many medications to manage cholesterol and high blood pressure in anyone with diabetes, regardless of need. Guido has been taking a statin (Atorvastatin, brand name Lipitor), along with at least four others for blood pressure control. He used to take Simvastitin (Zocor), but a year prior had been changed to Atorvastatin (and his dose doubled). That’s when his problems with exercise began. Many prescribed medications can directly affect people’s ability to exercise or their responses to it, but most healthcare providers focus on the ones that affect blood glucose, particularly if they increase the risk of activity-related hypoglycemia. Another type really needs to be considered, though, because of the sheer number of patients who are being put on them and their potentially negative impact on the ability to exercise: statins. Statins are medications taken to treat high cholesterol levels or abnormal levels of blood fats, in an attempt to lower the risk of heart attack and stroke. Brand name examples include Altoprev, Crestor, Lescol, Lipitor, Livalo, Mevacor, Pravachol, and Zocor. The cholesterol guidelines were recently updated, the result being that even more adults with diabetes and prediabetes are being prescribed various medications from this class. In individuals who are unwilling or unable to change their diet and lifestyles sufficiently or have genetically high levels of blood lipids, the benefits of statins for lowering cardiovascular risk likely greatly exceed the risks, or so the experts claim (1). If a person has a low risk for developing cardiovascular problems and does not already have type 2 Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia: Medications That Can Cause It

Hypoglycemia: Medications That Can Cause It

Many common medications can cause changes to your blood glucose levels. This handy guide will help you keep track of what drugs can cause hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Note that all drugs are listed by trade name when possible, and that you may take a generic form of one of these medications. This is not an all-inclusive list, and not all medications will cause the same side effects in all people. If you have concerns, please speak to your physician, pharmacist, or dietitian. Abelcet® Achromycin® V Advil® Amphotec® Anafranil® Ancobon® Aspirin (usually only with very large doses) Atromid-S Avelox® Aventyl® Azulfidine® Benemid® Capoten® and other angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors Cataflam® Chlorthalidone Clonidine Coumadin® Cylert Diclofenac Sodium Disalcid Flexiril® Floxin® Fungizone Inderal® Levaquin® Lipitor® Macrobid® Macrodantin Mepron® Midol® Misoprostol Motrin® Nardil® Norpace® Norpramin® Pamelor® Panmycin® Parnate® Pepto-Bismol® Percocet® Quinine Salflex® Sumycin® Tagamet® Tapazole® Tegretol® Tenoretic® Tenormin® Tequin® Tipramine Tofranil® Trisenox® Vasotec® Viagra® Voltaren® Xenical® Ziac® References and recommended readings Diabetes In Control, Inc. Drugs that can affect blood glucose levels. Available at: Accessed June 18, 2012. Drugs.com. Drug-induced hypoglycemia. Available at: Accessed June 18, 2012. Continue reading >>

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