diabetestalk.net

Lipid Levels And Diabetes

Controlling Lipid Levels In Diabetes

Controlling Lipid Levels In Diabetes

, Volume 39, Supplement2 , pp s29s34 | Cite as Coronary heart disease (CHD) is associated with a 2- to 4-times greater risk of morbidity and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes than in non-diabetic individuals. Dyslipidaemia is an important CHD risk factor in diabetic patients. The key atherogenic features of diabetic dyslipidemia are elevated levels of serum triglycerides, low levels of high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and the preponderance of small, dense low density lipoprotein (LDL). As a result, treatment guidelines for diabetic dyslipidaemia recommend elevated LDL cholesterol and triglyceride levels and low HDL cholesterol levels as targets of therapy. Unfortunately, however, these lipid abnormalities often persist dispite best efforts to control hyperglycaemia, improve diet, and increase physical exercise, and therefore demand specific therapeutic intervention. Statins are the first choice for LDL cholesterol lowering as they are effective and well tolerated, and do not have adverse effects on glycaemic control. Furthermore, recent evidence suggests that statins may also be employed to treat moderately elevated levels of triglycerides. An increasing number of primary and secondary prevention trials have shown that lipid-lowering therapy with statins can significantly reduce the risk of CHD events in patients with diabetic dyslipidaemia. Key words Diabetic dyslipidaemiaLow density lipoproteinCoronary heart diseaseLipid-loweringStatins This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check access. Continue reading >>

Lipid Profile And Persistent Lipid Abnormalities In Diabetic Patients – A Retrospective Study

Lipid Profile And Persistent Lipid Abnormalities In Diabetic Patients – A Retrospective Study

Abstract The purposes of this study are the characterization the lipid profile and the suitability of the statins treatment according to the cardiovascular profile. Also, in statin-treated patients, we aim to determine the prevalence of persistent lipid abnormalities. Observational and retrospective study of outpatient diabetic patients of a hospital consultation, between Jun/2014 and Jun/2015. Of the 199 diabetic patients included, 58.6% were treated with statins and only 13.9% were treated with statin dose adequate for its cardiovascular profile. The patients without overt cardiovascular disease had higher total cholesterol (178.0 vs 157.5 mg/dl; p = 0.003), HDL-C (51.0 vs 43.0 mg/dl; p = 0.005), LDL-C (97.0 vs 79.0 mg/dl; p = 0.004) and non-HDL-C (127.0 vs 112.5 mg/dl; p = 0.04) and higher prevalence of patients who achieved HDL-C goals (64.3 vs 33.3%; p < 0.0001). Almost half of statin-treated patients (46.8%) failed to achieve the LDL-C goals, 35.8% and 51.6% failed the triglycerides and HDL-C goals, respectively. Only 11.7% achieved all three goals. In statin-treated patients, we found a statistically significant difference between patients with and without cardiovascular disease on the prevalence of patients reaching the target HDL-C (68.1 vs 35.4%; p = 0.001). There were no differences in the prevalence of patients who achieved LDL-C and triglyceride goals. There is a suboptimal utilization of statins and a substantial percentage of diabetic patients that do not achieve the therapeutic goals. We emphasize the need for an effort to optimize the lipid profile of diabetics in order to contribute to reducing the prevalence of cardiovascular diseases in this population. Resumo Os objetivos são a caracterização do perfil lipídico e a avaliação do tratamento com Continue reading >>

A Guide To Living With Diabetes And High Cholesterol

A Guide To Living With Diabetes And High Cholesterol

If you’ve been diagnosed with diabetes, you know that controlling your blood sugar levels is important. The more you can keep these levels down, the lower your risk of developing cardiovascular disease and other health problems. Having diabetes puts you at a higher risk for developing high cholesterol. As you watch your blood sugar numbers, watch your cholesterol numbers too. Here, we explain why these two conditions often show up together, and how you can manage both with practical lifestyle approaches. Diabetes and high cholesterol often occur together If you have both diabetes and high cholesterol, you’re not alone. The American Heart Association (AHA) states that diabetes often lowers HDL (“good”) cholesterol levels and raises triglycerides and LDL (“bad”) cholesterol levels. Both of these increase the risk for heart disease and stroke. The National Diabetes Statistics Report of 2014 shared similar findings. Between 2009 and 2012, about 65 percent of adults with diabetes had LDL cholesterol levels higher than ideal, or used cholesterol-lowering medications. As a reminder: An LDL cholesterol level under 100 milligrams/deciliter (mg/dL) is considered ideal. 100–129 mg/dL is close to ideal. 130–159 mg/dL is borderline elevated. High cholesterol levels can be dangerous. Cholesterol is a type of fat that can build up inside the arteries. Over time, it can harden to form a stiff plaque. That damages arteries, making them stiff and narrow and inhibiting blood flow. The heart has to work harder to pump blood, and risk for heart attack and stroke go up. Why diabetes increases risk of high cholesterol Scientists aren’t sure yet exactly how diabetes affects cholesterol, but they’re working on it. Some research has pointed to a connection between insulin and Continue reading >>

Cholesterol Screening Tests And Diabetes

Cholesterol Screening Tests And Diabetes

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri, MD on October 14, 2017 When you have diabetes, you're more likely to get heart disease. Because of that, you need to have your cholesterol levels and triglycerides (a type of blood fat) checked at least once a year. A simple blood test is all you need. It also helps to know as much as you can about cholesterol and the steps you can take to keep your levels where they should be. The golden rule: Keep your bad LDL cholesterol level down and your good HDL level up. Your body actually needs some cholesterol. But many people have too much of the bad kind and not enough of the good. Over time, that can lead to a buildup called plaque in your arteries, leaving less space for blood to flow. Blocked heart vessels can cause chest pain, a heart attack, or a stroke. The "good" HDL cholesterol helps your body get rid of the "bad" LDL. The higher your HDL level, the better. Another type of blood fat, called triglycerides, also makes heart disease more likely, although its not the same as cholesterol. You want to keep your triglyceride levels low. Diet.Saturated fat in the foods you eat raises your bad cholesterol level. Weight.Extra pounds increase your cholesterol and your chance of getting heart disease. Exercise.Get it regularly, since that can lower "bad" cholesterol and bring up the "good." Genes.They influence how much cholesterol your body makes. High levels can run in families. Other causes.Certain medications and medical conditions can raise your levels. High triglycerides could come from diabetes or thyroid problems. It can help to lose extra weight and avoid foods that are high in calories. What Should My Total Cholesterol Level Be? A blood test is all you need to find out what your cholesterol level is. Your doctor may recommend that you fast f Continue reading >>

Lipid Profile

Lipid Profile

A blood test, or the results of a blood test, that measures levels of lipids, or fats, including cholesterol and triglycerides. Factors such as your age, sex, and genetics influence your lipid profile. Certain aspects of your lifestyle, including your diet, level of physical activity, level of diabetes control, and smoking status, also affect your lipid profile. And some medical conditions can raise or lower cholesterol and triglyceride levels. A lipid profile is a direct measure of three blood components: cholesterol, triglycerides, and high-density lipoproteins (HDLs). Cholesterol is a vital substance that your body uses to produce such things as digestion-aiding material, hormones, and cell membranes. It is both produced by the body and absorbed from some of the foods you eat. Cholesterol and triglycerides are transported in the blood by combinations of lipids and proteins called lipoproteins. HDLs, the so-called “good” or “healthy” cholesterol, are lipoproteins made mostly of protein and little cholesterol. HDLs can help to clear cholesterol deposits in blood vessels left by another blood component called low-density lipoproteins, or LDLs. LDL levels may be calculated from the three directly measured lipids or may be more accurately measured by a direct test. LDLs and very-low-density lipoproteins (VLDLs) are the so-called “bad” cholesterols. Unlike HDLs, LDLs and VLDLs are high-cholesterol particles. While cholesterol is necessary for various bodily functions, too much cholesterol is harmful, since excess cholesterol can be deposited in blood vessel walls. These fat deposits can lead to atherosclerosis, or hardening of the arteries, and cardiovascular disease, the number one killer in the United States. High levels of triglycerides are also associated w Continue reading >>

Diabetes And High Cholesterol 101

Diabetes And High Cholesterol 101

Cholesterol is a type of fat found in the blood. Everyone has it, but people with diabetes are more likely to have unhealthy levels of LDL, which can cause narrowing or blocking of the blood vessels. This blockage, when severe, keeps blood from reaching some areas of the heart, increasing your risk for a heart attack or stroke. There are two types of cholesterol in the blood: HDL and LDL. LDL levels should be kept low to help protect your heart. By contrast, HDL is a healthy fat that helps clear fatty deposits from your blood vessels and protect your heart. Try thinking "L should be low, H is healthy" to help you remember the difference between the two types. Triglycerides are another type of fat in your blood that can add to your risk of a heart attack or stroke at high levels, similar to the effect of high cholesterol. Know the Numbers What are the low and high levels of cholesterol for those with diabetes? According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), most adults with diabetes should aim for an LDL level of less than 100 mg/dl. The ADA-recommended HDL levels are greater than 40 mg/dl for men with diabetes and greater than 50 mg/dl for women with diabetes. The ADA recommends that both men and women with diabetes aim for triglyceride levels less than 150 mg/dl. What's mg/dl? It stands for milligrams of cholesterol per deciliter of blood -- the standard unit of measure for cholesterol and triglycerides. Everyone, including people with diabetes, needs some cholesterol in their blood to help build healthy cells. However, there are no symptoms to alert you if your LDL is too high or your HDL is too low. A blood test at your doctor's office is the only way to know. As a result, it is especially important to have your cholesterol checked regularly (at least yearly) i Continue reading >>

Cholesterol Abnormalities & Diabetes

Cholesterol Abnormalities & Diabetes

Cholesterol is a waxy substance that is made by the body and found in some animal-based foods. Blood cholesterol levels describe a group of fats also known as lipoproteins which includes HDL-C, or "good" cholesterol and LDL-C or "bad" cholesterol. Cholesterol is important to overall health, but when levels are too high, cholesterol can be harmful by contributing to narrowed or blocked arteries. Unfortunately, people with diabetes are more prone to having unhealthy high cholesterol levels, which contributes to cardiovascular disease (CVD). By taking steps to manage cholesterol, individuals can reduce their chance of cardiovascular disease and premature death. Using a blood sample taken after a brief period of fasting by the patient, a lipoprotein profile reveals the following lipid measures: Low-density-lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol = "bad" cholesterol A high LDL-C level is associated with a higher risk for CVD. However, your LDL number should no longer be the main factor in guiding treatment to prevent heart attack and stroke, according to the latest guidelines from the American Heart Association. For patients taking statins, it’s important to work with your doctor to manage your LDL appropriately. A diet high in saturated and trans fats can raise your LDL cholesterol. High-density-lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol = "good" cholesterol With HDL-C, higher levels are associated with a lower risk for CVD. Low HDL cholesterol puts you at higher risk for heart disease. People with high blood triglycerides usually also have lower HDL cholesterol. Genetic factors, type 2 diabetes, and certain drugs, such as beta-blockers and anabolic steroids, also lower HDL cholesterol levels. Smoking, being overweight and being sedentary can all contribute to lower HDL cholesterol. Triglycerid Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Cholesterol

Diabetes And Cholesterol

Tweet High cholesterol levels may be a sign that you are at higher risk of heart disease and stroke. However, it is the balance of cholesterol levels that is a better indicator heart health and it is the balance of cholesterol that your doctors should take into account before advising treatment. Lifestyle modifications and statins are commonly used to reduce high cholesterol levels. Whilst cholesterol levels may rise for a number of reasons, high cholesterol levels over a period of years is often associated with a greater risk of health problems. Too low cholesterol can be more dangerous than too high cholesterol. What is cholesterol? Cholesterol is a type of blood fat (blood lipid) that forms the membrane of each cell of the body. Cholesterol is carried in the blood by proteins called lipoproteins and it is these that are measured when you have a cholesterol test. These are: High Density Lipoprotein (HDL) Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) LDL is often referred to as ‘bad cholesterol’, because it is this form of cholesterol that can build up in blood vessels. HDL is often referred to as ‘good cholesterol’, because it helps to clear excess LDL out of the blood. Whilst LDL may be called bad cholesterol, it is needed for the body and is usually healthy as long as it is kept in balance by a sufficient level of HDL. Triglycerides are another form of blood lipid (blood fat) and are also measured when a cholesterol test is taken. Total cholesterol is the figure of all the different blood fats added together. Ratio of total cholesterol-to-HDL is taken by dividing the total cholesterol figure by the HDL figure. This provides a more reliable indicator of heart health than looking at the total cholesterol or LDL figures. Read more: Cholesterol targets for people with diabetes Continue reading >>

Lipid Management In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Lipid Management In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Lipid Management in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Marsha J. Daniel, Dr Daniel is Clinical Pharmacist, Cleveland Clinic Florida, Weston; Copyright 2011 by Engage Healthcare Communications, LLC Diabetes is correlated with a high risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). The management of diabetic dyslipidemia, a well-recognized and modifiable risk factor, is a key element in the multifactorial approach to preventing CVD in patients with type 2 diabetes. Diabetic dyslipidemia is characterized by elevated triglyceride levels, decreased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, and elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels. To describe the effective approach to the management of dyslipidemia in patients with diabetes to allow providers and payers to become familiar with the treatment goals for all the components of lipoproteins, to correctly initiate appropriate lipid-lowering medications based on treatment goals and lipid-lowering capability, and to apply the data presented in lipid clinical trials to the treatment of patients with diabetes. Diabetes is associated with a 2- to 4-fold increase in risk for CVD. The risk factors for coronary artery disease (CAD) include hypertension, dyslipidemia, obesity, and smoking. Therefore, prioritizing and managing diabetic patients with CVD risk factors is vital. LDL-C appears to have the greatest role in premature and early atherosclerosis and the development of CAD and must be treated as aggressively as hyperglycemia to reduce CAD risk. Becoming familiar with lipid treatment goals and the many therapies available today can help providers and payers implement the appropriate approach to managing diabetic dyslipidemia risk factors and reduce the burden of this disease. The prevalence of diabetes has increased dramati Continue reading >>

What Is A Lipid Profile? - Diabetes Nsw & Act - Live Your Life

What Is A Lipid Profile? - Diabetes Nsw & Act - Live Your Life

What is a lipid profile? Mel W 2016-04-28T15:29:04+00:00 by Credentialled Diabetes Educator, Kristine Bell A lipid profile consists of a series of tests that measure the different types of fats, called cholesterol and triglycerides, in the blood. People with diabetes are at a higher risk of heart disease and so this test can help determine your risk of heart attack and stroke. What is cholesterol and why is it so bad? Cholesterol isnt all bad. In fact it is an essential part of all the cells around your body, making up about half of the cell wall and helping the cell communicate with the other cells around it. Cholesterol is carried around the body by two different types of transporters called lipoproteins. The LDL (Low Density Lipoprotein) cholesterol is the lousy type. It can damage the cell wall and leaves cholesterol lying around the blood stream, where it can clog the arteries and cause a heart attacks or stroke. The other type is the HDL (High Density Lipoprotein) cholesterol. This is the healthy type of cholesterol. It works as a cleaner scrubbing the cell walls clean and picking up all the excess cholesterol and taking it back to the liver to be processed. Having a high HDL-cholesterol level is protective against heart disease. Your doctor can check your cholesterol and triglyceride levels through a blood test. We recommend getting your lipids checked once a year. Your doctor may recommend getting it tested more frequently if your levels are above your target range or if you have started or changed a medication to help lower your cholesterol levels. I have diabetes, what levels should I be aiming for? Your doctor will recommend the cholesterol and triglyceride targets that are most appropriate for you. Because people with diabetes are at a higher risk of heart Continue reading >>

Lipids And Lipoproteins In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Lipids And Lipoproteins In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes are associated with a clustering of interrelated plasma lipid and lipoprotein abnormalities, which include reduced HDL cholesterol, a predominance of small dense LDL particles, and elevated triglyceride levels. Each of these dyslipidemic features is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Increased hepatic secretion of large triglyceride-rich VLDL and impaired clearance of VLDL appears to be of central importance in the pathophysiology of this dyslipidemia. Small dense LDL particles arise from the intravascular processing of specific larger VLDL precursors. Typically, reduced plasma HDL levels in type 2 diabetes are manifest as reductions in the HDL2b subspecies and relative or absolute increases in smaller denser HDL3b and HDL3c. Although behavioral interventions such as diet and exercise can improve diabetic dyslipidemia, for most patients, pharmacological therapy is needed to reach treatment goals. There are several classes of medications that can be used to treat lipid and lipoprotein abnormalities associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, including statins, fibrates, niacin, and thiazolidinediones. Clinical trials have shown significant improvement in coronary artery disease after diabetic dyslipidemia treatment. Type 2 diabetes is associated with a cluster of interrelated plasma lipid and lipoprotein abnormalities, including reduced HDL cholesterol, a predominance of small dense LDL particles, and elevated triglycerides (1). These abnormalities occur in many patients despite normal LDL cholesterol levels. These changes are also a feature of the insulin resistance syndrome (also known as the metabolic syndrome), which underlies many cases of type 2 diabetes. In fact, pre-diabetic individuals Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Cholesterol | Joslin Diabetes Center

Diabetes & Cholesterol | Joslin Diabetes Center

Lipids are fat-like substances found in the blood. Cholesterol and triglycerides are two types of lipids. The body needs some lipids to stay healthy, but elevated lipid levels can damage artery walls, causing atherosclerosis, or hardening of artery walls, which can cause heart attacks. Below is a quick reference guide to the types of terms that you may have heard from your doctor when discussing cholesterol levels. According to Tracey Lucier, Nutrition Educator at the Joslin Diabetes Center, cholesterol is found only in animal foods, such as eggs, milk, cheese, liver, meat and chicken. "Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance made in your liver and found in foods. Your total blood cholesterol level should be 200 mg/dL or lower," Lucier states. The body needs cholesterol to perform several functions including cell maintenance, and also metabolizes fat soluble vitamins, among many other activities. Having elevated LDL cholesterol levels for a significant period of time can damage arteries. When LDL is high, it causes the formation of "plaque" in the blood, damaging and block arteries. --LDL readings should be less than 100; less than 70 if you have diabetes and heart disease This type of cholesterol works to clear LDL cholesterol from the blood, keeping the arteries open. When HDL cholesterol is too low,fewer amounts ofLDL cholesterol is removed from the blood, increasing the risk of damage to the arteries. --HDL should be greater than 40 for women; greater than 50 for men High triglycerides prevent HDL from removing LDL from the blood. They also produce LDL that blocks arteries. --Triglyceride levels should be less than 150 Continue reading >>

Diabetic Dyslipidemia: Causes And Consequences

Diabetic Dyslipidemia: Causes And Consequences

Diabetic Dyslipidemia: Causes and Consequences Division of Preventive Medicine and Nutrition, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York 10032 Search for other works by this author on: The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, Volume 86, Issue 3, 1 March 2001, Pages 965971, Ira J. Goldberg; Diabetic Dyslipidemia: Causes and Consequences, The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, Volume 86, Issue 3, 1 March 2001, Pages 965971, More cardiovascular disease occurs in patients with either type 1 or 2 diabetes. The link between diabetes and atherosclerosis is, however, not completely understood. Among the metabolic abnormalities that commonly accompany diabetes are disturbances in the production and clearance of plasma lipoproteins. Moreover, development of dyslipidemia may be a harbinger of future diabetes. A characteristic pattern, termed diabetic dyslipidemia, consists of low high density lipoprotein (HDL), increased triglycerides, and postprandial lipemia. This pattern is most frequently seen in type 2 diabetes and may be a treatable risk factor for subsequent cardiovascular disease. The pathophysiological alterations in diabetes that lead to this dyslipidemia will be reviewed in this article. Causes of lipoprotein abnormalities in diabetes Defects in insulin action and hyperglycemia could lead to changes in plasma lipoproteins in patients with diabetes. Alternatively, especially in the case of type 2 diabetes, the obesity/insulin-resistant metabolic disarray that is at the root of this form of diabetes could, itself, lead to lipid abnormalities exclusive of hyperglycemia. Type 1 diabetes, previously termed insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, provides a much clearer understanding of the relationship among diabetes, ins Continue reading >>

Your Blood Lipids

Your Blood Lipids

What do all of these numbers mean? Your total cholesterol should be below 200 mg/dl and your LDL should be below 100 mg/dl. Keep reading to find out more. Part of understanding your own heart health is knowing your heart health numbers. This includes your blood lipid panel and your blood pressure. But what do all of these numbers mean? Defining Cholesterol and Triglycerides First, it helps to understand exactly what blood lipids are. Both cholesterol and triglycerides in the blood are called lipids. When blood lipid levels are high, this is called dyslipidemia. Cholesterol Cholesterol is a waxy, fat-like substance that is found in the tissue of humans and other animals. It plays important roles in the body. Our livers produce all the cholesterol that we need for these important functions. We also get cholesterol from the animal foods we eat such as meats, poultry, eggs, and dairy products. High blood cholesterol levels can contribute to atherosclerosis, or clogging of the arteries. Triglycerides, or blood fats, are the fats that circulate through the bloodstream along with cholesterol. Your body gets triglycerides from food (especially meats and plant oils) and also makes triglycerides on its own. As with cholesterol, you need just the right amount of triglycerides. High triglyceride levels increase your risk of heart and blood vessel disease. Cholesterol and triglycerides are both lipids, but have very different shapes. Cholesterol is made up of connected rings of carbon atoms and also is called a “sterol”. Triglycerides are chains of carbons called “fatty acids”, attached at one end to a carbon backbone. We all know that oil doesn’t mix with water! Our blood lipids are just like oil. In order to circulate in the watery blood, these lipids (cholesterol and tr Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Cholesterol: What Is The Relationship?

Diabetes And Cholesterol: What Is The Relationship?

What is the relationship between cholesterol and diabetes? How does cholesterol affect my diabetes, and how do I manage it? Judy contacted TheDiabetesCouncil When Judy contacted TheDiabetesCouncil, she had questions about her cholesterol. Though her overall number was at 180 mg/dl, and in a normal range, her LDL-C was higher than normal, although mildly elevated, and her HDL-C was low. Her doctor had explained very little about this to Judy, and she was confused. How can her overall cholesterol number be acceptable, but her other cholesterol numbers were out of range. What did this mean for Judy’s health? Was she more prone to heart disease and stroke due to these cholesterol numbers? Her triglycerides were a little elevated, too. We decided to give Judy a guide that would help her to fully understand her cholesterol numbers, and how they affect her cardiovascular health. We also wanted to make sure that Judy and others like her understand how their cholesterol numbers relate to their diabetes. So let’s get started… What is cholesterol Cholesterol is mainly comprised of fat and lipoproteins. A lipoprotein is comprised of cholesterol, protein, and fat (triglycerides). Cholesterol comes from two sources. Our body manufactures some cholesterol on its own. In addition, cholesterol comes from animal products, such as milk, eggs, cheese, and meats. Cholesterol has the consistency similar to gum or wax. Small amounts of cholesterol are important for a healthy cell membrane (good cholesterol), and some cholesterol has been deemed, “the bad cholesterol,” due to these cholesterol particles tends to cause atherosclerosis, or hardening of the arteries. Some cholesterol is “good,” cholesterol, that tends to carry the bad cholesterol away and out the body. That is why y Continue reading >>

More in diabetes