diabetestalk.net

Link Between Type 2 Diabetes And Rheumatoid Arthritis

Type 2 Diabetes Risk May Be Higher With Ra

Type 2 Diabetes Risk May Be Higher With Ra

People who have rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are known to be more likely to develop other serious health problems, including heart disease, lung disease and some types of cancer. Now a recent study in the online journal PLOS One appears to indicate they also have a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Lead study author Piero Ruscitti, MD, of the University of L’Aquila in Italy, writes that he and his colleagues undertook the study to show that type 2 diabetes is common but often overlooked in RA patients. For the study, the researchers followed 439 people with newly-diagnosed RA for one year, evaluating them every three months. During that time, 31 (7.1 percent) developed type 2 diabetes. The researchers then investigated the role of traditional risk factors as well as RA-specific risk factors to determine which ones predicted who might develop diabetes at then end of the 12 months. After taking into account factors such as demographic characteristics (like age and sex), the presence of other conditions, smoking status and medications used, they found three factors that pointed to a higher risk of developing diabetes among the study group. As might be expected, those who had impaired fasting glucose (IFG), a condition sometimes called pre-diabetes, had a more than 30-times greater chance of progressing to diabetes than someone with normal fasting glucose level. Additionally, those who had high blood pressure – a well-established risk factor for diabetes in the general population – had an almost seven-times greater risk. But the factor that had the greatest impact was having a high RA disease activity score (DAS28) at the end of the 12 months. The DAS28, which measures how well RA is controlled, is based the amount of inflammation, joint pain and swelling a pers Continue reading >>

Inflammatory Arthritis And Diabetes: Managing Both

Inflammatory Arthritis And Diabetes: Managing Both

Inflammation is one link between arthritis and diabetes, but there are other factors involved. Almost half (47%) of adults with arthritis also have another chronic condition. Of the 52.5 million US adults with arthritis, 16% (7.3 million) have type 2 diabetes, and 47% of adults with diabetes have arthritis. Is there a connection? Does having one condition lead to the other? Inflammatory Arthritis Inflammatory arthritis is a general term used for a group of autoimmune diseases in which the immune system attacks a person’s own tissues – the joints but also other organs throughout the body. The resulting joint symptoms include inflammation, pain, stiffness and swelling. The most common forms of inflammatory arthritis are rheumatoid arthritis (RA), ankylosing spondylitis (AS) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) – affecting approximately 4 million people in the US. Diabetes Type 1 diabetes is also an autoimmune condition that causes the body to not produce, use, or metabolize the hormone insulin sufficiently. In a healthy person, insulin is produced in the pancreas and helps the body convert sugars to energy. A person with type 1 diabetes does not produce insulin because their immune system attacks and destroys the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas; although the reason why this occurs is unknown, genes and possibly viral infections are thought to be responsible. It is usually diagnosed in children and young adults. Type 2 diabetes begins with insulin resistance, in which the pancreas gradually loses its ability to produce sufficient amounts of insulin. Technically considered a metabolic disorder, this type of diabetes is associated with older age, obesity, family history and other factors. In adults, nearly all diagnosed cases are type 2 diabetes. The Relationship Betw Continue reading >>

Risk Of Rheumatoid Arthritis In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: A Nationwide Population-based Case-control Study

Risk Of Rheumatoid Arthritis In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: A Nationwide Population-based Case-control Study

Go to: Introduction The prevalence of type 2 diabetes has rapidly increased in many Asian populations, including the Taiwanese, thought to be the result of a combination of a sedentary lifestyle and unhealthy dietary habits. In Taiwan, the crude incidence of type 2 diabetes was 8 per 1,000 with a prevalence of 8.3% in 2007 [1]. Type 2 diabetes is characterized by pancreatic β cell dysfunction and insulin resistance. Obesity can trigger chronic low-grade inflammation and the resulting inflammatory mediators are detrimental to β cell function [2], [3]. Modulating inflammatory reactions in patients with type 2 diabetes with the use of salsalate has been shown to improve glycemic control [6], strongly suggesting that inflammatory pathways are involved in the metabolic abnormalities of type 2 diabetes. Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic and disabling disease characterized by persistent synovitis, systemic inflammation, and the presence of autoantibodies [7]. The annual incidence of RA in Taiwan was 15.8 cases per 100,000 population with a female to male ratio of 4 to 1 [8]. Inflammatory mediators such as C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin (IL)-6, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α are frequently elevated in patients with type 2 diabetes [4], [5] as well as in the sera of patients many years before the clinical onset of RA [9], suggesting a critical role in the immunopathogenesis of this disease. This observation also suggests that low-grade inflammation should have already existed in patients with RA during the preclinical phase. In addition, smoking causes chronic lung inflammation and could subsequently lead to the production of autoantibodies, resulting in the development of RA among genetically susceptible individuals [10]. Therefore, it is plausible that chroni Continue reading >>

10 Facts About Diabetes And Ra

10 Facts About Diabetes And Ra

1. Your body breaks food down into glucose. It then uses insulin produced by the pancreas to convert that glucose to energy. If your body doesn’t produce enough insulin itself, you may develop diabetes. Almost 24 million people in the US live with diabetes, approximately 3 percent of the population. 2. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease where the immune system attacks insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. It typically develops during childhood, but may also affect adults. People who have Type 1 diabetes must take insulin every day. 3. Type 2 diabetes is the most common type of diabetes, affecting 90-95 percent of people living with the condition. This type of diabetes tends to be associated with obesity, age, physical inactivity and previous history of gestational diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is usually treated with monitoring blood sugars, healthy eating, exercise and possibly diabetes medication. 4. There appears to be no link between RA and Type 1 diabetes. However, people with RA may be at higher risk for developing Type 2 diabetes. People with RA may be more sedentary, experience weight gain due to lack of physical activity or medications or take prednisone, all of which are risk factors for Type 2 diabetes. 5. It’s important for people with RA to stay ahead of a number of possible comorbidities, including the increased risk of developing diabetes. Regular checks of your cholesterol and blood sugar levels (both simple blood tests) and monitoring your blood pressure will enable you to deal with problems early. This can help you manage the risks of diabetes and heart disease. 6. People who have developed Type 2 diabetes often have no symptoms. Those who do have symptoms may experience any of a variety, including increased thirst or hunger (especially a Continue reading >>

Rheumatoid Arthritis And Diabetes: Are They Linked?

Rheumatoid Arthritis And Diabetes: Are They Linked?

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and diabetes are very different diseases. But there's a connection between them. Having one may mean you're more likely to develop the other. In fact, research shows that RA raises your risk for diabetes by about 50%. And diabetes raises your risk of having arthritis, including RA and arthritis-related issues, by about 20%. Nearly half of American adults who have diabetes also have arthritis. Experts aren't sure why these two diseases are linked. They believe that a variety of things play a role, including: RA and type 1 diabetes are both autoimmune diseases. The immune system's job is to destroy germs and other sickness-causing invaders. Sometimes, the system goes haywire and turns against the body's own healthy cells. RA attacks the joints. Type 1 diabetes targets the cells in the pancreas that produce insulin, a hormone that helps your body process blood sugar. Type 1 diabetes is typically diagnosed in children and young adults and makes up less than 5% of all diabetes cases. Research suggests that some people tend to have more than one autoimmune disease. This may be partly due to genetics. And scientists have identified a gene that raises the risk for both type 1 diabetes and RA. RA causes chronic inflammation. In the short run, inflammation helps the body heal. But when it's ongoing, it causes the body to stop responding to insulin the way it should. This is called insulin resistance. Over time, the condition raises the risk for type 2 diabetes. This occurs when the body doesn't make enough insulin or resists its effects. Diabetes also triggers inflammation. On the flipside, chronic inflammation from diabetes may pave the way for RA. RA is caused by genetics and environmental factors. Research suggests that inflammation may cause people w Continue reading >>

How Rheumatoid Arthritis Can Affect Your Blood Sugar

How Rheumatoid Arthritis Can Affect Your Blood Sugar

When you hear the word “arthritis,” you probably think of joint pain, swelling and stiffness. But rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a disease that causes inflammation in your joints, can affect the rest of your body, too—sometimes in surprising ways. For example, studies have shown that people with RA are more likely to also have diabetes, a condition characterized by high blood sugar levels. From Joint Pain to Blood Sugar Woes It turns out that inflammation, which is a key feature of RA, may cause a buildup of sugar in the blood. Luckily, there’s a silver lining to the relationship between RA and blood sugar: Certain things that help manage your RA, like some lifestyle choices and medications, may also help prevent or control diabetes. Inflammation and Insulin Resistance So, how can inflammation lead to high blood sugar? The answer has to do with insulin. Insulin is a hormone that helps a person’s cells absorb sugar from the blood so it can be used for energy. If the cells are unable to use insulin effectively, a condition known as insulin resistance, excess sugar can start to build up in the blood. Eventually, the person may develop type 2 diabetes. Remember that RA can cause widespread inflammation throughout the body. This inflammation, in turn, may increase the body’s risk of developing insulin resistance. Researchers are still studying exactly how inflammation contributes to insulin resistance. Two likely culprits are tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), proteins that are involved in joint inflammation. There’s evidence that both TNF and IL-6 may interfere with insulin’s ability to work properly. Tips to Help Manage Both Conditions Having RA doesn’t automatically mean you’ll develop insulin resistance or diabetes. But your risk is inc Continue reading >>

Abnormal Glucose Metabolism In Rheumatoid Arthritis

Abnormal Glucose Metabolism In Rheumatoid Arthritis

BioMed Research International Volume 2017 (2017), Article ID 9670434, 6 pages 1Department of Rheumatology, Jiangxi Provincial People’s Hospital, Nanchang 330006, China 2Department of Critical Care Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xiamen University, Xiamen 361003, China Academic Editor: Brant R. Burkhardt Copyright © 2017 Hui Pi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Abstract The incidence of abnormal glucose metabolism in patients with rheumatoid arthritis was considerably higher than the general population. The persistent systemic inflammatory state in rheumatoid arthritis might be associated with the glucose metabolism dysfunction. In this context, insulin resistance, islet β cell apoptosis, inflammatory cytokines, and other aspects which were linked with abnormal glucose metabolism in rheumatoid arthritis were reviewed. This review will be helpful in understanding the abnormal glucose metabolism mechanism in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and might be conducive to finding an effective treatment. 1. Introduction Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by chronic, symmetry, and destructive poly-articular synovitis. Although its pathogenesis remains unclear, it has shown that inflammation induced by abnormal immune response plays a crucial role in the development of RA. Recent studies show that RA patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) prevalence rate was about 15% to 19%, which was significantly higher than the prevalence rate of 4% to 8% of global middle-aged population DM [1, 2]. In a study, which consists of 48,718 cases of RA patients Continue reading >>

Identifying And Treating Diabetes Joint Pain

Identifying And Treating Diabetes Joint Pain

Diabetes and joint pain are considered to be independent conditions. Joint pain may be a response to an illness, injury, or arthritis. It can be chronic (long-term) or acute (short-term). Diabetes is caused by the body not using the hormone insulin correctly, or insufficient production of it, which affects blood sugar levels. What would a hormone and blood sugar-related condition have to do with joint health? Diabetes is associated with widespread symptoms and complications. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 47 percent of people with arthritis also have diabetes. There is an undeniably strong link between the two conditions. Diabetes can damage joints, a condition called diabetic arthropathy. Unlike pain caused by immediate trauma, the pain of arthropathy happens over time. Other symptoms include: thick skin changes in the feet painful shoulders carpal tunnel syndrome A joint is the place where two bones come together. Once a joint wears down, the protection it provides is lost. Joint pain from diabetic arthropathy comes in different forms. Charcot’s joint occurs when diabetic nerve damage causes a joint to break down. Also called neuropathic arthropathy, this condition is seen in the feet and ankles in people with diabetes. Nerve damage in the feet is common in diabetes, which may lead to Charcot’s joint. A loss of nerve function leads to numbness. People who walk on numb feet are more likely to twist and injure ligaments without knowing it. This places pressure on the joints, which can eventually cause them to wear down. Severe damage leads to deformities in the foot and other affected joints. Bone deformities in Charcot’s joint may be prevented through early intervention. Signs of the condition include: painful joints swelling or redn Continue reading >>

The Link Between Rheumatoid Arthritis And Diabetes

The Link Between Rheumatoid Arthritis And Diabetes

Having rheumatoid arthritis (RA) makes you about 50 percent more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than those without the autoimmune disease. Experts aren’t exactly sure what’s behind the connection, but many say that the link may be due to the inflammation that occurs with RA. “A lot of inflammation causes insulin resistance, which increases blood sugar levels,” says Scott Zashin, MD, a rheumatologist and clinical professor of medicine at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School. Being sedentary because of RA pain further increases your risk for type 2 diabetes. And any steroid drugs you take for RA can make it harder to control blood sugar. “When you have a lot of steroids in your body, your body makes glucose because it assumes you’re going to need it for some kind of ‘fight or flight’ response,” says Wayne Evron, MD, an endocrinologist and medical director of the Joslin Diabetes Center in Pittsburgh. “But if you’re giving them to someone to control their RA, it can make their sugars higher.” The connection between type 2 diabetes and RA isn’t yet set in stone. “The data is kind of mixed,” Dr. Zashin warns. “There have been studies published showing an association between RA and diabetes, and some that haven’t shown an association.” Type 1 diabetes, which occurs when the body’s immune system attacks the pancreas, may also be a risk for people with RA. Though it used to be called juvenile diabetes, people can develop type 1 diabetes at any age. And because type 1 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis are both autoimmune diseases, they can occur together. Dr. Evron explains that they may be prevalent in families that tend to get autoimmune diseases And researchers have recently identified a gene named PTPN22 that can increas Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes And Rheumatoid Arthritis (ra)

Type 1 Diabetes And Rheumatoid Arthritis (ra)

Question I have Type 1 diabetes and have recently been diagnosed with RA. What are the effects of DMARDs on diabetes/glucose levels or vice versa? Answer With type 1 Diabetes it is very important to maintain optimal control of your blood sugar. Some medications for RA can affect diabetes. The biggest offender is probably prednisone and other steroids. These will often raise blood sugar levels, sometimes even from a steroid injection into a joint. When doses of steroids are increased, more insulin or other medications may be needed to control blood sugar. The opposite can happen when steroids are discontinued or tapered. Patients with diabetes also have an increased risk of infection. Because many DMARD medications, especially biological agents, can increase the risk of infection, it is very importnat for patients with diabetes to be vigilant in preventing infection, and in attending to any fever, or localizing signs of infection (such as cough with phlegm, discolored nasal discharge, fever, skin redness, urinary burning) promptly by notifying a health care provider for treatment. Will You Support the Education of Arthritis Patients? Each year, over 1 million people visit this site to learn about Arthritis. Unlike many health education websites, we produce our own content. Additionally, we do not accept advertising, paid guests posts, or charge for access. That’s where you come in. Your gift will allow us to reach more patients and healthcare professionals with this valuable information. Give Today Continue reading >>

A Specific Association Exists Between Type 1 Diabetes And Anti-ccp Positive Rheumatoid Arthritis

A Specific Association Exists Between Type 1 Diabetes And Anti-ccp Positive Rheumatoid Arthritis

Go to: Abstract The co-occurrence of autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and type 1 diabetes (T1D) has been reported in individuals and families. We studied the strength and nature of this association at the population level. We conducted a case-control study of 1419 incident RA cases and 1674 controls between 1996 and 2003. Subjects were recruited from university, public and private rheumatology units throughout Sweden. Blood samples were tested for the presence of antibodies to cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP), rheumatoid factor (RF) and the presence or absence of the 620W PTPN22 allele. Information on history of diabetes was obtained by questionnaire, telephone interview, and medical record review. The prevalence of T1D and type 2 diabetes (T2D) was compared between incident RA cases and controls and further stratified by anti-CCP, RF status, and the presence of the PTPN22 risk allele. T1D was associated with an increased risk of RA, OR 4.9 (95% CI 1.8–13.1), and was specific for anti-CCP+ RA, OR 7.3 (95% CI 2.7–20.0), but not anti-CCP negative RA. Further adjustment for PTPN22 attenuated the odds ratio for anti-CCP+ RA in individuals with T1D to 5.3 (95% CI 1.5–18.7). No association was observed between RA and T2D. The association between T1D and RA is specific for a particular RA subset, anti-CCP+ RA. The risk of type 1 diabetics developing RA later in life may be attributed in part to the presence of the 620W PTPN22 allele, suggesting a common pathway for the pathogenesis of these two diseases. Continue reading >>

Rheumatoid Arthritis And Diabetes

Rheumatoid Arthritis And Diabetes

People with type 1 diabetes are at a greater risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disease that results in the immune system destroying cartilage, the tissue that provides the lining of bones that allows joints to move freely. Whilst RA can happen to anyone, people with other autoimmune diseases, including type 1 diabetes , in the family have a higher chance of developing the condition. Research has shown that a number of specific genetic regions are associated with increased susceptibility for both type 1 diabetes (which includes diabetes LADA ) and rheumatoid arthritis. These research findings explain why people with type 1 diabetes are statistically more likely to develop rheumatoid arthritis. Variants of the following genes have been linked with higher susceptibility to both type 1 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis: People with other forms of diabetes may also develop rheumatoid arthritis, albeit there is no increased risk. As with other forms of arthritis, the condition causes inflamed joints , which can be stiff and painful. Stiffness in the morning that lasts for more than 30 minutes may indicate that rheumatoid arthritis is present rather than other forms of arthritis. The joints of the fingers and feet are often the first parts of the body to be affected. It is common for rheumatoid arthritis to affect joints of the body in a symmetric fashion. That is, if one wrist is affected, it is common for the other wrist to be affected too. In addition to directly affecting the joints, rheumatoid arthritis may also cause other symptoms including: X-rays, ultrasound scans and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans can be used to view the joints for specific signs of inflammation and damage to the cartilage. It is not known wha Continue reading >>

Increased Risk For Diabetes In Patients With Poorly Controlled Rheumatoid Arthritis

Increased Risk For Diabetes In Patients With Poorly Controlled Rheumatoid Arthritis

Increased Risk for Diabetes in Patients With Poorly Controlled Rheumatoid Arthritis Increased Risk for Diabetes in Patients With Poorly Controlled Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients with concomitant RA and T2D are at increased risk for developing CVD. According to a study published in PLoS ONE, patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have an increased short-term risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2D). In patients with RA, T2D remains significantly underdiagnosed and undertreated, which increases the risk of developing cardiometabolic comorbidities. A single-center, prospective study was designed to determine the prevalence of T2D in patients with RA over the course of a year, estimating the occurrence of new T2D diagnoses while taking into consideration traditional cardiovascular and RA-specific related risk factors. Four hundred thirty nine consecutive patients with RA were enrolled in the trial; 7.1% (31/439) developed T2D within 1 year of follow-up. The presence of high blood pressure (odds ratio [OR], 6.83; 95% CI, 2.1821.34, P =.001), impaired fasting glucose (IFG) at first observation (OR, 30.55; 95% CI 6.53142.76, P <.0001), and poor EULAR-DAS28 response at 1 year follow-up (OR, 33.59; 95% CI: 6.95162.21, P <.0001) were all significantly associated with a higher risk of developing T2D. The presence of high blood pressure, IFG at first observation, and poor EULAR-DAS28 response at 1 year follow-up were significantly associated with a higher risk of developing T2D. The presence of high blood pressure and poor EULAR-DAS28 response after 1 year of follow-up were significantly associated with the risk of IFG. After 1 year of follow-up, more than 7% (34/439) of participants had IFG, with regression analysis showing the presence of high blood pressure (OR, 5.71; 95% CI 1. Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Risk Goes Up In Rheumatoid Arthritis

Type 2 Diabetes Risk Goes Up In Rheumatoid Arthritis

There is a significant increase in the short-term risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus in patients who have rheumatoid arthritis, a study found. The high disease activity is associated with derangements in glucose metabolism. Although rheumatoid arthritis is known to be an inflammatory autoimmune disease that affects joints, the condition is also associated with important comorbidities, Piero Ruscitti and colleagues in Italy noted. They pointed out that a significant number of patients with rheumatoid arthritis are affected by type 2 diabetes and that cardiometabolic comorbidity remains underdiagnosed and undertreated in these patients. Studies suggest that certain proinflammatory mediators, such as tumor necrosis factor and interleukin-1β, may be shared between rheumatoid arthritis and type 2 diabetes. The researchers presented the results of their prospective investigation into the relationship between cardiovascular risk factors, rheumatoid arthritis risk factors, and new-onset type 2 diabetes in a recent PLoS ONE article. The study The authors conducted a longitudinal observational cohort study to determine the risk of type 2 diabetes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis; 439 consecutive patients were included. The results Type 2 diabetes predictors • Type 2 diabetes developed in 7.1% of subjects (31/439). • The combination of high blood pressure, impaired fasting glucose, and high disease activity scores in 28 joints with erythrocyte sedimentation rate (DAS28[ESR]) proved to significantly increase the risk of type 2 diabetes by logistic regression (x2=79.32, p<0.0001). • High blood pressure conferred 6.83 times the risk of type 2 diabetes (odds ratio [OR], 6.83; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.18-21.34, p=0.001). • For patients who did not see reductions in t Continue reading >>

Ask The Doctor: Type 2 Diabetes And Rheumatoid Arthritis

Ask The Doctor: Type 2 Diabetes And Rheumatoid Arthritis

Hello, my mother suffers from Type 2 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis. I know she takes medication prescribed by her physician, but I was hoping you could offer other ideas for her healing, as well as for managing the aches and pain of her RA. Thanks so much for your time and any suggestions! Dr. Whimsy: Hello, and thank you for your question. Type 2 diabetes is quickly becoming one of the most serious health epidemics in the United States. Currently, the American Diabetes Association estimates that over 25 million Americans suffer from the disease, with an additional 79 million pre-diabetic individuals suffering as well. People who suffer from diabetes are at greater risk for heart disease and many other serious health risks. While type 1 diabetes is considered irreversible, type 2 diabetes can be reversed in some individuals with proper diet, exercise, and supplementation. Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disorder characterized by pain and inflammation, especially in the joints of the hands, wrist, feet, ankles, and sometimes knees, and the presence of the antibody known as “rheumatoid factor.” For both conditions, weight loss seems to be extremely beneficial — improving energy while decreasing painful symptoms. One of the most common ways a naturopath might treat both conditions is by considering a diet known as “anti-inflammatory.” Both rheumatoid arthritis and type 2 diabetes seem to improve on a mostly whole foods plant-based diet that is rich in omega 3-fatty-acids and with the elimination of foods thought to be inflammatory like non-organic eggs, sugar and processed foods, dairy, wheat, and nightshade vegetables (tomatoes, eggplant, potatoes, bell peppers). Currently, Erewhon is able to offer additional support to its customers by carrying Metage Continue reading >>

More in diabetes