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Link Between Milk And Type 1 Diabetes

Does Bovine Insulin In Milk Trigger Type 1 Diabetes?

Does Bovine Insulin In Milk Trigger Type 1 Diabetes?

EquaYona: You raise a point that is often raised. Some thoughts for you: I think the RDA for calcium is based on how much you eat, not how much you absorb. Yes? So, I’m not sure that the comparison here makes sense? . Another thought is that the RDA for calcium is way higher than it needs to be based on the available evidence, especially for people who are on a plant based diet. Dr. Greger recommends about 600 mg : From what I have seen, that recommendation might even be higher than necessary. “…total calcium consumption among women in China, Peru, Sri Lanka, and many other non-Western countries is only about 500 milligrams a day, yet fracture rates are very low.” (from page 9 of Building Bone Vitality) And while the authors of Becoming Vegan, Express Edition recommend the RDA, they do acknowledge, “A somewhat ambiguous and predictable relationship exists between calcium and bone health. While the evidence generally supports a positive association between calcium intake and bone health, some populations who eat less than 400 mg of calcium per day have lower rates of osteoporosis than populations who consume more than 1,00 mg per day. This is because calcium *balance* is more critical than calcium intake.” (from page 41) That point about balance is key. There are a variety of factors in play, so requirements would be different for people depending on their diet and exercise. . Another thought is that people really do eat 12 oz or more of greens a day. For example, people who follow Esselstyn’s or Chef AJ’s diet. Cook 12 oz down and it just slides down pretty quickly/easily. I was eating a pound (16 oz) of broccoli a day for breakfast for a while. . My final thought is that plant based milks have at least as much calcium as dairy milks. At least the packag Continue reading >>

Cow's Milk Is Not A Cause Of Type 1 Diabetes, Suggests Long-term Study

Cow's Milk Is Not A Cause Of Type 1 Diabetes, Suggests Long-term Study

Cow's milk is not a cause of type 1 diabetes, suggests long-term study Cow's milk is not a cause of type 1 diabetes, suggests long-term study Smart InPen device launches in the US 19 December 2017 A new study shows no evidence that cow's milk is a causal factor in type 1 diabetes. Researchers have been trying to work out what causes type 1 diabetes to develop for many years. It is difficult to work out what causes a disease to develop and what causes autoimmune diseases , like type 1 diabetes , remains one of the biggest challenges facing medical science. The idea that cow's milk may increase the risk of type 1 diabetes has been one of the more promising theories. Previous research has shown evidence of an association between introducing cow's milk earlier in a child's life and the development of type 1 diabetes late into childhood. However, the results of the new study suggest that cow's milk as a cause of type 1 diabetes is very unlikely. The study is the result of a 15-year study of very young children at a genetically high risk of developing type 1 diabetes. A total of 2,159 newborn infants were enrolled into the study between May 2002-January 2007. Each of the infants had a first-degree relative (parent or sibling) with type 1 diabetes and additional signs of susceptibility (human leukocyte antigenconferred disease susceptibility). The study was global, with children being enrolled across 15 different countries. The infants were randomly assigned to be weaned on different milk formulas. Approximately half were weaned on an adapted cow's milk formula and the other half were weaned on extensively hydrolysed casein formula. The infants were given their assigned formula for at least 60 days within the first 6-8 months of life. The children were then monitored for at l Continue reading >>

Most Cow's Milk Baby Formulas Don't Up Risk Of Type 1 Diabetes

Most Cow's Milk Baby Formulas Don't Up Risk Of Type 1 Diabetes

HealthDay Reporter THURSDAY, Jan. 19, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Although breast milk is still considered the best nutrition for babies, a new study suggests that most cow's milk formulas don't increase the risk of developing type 1 diabetes. However, the German researchers who did the study did find that giving highly hydrolyzed formulas -- sometimes recommended for babies with food allergies -- in the first week of life may increase the chances of type 1 diabetes in some children. "There is no benefit for infants at increased genetic risk for type 1 diabetes to be fed hydrolyzed infant formula as a first formula if breast-feeding is not possible," said lead author Sandra Hummel, from the Institute of Diabetes Research in Munich. The study wasn't designed to prove a cause-and-effect relationship between cow's milk baby formula and the development of autoantibodies that can trigger type 1 diabetes. And it's important to note that type 1 diabetes is believed to be caused by more than one factor, diabetes experts explained. "This is one piece of the puzzle, and their conclusions are pretty mild. There's probably not going to be one single thing that's shown to be the cause of type 1 diabetes," said Jessica Dunne. She's the director of discovery research for JDRF -- formerly the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. Highly hydrolyzed formulas are formulas that contain cow's milk proteins that aren't whole -- they're already at least partially broken down, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics. According to Hummel, the molecular weight of cow's milk proteins differs by formula. It's lightest for the highly hydrolyzed formulas and heaviest for the standard formulas, she explained. Partially or highly hydrolyzed formulas also tend to be more expensive than standard i Continue reading >>

Early Exposure To Cows' Milk Raises Risk Of Diabetes In High Risk Children

Early Exposure To Cows' Milk Raises Risk Of Diabetes In High Risk Children

The controversial link between drinking cows' milk during infancy and the risk of developing diabetes may have been strengthened by a new study that finds that exposure early in life to cow's milk may increase the lifetime risk of developing diabetes in high risk children. In children diagnosed at a young age with diabetes, insulin autoantibodies are particularly present and are believed by some researchers to be the primary event in the process leading to type 1 diabetes. Exposure to cows' milk has previously been shown to cause the body to mount an immune response to insulin in some children and may precipitate the development of these autoantibodies, but the link has been disputed by at least one major study. In the current study Dr Johanna Paronen from University of Helsinki, Finland, and colleagues studied infants with relatives who had diabetes. The authors analysed the development of insulin specific T cell responses, the emergence of insulin binding antibodies by enzyme immunoassay, as well as the development of insulin autoantibodies by radioimmunoassay, in relation to exposure to cows' milk and family history of type 1 diabetes. All the infants included in the study had a first degree relative with type 1 diabetes and therefore were at an increased genetic risk of developing the disease (Diabetes 2000;49:1657-65). The infants were randomised to receive either cows' milk or a non-cows' milk hydrolysed casein based formula while also being breast fed for the first 6 to 8 months of life. According to the protocol, all infants were supposed to receive either cows' milk or formula for a minimum of two months. Breast feeding was encouraged, and the mothers were asked to add cows' milk or formula to their infant's diet at age 6 months at the latest, although most inf Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Causes

Type 1 Diabetes Causes

It isn’t entirely clear what triggers the development of type 1 diabetes. Researchers do know that genes play a role; there is an inherited susceptibility. However, something must set off the immune system, causing it to turn against itself and leading to the development of type 1 diabetes. Genes Play a Role in Type 1 Diabetes Some people cannot develop type 1 diabetes; that’s because they don’t have the genetic coding that researchers have linked to type 1 diabetes. Scientists have figured out that type 1 diabetes can develop in people who have a particular HLA complex. HLA stands for human leukocyte antigen, and antigens function is to trigger an immune response in the body. There are several HLA complexes that are associated with type 1 diabetes, and all of them are on chromosome 6. Different HLA complexes can lead to the development of other autoimmune disorders, such as rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, or juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Like those conditions, type 1 diabetes has to be triggered by something—usually a viral infection. What Can Trigger Type 1 Diabetes Here’s the whole process of what happens with a viral infection: When a virus invades the body, the immune system starts to produce antibodies that fight the infection. T cells are in charge of making the antibodies, and then they also help in fighting the virus. However, if the virus has some of the same antigens as the beta cells—the cells that make insulin in the pancreas—then the T cells can actually turn against the beta cells. The T cell products (antibodies) can destroy the beta cells, and once all the beta cells in your body have been destroyed, you can’t produce enough insulin. It takes a long time (usually several years) for the T cells to destroy the majority of th Continue reading >>

Study Finds No Link Between Baby Formula Made From Cow's Milk And Diabetes Risk

Study Finds No Link Between Baby Formula Made From Cow's Milk And Diabetes Risk

Could babies be at higher risk of developing Type 1 diabetes from drinking formula made from cow's milk? That idea has been circulating for some time but the evidence has been scant and contradictory. A study published Tuesday makes it seem less likely. There are two types of diabetes, and both are on the rise. It's clear that a major driving force behind the increase of Type 2 diabetes, which mainly affects adults, is the eating habits that are also driving the rise of obesity. A much bigger mystery is what has been propelling the increase of Type 1 diabetes (once called juvenile diabetes). This disease usually strikes children and takes hold when a child's immune system starts attacking cells in the pancreas that produce insulin. Researchers in Finland have been trying to tease apart the role of cow's milk for many years. In 2010 they published some intriguing results. They looked at antibodies that appear to be part of the Type 1 diabetes process. Studying 230 infants, they found these antibodies were more common in babies who consumed formula produced from cow's milk, compared with babies who were fed a formula in which those milk proteins had been broken down. The results from that small study only suggested that whole proteins from cow's milk are triggering the immune reaction that leads to type 1 diabetes. But if that proved to be the case, there would be an easy way to reduce the risk of the disease: simply make sure baby formula was based on degraded milk proteins rather than whole proteins. To find out whether that would indeed work, the scientists devised a very ambitious experiment, involving 2159 newborns studied at 78 study centers in 15 countries. Half those babies were given formula with regular cow's milk proteins for at least 60 days. The other half go Continue reading >>

Is Milk Bad For You? Diabetes And Milk

Is Milk Bad For You? Diabetes And Milk

Is cow’s milk good food for people, especially people with diabetes? The American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) say yes. Given how I feel about ADA and USDA’s record on nutrition advice, I think we should check for ourselves. ADA recommends two to three servings of low-fat milk (or other low-fat dairy food such as cheese and yogurt) each day. “Including sources of dairy products in your diet is an easy way to get calcium and high-quality protein,” according to their nutrition page. USDA says three cups a day for people age nine and up. But what do independent experts say? And what does the data say? Many disagree about milk’s being healthy. Dr. Mark Hyman, author of The Blood Sugar Solution, wrote, “I typically advise most of my patients to avoid dairy products completely… From an evolutionary point of view, milk is a strange food for humans. Until 10,000 years ago we didn’t domesticate animals and weren’t able to drink milk… The majority of humans naturally stop producing significant amounts of lactase — the enzyme needed to [deal with] lactose, the sugar in milk — sometime between the ages of two and five.” OK. So some experts disagree with the government. But we have to start at the beginning. What is milk anyway? What milk is made of Milk is food produced by mammal mothers to feed their young. Mammal milks are all similar, but they have important differences in the specific proteins. It may be that cow’s milk is not a good match for most human populations. Milk has significant amounts of fat, protein, and carbohydrate in one package. Normal cow’s milk contains 30–35 grams of protein per liter, mostly in the form of casein. It also contains dozens of other proteins in small amounts, various mi Continue reading >>

New Clue To Milk And Diabetes Link?

New Clue To Milk And Diabetes Link?

May 1, 2008 -- The reaction of an infant's immature immune system to a protein found in cow's milk infant formula may explain the suspected link between early consumption of cow's milk and an increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes later, according to a new study. But experts who reviewed the study for WebMD say the research is mixed on the suspected link and the new report does not offer conclusive proof of cause and effect. While these experts strongly support breastfeeding, they say those mothers who can't or choose not to breastfeed shouldn't be alarmed by the report. The protein under study, called beta-lactoglobulin, is found in cow's milk but not human breast milk. It is similar in structure to the human protein glycodelin, writes Marcia F. Goldfarb, author of the new report. The report is published in the letters section of the Journal of Proteome Research. Goldfarb directs Anatek-EP, a contract protein research laboratory in Portland, Maine. An infant's immature immune system may destroy the glycodelin in an effort to destroy the look-alike "foreign" protein beta-lactoglobulin, Goldfarb says. Glycodelin controls the production of the body's T-cells, which help protect against infection. If glycodelin is destroyed, there could be an overproduction of T cells, she says. Type 1 diabetes is thought to be caused when T-cells destroy the insulin-secreting beta cells in the pancreas, Goldfarb writes. In the report, Goldfarb notes the conflicting results of studies looking at early introduction of formula (before four months) and diabetes. She reports her results, evaluating blood samples taken from five adults without diabetes and five children and teens who all had type 1 diabetes. In the adults, she found two had antibodies to beta-lactoglobulin. In the childre Continue reading >>

New Evidence That Type 1 Diabetes Is Linked To The Level Of A1 Beta-casein In Most Types Of Cow Milk

New Evidence That Type 1 Diabetes Is Linked To The Level Of A1 Beta-casein In Most Types Of Cow Milk

New evidence that type 1 diabetes is linked to the level of A1 beta-casein in most types of cow milk 2 November 2017 / Latest News , Media Releases , Diabetes in the news This article was to be published in The Conversation but waspulled at the last minute as senior editors "felt that theinterests of associated commercial parties, who might benefit fromdissemination of the article, were too great". It has since beenpublished in several other publications. Authors:Keith Woodford,Agricultural Management Group, Lincoln University, Christchurch,New Zealand,& Boyd Swinburn,School of Population Health, University of Auckland, Auckland, NewZealand. Type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune disease in which the body attacksits own insulin-producing cells, is on the rise globally. Early evidence of an association between type 1 diabetes and aprotein in cow milk, known as A1 beta-casein, was published in 2003. However, the notion that thestatistically strong association could be causal has remainedcontroversial. we have reviewed the overall evidence that links A1 beta-casein totype 1 diabetes.Our research brings forward new ways oflooking at that evidence. Type 1 diabetes is the form of diabetes that often manifestsduring childhood. The key change is an inability of the pancreas toproduce insulin, which is essential for transporting glucose acrossinternal cell membranes. There is common confusion between type 1 and the much morecommon type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease.This means that the immune system attacks the body's own cells.Insulin-producing cells in the pancreas are then destroyed by"friendly fire". There is no accepted lifestyle change that will prevent or curetype 1 diabetes and daily insulin injections are requiredthroughout life. In contrast, people who d Continue reading >>

Confirmed Anew: Cow Milk May Trigger Type 1 Diabetes

Confirmed Anew: Cow Milk May Trigger Type 1 Diabetes

For quite some time the link between juvenile onset diabetes (type 1) and cow’s milk consumption has been noted in the scientific literature. You can view 12 such references on our page on Cow Milk. In genetically susceptible individuals the consumption of cow’s milk may trigger an autoimmune destruction of the beta cells in the pancreas which produce insulin. A new study, published in the journal Archives of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, has shed light on a possible new mechanism behind this connection. Finish researchers looked at 1113 infants with a genetic susceptibility to type 1 diabetes and who were randomly assigned to receive one of three infant formulas during the first 6 months of life whenever breast milk was not available: Cow’s milk formula (CMF) Whey-based hydrolyzed formula (WHF) Whey-based formula free of bovine insulin (insulin-free CMF) Beta cell autoimmunity was monitored at ages 3,6, and 12 months and then annually until 3 years of age. The results were reported as follows: In comparison with ordinary CMF, weaning to an insulin-free CMF reduced the cumulative incidence of autoantibodies by age 3 years in children at genetic risk of type 1 diabetes mellitus. The likelihood of finding autoantibodies associated with beta cell autoimmunity was 25% lower in the whey-based hydrolyzed formula group, and 61% lower in the insulin-free whey-based formula when compared with the cow’s milk formula group. Discussion This study brings to the fore a serious problem associated with drinking the milk of another species. The protein composition within cow’s milk -- particularly the beta-casein A1 molecule -- is radically different than that found within human breast milk, and even the traditional universal foster milk, goat’s milk. Casein, is a disul Continue reading >>

What Is The Link Between Cow's Milk And Diabetes?

What Is The Link Between Cow's Milk And Diabetes?

What is the link between cow’s milk and diabetes? Early exposure to cow’s milk formula has been linked to an immune response that can lead to type 1 diabetes in some children. The immune response involves the body’s immune system reacting to a trigger (which may be cow insulin or a protein called casein from cow’s milk). Structural similarities between the triggering molecule and the insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells confuse the human immune system and it attacks the cells in the pancreas. This limits the ability to produce insulin and may lead to diabetes. The avoidance of cow’s milk during the first few months of life may reduce the risk of type I diabetes in some children. See our special section on diabetes for more information or see Viva!Health’s fully-referenced scientific report The Big-D: Defeating Diabetes through Diet and a practical guide The Big-D: defeating diabetes with the D-Diet, both can be downloaded here. Continue reading >>

Dairy And Type 1 Diabetes In Children: The Science Explained

Dairy And Type 1 Diabetes In Children: The Science Explained

This video from Dr. John McDougall provides a clear explanation of how and why dairy products are thought to trigger type 1 diabetes in children and young adults, in addition to allergies, asthma, and other autoimmune diseases. Mothers’ milk is species specific: the composition of each animal’s milk has evolved over millions of years to perfectly meet the unique nutritional needs of the young of that species exclusively. Since a calf doubles its birth weight nearly four times faster than a human infant does, the concentration of protein in cows’ milk is 3 to 4 times higher than that found in human breast milk, and whereas breast milk contains just the right ratio of fatty acids, lactose, vitamins and amino acids for human digestion, brain development, and growth, cows’ milk contains these things in concentrations designed to turn an 80-pound calf into an 800-pound cow by 1 year of age. Because human bodies are not designed to consume it, cows’ milk is a major cause of childhood allergies, asthma, ear infections, skin rashes, and a host of other maladies; causes premature cholesterol build-up in arteries, the main precursor to heart disease; and is consistently linked to several cancers and other serious illnesses later in life. Dairy consumption not only causes completely unnecessary suffering and death for millions of cows every year in the U.S. alone, but it’s also harmful for the humans who consume it. Ditching dairy doesn’t have to be difficult; for tips on tons of delicious plant-based milks, creams, cheeses, yogurts and more, check out our Guide to Going Dairy Free. For a look at peer-reviewed scientific studies that highlight the link between cows’ milk consumption and incidence of type 1 diabetes in children, see the following summaries: Nutritio Continue reading >>

Can I Drink Milk If I Have Diabetes

Can I Drink Milk If I Have Diabetes

One of the most controversial issues in the nutrition community is whether milk consumption is healthy or an agent of disease. And what if you have diabetes – should you steer clear of milk? Short answer: it depends. This article will help you determine whether to consume milk or not and how to make the best choices if you decide to include dairy products in your diet. What is milk made of? Before we get started on the factors to consider before consuming milk, it can help to understand the composition of milk. In a nutshell, cow’s milk contains water and about 3 to 4% of fat, 3.5% of protein, 5% of a natural sugar called lactose as well as various minerals and vitamins. The following table shows the nutritional composition of various types of milk. As you can see from the table above, compared to human milk, animal milk contains a significantly higher amount of protein. That’s because calves need to grow much faster than babies and thus require much more protein. Is consuming milk from another species an issue? Keep reading to find out. Milk consumption and Type 1 diabetes – is there a link? There have been some controversial studies that have associated cow’s milk consumption with juvenile onset diabetes, more commonly known as type 1 diabetes. Scientists have found that the protein composition of cow’s milk, especially the A1 beta-casein molecule, is radically different from that of human milk and can be extremely hard to digest for humans. Although more research is needed, studies suggest that this A1 beta-casein along with bovine insulin present in cow’s milk can trigger an autoimmune reaction in genetically susceptible children who have a particular HLA (human leukocyte antigen) complex. This autoimmune reaction causes the body to produce antibodies Continue reading >>

A1 Beta-casein Milk Protein And Other Environmental Pre-disposing Factors For Type 1 Diabetes

A1 Beta-casein Milk Protein And Other Environmental Pre-disposing Factors For Type 1 Diabetes

A1 beta-casein milk protein and other environmental pre-disposing factors for type 1 diabetes 1Immunology Research Centre, St Vincents Hospital Melbourne, Fitzroy, Victoria, Australia 6School of Medicine, Faculty of Health, Deakin University, Geelong, Victoria, Australia 7Department of Medicine, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia 1Immunology Research Centre, St Vincents Hospital Melbourne, Fitzroy, Victoria, Australia 2Freedom Foods Group Ltd, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia 3Agricultural Management Group, Lincoln University, Christchurch, New Zealand 4Living Cell Technologies, Auckland, New Zealand 5School of Population Health, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand 6School of Medicine, Faculty of Health, Deakin University, Geelong, Victoria, Australia 7Department of Medicine, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia *School of Medicine, Faculty of Health, Deakin University, Locked Bag 20000, Geelong, Victoria 3220, Australia. E-mail: [email protected] 8These authors contributed equally to this work. Received 2016 Oct 11; Revised 2017 Feb 20; Accepted 2017 Mar 1. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the articles Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit Globally type 1 diabetes incidence is increasing. It is widely accepted that the pathophysiology of type 1 diabetes is influenced by environmental factors in people with specific human leukocyte antigen haplotypes. We propose that a comp Continue reading >>

Causes Of Type 1 Diabetes

Causes Of Type 1 Diabetes

Tweet Type 1 diabetes belongs to a group of conditions known as autoimmune diseases. Autoimmune diseases are when the body incorrectly identifies its own useful cells as an attacking organism. In type 1 diabetes, it is the beta cells in the pancreas which produce insulin that are wrongfully targeted and killed off by specific antibodies created by the body’s immune system. Researchers have been investigating what may cause the immune system to act in this way but to date researchers have theories but no concrete proof. Genetic predisposition Researchers have uncovered a number of genetic regions that are linked closely with type 1 diabetes. Each of these is denoted with a name such as IDDM1. At least 18 different regions have been discovered and some of the genetic areas include an increased susceptibility for other autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and coeliac disease. Whilst genetics offers clues as to why some people are more susceptible to type 1 diabetes, it doesn’t explain why some people with these genes develop type 1 diabetes and why others with these genes don’t. For example, having an identical twin with type 1 diabetes gives you a statistically higher risk but it doesn’t necessarily mean you will develop the condition. Genetics does not explain either why people will develop type 1 diabetes at different ages. Type 1 diabetes is most commonly diagnosed in 10 to 14 year olds but can be diagnosed at any age. Read more on diabetes and genetics Type 1 diabetes triggers Researchers have hypothesised that whilst some people are have a genetic predisposition to type 1 diabetes, there is likely to be an environmental factor that triggers the initial development of type 1 diabetes. Some of the possible triggers that have been suggested include: Continue reading >>

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