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Lilly And Boehringer Biosimilar Undercuts Lantus By 15%

Lilly And Boehringer Biosimilar Undercuts Lantus By 15%

Lilly and Boehringer biosimilar undercuts Lantus by 15% Eli Lilly and Boehringer Ingelheim will undercut Sanofi by 15% with Basaglar, abiosimilar version ofthe insulin blockbuster Lantuslaunched today in the US. Basaglar will also undercut Sanofis longer lasting version, Toujeo,and is likely towin a large share of the market over the next few years. Basaglar has been approved as a follow-on drug based on clinical comparisons with Lantus, the first time a drug has been approved using this pathway. The launch of Basaglar has been co-ordinated with a new alliance between Lilly and pharmacy benefits manager Express Scripts, aimed at cutting out-of-pocket costs to some patients hit hardest by recent price rises. The moves signal that Lilly and Boehringer are serious about muscling back into the diabetes market, in which Sanofi and Novo Nordisk have eclipsed Lilly, a pioneer in the field. The list price of Basaglar will be $316.85 for a pack of five pens,15% below the list price of Lantus. The companies also hope to steal market share from Novo Nordisk, undercutting the long-acting Levemir (insulin detemir) by 21% and Tresiba (insulin degludec) an ultra long-acting insulin, by 28%. The prices that patients will pay depends on their insurance scheme, with most paying a fixed co-payment for their medicines, while some pay a percentage of the medicines cost. Thenew cut-price rivalwill increase the pressure on both Sanofi and Novo Nordisk. Sales of Sanofis Lantus are already sliding in Europe because of competition from the biosimilar, where it was launched in 2015, and in the US prescribers have started to prefer Novo Nordisks newer rivals instead. In Q3, sales of Lantus were down 9.8% compared with the same period last year, at just under $1.4 billion. Sanofiannouncedthis week Continue reading >>

Similar, But Not Biosimilar: Lilly And Bi's Lantus Copy Approved In Us

Similar, But Not Biosimilar: Lilly And Bi's Lantus Copy Approved In Us

Basaglar was tentatively given the thumbs up by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in August 2014, but it was dependent upon resolving patent litigation with makers of fellow insulin glargine Lantus, Sanofi. But Eli Lilly has now announced a settlement agreement with the French Pharma firm and final approval has been granted for the product which will be available in the US from December next year. To BE or not to BE?​ Basaglar has an amino acid sequence identical to Lantus and in Europe was approved by the EMA as the first insulin biosimilar under the brand name Abasria in 2014​. However, in the US the product has been deemed a Lantus ‘follow-on,’ neither a biosimilar nor a generic but a branded biopharmaceutical in its own right, Boehringer-Ingelheim told this publication. “Lantus had been approved by the FDA [in 2000] not as a biopharmaceutical but as a new chemical entity (NCE),”​ spokesman Ralph Warsinsky said. “Therefore the approval process for our product with Lilly could not follow the US biosimilars-specific 351(k) pathway but rather the 505(b)(2) pathway.”​ The pathway provides a shorter and less costly drug development programme for modified versions of a previously approved product and requires additional clinical and nonclinical studies - other than bioavailability (BA) or bioequivalence (BE) studies - to demonstrate safety and efficacy. Earlier this year, the first actual biosimilar product – Sandoz’s Zarxio – was launched in the US but despite being heralded as a new era for biological products there remains unanswered questions regarding interchangeability​ of such drugs. And equally, Warsinsky said, Lilly and Boehringer-Ingelheim still await answers as to the potential substitution by physicians and/or pharmacists of Continue reading >>

Lilly And Boehringer Launch First Lantus Clone Basaglar In Us

Lilly And Boehringer Launch First Lantus Clone Basaglar In Us

Eli Lilly and Boehringer Ingelheim have launched their Basaglar copy at a 15% discount to Lantus (insulin glargine), which is already facing tough competition from other insulin products such as Novo Nordisk's Levemir (insulin detemir) and Tresiba (insulin degludec). Lilly and Boehringer's product is already on the market in Europe as Abasaglar. The list price of Basaglar in the US is $316.85 for a pack of five autoinjector pens, which also undercuts Sanofi's Lantus follow-up Toujeo, as well as Levemir and Tresiba. The competitive pricing has already encouraged pharmacy benefit manager CVS Health to include Basaglar rather than Lantus or Toujeo on its formulary from 2017. Lantus made €3.54bn in the first nine months of 2016, with around €2.6bn of that total coming from the US market. Sales were down around 15% on the same period of 2015, partly because of competition and also as a result of the pushback against insulin prices, which have been rising steadily in recent years. Lilly said this week that it will start offering a 40% discount to people who pay the highest out-of-pocket prices for its human insulin products, such as those who pay full retail price at pharmacies because they have no insurance or are in the deductible phase of their high-deductible insurance plans. The company's action comes as some US politicians are asking for a federal inquiry into insulin prices, although Lilly attributes the decision to "recent changes in insurance benefit design in the US that have increased the cost of insulin for some people". "Lilly and Boehringer Ingelheim are proud to bring another proven effective diabetes treatment choice to people who may need a long-acting insulin to help control their blood sugar," commented David Kendall, vice president of global medical af Continue reading >>

Sanofi Sues Eli Lilly Over Insulin Rival To Lantus

Sanofi Sues Eli Lilly Over Insulin Rival To Lantus

Sanofi sues Eli Lilly over insulin rival to Lantus (Reuters) - Sanofi SA, whose top-selling Lantus helps diabetics control blood sugar levels, has filed a lawsuit accusing Eli Lilly and Co of infringing seven patents related to insulin and devices used to deliver it. Diabetes drug Lantus SoloStar passes along the production line before being packed at a manufacturing site of French drugmaker Sanofi in Frankfurt June 5, 2013. REUTERS/Ralph Orlowski Through its complaint made public on Tuesday in the U.S. District Court in Wilmington, Delaware, Sanofi is seeking to halt Lillys proposed commercial marketing in the United States of a rival treatment, known as Abasria, saying the sale would violate its rights. Sanofis lawsuit, and a narrower lawsuit filed in January, came after Lilly and German partner Boehringer Ingelheim Corp last December said they had applied with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to sell a generic version of Lantus, whose active ingredient is insulin glargine. A European regulator, the European Medicine Agency, recommended approval of Lillys drug last month. Lantus is the worlds most widely prescribed insulin. Sales totaled 5.72 billion euros (US$7.78 billion) in 2013. Lilly spokeswoman Tammy Hull said the Indianapolis-based company is reviewing Sanofis latest lawsuit, and does not believe the application infringes any of the asserted patents. Sanofi is based in Paris. Lantus will lose U.S. patent protection in February 2015, and Sanofi and Lilly have been working on experimental insulin therapies to replace it. Sanofis product, Toujeo, has triple the concentration of insulin glargine as Lantus. Lillys proposed product has the same molecular formula as Lantus. The original lawsuit triggered an automatic 30-month stay of FDA approval of Lillys drug, Continue reading >>

Eli Lilly Launches Lantus Biosimilar To Boost Sales, But Not Without Risks

Eli Lilly Launches Lantus Biosimilar To Boost Sales, But Not Without Risks

Summary Revenues from new products helped LLY offset sagging sales of established blockbuster drugs. Lilly's blockbuster drugs are facing patent cliffs and generic competitions. Basaglar, a biosimilar version of Sanofi's Lantus, could potentially become a new blockbuster for Eli Lilly. Litigation risks rise as the biosimilar market gets crowded. Shares of Eli Lilly and Company (NYSE:LLY) have surged 11.06% from its March low, along with the S&P 500 Healthcare sector, up about 4.85% despite mixed first-quarter earnings results and the political dark cloud hanging over prescription drug prices. Presumptive nominees from both parties have continued to ramp up their rhetoric against the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries, with Congress also jumping into the debate and holding a series of hearings on the issue of drug prices. Speculators have been using the political noise as a backdrop to take short positions against the sector. Since the beginning of 2015, Lilly's stock has been trading in the range between $66 and $86 per share and is now bumping into the trendline resistance of the symmetrical triangle chart pattern. The stock is about to break out, despite that the company reported earnings that were lower-than-expected for the first-quarter 2016, but slightly raised its outlook for the year. Revenues from new pharmaceutical products, including diabetes drugs Trulicity (dulaglutide), Jardiance (empagliflozin) and Basaglar (biosimilar insulin glargine), as well as cancer drug Cyramza (ramucirumab), helped offset sagging sales of established products like Humalog (insulin lispro). Basaglar, also known as Abasaglar in Europe, could potentially become a blockbuster for Lilly, as the original branded product Lantus (insulin glargine), manufactured by Sanofi S.A. (NY Continue reading >>

Lilly's Lantus 'follow-on' Approved In The Us

Lilly's Lantus 'follow-on' Approved In The Us

Lilly's Lantus 'follow-on' approved in the US Basaglaris first insulin product to be licensed via the FDA'struncated 505(b)(2) pathway The US FDA has approved Eli Lilly's Basaglar, a 'follow-on' of Sanofi's $8bn-a-year basal insulin product Lantus. Basaglar (insulin glargine) is the first insulin product to be approved via the truncated 505(b)(2) US regulatory pathway, according to the FDA, which said the new product would "expand the availability of treatment options for health care professionals and patients". The agency said the safety and efficacy of Basaglar were supported by two clinical studies involving 534 and 744 patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, respectively. The Lantus 'follow-on' wasawardedtentative approval by the FDA in August 2014 and has also been approved in Europe as Abasaglar and has been launched in 11 countries to date, including Germany, the UK, the Netherlands, Denmark and Japan. The approval comes after settlement of a patent dispute between Lilly and Sanofi in September, in which Lilly agreed not to launch a pen injector version of insulin glargine - sold by Sanofi as Lantus SoloSTAR - until December 15 2016. The settlement did not cover insulin glargine sold in vials or combination products. Basaglar is also delivered via a prefilled pen injector - the KwikPen - and Lilly confirmed that it will not be launching the product until the end of next year. Approval is a boost to Lilly, which decided earlier this month to abandon development of another Lantus rival - insulin peglispro - after concluding data on a potential toxicity issue made the project too risky to pursue. Lantusis the top-selling basal insulin in the world but competition from versions of the brand and newer treatments has already started to affect sales, which fell more Continue reading >>

Fda Approves New Insulin Glargine Basaglar – The First “biosimilar” Insulin In The Us

Fda Approves New Insulin Glargine Basaglar – The First “biosimilar” Insulin In The Us

Twitter Summary: 1st ever “biosimilar” insulin approved in US – potential to come cheaper than other insulins, with launch in December 2016 Lilly/BI recently announced the FDA approval of its long-awaited biosimilar insulin glargine, Basaglar, for type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Basaglar is biologically similar to Sanofi’s basal insulin Lantus (insulin glargine), including the same protein sequence and a similar glucose-lowering effect. While the FDA does not call it a “biosimilar” drug for regulatory reasons, it can essentially be thought of as an alternative form of Lantus. Pricing for Basaglar is unknown at this time (more on this below), and the drug will not be launching in the US until after December 15, 2016. Why are “biosimilar” insulin options exciting? Most notably, they could potentially be offered at lower costs than brand name insulins. Basaglar has already launched in several international countries (under the brand name Abasaglar) and is typically priced at a 15%-20% discount relative to Lantus in those markets. It’s not clear yet how the discounts for Basaglar will compare in the US, and how much less patients with insurance might pay. “Generic” versions of drugs in the US typically come at a 50-80% discount to the original product. But unlike most generic drugs, biosimilar insulins are much more expensive to manufacture, so it’s unlikely they’ll see that same level of discount in the US. Indeed, Novartis launched the first “biosimilar” drug approved in the US last September (not in diabetes), which came at a 15% discount. Still, we’ve heard great optimism that biosimilar insulin glargine will help patients facing higher insulin costs. At the IDF conference in December, Dr. Matthew Riddle suggested that of all the insulins new Continue reading >>

Lilly's Lantus Biosim Arrives To Poach Already Hard-hit Sanofi Sales

Lilly's Lantus Biosim Arrives To Poach Already Hard-hit Sanofi Sales

Lilly's Lantus biosim arrives to poach already hard-hit Sanofi sales Eli Lilly and Boehringer Ingelheim have launched a biosimilar copy of Sanofi insulin blockbuster Lantus. The day is here: Novartis Zarxio and Pfizers Inflectra are getting some company on the biosimilars marketand Sanofis Lantus is getting some unwanted competition in the basal insulin market, too. Eli Lilly and Boehringer Ingelheim were scheduled to launchBasaglar, a copy of the French drugmakers star product,in the U.S. on Thursday, as per an agreement from last September. And with the rollout, they now have a chance at nabbing a piece of Lantus 4.02 billion in U.S. sales. Its a blow to Sanofi, for which the blockbuster generated 17.2% of aggregate net sales last year.Even pre-Basaglar, though, Lantus hasnt been performing like it used toparticularly in the U.S., where sales decreased 20.5% between 2014 and 2015. The reasons? Higher discounts and a slowdown in basal insulin market growth, to name a couple. Like this story? Subscribe to FiercePharma! Biopharma is a fast-growing world where big ideas come along daily. Our subscribers rely on FiercePharma as their must-read source for the latest news, analysis and data on drugs and the companies that make them. Sign up today to get pharma news and updates delivered to your inbox and read on the go. Payer pressure isnt going away anytime soon, either. It hit a high point for Sanofi in August, when CVS Health announced that it would be replacing Lantus with Basaglar on its 2017 formulary. To add to the pain, the PBM giant also excluded Sanofi's Lantus follow-up Toujeo, which had been helping to offset Lantus declines. The good news for Sanofi is that, while the formulary placement will definitely help Basaglar, its unclear how long itll take the new knoc Continue reading >>

Basaglar (insulin Glargine Injection 100 Units/ml), A Long-acting Basal Insulin, Is Now Available In U.s.

Basaglar (insulin Glargine Injection 100 Units/ml), A Long-acting Basal Insulin, Is Now Available In U.s.

BASAGLAR (insulin glargine injection 100 units/mL), A Long-Acting Basal Insulin, Is Now Available in U.S. BASAGLAR (insulin glargine injection 100 units/mL), A Long-Acting Basal Insulin, Is Now Available in U.S. announced today that BASAGLAR (insulin glargine injection 100 units/mL) is available by prescription in the BASAGLAR is a follow-on insulin to Lantus. It is a long-acting insulin with an amino acid sequence identical to Lantus, another U-100 insulin glargine. (FDA) approved BASAGLAR as a long-acting insulin used to control high blood sugar in adults and children with type 1 diabetes and adults with type 2 diabetes. BASAGLAR should not be used to treat diabetic ketoacidosis. BASAGLAR should not be used during episodes of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) or in people with an allergy to insulin glargine or any of the ingredients in BASAGLAR. "Lilly and Boehringer Ingelheim are proud to bring another proven effective diabetes treatment choice to people who may need a long-acting insulin to help control their blood sugar," said , M.D., vice president, Global Medical Affairs, Lilly Diabetes. "We know that starting insulin can be a challenging experience for some people with type 2 diabetes. As part of our continuing commitment to the diabetes community, we are expanding our educational resources." With resources designed to be simple, BASAGLAR goes beyond just insulin by offering helpful support for people beginning insulin. These bilingual resources include an app for smartphones and tablets to provide an interactive experience that helps patients relax and guides them through injection using their BASAGLAR KwikPen, injection demo kits (available through HCPs), and access to educational videos. Do NOT reuse needles or share insulin pens, even if the needle has been ch Continue reading >>

Insulin

Insulin

Indication BASAGLAR is a long-acting insulin used to control high blood sugar in adults and children with type 1 diabetes and adults with type 2 diabetes. Limitation of Use BASAGLAR is not for treating diabetic ketoacidosis. Important Safety Information Do not take BASAGLAR during episodes of low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin glargine or any of the ingredients in BASAGLAR. Do NOT reuse needles or share insulin pens, even if the needle has been changed. Before starting BASAGLAR, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including if you have liver or kidney problems, if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant, or if you are breastfeeding or planning to breastfeed. BASAGLAR should be taken once a day at the same time every day. Test your blood sugar levels while using insulin. Do not make any changes to your dose or type of insulin without talking to your healthcare provider. Any change of insulin should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision. The most common side effect of insulin, including BASAGLAR, is low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), which may be serious and life threatening. Signs and symptoms may include dizziness or light-headedness, sweating, confusion, headache, blurred vision, slurred speech, shakiness, fast heartbeat, anxiety, irritability, mood change, or hunger. Do NOT dilute or mix BASAGLAR with any other insulin or solution. It will not work as intended and you may lose blood sugar control, which could be serious. BASAGLAR must only be used if the solution is clear and colorless with no particles visible. Always make sure you have the correct insulin before each injection. BASAGLAR may cause serious side effects that can lead to death, such as severe allergic reactions. Get emergency help if you have: Heart fa Continue reading >>

Lilly Settles Sanofi Dispute, Plans 2016 Launch For Biosim Lantus

Lilly Settles Sanofi Dispute, Plans 2016 Launch For Biosim Lantus

Lilly settles Sanofi dispute, plans 2016 launch for biosim Lantus Basaglar, which is co-marketed by Eli Lilly and Boehringer Ingelheim (BI), is a biosimilar version of Sanofi's Lantus SoloSTAR (insulin glargine)that was tentatively approved by the FDA in August 2014. The companies have beenembroiled in a contentious patent infringement lawsuit in which Sanofi alleged that Lilly infringed its patents. Lilly and Sanofi have now settled their legal dispute, and Eli Lilly will launch Basaglarin December 2016, based on the terms of the settlement. In addition, as part of the settlement, Lilly will pay Sanofi royalties in exchange for a license for certain patents. After 15 years as one of the most popular basal insulins, the pediatric exclusivity patent on Sanofi's Lantus, which had a little more than $7 billion in sales last year, expired in Maythough there are several other active patents for the product. When Basaglar was approved by the FDA last year, a 30-month stay was implemented.But there have been ongoing negotiationsresulting in six more months of Lantus revenues for Sanofi, and the opportunity for Lilly and BI to launch Basaglar in the U.S. Basaglar, which is marketed as Abrasia in the E.U., was approved last year by E.U. regulators and will launch in that market during the third quarter of this year. Continue reading >>

Fda Approves Lilly's Copycat Of Lantus

Fda Approves Lilly's Copycat Of Lantus

Newsroom Published on: December 17, 2015 In updates from FDA, a copycat insulin is approved and final restrictions are lifted on a one-time blockbuster diabetes drug that all but disappeared from the market. It took awhile, but the end of patent protection for Lantus finally means competition Sanofis mainstay long-acting insulin glargine, as the FDA approved Basaglar, an identical amino acid sequence delivered with a prefilled pen. Things didnt come easy for Eli Lilly and Boehringer Ingelheim; Sanofi sued for patent infringement, and Lilly had to reach a settlement before the approval could move forward. Basalgar has been approved in 10 other countries. Per the settlement, Basalgar will not launch until December 15, 2016. FDA approved Basalgar to control high blood sugar in adults and children with type 1 diabetes and adults with type 2 diabetes, according to a statement from the Lilly. Lilly has a long history of developing and manufacturing insulin, having introduced the worlds first commercial insulin more than 90 years ago, said David Kendall, MD, vice president for Global Medical Affairs for Lilly. Sanofi, meanwhile, is marketing Toujeo, its next generation long-acting insulin, which clinical trials show may be more forgiving for patients who are not as prompt about injecting themselves at precise 24-hour intervals. FDA lifts rosiglitazone REMS. The FDA has formally lifted all remaining restrictions on rosiglitazone, the one-time blockbuster diabetes drug sold as Avandia, whose saga forever changed the approval process for diabetes and cardiovascular therapies. In 2013, the agency ended most restrictions on the drug more than 2 years after it had imposed special requirements for patients to obtain the drug. That came after an article in the New England Journal of Continue reading >>

Update: Sanofi Suit Defending Lantus Patents Freezes Lilly Biosimilar

Update: Sanofi Suit Defending Lantus Patents Freezes Lilly Biosimilar

UPDATE: Sanofi Suit Defending Lantus Patents Freezes Lilly Biosimilar [This story has been updated from an earlierversion to include comments from Eli Lilly, and to include the diabetes alliance with Boehringer Ingelheim, under which the biosimilar was developed]. In a case of dueling patents, Sanofi said yesterday it filed a federal lawsuit alleging that four of its patents for Lantus were infringed by Eli Lilly in the biosimilar version of the blockbuster diabetes drugit developed with Boehringer Ingelheim. The action effectively scuttles Lillys plan to market the biosimilar next year, and delays its entry to market by more than two years. The lawsuit, filed by Sanofi in U.S. District Court for the District of Delaware, triggered an automatic stay under the Hatch-Waxman Act of approval by the FDA forthe Lilly-BoehringerNDA fortheir biosimilar version of the insulin glargine product, LY2963016 for types 1 and 2 diabetes. That stay will run either 30 monthsuntilthe summer of2016or whenever the court decides on the suit; however, such decisions rarely occur within 30 months. Lilly responded to the lawsuit late this morning with a statement denying it did anything wrong. "Lilly respects the intellectual property of others and does not believe the application for approval of its new insulin glargine product infringes any valid claim of the asserted patents," Doug Norman, vp and general patent counsel for Eli Lilly, said in a company statement. Lilly designed the development program for LY2963016 as part of its diabetes alliance with Boehringer Ingelheim, launched in January 2011. The European Medicines Agency last year accepted for review the companies'marketing authorization application for the biosimilar. Lilly had hoped to market the biosimilar to Lantus in the U.S. so Continue reading >>

Lilly's Lantus Biosimilar Will Finally Launch In Europe In Q3

Lilly's Lantus Biosimilar Will Finally Launch In Europe In Q3

Lilly's Lantus biosimilar will finally launch in Europe in Q3 Sanofi's patent on Lantus (insulin glargine) expired last month, making room for Lilly's Abasglar in the E.U. Lilly and Boehringer Ingelheim are co-marketing the new biosimilar version of Lantus. Lantus, used for long-term glycemic control, is Sanofi's biggest-selling drug and had $7.05 billion in sales last year. Although Lantus's biosimilar (which will be called Basaglar in the U.S.) is not marketed yet in the U.S., the FDA granted it tentative approval in August 2014. When Sanofi's Lantus was approved in April 2000, it becamethe first FDA approved long-acting (basal) recombinant human insulin analog with a once-daily administration and a 24-hour glucose-lowering effect. For the past 15 years, it has been the go-to basal insulin for many endocrinologists and primary care physicians who treat patients with diabetes. Sales have continued to climb, with an increase of 12% between 2013 and 2014. While Lilly/BI's biosimilar version of Lantus has the go-ahead in Europe to hit the market, its introduction in the U.S. is subject to delay because of a patent-infringement lawsuit. If the courts don't determine that Lilly's position is legally correct, then Lilly and BIwon't be able to introduce Basaglar in the U.S. until 2016. One wildcard remains pricing. It's still not clear how Abasglar will be priced. Once that becomes clear, it will send a signal to the larger medical community about how pricing decisions might be made for other biosimilar entrants. Continue reading >>

(insulin Glargine Injection) 100 Units/ml

(insulin Glargine Injection) 100 Units/ml

Do not take Lantus® during episodes of low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin or any of the inactive ingredients in Lantus®. Do not share needles, insulin pens, or syringes with others. Do NOT reuse needles. Before starting Lantus®, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including if you have liver or kidney problems, if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant or if you are breast-feeding or planning to breast-feed. Heart failure can occur if you are taking insulin together with certain medicines called TZDs (thiazolidinediones), even if you have never had heart failure or other heart problems. If you already have heart failure, it may get worse while you take TZDs with Lantus®. Your treatment with TZDs and Lantus® may need to be changed or stopped by your doctor if you have new or worsening heart failure. Tell your doctor if you have any new or worsening symptoms of heart failure, including: Sudden weight gain Tell your doctor about all the medications you take, including OTC medicines, vitamins, and supplements, including herbal supplements. Lantus® should be taken once a day at the same time every day. Test your blood sugar levels while using insulin, such as Lantus®. Do not make any changes to your dose or type of insulin without talking to your healthcare provider. Any change of insulin should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision. Do NOT dilute or mix Lantus® with any other insulin or solution. It will not work as intended and you may lose blood sugar control, which could be serious. Lantus® must only be used if the solution is clear and colorless with no particles visible. Always make sure you have the correct insulin before each injection. While using Lantus®, do not drive or operate heavy machinery until Continue reading >>

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