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Lifestyle Management In Diabetes

4. Lifestyle Management

4. Lifestyle Management

Lifestyle management is a fundamental aspect of diabetes care and includes diabetes self-management education (DSME), diabetes self-management support (DSMS), nutrition therapy, physical activity, smoking cessation counseling, and psychosocial care. Patients and care providers should focus together on how to optimize lifestyle from the time of the initial comprehensive medical evaluation, throughout all subsequent evaluations and follow-up, and during the assessment of complications and management of comorbid conditions in order to enhance diabetes care. DIABETES SELF-MANAGEMENT EDUCATION AND SUPPORT Recommendations In accordance with the national standards for diabetes self-management education and support, all people with diabetes should participate in diabetes self-management education to facilitate the knowledge, skills, and ability necessary for diabetes self-care and in diabetes self-management support to assist with implementing and sustaining skills and behaviors needed for ongoing self-management, both at diagnosis and as needed thereafter. B Effective self-management and improved clinical outcomes, health status, and quality of life are key goals of diabetes self-management education and support that should be measured and monitored as part of routine care. C Diabetes self-management education and support should be patient centered, respectful, and responsive to individual patient preferences, needs, and values and should help guide clinical decisions. A Diabetes self-management education and support programs have the necessary elements in their curricula to delay or prevent the development of type 2 diabetes. Diabetes self-management education and support programs should therefore be able to tailor their content when prevention of diabetes is the desired goal Continue reading >>

Lifestyle Intervention For Treatment Of Diabetes (liftdiabetes)

Lifestyle Intervention For Treatment Of Diabetes (liftdiabetes)

Study Description Study Design Arms and Interventions Outcome Measures Eligibility Criteria Contacts and Locations More Information This study is evaluating two approaches to improving the control blood sugar, and other risk factors for heart disease in overweight and obese adults with type 2 diabetes. The first approach has participants focus on weight loss via reducing food intake and increasing physical activity, while attending weekly group sessions led by trained community health workers for 12 months. The second approach has participants receive education on diabetes self management, which focuses primarily on glucose control, while attending monthly group sessions led by a study staff member for 12 months. We are recruiting persons with type 2 diabetes who live in the Winston-Salem/Forsyth County area of North Carolina who are willing to attend sessions at the Downtown Health Plaza of Wake Forest Baptist Health. We will measure risk factors for heart disease (glucose control, blood pressure, blood cholesterol) and calculate the predicted risk of heart disease, and see which intervention lowers risk to a greater extent at 12 months, as well as 24 months. Behavioral: Community Lifestyle Weight Loss (LWL) Behavioral: Diabetes Self Management (DSM) The Look AHEAD trial has demonstrated improved risk factor control among overweight or obese diabetes patients who received an intensive lifestyle intervention at both one and four years after enrollment. Translating such findings into accessible and effective weight loss programs is a major public health challenge. We are conducting "Lifestyle Interventions for Treatment of Diabetes" (LIFT Diabetes). The overall goal is to investigate two approaches to improving risk factor control; one which is modeled after Look AHEAD Continue reading >>

Weight Management Through Lifestyle Modification For The Prevention And Management Of Type 2 Diabetes: Rationale And Strategies. A Statement Of The American Diabetes Association, The North American Association For The Study Of Obesity, And The American Society For Clinical Nutrition

Weight Management Through Lifestyle Modification For The Prevention And Management Of Type 2 Diabetes: Rationale And Strategies. A Statement Of The American Diabetes Association, The North American Association For The Study Of Obesity, And The American Society For Clinical Nutrition

Weight management through lifestyle modification for the prevention and management of type 2 diabetes: rationale and strategies. A statement of the American Diabetes Association, the North American Association for the Study of Obesity, and the American Society for Clinical Nutrition From the Division of Geriatrics and Nutritional Sciences and Center for Human Nutrition, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis (SK); the Department of Family Practice, University of Vermont, Burlington (NFS); the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Nutrition, St Luke's- Roosevelt Hospital Center, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York (XP-S); the Springfield Diabetes & Endocrine Center, Springfield, IL (AD); the Division of Health, Behavior and Nutrition, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (JW-R); St Mark's Diabetes Center, Salt Lake City, UT (KK); and the American Diabetes Association, Alexandria, VA (NGC) Search for other works by this author on: From the Division of Geriatrics and Nutritional Sciences and Center for Human Nutrition, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis (SK); the Department of Family Practice, University of Vermont, Burlington (NFS); the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Nutrition, St Luke's- Roosevelt Hospital Center, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York (XP-S); the Springfield Diabetes & Endocrine Center, Springfield, IL (AD); the Division of Health, Behavior and Nutrition, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (JW-R); St Mark's Diabetes Center, Salt Lake City, UT (KK); and the American Diabetes Association, Alexandria, VA (NGC) Search for other works by this author on: From the Division of Geriatrics and Nutritional Sciences and Center for Human Nutrition, Wa Continue reading >>

Aging & Health A To Z

Aging & Health A To Z

Diabetes Lifestyle & Management Managing Diabetes with Diet and Exercise Healthy eating and exercise is very beneficial for people with diabetes. They can improve your overall health, help manage your blood glucose level, and decrease your risk of the complications of diabetes. Your healthcare providers will help you design a diet and exercise program that is right for you. They will help you increase your level of physical activity safely and gradually, so you can keep it up over time. Your diet and exercise plan will also take into account any other illnesses or physical limitations you may have. Your healthcare provider may also have you work with a dietician to help you develop a healthy food plan that you will enjoy. Choose Healthy, Low-calorie Foods—and Watch the Calories To help manage your blood glucose levels, you need to control the number of calories you eat each day. But you don’t have to give up taste and satisfaction! Here’s how to eat well and healthfully when you have diabetes: Eat smaller portions at each meal. If you eat out, share what you order with a friend or bring home part of your meal to eat the next day. Eat cereals, breads, and pasta made with whole grains instead of white flour. Substitute brown rice for white rice and sweet potatoes for white potatoes. Read labels on foods such as cereal, bread, and pasta. Choose those containing at least 3 grams or more of fiber per serving. Eat a variety of brightly-colored, low calorie fruits and vegetables. Aim for 6 to 9 servings a day. Especially good choices include leafy greens (such as spinach, chard, kale, collards, mustard greens, and dark green or red lettuces), broccoli, broccoli rabe, red peppers, carrots, berries, cherries, apples, pears, and citrus fruits. Drink water or unsweetened tea Continue reading >>

Lifestyle Changes To Manage Type 2 Diabetes

Lifestyle Changes To Manage Type 2 Diabetes

You can improve your overall health, lower your blood sugar levels, and lower your chance of having a heart attack or stroke by changing your diet and activities. Here are a few things you can do to stay as healthy as possible after you've been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Maintain a healthy body weight Many people with type 2 diabetes are overweight. Losing weight and keeping it off will help you control your blood sugar and make you feel better. Body mass index (BMI) is a measure of body fat. It is based on your height and weight. Go to to calculate your BMI. A healthy BMI is less than 25. If your BMI is more than 25, talk with your doctor about things you can do to lose weight. Begin by setting a goal to lose 7 percent of your current weight. For example, if you weigh 250 pounds, your first goal will be to lose 18 pounds. Losing any amount of weight and keeping it off will improve your health, so don't get discouraged if you lose the weight slowly. Combining a healthy diet with exercise is the best way to lose weight and keep it off. Make healthy food choices Less than 25 percent of your calories should come from fat. Avoid fatty foods like deli meats, hot dogs, snack foods, and pastries. If reducing the amount of fat from calories does not help you lose weight, decrease the total number of calories you consume. The number of calories you should consume each day depends on how much you weigh. Exercise regularly Getting at least 150 minutes per week of moderate exercise, like walking, biking, and swimming, will help you lose weight and keep it off, and it can help keep your heart healthy. Spread your exercise out over several days each week (for example, five sessions of 30 minutes each). Try not to go more than two days without exercising. If you do not have any m Continue reading >>

Aims, Education And Lifestyle

Aims, Education And Lifestyle

Almost all those with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes and some with type 2 present with symptoms of uncontrolled diabetes, and initial management is to reverse these symptoms and prevent metabolic decompensation. Prolonged hyperglycaemia damages both small blood vessels (microvascular complications) and arteries (macrovascular complications), and the goal here is to keep the long-term blood glucose as normal as feasible. The first steps towards this are patient education, increased physical activity, diet and weight control. These measures are typically supplemented by oral or injectable therapies to control glucose levels. These therapies require careful monitoring in order to maximise benefit and reduce unwanted consequences of treatment such as hypoglycaemia. Other measures such as control of blood pressure or lipids and smoking cessation may also be needed to prevent cardiovascular disease, the major cause of excess mortality in diabetes. Preventive measures such as these are supplemented by regular screening for complications and early referral to specialist services (ophthalmology, nephrology etc). Management plans should be discussed with and endorsed by the person concerned, supplemented by the social, emotional and (sometimes) psychological support needed by those who carry the burden of chronic illness. WHO defines health as a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity. This definition might be considered aspirational rather than realistic: very few of us would qualify according to these criteria! A more realistic approach makes use of Maslow's hierarchy of needs, which progresses from physiological needs to safety and security, from there to love and belonging to esteem (social acceptance) and Continue reading >>

6 Lifestyle Changes To Control Your Diabetes

6 Lifestyle Changes To Control Your Diabetes

Working closely with your doctor, you can manage your diabetes by focusing on six key changes in your daily life. 1. Eat healthy. This is crucial when you have diabetes, because what you eat affects your blood sugar. No foods are strictly off-limits. Focus on eating only as much as your body needs. Get plenty of vegetables, fruits, and whole grains. Choose nonfat dairy and lean meats. Limit foods that are high in sugar and fat. Remember that carbohydrates turn into sugar, so watch your carb intake. Try to keep it about the same from meal to meal. This is even more important if you take insulin or drugs to control your blood sugars. 2. Exercise. If you're not active now, it’s time to start. You don't have to join a gym and do cross-training. Just walk, ride a bike, or play active video games. Your goal should be 30 minutes of activity that makes you sweat and breathe a little harder most days of the week. An active lifestyle helps you control your diabetes by bringing down your blood sugar. It also lowers your chances of getting heart disease. Plus, it can help you lose extra pounds and ease stress. 3. Get checkups. See your doctor at least twice a year. Diabetes raises your odds of heart disease. So learn your numbers: cholesterol, blood pressure, and A1c (average blood sugar over 3 months). Get a full eye exam every year. Visit a foot doctor to check for problems like foot ulcers and nerve damage. 4. Manage stress. When you're stressed, your blood sugar levels go up. And when you're anxious, you may not manage your diabetes well. You may forget to exercise, eat right, or take your medicines. Find ways to relieve stress -- through deep breathing, yoga, or hobbies that relax you. 5. Stop smoking. Diabetes makes you more likely to have health problems like heart disease Continue reading >>

Nutrition And Lifestyle Modifications For Diabetes Patients

Nutrition And Lifestyle Modifications For Diabetes Patients

Home / Resources / Articles / Nutrition and Lifestyle Modifications for Diabetes Patients Nutrition and Lifestyle Modifications for Diabetes Patients Lifestyle change is the new trend for managing a patients diabetes, according to research. It is well established that diabetes mellitus (DM) is a progressive metabolic disorder, characterized by hallmark signs such as hyperglycemia, which is due to a deficiency of the hormone insulin. Besides glucose control, which is essential for patients who have DM, there is a strong need for patients to maintain a healthy and balanced life in order to avoid any complications. There are essentially seven key self-preservation behaviors in patients with diabetes that predict healthy outcomes, namely: eating well, being physically active, monitoring blood sugar regularly, compliance and adherence to the medications prescribed, good problem-solving skills, healthy coping skills and risk-reduction behaviors. All seven of these behaviors have proven to show a positive correlation with good glycemic control, reduction of complications and improvement in quality of life. Individuals with diabetes have been shown to make a drastic impact on the advancement and development of their disease by partaking in their own care. Despite this fact, when looking at a longer-term change in individuals, compliance and adherence to these activities is incredibly low. In a new study published in US Endocrinology, researchers examined the effectiveness of nutrition and lifestyle modifications in improving diabetes outcomes. One of their essential focuses was on the ABCs of diabetes management: A1c, blood pressure and cholesterol. Maintaining an A1c level of about 7%, keeping your blood pressure <140/90mmHg, and maintaining LDL at <100mg/dL (with no cardiova Continue reading >>

Diabetes Management Guidelines

Diabetes Management Guidelines

Source: American Diabetes Association. Standards of medical care in diabetes—2016. Diabetes Care. 2016;39(suppl 1):S1-S106. Available here. Refer to source document for full recommendations, including class of recommendation and level of evidence. Jump to a topic or click back/next at the bottom of each page Lifestyle Changes Medical Nutrition Therapy (MNT) The ADA acknowledges that there is no one-size-fits-all eating pattern for individuals with type 2 diabetes. MNT is recommended for all individuals with type 1 and type 2 diabetes as part of an overall treatment plan, preferably provided by a registered dietitian skilled in diabetes MNT Goals of MNT: A healthful eating pattern to improve overall health, specifically: Achievement and maintenance of weight goals Attainment of individualized glycemic, blood pressure, and lipid goals Type 2 diabetes prevention or delay Attain individualized glycemic, blood pressure, and lipid goals Achieve and maintain body weight goals Delay or prevent diabetes complications Nutrition guidelines from the ADA are available. Click here for summary recommendations on coordinating foods with diabetes medications, eating patterns, and more. Physical Activity Adults with diabetes Exercise programs should include ≥150 min/wk moderate-intensity aerobic activity (50%-70% max heart rate), spread over ≥3 days/wk with no more than 2 consecutive days without exercise Resistance training ≥2 times/wk (in absence of contraindications)* Reduce sedentary time = break up >90 minutes spent sitting Evaluate patients for contraindications prohibiting certain types of exercise before recommending exercise program† Consider age and previous level of physical activity Children with diabetes, prediabetes ≥60 min physical activity/day *Adults with typ Continue reading >>

Effect Of Lifestyle Intervention In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: A Meta-analysis

Effect Of Lifestyle Intervention In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes: A Meta-analysis

Abstract The effect of lifestyle intervention on clinical risk factors in patients with type 2 diabetes is unclear. The aim of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the effects of comprehensive lifestyle change, such as diet, exercise, and education, on clinical markers that are risk-factors for cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes. We searched Medline, Cochrane, EMBASE, and Google Scholar (up to August 31, 2013) for randomized controlled trials that compared standard of care (control group) with treatment regimens that included changes in lifestyle (intervention group). The primary outcome was reduction in risk factors of cardiovascular disease including body mass index (BMI), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c). A total of 16 studies were included in the meta-analysis. The standardized difference in means of change from baseline significantly favored the intervention compared with the control group in BMI (− 0.29; 95% CI, − 0.52 to − 0.06, P = 0.014), HbA1c (− 0.37; 95% CI, − 0.59 to − 0.14, P = 0.001), SBP (− 0.16: 95% CI, − 0.29 to − 0.03, P = 0.016), DBP (− 0.27, 95% CI = − 0.41 to − 0.12, P < 0.001). There was no difference between the intervention and control groups in HDL-c (0.05; 95% CI, − 0.10 to 0.21; P = 0.503) and LDL-c (− 0.14; 95% CI, − 0.29 to 0.02; P = 0.092). The meta-analysis found that lifestyle intervention showed significant benefit in risk factors that are known to be associated with development of cardiovascular disease in patients with type 2 diabetes. Fig. 1. Flow chart for study selection. Fig. 2. The quality assessment for each included study was sum Continue reading >>

Lifestyle Changes For Type 2 Diabetes

Lifestyle Changes For Type 2 Diabetes

Physical activity and diet changes and often advised to those at high risk Lifestyle changes are often advised for people at higher risk of diabetes and those who are newly diagnosed with type 2, to help manage their diabetes. The recommended lifestyle interventions include: Taking two and a half hours each week of moderate intensity physical activity or one hour and 15 minutes of high intensity exercise. Losing weight gradually to achieve a healthy body mass index Replacing refined carbohydrates with wholegrain foods and increase intake of vegetables and other foods high in dietary fibre Reducing the amount of saturated fat in the diet NICE recommend taking either 2 hours of moderate intensity physical activity or 1 hours of intense exercise. Moderate intensity physical activity includes: Cycling either rapidly or over steep terrain Some people may be able to be referred for structured or supervised exercise sessions . Guideline issued by NICE recommend those that are overweight aim to lose weight gradually until a healthy BMI is achieved. Or between 18.5 and 22.9 for people of South Asian descent For those with a BMI above the healthy range, NICE recommends aiming to achieve weight loss gradually, with a target to reduce weight by 5 to 10% over a period of a year. Weight loss can help to reduce the risk of developing diabetes and can enable people with existing pre-diabetes or type 2 diabetes to better control blood glucose levels. If you have a BMI of over 30, your GP may refer you to take part in a structured weight loss programme. People unable to achieve weight loss via lifestyle changes may be prescribed a weight loss pill called orlistat. The general dietary advice from NICE to reduce risk of type 2 diabetes is to decrease intakes of fat and increase intake of Continue reading >>

Diabetes Lifestyle Management Jobs

Diabetes Lifestyle Management Jobs

Tip: Enter your city or zip code in the "where" box to show results in your area. The companys diabetes prevention, education and management products are in use at more than 1,000 healthcare facilities in the U.S.... Chronic Care Management Registered Nurse*. The RN Chronic Care Management Nurse will work with the Diabetes Self-Management Program to develop a comprehensive... RN / Diabetes Educator. We need dedicated RNs to join our disease management program. We will train you for the position, so prior disease management experience... 9.Success completion of the YMCA Diabetes Prevention Program Training upon hire required. Under the direction of the Community Wellness Director, and in harmony... Our innovations in nutritional biochemistry, data science and digital tools combined with our clinical expertise are shifting the diabetes treatment paradigm... The lifestyle management program is supported by a computerized tracking and management system and comprehensive educational materials.... Manage partner interactions, deliverables for key projects, and implement status to management team. Strong knowledge of medical technology in the consumer... Bilingual Pediatric Wellness Coach -- Diabetes Initiative Community Health Innovations - Monterey, CA The purpose of the initiative is to prevent the development of diabetes and other obesity related diseases, as well as provide positive, measureable change for... Continue reading >>

Lifestyle Modifications In The Management Of Type 1 Diabetes: Still Relevant After All These Years?

Lifestyle Modifications In The Management Of Type 1 Diabetes: Still Relevant After All These Years?

Lifestyle Modifications in the Management of Type 1 Diabetes: Still Relevant After All These Years? Department of Psychiatry and Neurobehavioral Sciences, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia. Address correspondence to:, Linda Gonder-Frederick, Center for Behavioral Medicine Research, P.O. Box 800-223, Charlottesville, VA 22908, E-mail:Email: [email protected] Author information Copyright and License information Disclaimer As we progress into the 21st century, the landscape of research and treatment in type 1 diabetes (T1D) is undergoing a massive transformation, characterized by rapid advances on numerous scientific fronts, including insulin and other hormonal therapies, technologies for blood glucose (BG) monitoring and insulin delivery, stem cell therapies, genetic engineering, -cell transplantation, and even xenotransplantation. Clearly, these scientific advances have enormous implications for future diabetes management. These rapid developments and cutting-edge discoveries may also have important, but not always obvious, implications for our perspectives on how different aspects of diabetes management should be prioritized in research and patient care. For example, with the enthusiasm generated by recent technological breakthroughs, especially those associated with closed-loop control (CLC) or the artificial pancreas (AP), is there a reason to be concerned that more traditional (and perhaps less exciting) aspects of T1D management, such as lifestyle modifications, will receive less attention in research and diabetes care? How relevant are lifestyle factors, including diet and exercise, to contemporary views and practice of T1D treatment? What role will they play in future diabetes management? This column explores the potential impact of r Continue reading >>

Diabetes Lifestyle Management | Abbott Nutrition Health Institute

Diabetes Lifestyle Management | Abbott Nutrition Health Institute

PRESENTER: JEFFREY I. MECHANICK, MD, FACP, FACE, FACN Clinical Professor of Medicine and Director of Metabolic Support, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Bone Disease, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, New York, USA Dr. Osama Hamdy, MD, PhD, FACE is the Medical Director of Joslins Obesity Clinical Program, Assistant Medical Director of Professional Medical Education, Clinical Investigator in the Section on Clinical, Behavioral & Outcomes Research at Joslin, and an Assistant Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. PRESENTER: DR MECHANICK, MD, FACP, FACE, FACN, ECNU Dr Mechanick is the Clinical Professor of Medicine and Director of Metabolic Support in the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Bone Disease at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, in New York City, where he also has an endocrinology and metabolic support private practice. Previously, he served as President for the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. PRESENTER: REFAAT HEGAZI, MD, PHD, MPH, MS Dr Hegazi joined Abbott Nutrition as Medical Director of Adult Nutrition in February 2009. His primary responsibilities include strategic development and medical supervision of clinical studies and building a network of external experts in medical nutrition. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Self-management: Facilitating Lifestyle Change

Diabetes Self-management: Facilitating Lifestyle Change

Diabetes Self-Management: Facilitating Lifestyle Change MARLON RUSSELL KOENIGSBERG, PhD, and JENNIFER CORLISS, MD, University at Buffalo Family Medicine Residency Program, Williamsville, New York Am Fam Physician.2017Sep15;96(6):362-370. Patient information: Handouts on this topic are available at and . Healthy eating and increased physical activity can prevent or delay the onset of diabetes mellitus and facilitate diabetes management. Current guidelines recommend long-term weight loss of 5% to 7% of body weight and 150 minutes of at least moderate-intensity physical activity per week for most patients with prediabetes and diabetes. Techniques to assess and facilitate adherence to these lifestyle changes can be practical in primary care. During office visits, physicians should assess and gradually encourage patients' readiness to work toward change. Addressing patients' conviction and confidence can be effective in moving them toward action. Long-term goals are best separated into highly specific short-term outcome goals and achievable behavior targets. Lifestyle goals and targets should be tailored to patients' preferences and progress while building confidence in small steps. Screening for diabetes-related attitudes, expectations, and quality of life, and addressing psychosocial factors, both favorable and unfavorable, can facilitate the likelihood of success. Follow-up contact with patients helps maintain and expand progress by reviewing self-monitored goals, targets, and achievements; finding opportunities to encourage and empower; reviewing slips, triggers, and obstacles; and negotiating further customization of the plan. Approximately 9% to 10% of the U.S. population has type 2 diabetes mellitus, including estimated undiagnosed cases. 1 From 1980 to 2014, the pre Continue reading >>

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