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Lifestyle Changes To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Lifestyle Changes For Type 2 Diabetes

Lifestyle Changes For Type 2 Diabetes

Physical activity and diet changes and often advised to those at high risk Lifestyle changes are often advised for people at higher risk of diabetes and those who are newly diagnosed with type 2, to help manage their diabetes. The recommended lifestyle interventions include: Taking two and a half hours each week of moderate intensity physical activity or one hour and 15 minutes of high intensity exercise. Losing weight gradually to achieve a healthy body mass index Replacing refined carbohydrates with wholegrain foods and increase intake of vegetables and other foods high in dietary fibre Reducing the amount of saturated fat in the diet NICE recommend taking either 2 hours of moderate intensity physical activity or 1 hours of intense exercise. Moderate intensity physical activity includes: Cycling either rapidly or over steep terrain Some people may be able to be referred for structured or supervised exercise sessions . Guideline issued by NICE recommend those that are overweight aim to lose weight gradually until a healthy BMI is achieved. Or between 18.5 and 22.9 for people of South Asian descent For those with a BMI above the healthy range, NICE recommends aiming to achieve weight loss gradually, with a target to reduce weight by 5 to 10% over a period of a year. Weight loss can help to reduce the risk of developing diabetes and can enable people with existing pre-diabetes or type 2 diabetes to better control blood glucose levels. If you have a BMI of over 30, your GP may refer you to take part in a structured weight loss programme. People unable to achieve weight loss via lifestyle changes may be prescribed a weight loss pill called orlistat. The general dietary advice from NICE to reduce risk of type 2 diabetes is to decrease intakes of fat and increase intake of Continue reading >>

Prevention Of Type 2 Diabetes Through Lifestyle Modification: Is There A Role For Higher-protein Diets?

Prevention Of Type 2 Diabetes Through Lifestyle Modification: Is There A Role For Higher-protein Diets?

Prevention of Type 2 Diabetes through Lifestyle Modification: Is There a Role for Higher-Protein Diets? Human Nutrition Unit, Department of Medicine, School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand To whom correspondence should be addressed. E-mail: [email protected] . Search for other works by this author on: Author disclosures: SDP holds the Fonterra Chair in Human Nutrition. AY Liu, MP Silvestre, and SD Poppitt, no conflicts of interest. Advances in Nutrition, Volume 6, Issue 6, 1 November 2015, Pages 665673, Amy Y Liu, Marta P Silvestre, Sally D Poppitt; Prevention of Type 2 Diabetes through Lifestyle Modification: Is There a Role for Higher-Protein Diets?, Advances in Nutrition, Volume 6, Issue 6, 1 November 2015, Pages 665673, Type 2 diabetes (T2D) incidence is increasing worldwide, driven by a rapidly changing environment and lifestyle and increasing rates of overweight and obesity. Prevention of diabetes is key and is most likely achieved through prevention of weight gain and/or successful long-term weight loss maintenance. Weight loss is readily achievable but there is considerable challenge in maintaining that weight loss over the long term. Lower-fat carbohydrate-based diets are widely used for T2D prevention. This is supported primarily by 3 successful long-term interventions, the US Diabetes Prevention Program, the Finnish Diabetes Prevention Study, and the Chinese Da Qing Study, but evidence is building in support of novel higher-protein (>20% of energy) diets for successful weight loss maintenance and prevention of T2D. Higher-protein diets have the advantage of having relatively low energy density, aiding longer-term appetite suppression, and preserving lean body mass, all central to successful weight loss and prevent Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Prevention

Type 2 Diabetes Prevention

You may be able to prevent type 2 diabetes. Even if you have several of the risk factors and even if you’ve been told you have pre-diabetes, you can take action and reduce your risk of developing diabetes. Don’t delay: if you’ve been told that you’re at risk of developing diabetes, get started as soon as possible. Your healthcare provider can help you develop a plan, but it should include: Getting to—and staying at—a healthy weight: Being overweight (BMI greater than 25) increases your risk of developing type 2 diabetes, so if you’re overweight, you should take steps to lose weight. By losing 5% to 10% of your body weight, you can reduce your risk. You can do this by eating smaller portions and being more physically active, which, conveniently enough, are two other ways to prevent type 2 diabetes. Reduce portions and eat healthier: You should choose healthier food choices by reducing portions and limiting added fat and sugar. Choose more whole grains, vegetables, and lean meats and dairy products. Seek out new, healthy recipes; there are many cookbooks that offer lower-fat and healthier recipes. A terrific rule to follow is: everything in moderation. Reduce portion sizes overall. Limit your intake of alcohol; you don’t have to entirely avoid it. Eat small, well-balanced meals spread throughout the day; larger meals can make it more difficult to keep your blood glucose level in a healthy range. Exercising: Exercise is important to help prevent type 2 diabetes because it has so many benefits. It can help you lose weight, and if you’re insulin resistant, it can help your body increase its sensitivity to insulin (exercise can help you use insulin better). Plus, exercise keeps your heart strong, makes you sleep better, and can even put you in a better mood. Continue reading >>

Change Your Ways, Reduce Your Risk: 7 Tips For Preventing Diabetes

Change Your Ways, Reduce Your Risk: 7 Tips For Preventing Diabetes

Piggybacking the obesity epidemic, diabetes rates continue to surge. On June 10, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released new and alarming statistics on diabetes. An estimated 29 million Americans have the disease, a nearly 12 percent increase from the 26 million diabetics in 2010. One-fourth of people don’t know they have diabetes—a scary fact, given the complications of chronically high blood sugar: heart attack, stroke, sight-robbing eye disease, kidney failure, foot amputation. Worse, another 86 million adults have prediabetes, a condition of elevated blood sugar just below the threshold for diabetes. The vast majority of cases are type 2 diabetes, a condition characterized by insulin resistance, meaning cells fail to respond to insulin. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas doesn’t make enough insulin. The good news is type 2 diabetes is largely preventable. A seminal 2006 study demonstrated that intensive lifestyle modification reduced the risk of developing diabetes by 58 percent, as compared to a 31 percent risk reduction achieved with the antidiabetes drug metformin. 7 tips to help reduce your risk: Lose excess body fat. Being overweight is a big risk factor for diabetes. In contrast, every kilogram (2.2 pounds) of weight lost reduces diabetes risk by 16 percent. Follow a plant-based, low-calorie diet. Eat a variety of fruits and vegetables—a dietary pattern studies show reduces diabetes risk. Foods to avoid are those rich in trans fats (also called hydrogenated fat), saturated fat, and sugar. Drink water. Studies link sugar-sweetened beverages with obesity and diabetes. Cut them out of your diet and the risk of both conditions falls. Move your body. Physical inactivity raises the risk of diabetes. Exercise renders cells more sensitive t Continue reading >>

You Can Prevent Diabetes With A Healthy Lifestyle

You Can Prevent Diabetes With A Healthy Lifestyle

Even though type 2 Diabetes is not an infectious disease, we’re in in the midst of an epidemic. Once called as adult-onset diabetes, this difficult disease is striking an ever-growing number of teens and adults alike. More than 24 million Americans have diabetes; of those, about 6 million don’t know they have the disease. Yes, the numbers are alarming. And this leads us to an importance question: Can diabetes be prevented? But the good news is that type 2 diabetes is largely preventable. More than half the cases could be avoided by taking several simple steps: keeping weight under control, exercising more, eating a healthy LCHF diet, quit smoking, improve sleep pattern and quality, taking a few dietary supplements can all go a long way towards preventing Diabetes Type 2. This is even more important if you are genetically predisposition to risk of diabetes type 2 or are already pre-diabetic. Here are a few simple tips that can help you prevent diabetes. Changing the habits of a lifetime isn’t easy, but it’s worth the effort. Understanding Diabetes Before we tell you how to prevent type 2 diabetes, it’s important to understand Diabetes. Diabetes occurs when the body can’t make enough insulin or can’t properly use the insulin it makes. There are 3 main kinds of diabetes: 1. Diabetes Type 1 The body attacks beta cells in the pancreas until they can no longer produce insulin. Type 1 diabetics are insulin dependent. 2. Diabetes Type 2 Associated with insulin resistance, where the body is making insulin but it’s not enough. Diabetes Type 2 is preventable as well as reversible with simple lifestyle changes. 3. Gestational Diabetes Gestational diabetes is a temporary condition, marked by elevated blood sugar levels during the course of pregnancy. However, gestati Continue reading >>

10 Tips To Help Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

10 Tips To Help Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

You can help reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes by understanding your risk and making changes to your lifestyle. Common risk factors include increased weight, blood pressure, cholesterol and triglyceride (blood fat) levels. Changing the habits of a lifetime isn’t easy, but it’s worth the effort. Here are some tips to help you reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes. Check your risk of diabetes. Take the Life! risk assessment test and learn more about your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. A 12+ score indicates that you are at high risk and may be eligible for the Life! program - a free Victorian lifestyle modification program that helps you reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, or call 13 RISK (13 7475). Manage your weight. Excess body fat, particularly if stored around the abdomen, can increase the body’s resistance to the hormone insulin. This can lead to type 2 diabetes. Exercise regularly. Moderate physical activity on most days of the week helps manage weight, reduce blood glucose levels and may also improve blood pressure and cholesterol. Eat a balanced, healthy diet. Reduce the amount of fat in your diet, especially saturated and trans fats. Eat more fruit, vegetables and high-fibre foods. Cut back on salt. Limit takeaway and processed foods. ‘Convenience meals’ are usually high in salt, fat and kilojoules. It’s best to cook for yourself using fresh ingredients whenever possible. Limit your alcohol intake. Too much alcohol can lead to weight gain and may increase your blood pressure and triglyceride levels. Men should have no more than two standard drinks a day and women should have no more than one. Quit smoking. Smokers are twice as likely to develop diabetes as non-smokers. Control your blood pressure. Most people can do th Continue reading >>

5 Ways To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

5 Ways To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

Source: Web exclusive: October 2009 Given the serious consequences emanating from insulin resistance and Type-2 diabetes, preventing this disease is certainly our best weapon in reducing the damage caused by a surplus of blood sugar. Luckily for us, the preventive potential is extraordinary: Adopting a healthy lifestyle can prevent up to 90 percent of Type-2 diabetes cases! To see how we can reduce the risk of diabetes, let us review some lifestyle factors. 1. Maintain a healthy body weight Given that excess weight and obesity are instrumental in the development of Type-2 diabetes, maintaining a normal body weight is an essential aspect of any preventive approach. The most spectacular illustration of how weight loss can influence the risk of diabetes is undoubtedly the effect of bariatric surgery (reducing stomach size) on morbidly obese people. Radically reducing the size of the stomach rapidly decreases obesity and almost completely eliminates Type-2 diabetes! However, it is neither necessary nor desirable to undergo this type of surgery to reap the benefits of weight loss: Losing just 5 kg, even over several years, can reduce the risk of diabetes by 50%! At a time when overweight has become the norm rather than the exception, Type-2 diabetes undoubtedly illustrates the dangers of excess weight and the need to be as slim as possible in order to prevent this disease. 2. Reduce intake of high-sugar foods You can also significantly reduce the risk of diabetes by paying particular attention to the amount and especially the type of carbohydrates: that is, the sugar in your diet. There are three main types of carbohydrates. ‘ The first is simple sugars ‘ like those in fruits, dairy products, maple syrup, or honey ‘ and sugars added to various products sold in grocery Continue reading >>

Diabetes Prevention: 5 Tips For Taking Control

Diabetes Prevention: 5 Tips For Taking Control

Changing your lifestyle could be a big step toward diabetes prevention — and it's never too late to start. Consider these tips. When it comes to type 2 diabetes — the most common type of diabetes — prevention is a big deal. It's especially important to make diabetes prevention a priority if you're at increased risk of diabetes, such as if you're overweight or you have a family history of the disease. Diabetes prevention is as basic as eating more healthfully, becoming more physically active and losing a few extra pounds. It's never too late to start. Making a few simple changes in your lifestyle now may help you avoid the serious health complications of diabetes down the road, such as nerve, kidney and heart damage. Consider the latest diabetes prevention tips from the American Diabetes Association. 1. Get more physical activity There are many benefits to regular physical activity. Exercise can help you: Lose weight Lower your blood sugar Boost your sensitivity to insulin — which helps keep your blood sugar within a normal range Research shows that aerobic exercise and resistance training can help control diabetes. The greatest benefit comes from a fitness program that includes both. 2. Get plenty of fiber It's rough, it's tough — and it may help you: Reduce your risk of diabetes by improving your blood sugar control Lower your risk of heart disease Promote weight loss by helping you feel full Foods high in fiber include fruits, vegetables, beans, whole grains and nuts. 3. Go for whole grains It's not clear why, but whole grains may reduce your risk of diabetes and help maintain blood sugar levels. Try to make at least half your grains whole grains. Many foods made from whole grains come ready to eat, including various breads, pasta products and cereals. Look Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Your doctor’s just told you that you have prediabetes. That means there's a good chance you could get , but you don't have to. There are plenty of things you can do to try to prevent it. Focus on the things you can change, like your diet and how active you are. Don’t dwell on the things you can't do anything about, like your age or your family's medical history. Your doctor can let you know where you stand and what you can do to turn things around. Losing extra pounds, eating better, and becoming more active are some of the most important steps you can take. There are people who aren't overweight who have type 2 diabetes. But added pounds do put you at risk. In one study, being overweight or obese was the single most important thing that predicted who would get diabetes. The study results showed that over 16 years, regular exercise -- at least 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week -- and a low-fat, high-fiber diet helped prevent it. If you're at high risk for the disease, your doctor may recommend taking medication to hold it off. Several studies show that various types of diabetes drugs, along with a healthy lifestyle, can cut the odds that you'll get it One study showed that people most likely to get it could lower their odds by 31%. They took the prescription diabetes drug metformin and made lifestyle and diet changes. That's good. But the study also showed that drastic lifestyle changes are the best way to avoid diabetes. You'll need to work with a dietitian to come up with a meal plan and talk to a trainer about how to get more exercise. Continue reading >>

Healthy Changes Can Prevent Diabetes

Healthy Changes Can Prevent Diabetes

Most Type 2 Diabetes Could Be Preventable in Adults April 27, 2009 -- Nine out of 10 new type 2 diabetes cases in older adults could be prevented through healthy lifestyle changes, according to a new study. The results show a combination of five lifestyle factors -- physical activity , diet, smoking habits, alcohol use, and body fat -- accounted for 90% of new diabetes cases in men and women 65 and older. Most recent research has focused on diabetes prevention in young people, but researchers say the results suggest that even modest healthy lifestyle changes later in life can make a big difference in reducing the risk of developing type 2 diabetes . For example, a single change such as becoming physically active or limiting alcohol use could have a significant impact. Overall, the study showed people in the low-risk category for each lifestyle factor had a 35% lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes . Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes and affects about 24 million Americans. It occurs when the body no longer is able to properly respond to and produce insulin , which causes blood sugar levels to rise. The findings highlight that type 2 diabetes really is a lifestyle disease and is largely preventable, researcher Dariush Mozaffarian, assistant professor of epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health, says in a news release. Previous studies have linked these lifestyle factors individually to diabetes prevention in certain people, but researchers say this study quantifies the effect of several lifestyle factors on diabetes prevention in a large group of older men and women. The study, published in the Archives of Internal Medicine, followed 4,883 men and women 65 and older for 10 years. During the follow-up period, 337 new cases of type 2 diabete Continue reading >>

10 Simple Lifestyle Changes To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

10 Simple Lifestyle Changes To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

It accounts for 22,000 British deaths a year and is a major contributor to kidney failure, heart attack and stroke. Type 2 diabetes affects 3.5 million people in the UK and costs the NHS £8.8billion a year but, according to one leading doctor, the disease is far more preventable than most think. Sir Muir Gray, an honorary professor at Oxford University, says Type 2 diabetes is not even a “real disease” at all – and that a few practical lifestyle changes can dramatically reduce our risk of contracting it. “Type 2 diabetes or walking deficiency syndrome?” he asks. “I’m trying to get the name changed. The problem with calling it Type 2 diabetes makes you think it’s like rheumatoid arthritis or a real disease. These are conditions caused by the modern environment.” While some object to Sir Muir’s diagnosis that it is not a “real disease”, doctors agree that we could all be doing more to combat Type 2 diabetes. “It is a very serious and debilitating health condition for patients and can lead to other serious conditions,” says Dr Stephen Lawrence, clinical lead for diabetes for the Royal College of GPs. “Simple lifestyle changes, including being more active and taking steps to lose weight, can have real benefits… But we need to be encouraging patients to do this, not blaming them for having the condition.” So how can you reduce your risk of contracting Type 2 diabetes? A few basic lifestyle changes can work wonders… Park and stride Walk whenever possible: even simple things such as getting off the bus a stop earlier or parking a little further from the shops can make a big difference over time. Once you get into the habit, try to walk as fast as you can at least some of the time. “Picking up the pace even briefly can help with blood suga Continue reading >>

Reduce Your Diabetes Risk

Reduce Your Diabetes Risk

Type 2 diabetes is often linked to being overweight. That means there are steps you can take to reduce your risk of developing it. Around 90% of people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes. If you maintain a healthy weight, you can reduce your risk of developing the condition. If you think that you may already have symptoms of diabetes, see your GP. There are no lifestyle changes that can lower your risk of type 1 diabetes. If you are overweight or obese, you're at an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. You can find out if you're a healthy weight by calculating your BMI using our healthy weight calculator. BMI and diabetes risk For most people in the UK, if your BMI is 25 or above, you are in the overweight range, while a BMI of 30 or above puts you in the obese range. However, some groups have a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes than white populations. These groups are advised to maintain a BMI lower than the standard 25. The advice is: Asians with a BMI score of 23 or more are at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Asians with a BMI of 27.5 or more are at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Although the evidence is less clear-cut, black people and other minority groups are also advised to maintain a BMI below 25, to reduce their risk of type 2 diabetes. Your waist and diabetes risk BMI isn't the only important measurement when it comes to your diabetes risk. Your waistline may also indicate that you're carrying extra body fat, and are therefore at risk. All women have an increased risk of diabetes if their waist measures more than 80cm (31.5 inches). White or black men have an increased risk if their waist measures more than 94cm (37 inches). Asian men have an increased risk if their waist measures more than 90cm (35 inches). Find out more about wh Continue reading >>

Lifestyle Changes Lower Rates Of Type 2 Diabetes Among Adults At Increased Risk, But May Not Prevent Complications In Those Already Diagnosed

Lifestyle Changes Lower Rates Of Type 2 Diabetes Among Adults At Increased Risk, But May Not Prevent Complications In Those Already Diagnosed

Key messages from scientific research that's ready to be acted on Lifestyle changes lower rates of type 2 diabetes among adults at increased risk, but may not prevent complications in those already diagnosed Schellenberg ES, Dryden DM, Vandermeer B et al. [TITLE]. Ann Intern Med. 2013; 159(8): 543-551. Do lifestyle interventions help prevent adults at risk of type 2 diabetes from getting the disease? Do they help prevent complications (such as cardiovascular disease and death) in adults already diagnosed with type 2 diabetes? Obesity and physical inactivity are known risk factors for type 2 diabetes. Programs that promote lifestyle changes to address these risk factors can help prevent and manage type 2 diabetes. This is a systematic review of 20 randomized controlled trials , 9 involving adults at high risk for type 2 diabetes and 11 involving adults who already have the disease. Lifestyle interventions lasted at least six months and included an exercise program, dietary changes and at least one other component such as counseling, smoking cessation or behavior modification. Participants ranged in age from 44 to 85 years. The smallest study had 39 participants; the largest had 3,234 participants. The studies measured how many people developed type 2 diabetes (from the high risk groups) and/or how many developed health complications. The studies also measured warning signs for health complications, such as high blood pressure, physical inactivity, diet, blood sugar and body composition. Comparison or control groups were people receiving the usual care from their physicians, people participating in just diet or exercise programs (not both at the same time), or people on a waiting list to join the programs. Seven studies found that lifestyle interventions helped prevent t Continue reading >>

13 Ways To Prevent Diabetes

13 Ways To Prevent Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic disease that affects millions of people worldwide. Uncontrolled cases can cause blindness, kidney failure, heart disease and other serious conditions. Before diabetes is diagnosed, there is a period where blood sugar levels are high but not high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes. This is known as prediabetes. It's estimated that up to 70% of people with prediabetes go on to develop type 2 diabetes. Fortunately, progressing from prediabetes to diabetes isn't inevitable (1). Although there are certain factors you can't change — such as your genes, age or past behaviors — there are many actions you can take to reduce the risk of diabetes. Here are 13 ways to avoid getting diabetes. Eating sugary foods and refined carbs can put at-risk individuals on the fast track to developing diabetes. Your body rapidly breaks these foods down into small sugar molecules, which are absorbed into your bloodstream. The resulting rise in blood sugar stimulates your pancreas to produce insulin, a hormone that helps sugar get out of the bloodstream and into your body's cells. In people with prediabetes, the body's cells are resistant to insulin's action, so sugar remains high in the blood. To compensate, the pancreas produces more insulin, attempting to bring blood sugar down to a healthy level. Over time, this can lead to progressively higher blood sugar and insulin levels, until the condition eventually turns into type 2 diabetes. Many studies have shown a link between the frequent consumption of sugar or refined carbs and the risk of diabetes. What's more, replacing them with foods that have less of an effect on blood sugar may help reduce your risk (2, 3, 4, 5, 6). A detailed analysis of 37 studies found that people with the highest intakes of fast-digesting carb Continue reading >>

Lifestyle Changes Can Help Prevent Type 2 Diabetes; Local Course Offers Guidance

Lifestyle Changes Can Help Prevent Type 2 Diabetes; Local Course Offers Guidance

Home Health & Human Services Lifestyle changes can help prevent type 2 diabetes; local course offers guidance Lifestyle changes can help prevent type 2 diabetes; local course offers guidance YOUR LOCAL NEWS IS MADE POSSIBLE BY SUPPORT FROM This story was originally published April 16 and updated with a new program start date April 24. TOMPKINS COUNTY, N.Y. Millions of people in the U.S., about one in three Americans, have prediabetes and ninety percent don't know it. A class offered locally is bringing attention to the condition and helping people make simple changes in their lifestyle to prevent type 2 diabetes. A yearlong National Diabetes Prevention Program hosted by the Tompkins County Health Department will begin in May. The class is also supported by the Human Services Coalition of Tompkins County. An estimated 84 million Americans have prediabetes, a health condition in which blood sugar levels are elevated, but not quite high enough to be diagnosed as type 2 diabetes. There are several factors that contribute to type 2 diabetes, such as age and genetics that can't be helped, but diet and activity level can be controlled. Susan Dunlop, community health nurse for the Tompkins County Health Department, said the program is designed to help people get their blood sugar level back into the normal range. "With very simple behavior changes, most people can get back into the normal range, whereas once you're a type 2 diabetic, it's very hard to reverse that," Dunlop said. Get the top headlines of the week in your email inbox every Monday morning. Dunlop is also a trained lifestyle coach and will lead the program. Making those changes may sound simple on paper, but having a supportive group and individually tailored goals has helped dozens of people who have gone through Continue reading >>

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